20:41
TEDGlobal 2012

Daphne Koller: What we're learning from online education

ダフニー・コラー 「オンライン教育が教えてくれること」

Filmed:

ダフニー・コラーは最も好奇心をそそる授業を無料でネットに公開するようトップクラスの大学を口説いています。単にサービスを提供するというだけでなく、それは人がいかに学ぶかを研究できる機会を与えます。キー入力、確認クイズ、フォーラムでの学生同士の議論、自己採点の宿題の1つひとつから、知識がいかに処理され、さらには吸収されるのかを示す、かつてないデータを収集できるのです。

- Educator
With Coursera, Daphne Koller and co-founder Andrew Ng are bringing courses from top colleges online, free, for anyone who wants to take them. Full bio

Like many of you, I'm one of the lucky people.
皆さんの多くと同じように
私は幸運に恵まれました
00:16
I was born to a family where education was pervasive.
高い教育をみんな受けている
家庭に生まれました
00:19
I'm a third-generation PhD, a daughter of two academics.
3代続きの博士で
両親はともに学者です
00:23
In my childhood, I played around in my father's university lab.
子どもの頃は 大学にある父の
研究室を遊び場にしていました
00:27
So it was taken for granted that I attend some of the best universities,
だから いい大学に進むのも
当然のことのように思っていました
00:31
which in turn opened the door to a world of opportunity.
そしてそれが私に大きな
可能性を与えてくれました
00:35
Unfortunately, most of the people in the world are not so lucky.
あいにくと世界の人の多くは
そんな幸運に恵まれてはいません
00:38
In some parts of the world, for example, South Africa,
場所によっては たとえば
南アフリカなどでは
00:42
education is just not readily accessible.
教育は容易に得られる
ものではありません
00:46
In South Africa, the educational system was constructed
教育システムは
アパルトヘイトの時代に
00:48
in the days of apartheid for the white minority.
少数の白人向けに
作られました
00:51
And as a consequence, today there is just not enough spots
その結果 優れた
教育を受けることを望み
00:54
for the many more people who want and deserve a high quality education.
それに値する人のための
場所が 不足しています
00:57
That scarcity led to a crisis in January of this year
この希少性が 今年1月に
ヨハネスブルグ大学で起きた
01:01
at the University of Johannesburg.
事件に繋がりました
01:05
There were a handful of positions left open
大学入試の受付が 一部追加で
01:06
from the standard admissions process, and the night before
行われることになったとき
01:09
they were supposed to open that for registration,
そのチャンスを掴むため
01:11
thousands of people lined up outside the gate in a line a mile long,
列の先頭になりたいと思った
何千という人が
01:14
hoping to be first in line to get one of those positions.
登録開始の前夜 門の外に
何キロもの列を作りました
01:18
When the gates opened, there was a stampede,
門が開いたとたん
人々が殺到して
01:22
and 20 people were injured and one woman died.
20人が怪我をし 1人の女性が
亡くなりました
01:24
She was a mother who gave her life
息子の人生に 少しでも
01:28
trying to get her son a chance at a better life.
良いチャンスを与えたいと
願った母親でした
01:30
But even in parts of the world like the United States
教育の場に事欠かない
アメリカのような場所でさえ
01:34
where education is available, it might not be within reach.
みんなに行き渡っている
わけではありません
01:37
There has been much discussed in the last few years
この何年か医療費の高騰が
01:41
about the rising cost of health care.
よく話題に上りますが
01:44
What might not be quite as obvious to people
あまり認識されていないのは
01:46
is that during that same period the cost of higher education tuition
同じ時期に高等教育の費用が
01:49
has been increasing at almost twice the rate,
その2倍のペースで増え
01:53
for a total of 559 percent since 1985.
1985年の5.6倍にも
なっていることです
01:55
This makes education unaffordable for many people.
このため 教育が今や多くの人の
手が届かないものになっています
02:00
Finally, even for those who do manage to get the higher education,
そして どうにか高等教育を
受けることのできた人たちでさえ
02:04
the doors of opportunity might not open.
機会が開かれているとは限りません
02:08
Only a little over half of recent college graduates
最近のアメリカの
大学卒業生で
02:11
in the United States who get a higher education
それだけの教育を実際に
必要とする仕事に
02:14
actually are working in jobs that require that education.
就いているのは
半数強にすぎません
02:16
This, of course, is not true for the students
トップレベルの大学の
02:19
who graduate from the top institutions,
卒業生を別にすると
02:21
but for many others, they do not get the value
多くの人が その時間と
労力に見合った恩恵を
02:23
for their time and their effort.
受けていないのです
02:26
Tom Friedman, in his recent New York Times article,
トーマス・フリードマンが最近の
ニューヨークタイムズ紙のコラムで
02:29
captured, in the way that no one else could, the spirit behind our effort.
私たちの活動の背後にある本質を
彼ならではの鋭さで捉えています
02:32
He said the big breakthroughs are what happen
「突如可能になったことと
どうしても必要とされていたものが
02:37
when what is suddenly possible meets what is desperately necessary.
出会ったとき 大きなブレークスルー
は起きる」と彼は書きました
02:40
I've talked about what's desperately necessary.
どうしても必要とされていたもの
についてはお話ししましたので
02:44
Let's talk about what's suddenly possible.
次に もう一方の
話をしましょう
02:46
What's suddenly possible was demonstrated by
突如可能になったことを
明らかにしたのは
02:49
three big Stanford classes,
スタンフォードの3つの
人気講義でした
02:52
each of which had an enrollment of 100,000 people or more.
それぞれを10万人以上が受講したのです
これを理解するために
02:54
So to understand this, let's look at one of those classes,
その講義の1つで
私の同僚兼 共同創業者である
02:58
the Machine Learning class offered by my colleague
アンドリュー・ンが受け持つ
03:01
and cofounder Andrew Ng.
授業を取り上げましょう
03:03
Andrew teaches one of the bigger Stanford classes.
彼はスタンフォードでも
人気の授業である
03:05
It's a Machine Learning class,
「機械学習」を教えています
03:07
and it has 400 people enrolled every time it's offered.
この授業は毎年400人が
受講登録していますが
03:08
When Andrew taught the Machine Learning class to the general public,
それを一般の人に向けて
教えることにしたら
03:12
it had 100,000 people registered.
10万人が登録したのです
03:15
So to put that number in perspective,
これがどれほど大きな
数字かというと
03:18
for Andrew to reach that same size audience
アンドリューが同じ数の学生を
03:20
by teaching a Stanford class,
スタンフォードの教室で
教えようと思ったら
03:22
he would have to do that for 250 years.
250年教え続けなければ
ならないのです
03:24
Of course, he'd get really bored.
きっと飽きてしまうでしょうね
03:28
So, having seen the impact of this,
この反響の大きさを
目の当たりにしたとき
03:31
Andrew and I decided that we needed to really try and scale this up,
アンドリューと私は
これをスケールアップして
03:34
to bring the best quality education to as many people as we could.
最高のクオリティの教育を 可能な限り多くの人に
届ける努力をすべきだと思いました
03:37
So we formed Coursera,
それでCourseraを設立して
03:41
whose goal is to take the best courses
最高の大学の
最高の講師陣による
03:43
from the best instructors at the best universities
最高の授業を
世界のすべての人に
03:46
and provide it to everyone around the world for free.
無償で提供することを
目標に掲げました
03:49
We currently have 43 courses on the platform
現在4つの大学の多岐にわたる
03:53
from four universities across a range of disciplines,
43の授業を提供しています
03:56
and let me show you a little bit of an overview
どんなものか少し
03:59
of what that looks like.
ご覧いただきましょう
04:01
(Video) Robert Ghrist: Welcome to Calculus.
解析の授業にようこそ
04:04
Ezekiel Emanuel: Fifty million people are uninsured.
保険を持たない人が
5千万人いるのです
04:05
Scott Page: Models help us design more effective institutions and policies.
モデルは効果的な組織や
政策を作る助けになります
04:07
We get unbelievable segregation.
信じがたい差別を
受けているのです
04:10
Scott Klemmer: So Bush imagined that in the future,
ブッシュは 将来人々が額にカメラを
04:13
you'd wear a camera right in the center of your head.
付けるようになると想像したのです
04:15
Mitchell Duneier: Mills wants the student of sociology to develop the quality of mind ...
ミルズは その社会学の研究者に
心の資質を開発してほしかったのです・・・
04:17
RG: Hanging cable takes on the form of a hyperbolic cosine.
垂れ下がったケーブルの形は
双曲線余弦関数になります
04:21
Nick Parlante: For each pixel in the image, set the red to zero.
画像の各ピクセルについて
赤を0に設定します
04:25
Paul Offit: ... Vaccine allowed us to eliminate polio virus.
ワクチンはポリオウィルスの
撲滅を可能にしました
04:28
Dan Jurafsky: Does Lufthansa serve breakfast and San Jose? Well, that sounds funny.
“Does Lufthansa serve breakfast and San Jose?”
と言うと変に聞こえますよね
04:31
Daphne Koller: So this is which coin you pick, and this is the two tosses.
どちらのコインを選ぶかということで
2回コイン投げをします
04:35
Andrew Ng: So in large-scale machine learning, we'd like to come up with computational ...
大規模機械学習によって
得たいのは計算的な・・・
04:38
(Applause)
(拍手)
04:42
DK: It turns out, maybe not surprisingly,
当然のことだと思いますが
04:47
that students like getting the best content
最高の大学の
最高のコンテンツが
04:50
from the best universities for free.
ただで手に入ることを
学生は歓迎します
04:52
Since we opened the website in February,
2月にこのウェブサイトを
開設して以来
04:55
we now have 640,000 students from 190 countries.
190カ国から64万人が
参加しています
04:57
We have 1.5 million enrollments,
受講登録数は150万
05:02
6 million quizzes in the 15 classes that have launched
15の授業で600万の
小テストの回答があり
05:04
so far have been submitted, and 14 million videos have been viewed.
1400万回ビデオが
視聴されています
05:07
But it's not just about the numbers,
でも肝心なのは数ではなく
05:12
it's also about the people.
人間です
05:14
Whether it's Akash, who comes from a small town in India
インドの小さな村に
住むアカシュには
05:16
and would never have access in this case
スタンフォードのような
クオリティの授業に
05:19
to a Stanford-quality course
接する機会もお金も
05:21
and would never be able to afford it.
ありませんでした
05:22
Or Jenny, who is a single mother of two
2人の子どもを持つ
シングルマザーの
05:25
and wants to hone her skills
ジェニーは
能力を磨き
05:27
so that she can go back and complete her master's degree.
大学に戻って修士号を
取りたいと思っています
05:29
Or Ryan, who can't go to school,
ライアンは大学に
行くことができません
05:32
because his immune deficient daughter
免疫不全の娘がいて
05:35
can't be risked to have germs come into the house,
家に雑菌を持ち込む
リスクのため
05:37
so he couldn't leave the house.
家を出られないのです
05:40
I'm really glad to say --
最近ライアンから
連絡があり
05:42
recently, we've been in correspondence with Ryan --
この話がハッピーエンド
になったと聞いて
05:44
that this story had a happy ending.
とても喜んでいます
05:46
Baby Shannon -- you can see her on the left --
赤ちゃんのシャノンは
左の子ですが
05:48
is doing much better now,
今ではずっと良くなり
05:50
and Ryan got a job by taking some of our courses.
ライアンもCourseraで受けた授業を元に
仕事を得ることができました
05:51
So what made these courses so different?
では Courseraの授業の
何が特別なのでしょう?
05:56
After all, online course content has been available for a while.
オンライン授業なら
別に以前からありました
05:58
What made it different was that this was real course experience.
違っているのは これが本当の
授業体験を与えることです
06:02
It started on a given day,
特定の日に始まり
06:05
and then the students would watch videos on a weekly basis
学生は 毎週毎週ビデオを見て
06:07
and do homework assignments.
宿題をします
06:11
And these would be real homework assignments
本当の宿題で
06:12
for a real grade, with a real deadline.
本当の成績と 本当の
締め切りがあります
06:14
You can see the deadlines and the usage graph.
これは 締め切り日と
サイト利用者数ですが
06:18
These are the spikes showing
グラフで突き出している部分は
06:20
that procrastination is global phenomenon.
先延ばしが世界的な現象である
ことを示しています
06:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:26
At the end of the course,
授業の最後に学生は
06:28
the students got a certificate.
修了証を受け取ります
06:30
They could present that certificate
それを就職活動先に提示して
06:32
to a prospective employer and get a better job,
より良い仕事を得ることもでき
06:34
and we know many students who did.
既にそうしている人たちがいます
06:36
Some students took their certificate
この修了証を入学先の
06:38
and presented this to an educational institution at which they were enrolled
学校に出して 単位として
認めてもらっている
06:40
for actual college credit.
人もいます
06:43
So these students were really getting something meaningful
だから学生たちは
かけた時間と
06:45
for their investment of time and effort.
労力に対して 実のある
結果を得ているのです
06:47
Let's talk a little bit about some of the components
では授業の構成について
06:50
that go into these courses.
少し見ていきましょう
06:52
The first component is that when you move away
教室の物理的制約を離れ
06:54
from the constraints of a physical classroom
コンテンツを最初から
06:57
and design content explicitly for an online format,
オンライン向けに
デザインするなら
06:59
you can break away from, for example,
たとえば1時間単位の講義を
07:02
the monolithic one-hour lecture.
バラしてしまうこともできます
07:05
You can break up the material, for example,
1つのコンセプトを
07:07
into these short, modular units of eight to 12 minutes,
8分から12分で説明する
小さなユニットに
07:09
each of which represents a coherent concept.
教材を分割することができます
07:12
Students can traverse this material in different ways,
学生は各々の背景知識や
関心に応じて
07:15
depending on their background, their skills or their interests.
違う順序で 教材を
見ていくことができます
07:18
So, for example, some students might benefit
例えば ある学生には
07:21
from a little bit of preparatory material
他の学生が既に知っている
前提知識を与える
07:24
that other students might already have.
準備的な教材が役に
立つかもしれません
07:27
Other students might be interested in a particular
あるいは自分で学んでいける
07:29
enrichment topic that they want to pursue individually.
進んだ内容の教材に興味を持つ
学生もいるかもしれません
07:31
So this format allows us to break away
ですから この形式によって
07:34
from the one-size-fits-all model of education,
全員に一律同じものを押しつける
従来のモデルを打ち壊し
07:38
and allows students to follow a much more personalized curriculum.
個人個人に合ったカリキュラムを
組めるようになるのです
07:40
Of course, we all know as educators
私たちは教育者ですから
07:44
that students don't learn by sitting and passively watching videos.
黙ってビデオを見ているだけでは
学べないことを知っています
07:47
Perhaps one of the biggest components of this effort
私たちのアプローチにおける
最大の要素は
07:50
is that we need to have students
学習内容を本当に
理解するための
07:53
who practice with the material
練習問題を課している
07:56
in order to really understand it.
ことかもしれません
07:58
There's been a range of studies that demonstrate the importance of this.
練習問題の重要性は 多くの
研究によって示されています
08:01
This one that appeared in Science last year, for example,
たとえばこれは 去年の
08:04
demonstrates that even simple retrieval practice,
サイエンス誌に
載った研究ですが
08:07
where students are just supposed to repeat
習ったことを
単に繰り返すだけの
08:10
what they already learned
単純な復習問題が
08:13
gives considerably improved results
他の学習方法よりも
08:14
on various achievement tests down the line
試験結果を大きく向上させる
08:16
than many other educational interventions.
ということが分かりました
08:18
We've tried to build in retrieval practice into the platform,
復習問題や その他の練習問題を
08:23
as well as other forms of practice in many ways.
いろいろ組み込んでいます
08:25
For example, even our videos are not just videos.
ビデオも単なるビデオではありません
08:28
Every few minutes, the video pauses
数分ごとに止まって
08:32
and the students get asked a question.
学生に質問を投げかける
ようになっています
08:34
(Video) SP: ... These four things. Prospect theory, hyperbolic discounting,
この4つ プロスペクト理論
双曲割引
08:36
status quo bias, base rate bias. They're all well documented.
現状のバイアス
基準率の無視です
08:38
So they're all well documented deviations from rational behavior.
いずれもよく知られた
合理的行動からの逸脱です
08:41
DK: So here the video pauses,
ここでビデオが止まって
08:44
and the student types in the answer into the box
学生は回答欄に答えを書いて
送信します
08:46
and submits. Obviously they weren't paying attention.
(不正解 もう一度)
どうも注意して聞いてなかったようです
08:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:51
So they get to try again,
もう一度やって
08:52
and this time they got it right.
今度は正解しました
08:54
There's an optional explanation if they want.
必要なら補足説明を
見ることもできます
08:57
And now the video moves on to the next part of the lecture.
それから講義が
先へと進みます
08:59
This is a kind of simple question
これは私が教室で
聞くような
09:03
that I as an instructor might ask in class,
簡単な質問ですが
09:05
but when I ask that kind of a question in class,
教室での場合
80%の学生は
09:07
80 percent of the students
まだ私の言ったことを
09:10
are still scribbling the last thing I said,
書き取っている最中で
09:11
15 percent are zoned out on Facebook,
15%はFacebookに没頭しており
09:13
and then there's the smarty pants in the front row
最前列にいる賢い学生が
09:16
who blurts out the answer
他の人たちに
09:19
before anyone else has had a chance to think about it,
考える間も与えず
答えてしまいます
09:20
and I as the instructor am terribly gratified
教師としては
せめて誰か答えの
09:22
that somebody actually knew the answer.
分かる人がいれば
それでよしとします
09:25
And so the lecture moves on before, really,
だから ほとんどの学生が
質問されたことに
09:27
most of the students have even noticed that a question had been asked.
気付きもしないうちに
授業は先に進んでしまいます
09:29
Here, every single student
でもCourseraでは
すべての学生が
09:33
has to engage with the material.
質問に取り組む
ことになります
09:36
And of course these simple retrieval questions
もちろんこの
単純な復習問題が
09:38
are not the end of the story.
すべてではありません
09:40
One needs to build in much more meaningful practice questions,
もっと突っ込んだ
練習問題も必要で
09:42
and one also needs to provide the students with feedback
学生にフィードバックを
09:45
on those questions.
与える必要もあります
09:47
Now, how do you grade the work of 100,000 students
でも10万人の宿題を
教育助手を1万人も使わずに
09:49
if you do not have 10,000 TAs?
どうやって採点したら
いいのでしょう?
09:52
The answer is, you need to use technology
答えはテクノロジーを使う
09:55
to do it for you.
ということです
09:57
Now, fortunately, technology has come a long way,
幸いテクノロジーの
進歩によって
09:59
and we can now grade a range of interesting types of homework.
様々なタイプの宿題の採点が
できるようになっています
10:01
In addition to multiple choice
ご覧いただいたような
10:05
and the kinds of short answer questions that you saw in the video,
選択肢式の問題や
答えの短い質問のほか
10:06
we can also grade math, mathematical expressions
数式や微分の問題も
10:09
as well as mathematical derivations.
採点できます
10:13
We can grade models, whether it's
様々なモデルも
採点できます
10:15
financial models in a business class
経営の授業での
金融モデルや
10:17
or physical models in a science or engineering class
科学や工学の授業での
物理モデル
10:20
and we can grade some pretty sophisticated programming assignments.
それに結構込み入った
プログラミング課題も採点できます
10:23
Let me show you one that's actually pretty simple
単純ですが視覚的な例を
10:26
but fairly visual.
ご覧いただきましょう
10:28
This is from Stanford's Computer Science 101 class,
これはスタンフォード大の
「コンピュータ科学入門」の
10:30
and the students are supposed to color-correct
課題ですが 学生は
赤いぼんやりした画像の
10:32
that blurry red image.
色を変えます
10:34
They're typing their program into the browser,
ブラウザ上でプログラムを書いて
10:35
and you can see they didn't get it quite right, Lady Liberty is still seasick.
正しくないと 自由の女神が
船酔いしたような画像になります
10:37
And so, the student tries again, and now they got it right, and they're told that,
もう一度トライして ちゃんと書けたら
それと分かり
10:41
and they can move on to the next assignment.
次の課題へと進みます
10:45
This ability to interact actively with the material
能動的に課題に取り組み
答えが正しいか
10:48
and be told when you're right or wrong
間違っているか
分かるというのは
10:51
is really essential to student learning.
学習のために
欠かせないことです
10:52
Now, of course we cannot yet grade
もちろん全ての授業の
10:56
the range of work that one needs for all courses.
全ての課題の採点が
できるわけではありません
10:58
Specifically, what's lacking is the kind of critical thinking work
特に人文 社会科学 経営学などの
11:01
that is so essential in such disciplines
批判的思考力を見るような
11:04
as the humanities, the social sciences, business and others.
課題の採点には適しません
11:06
So we tried to convince, for example,
そこで選択式の出題方法も
11:09
some of our humanities faculty
そんなに悪くはないと
11:12
that multiple choice was not such a bad strategy.
人文の先生たちを
説得してみましたが
11:13
That didn't go over really well.
あまりうまくは
いきませんでした
11:16
So we had to come up with a different solution.
それで別な解決法を
見つける必要がありました
11:18
And the solution we ended up using is peer grading.
その解決法は 学生が
互いを採点するというものです
11:21
It turns out that previous studies show,
このサドラー&グッドのような
11:24
like this one by Saddler and Good,
過去の研究結果から
相互採点は
11:26
that peer grading is a surprisingly effective strategy
再現可能な採点
結果が得られる
11:28
for providing reproducible grades.
驚くほど効果的な方法
だと分かりました
11:30
It was tried only in small classes,
小規模でしか
11:34
but there it showed, for example,
試されていませんが
ここに出ているように
11:35
that these student-assigned grades on the y-axis
y 軸の学生による採点は
11:37
are actually very well correlated
x 軸の教師による採点と
11:39
with the teacher-assigned grade on the x-axis.
非常に高い相関を
示しています
11:41
What's even more surprising is that self-grades,
さらに驚くのは
自己採点結果で
11:43
where the students grade their own work critically --
学生に自分で採点させると—
11:46
so long as you incentivize them properly
自分に満点をつけたり
しないよう適切に
11:48
so they can't give themselves a perfect score --
動機付けする
必要がありますが—
11:50
are actually even better correlated with the teacher grades.
教師の採点と より高い
相関を示すのです
11:52
And so this is an effective strategy
ですから これは大規模な
採点に使える
11:55
that can be used for grading at scale,
効果的な戦略であり
11:57
and is also a useful learning strategy for the students,
学生にとっても有用な
学習方法です
11:59
because they actually learn from the experience.
採点の体験から学ぶ
ことができるからです
12:02
So we now have the largest peer-grading pipeline ever devised,
私たちは今や 史上最大の
相互採点システムを持っており
12:04
where tens of thousands of students
何万人という学生が
12:09
are grading each other's work,
互いの課題を採点し
12:11
and quite successfully, I have to say.
極めて良い結果が
得られています
12:12
But this is not just about students
学生たちはもっぱら自室で
12:15
sitting alone in their living room working through problems.
1人問題に取り組む
わけではありません
12:18
Around each one of our courses,
それぞれの授業に 受講生の
12:21
a community of students had formed,
コミュニティができあがり
12:22
a global community of people
世界中の学生が
12:25
around a shared intellectual endeavor.
互いの成果を共有しています
12:26
What you see here is a self-generated map
ご覧いただいているのは
12:29
from students in our Princeton Sociology 101 course,
プリンストン大の
「社会学入門」の学生の
12:32
where they have put themselves on a world map,
所在を示した地図で
Courseraがいかに広く
12:35
and you can really see the global reach of this kind of effort.
世界で利用されているか
分かります
12:37
Students collaborated in these courses in a variety of different ways.
学生たちは様々な方法で
互いに協力し合っています
12:40
First of all, there was a question and answer forum,
第一に Q&Aフォーラムがあって
12:45
where students would pose questions,
学生が何か質問を投げると
12:48
and other students would answer those questions.
他の学生が答えます
12:50
And the really amazing thing is,
これが素晴らしいのは
12:52
because there were so many students,
学生の数が非常に多いため
12:54
it means that even if a student posed a question
質問が投げられたのが
12:56
at 3 o'clock in the morning,
明け方の3時だろうと
12:58
somewhere around the world,
世界のどこかには
13:00
there would be somebody who was awake
起きていて同じ問題に
取り組んでいる
13:01
and working on the same problem.
学生がいるということです
13:03
And so, in many of our courses,
そのため Courseraの
13:05
the median response time for a question
Q&Aフォーラムにおける
13:07
on the question and answer forum was 22 minutes.
質問への回答時間の中央値は
たったの22分です
13:10
Which is not a level of service I have ever offered to my Stanford students.
そのようなレベルのサービスは
スタンフォードではとても提供できません
13:13
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:18
And you can see from the student testimonials
学生の声から分かるように
13:19
that students actually find
このオンラインコミュニティの
13:21
that because of this large online community,
規模のおかけで
13:23
they got to interact with each other in many ways
学生の交流は 実際の
教室におけるよりも
13:25
that were deeper than they did in the context of the physical classroom.
広く深いものになっています
13:28
Students also self-assembled,
学生たちはまた
13:32
without any kind of intervention from us,
教師の側からの
働きかけなしに
13:34
into small study groups.
小さな学習グループを
自主的に作っています
13:36
Some of these were physical study groups
あるものは地域限定の
学習グループで
13:38
along geographical constraints
毎週集まって
13:41
and met on a weekly basis to work through problem sets.
課題に取り組んでいます
13:42
This is the San Francisco study group,
これはサンフランシスコの
グループですが
13:45
but there were ones all over the world.
同じようなものが
世界中にあります
13:47
Others were virtual study groups,
一方バーチャルな
学習グループもあって
13:49
sometimes along language lines or along cultural lines,
言語や文化によって
まとまっているものもあれば
13:51
and on the bottom left there,
左下のもののような
13:54
you see our multicultural universal study group
他の文化圏の人との
交流を望む
13:56
where people explicitly wanted to connect
ユニバーサルな
多文化の
14:00
with people from other cultures.
学習グループもあります
14:01
There are some tremendous opportunities
このようなフレームワークから
得られる可能性には
14:04
to be had from this kind of framework.
膨大なものがあります
14:06
The first is that it has the potential of giving us
第一に人間の学習について
14:10
a completely unprecedented look
かつてない洞察を得られる
14:13
into understanding human learning.
可能性です
14:16
Because the data that we can collect here is unique.
ここで集められるデータは
独特のものです
14:18
You can collect every click, every homework submission,
何万という学生による
あらゆるクリック
14:22
every forum post from tens of thousands of students.
あらゆる宿題の提出 あらゆるフォーラム
投稿データを集められます
14:26
So you can turn the study of human learning
人間の学習の研究を
14:30
from the hypothesis-driven mode
仮説駆動でなく
14:32
to the data-driven mode, a transformation that,
データ駆動で行うことができます
14:34
for example, has revolutionized biology.
これは生物学に革命を
もたらしたのと同じ変化です
14:37
You can use these data to understand fundamental questions
これらのデータを使って
根本的な疑問に答えることができます
14:40
like, what are good learning strategies
効果的な優れた学習戦略と
14:44
that are effective versus ones that are not?
そうでないものは何か?
14:45
And in the context of particular courses,
個々の授業内容についても
14:48
you can ask questions
学生がよくする勘違いに
14:50
like, what are some of the misconceptions that are more common
どんなものがあり
どうすれば避けられるか
14:52
and how do we help students fix them?
考えることができます
14:55
So here's an example of that,
これはアンドリューの
14:57
also from Andrew's Machine Learning class.
機械学習の授業の例ですが
14:59
This is a distribution of wrong answers
ある課題に対する
15:01
to one of Andrew's assignments.
間違った答えの
分布を示しています
15:03
The answers happen to be pairs of numbers,
答えが2つの数字の
組み合わせだったので
15:05
so you can draw them on this two-dimensional plot.
二次元平面に
プロットできました
15:07
Each of the little crosses that you see is a different wrong answer.
小さな×印のそれぞれが
間違った答えを表しています
15:09
The big cross at the top left
左上の大きな×印では
15:13
is where 2,000 students
2千人の学生が
15:15
gave the exact same wrong answer.
同じ間違った答えをしています
15:17
Now, if two students in a class of 100
100人の教室で2人の学生が
15:20
give the same wrong answer,
同じ間違いをしても
15:22
you would never notice.
気付かないでしょうが
15:24
But when 2,000 students give the same wrong answer,
2千人が同じ間違いをすれば
15:25
it's kind of hard to miss.
見落としようがありません
15:28
So Andrew and his students went in,
それでアンドリューと学生たちは
15:29
looked at some of those assignments,
このような課題を調べて
15:32
understood the root cause of the misconception,
勘違いの原因を突き止めました
15:33
and then they produced a targeted error message
そして学生が それと
同じ間違いをしたときに
15:37
that would be provided to every student
エラーメッセージを
15:40
whose answer fell into that bucket,
出すようにしました
15:42
which means that students who made that same mistake
だから学生は
この勘違いに対して
15:44
would now get personalized feedback
専用のフィードバックを受け
15:46
telling them how to fix their misconception much more effectively.
より効果的に 勘違いを解消できます
15:48
So this personalization is something that one can then build
このようなパーソナライゼーションは
15:53
by having the virtue of large numbers.
規模によって可能になったものです
15:56
Personalization is perhaps
パーソナライゼーションは
16:00
one of the biggest opportunities here as well,
ここで一番大きな
可能性かもしれません
16:02
because it provides us with the potential
30年来の問題を
16:04
of solving a 30-year-old problem.
解決できるかも
しれないのですから
16:07
Educational researcher Benjamin Bloom, in 1984,
教育の研究者ベンジャミン・
ブルームは 1984年に
16:09
posed what's called the 2 sigma problem,
2シグマ問題という
問題を提起しました
16:13
which he observed by studying three populations.
3種類のグループの観察から
見出されたものです
16:15
The first is the population that studied in a lecture-based classroom.
第一のグループは教室での
講義で学習します
16:18
The second is a population of students that studied
第二のグループも
16:22
using a standard lecture-based classroom,
通常の授業で学習しますが
16:24
but with a mastery-based approach,
習得度アプローチを使い
16:26
so the students couldn't move on to the next topic
前の課題を習得しなければ
16:28
before demonstrating mastery of the previous one.
次の課題には進めません
16:30
And finally, there was a population of students
三番目はチューターからの
16:33
that were taught in a one-on-one instruction using a tutor.
個別指導で教わるグループです
16:36
The mastery-based population was a full standard deviation,
習得度ベースのグループは
16:40
or sigma, in achievement scores better
通常の講義ベースのグループよりも
16:44
than the standard lecture-based class,
得点が標準偏差(σ)の分だけ
良くなり
16:46
and the individual tutoring gives you 2 sigma
個別指導のグループでは
16:48
improvement in performance.
成績が2σ良くなっています
16:50
To understand what that means,
どういうことかというと
16:52
let's look at the lecture-based classroom,
講義ベースの場合の点数の
16:54
and let's pick the median performance as a threshold.
中央値を閾値としたとき
講義ベースのグループでは
16:56
So in a lecture-based class,
中央値を閾値としたとき
講義ベースのグループでは
16:58
half the students are above that level and half are below.
半数がそれより上
半数がそれより下になりますが
17:00
In the individual tutoring instruction,
個別指導のグループでは
17:04
98 percent of the students are going to be above that threshold.
98%がこの閾値よりも
上になります
17:06
Imagine if we could teach so that 98 percent of our students
98%の学生が平均以上
になる教育というのを
17:11
would be above average.
考えてみてください
17:14
Hence, the 2 sigma problem.
これが2σ問題です
17:17
Because we cannot afford, as a society,
社会として学生全員に
17:20
to provide every student with an individual human tutor.
人間のチューターを割り当てる
ことは 不可能ですが
17:22
But maybe we can afford to provide each student
学生全員にコンピュータや
スマートフォンを
17:26
with a computer or a smartphone.
提供することなら
できるでしょう
17:28
So the question is, how can we use technology
問題はテクノロジーによって
17:30
to push from the left side of the graph, from the blue curve,
左の青い曲線を
右の緑の曲線に
17:32
to the right side with the green curve?
どこまで近づけられるか
ということです
17:35
Mastery is easy to achieve using a computer,
習得度ベースの学習は コンピュータで
容易に実現できます
17:38
because a computer doesn't get tired
コンピュータは
17:40
of showing you the same video five times.
同じビデオを5回
繰り返すのを厭いません
17:42
And it doesn't even get tired of grading the same work multiple times,
同じ問題を 繰り返し
採点するのも厭いません
17:45
we've seen that in many of the examples that I've shown you.
それはご覧いただいた例の通りです
17:48
And even personalization
パーソナライゼーションもまた
17:51
is something that we're starting to see the beginnings of,
可能になり始めています
17:53
whether it's via the personalized trajectory through the curriculum
ご覧いただいたような
パーソナライズされたカリキュラムや
17:55
or some of the personalized feedback that we've shown you.
パーソナライズされたフィードバックを
提供することができます
17:58
So the goal here is to try and push,
ここでのゴールは
18:02
and see how far we can get towards the green curve.
緑の曲線に向かって どこまで
押し進められるかということです
18:04
So, if this is so great, are universities now obsolete?
これがそんなに素晴らしいものなら
大学は陳腐化するのでしょうか?
18:08
Well, Mark Twain certainly thought so.
マーク・トウェインは
確かにそう考えていました
18:13
He said that, "College is a place where a professor's lecture notes
彼はこう言っています
「大学というのは
18:16
go straight to the students' lecture notes,
教授の講義ノートが 学生の講義ノートへと
両者の頭脳を介さずに変換される場所である」
18:19
without passing through the brains of either."
教授の講義ノートが 学生の講義ノートへと
両者の頭脳を介さずに変換される場所である」
18:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:23
I beg to differ with Mark Twain, though.
私はマーク・トウェインに
異を唱えたいと思います
18:27
I think what he was complaining about is not
彼が難じているのは
大学というよりは
18:29
universities but rather the lecture-based format
多くの大学が多大な
時間を費やしている
18:32
that so many universities spend so much time on.
講義ベースの形式です
18:35
So let's go back even further, to Plutarch,
さらに遡ってプルタルコスは
こう言っています
18:38
who said that, "The mind is not a vessel that needs filling,
「心というのは 満たすべき
容れ物ではなく
18:41
but wood that needs igniting."
焚き付けるべき
木のようなものである」
18:43
And maybe we should spend less time at universities
大学は学生の頭に講義内容を
18:45
filling our students' minds with content
詰め込もうとするのではなく
18:47
by lecturing at them, and more time igniting their creativity,
実際の対話を通じて
彼らのクリエイティビティや
18:50
their imagination and their problem-solving skills
想像力や問題解決能力を
焚き付けることに
18:54
by actually talking with them.
もっと時間を費やすべきでしょう
18:57
So how do we do that?
どうしたら そうできるのでしょう?
18:59
We do that by doing active learning in the classroom.
教室での能動的学習です
19:01
So there's been many studies, including this one,
ここに挙げたものをはじめ
沢山の研究があるのですが
19:04
that show that if you use active learning,
能動的学習を使い
19:07
interacting with your students in the classroom,
教室で学生との交流を持つと
19:09
performance improves on every single metric --
あらゆる指標で
結果が改善されます
19:11
on attendance, on engagement and on learning
出席率 参加の度合い
19:14
as measured by a standardized test.
標準テストで評価した学習度
19:16
You can see, for example, that the achievement score
ご覧のように この実験で
19:18
almost doubles in this particular experiment.
達成度のスコアは
ほとんど倍になっています
19:20
So maybe this is how we should spend our time at universities.
これが大学で時間をかけるべき
ことなのかもしれません
19:23
So to summarize, if we could offer a top quality education
まとめになりますが
最高の教育を
19:27
to everyone around the world for free,
世界中の人に無償で
提供できたなら
19:32
what would that do? Three things.
何が起きるでしょう?
3つあります
19:34
First it would establish education as a fundamental human right,
第一に教育が 基本的人権
として確立されるでしょう
19:37
where anyone around the world
動機と能力を持った
19:40
with the ability and the motivation
世界中の誰もが
19:41
could get the skills that they need
自分や家族やコミュニティに
19:43
to make a better life for themselves,
より良い生活をもたらすために
19:45
their families and their communities.
必要なスキルを手にできる権利です
19:47
Second, it would enable lifelong learning.
第二に 生涯学習が
可能になるでしょう
19:49
It's a shame that for so many people,
多くの人が 高校や大学を
卒業したときに
19:52
learning stops when we finish high school or when we finish college.
学びやめてしまうのは
残念なことです
19:53
By having this amazing content be available,
素晴らしい学習コンテンツが
19:57
we would be able to learn something new
提供されることで
望むときにはいつでも
19:59
every time we wanted,
新しいことを学び
20:02
whether it's just to expand our minds
視野を広げたり
20:03
or it's to change our lives.
生活を変えることができます
20:04
And finally, this would enable a wave of innovation,
そして最後に 新たなイノベーションの
波を生み出すでしょう
20:06
because amazing talent can be found anywhere.
ものすごい才能を持った人が
どこにいるか分かりません
20:10
Maybe the next Albert Einstein or the next Steve Jobs
明日のアインシュタインや
明日のスティーブ・ジョブズは
20:13
is living somewhere in a remote village in Africa.
アフリカの僻地の村に
いるかもしれません
20:16
And if we could offer that person an education,
その人たちに教育を
提供できたなら
20:18
they would be able to come up with the next big idea
彼らは次の大いなる
アイデアを生み出し
20:21
and make the world a better place for all of us.
すべての人のため 世界をより良い場所に
変えてくれることでしょう
20:23
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございました
20:26
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:27
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Mieko Akai

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Daphne Koller - Educator
With Coursera, Daphne Koller and co-founder Andrew Ng are bringing courses from top colleges online, free, for anyone who wants to take them.

Why you should listen

A 3rd generation Ph.D who is passionate about education, Stanford professor Daphne Koller is excited to be making the college experience available to anyone through her startup, Coursera. With classes from 85 top colleges, Coursera is an innovative model for online learning. While top schools have been putting lectures online for years, Coursera's platform supports the other vital aspect of the classroom: tests and assignments that reinforce learning.

At the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, computer scientist Daphne Koller studies how to model large, complicated decisions with lots of uncertainty. (Her research group is called DAGS, which stands for Daphne's Approximate Group of Students.) In 2004, she won a MacArthur Fellowship for her work, which involves, among other things, using Bayesian networks and other techniques to explore biomedical and genetic data sets.

More profile about the speaker
Daphne Koller | Speaker | TED.com