12:57
TEDGlobal 2012

Margaret Heffernan: Dare to disagree

マーガレット・ヘッファナン:対立の意義

Filmed:

多くの人間は本能的に対立を避けようとするが、マーガレット・ヘッファナンが示すように、よい対立こそ進歩の要なのだ。彼女は(時として直感に反して)、最良のパートナーとは自分の考えに同調する者ではなく、素晴らしい調査チーム、仕事関係、ビジネスがいかに深い対立を容認するかを教えてくれる。

- Management thinker
The former CEO of five businesses, Margaret Heffernan explores the all-too-human thought patterns -- like conflict avoidance and selective blindness -- that lead organizations and managers astray. Full bio

In Oxford in the 1950s,
1950年代のオックスフォードに
00:16
there was a fantastic doctor, who was very unusual,
とても優秀で 稀な一人の医者がいました
00:18
named Alice Stewart.
アリス・スチュアートです
00:21
And Alice was unusual partly because, of course,
アリスが稀有であった理由のひとつは もちろん
00:23
she was a woman, which was pretty rare in the 1950s.
その当時では珍しく 彼女が女医であったことです
00:27
And she was brilliant, she was one of the,
彼女は目立っていました
00:30
at the time, the youngest Fellow to be elected to the Royal College of Physicians.
当時 最も若くして 国立医科大学の
研究員の一人に選ばれたのです
00:32
She was unusual too because she continued to work after she got married,
また 彼女が稀なのは 結婚後も仕事を続け
00:37
after she had kids,
子供を産み
00:41
and even after she got divorced and was a single parent,
離婚をしてシングルマザーになった後でさえも
00:43
she continued her medical work.
医療に従事し続けたからでもあり
00:46
And she was unusual because she was really interested in a new science,
さらに彼女が 新しい科学に興味を抱いていたからです
00:48
the emerging field of epidemiology,
疫学の新興分野
00:52
the study of patterns in disease.
病気におけるパターンの研究です
00:55
But like every scientist, she appreciated
しかし他の科学者と同じようにアリスは
00:58
that to make her mark, what she needed to do
医者として名を残すためには 難題を発見し
01:01
was find a hard problem and solve it.
解決しなければならないことを十分に知っていました
01:03
The hard problem that Alice chose
アリスが選んだ難題とは
01:07
was the rising incidence of childhood cancers.
増加していた小児ガンです
01:10
Most disease is correlated with poverty,
ほとんどの病気は 貧困と関連性がありましたが
01:13
but in the case of childhood cancers,
子供の癌の場合
01:15
the children who were dying seemed mostly to come
末期の子供のほとんどは
01:18
from affluent families.
裕福な家庭の出身でした
01:20
So, what, she wanted to know,
彼女は知りたがりました
01:23
could explain this anomaly?
「この例外はどう説明出来るのか?」
01:25
Now, Alice had trouble getting funding for her research.
しかしアリスは 研究費を集めるのに苦労しました
01:28
In the end, she got just 1,000 pounds
結局 たったの1000ポンドを
01:30
from the Lady Tata Memorial prize.
レディ・タタ メモリアルから受け取ったのみでした
01:32
And that meant she knew she only had one shot
それは データ収集にかけられるのは
01:35
at collecting her data.
一回のみということを意味していました
01:37
Now, she had no idea what to look for.
しかし何を探せばいいのかまったくわかりません
01:39
This really was a needle in a haystack sort of search,
それはまるで不可能な調査に思われました
01:42
so she asked everything she could think of.
そこで彼女は思いつくこと全てを問いました
01:45
Had the children eaten boiled sweets?
癌の子供たちは飴を食べていたか?
01:47
Had they consumed colored drinks?
着色された飲み物を飲んでいたか?
01:49
Did they eat fish and chips?
フィッシュ&チップスを食べていたか?
01:51
Did they have indoor or outdoor plumbing?
トイレは屋外か屋内か?
01:53
What time of life had they started school?
学校に通い始めたのはいつか?
01:55
And when her carbon copied questionnaire started to come back,
そして彼女のカーボン印刷のアンケートが返って来始めると
01:58
one thing and one thing only jumped out
あるひとつのこと ただひとつのことが
02:02
with the statistical clarity of a kind that
科学者が夢見るような統計的明確さを伴って
02:05
most scientists can only dream of.
浮かび上がったのです
02:07
By a rate of two to one,
二人に一人の割合で
02:10
the children who had died
死んだ子供の母親は
02:12
had had mothers who had been X-rayed when pregnant.
妊娠時にX線を浴びていたのです
02:14
Now that finding flew in the face of conventional wisdom.
その発見は 当時の一般的見解に相反するものでした
02:20
Conventional wisdom held
世間一般の見解は
02:25
that everything was safe up to a point, a threshold.
X線はある閾値内であればまったく安全というものでした
02:27
It flew in the face of conventional wisdom,
レントゲン撮影機は当時
02:31
which was huge enthusiasm for the cool new technology
素晴らしい先端技術として多大な期待が寄せられており
02:33
of that age, which was the X-ray machine.
その一般通念と相容れなかったのです
02:37
And it flew in the face of doctors' idea of themselves,
そしてこれは 自分たちは患者を助けているのだ
02:40
which was as people who helped patients,
傷つけているのではない という
02:44
they didn't harm them.
医者の自己イメージに反するものでした
02:48
Nevertheless, Alice Stewart rushed to publish
それでもアリス・スチュアートは その予備調査結果を
02:51
her preliminary findings in The Lancet in 1956.
急いで1956年のランセット誌に発表しました
02:55
People got very excited, there was talk of the Nobel Prize,
人々は称賛し ノーベル賞の話も出ました
02:58
and Alice really was in a big hurry
アリスは大急ぎで
03:02
to try to study all the cases of childhood cancer she could find
子供の癌の全てのケースを 消えてしまう前に
03:04
before they disappeared.
調べようと努めました
03:08
In fact, she need not have hurried.
ところが実際 彼女は急ぐ必要などありませんでした
03:10
It was fully 25 years before the British and medical --
イギリスとアメリカの医療機関が
03:15
British and American medical establishments
妊婦へのX線照射をとりやめたのは
03:19
abandoned the practice of X-raying pregnant women.
それから25年も後のことだったからです
03:22
The data was out there, it was open, it was freely available,
アリスの調査データは公開され 簡単に閲覧できました
03:28
but nobody wanted to know.
しかし誰も知りたがらなかったのです
03:33
A child a week was dying,
子供が一週間に一人死んでいくのに
03:38
but nothing changed.
何も変わらなかったのです
03:40
Openness alone can't drive change.
公開されただけでは 物事は変わらない
03:43
So for 25 years Alice Stewart had a very big fight on her hands.
アリスは25年間 苦闘を続けました
03:49
So, how did she know that she was right?
では彼女は どうして自分が正しいと知っていたのでしょう?
03:55
Well, she had a fantastic model for thinking.
彼女には「素晴らしい思考のモデル」がありました
03:58
She worked with a statistician named George Kneale,
アリスの仕事相手の統計学者ジョージ・ニールは
04:02
and George was pretty much everything that Alice wasn't.
彼女とは正反対の人間でした
04:04
So, Alice was very outgoing and sociable,
アリスは外交的で社交的
04:06
and George was a recluse.
ジョージは隠遁者でした
04:09
Alice was very warm, very empathetic with her patients.
アリスは暖かく 患者の気持ちをよく理解しました
04:12
George frankly preferred numbers to people.
ジョージは人よりも数字が好きでした
04:16
But he said this fantastic thing about their working relationship.
彼は二人の仕事上の関係の素晴らしさに言及し
04:20
He said, "My job is to prove Dr. Stewart wrong."
「私の仕事はスチュアート医師の間違いを証明すること」と言いました
04:24
He actively sought disconfirmation.
彼は積極的に不一致を探しました
04:30
Different ways of looking at her models,
別の視点から彼女のモデルや統計を検証し
04:34
at her statistics, different ways of crunching the data
データの演算処理を別の方法で行い
04:36
in order to disprove her.
彼女を反証しようとしました
04:39
He saw his job as creating conflict around her theories.
彼は自分の仕事は対立を作り出すことだと心得ていました
04:42
Because it was only by not being able to prove
なぜなら アリスが「自分が正しい」と確信できる
04:48
that she was wrong,
唯一の方法は
04:51
that George could give Alice the confidence she needed
「アリスは間違っている」とジョージが証明できない
04:54
to know that she was right.
ことだったからです
04:57
It's a fantastic model of collaboration --
これは素晴らしい共同作業のモデルです
05:00
thinking partners who aren't echo chambers.
自分に同調しない思考のパートナー
05:04
I wonder how many of us have,
私たちのうち どれほどの人がそのような協力者を
05:09
or dare to have, such collaborators.
持つ いえ 持ちたいと思うでしょう
05:12
Alice and George were very good at conflict.
アリスとジョージは対立が得意でした
05:19
They saw it as thinking.
彼らは対立を思考と捉えていました
05:22
So what does that kind of constructive conflict require?
では このような建設的な対立には何が必要なのでしょう?
05:26
Well, first of all, it requires that we find people
まずはじめに 自分たちと全く違う
05:30
who are very different from ourselves.
人を見つけること
05:33
That means we have to resist the neurobiological drive,
つまり 人間は自分に似た人物の方をより好むという
05:36
which means that we really prefer people mostly like ourselves,
神経生物学的欲望に 抗わねばならず
05:40
and it means we have to seek out people
それは 異なった素性や規律
05:45
with different backgrounds, different disciplines,
異なる思考パターンや経験を持つ
05:47
different ways of thinking and different experience,
人を探し彼らと関わり合う方法を
05:49
and find ways to engage with them.
見いだすことを意味します
05:53
That requires a lot of patience and a lot of energy.
それは 非常な忍耐とエネルギーを要します
05:57
And the more I've thought about this,
そして私は このことについて考えるにつけ
06:02
the more I think, really, that that's a kind of love.
それが愛のようなものに思えてならないのです
06:04
Because you simply won't commit that kind of energy
その人のことを気にしないのであれば それほど労力と時間を
06:09
and time if you don't really care.
割けるものでしょうか
06:12
And it also means that we have to be prepared to change our minds.
それは同時に 我々が考えを切り替える必要があることを意味している
06:17
Alice's daughter told me
アリスの娘は私に言いました
06:21
that every time Alice went head-to-head with a fellow scientist,
アリスは仲間の科学者と正面からぶつかるたびに
06:24
they made her think and think and think again.
彼らは彼女をひたすら考えに考えさせ続ける
06:27
"My mother," she said, "My mother didn't enjoy a fight,
「私の母は戦いが好きではありませんでした
06:31
but she was really good at them."
得意でしたけれどもね」
06:35
So it's one thing to do that in a one-to-one relationship.
これは一対一のやり取りについての話です
06:40
But it strikes me that the biggest problems we face,
しかし 直面する大きな問題
06:44
many of the biggest disasters that we've experienced,
つまり我々の経験する大惨事のほとんどは
06:47
mostly haven't come from individuals,
個人によってではなく
06:50
they've come from organizations,
ともすれば国よりも大きな
06:52
some of them bigger than countries,
あるいは何百 何千 何万もの命に
06:54
many of them capable of affecting hundreds,
影響を与えうるような組織によって引き起こされているように
06:56
thousands, even millions of lives.
私には思われます
06:58
So how do organizations think?
では 組織はどのように思考しているのでしょうか?
07:02
Well, for the most part, they don't.
…ほとんどの場合 彼らは思考していません
07:07
And that isn't because they don't want to,
それは彼らが考えたくないからではなく
07:11
it's really because they can't.
考えることができないからです
07:14
And they can't because the people inside of them
そして考えることが出来ないのは 内部の人間が
07:16
are too afraid of conflict.
対立を忌避するからです
07:20
In surveys of European and American executives,
欧米の企業の重役を調査した結果
07:24
fully 85 percent of them acknowledged
85%もが 仕事上提起したくない問題や
07:27
that they had issues or concerns at work
悩み事を抱えていることが
07:30
that they were afraid to raise.
わかりました
07:33
Afraid of the conflict that that would provoke,
起こりうる対立への心配や
07:37
afraid to get embroiled in arguments
どう処理すればいいかわからない
07:40
that they did not know how to manage,
議論へ巻き込まれることへの不安があり
07:42
and felt that they were bound to lose.
彼らは敗北の気配を感じるのです
07:44
Eighty-five percent is a really big number.
85%というのはとても大きい数字です
07:49
It means that organizations mostly can't do
その数字は ジョージとアリスが成功裏に行っていたことが
07:55
what George and Alice so triumphantly did.
組織には出来ないことを示しています
07:58
They can't think together.
共に考えることが出来ないのです
08:00
And it means that people like many of us,
そしてそのことは 組織を運営し
08:05
who have run organizations,
最高の人材を探したことのある
08:07
and gone out of our way to try to find the very best people we can,
我々のような人間が
08:09
mostly fail to get the best out of them.
彼らから最大限のものを引き出せないことを意味します
08:13
So how do we develop the skills that we need?
では そういったスキルはどうすれば身に付くのでしょう?
08:19
Because it does take skill and practice, too.
そう それにもスキルと練習が必要なのです
08:22
If we aren't going to be afraid of conflict,
もし対立におびえることがなくなれば
08:26
we have to see it as thinking,
我々はむしろそれを思考と捉え
08:30
and then we have to get really good at it.
対立による思考がもっと上手になるはずです
08:32
So, recently, I worked with an executive named Joe,
最近 私はジョーという役員と働いていました
08:36
and Joe worked for a medical device company.
彼は医療機器の企業に勤めていました
08:41
And Joe was very worried about the device that he was working on.
ジョーは 自分の取り組んでいる機械を
非常に心配していました
08:44
He thought that it was too complicated
彼はその機械が複雑すぎると考え
08:47
and he thought that its complexity
その複雑さから人を本当に傷つけうるような
08:50
created margins of error that could really hurt people.
誤差を生み出すのではないかと思いました
08:52
He was afraid of doing damage to the patients he was trying to help.
まさに自分が助けようとしている患者を痛めつけてしまうのではないか と
08:56
But when he looked around his organization,
しかし 会社を見渡してみても
09:00
nobody else seemed to be at all worried.
そんな心配をしている人は見当たりませんでした
09:03
So, he didn't really want to say anything.
だからこそ彼は 何も言い出せませんでした
09:07
After all, maybe they knew something he didn't.
他の人は彼の知らないことを
09:10
Maybe he'd look stupid.
知っていたのかもしれません
彼は愚か者に見えるかもしれません
09:12
But he kept worrying about it,
それでも彼は心配し続け
09:14
and he worried about it so much that he got to the point
心配するあまりに自分の愛する仕事を
09:17
where he thought the only thing he could do
辞めるしかないという考えにまで
09:20
was leave a job he loved.
至ってしまいました
09:22
In the end, Joe and I found a way
最終的に ジョーと私は 彼の悩みを
09:26
for him to raise his concerns.
提起する方法を見つけました
09:30
And what happened then is what almost always
そこで起こったことは これと似たような状況において
09:32
happens in this situation.
常に起こるようなことでした
09:35
It turned out everybody had exactly the same
つまり 全員が同じ疑問と心配を
09:36
questions and doubts.
抱いていたのです
09:39
So now Joe had allies. They could think together.
こうして彼は仲間を得ました 
共に考えることが出来たのです
09:41
And yes, there was a lot of conflict and debate
もちろんそれは対立と議論にあふれ
09:45
and argument, but that allowed everyone around the table
討論が交わされましたが それは同時にそこにいる皆の
09:49
to be creative, to solve the problem,
創造力を掻き立て 問題を解決し
09:53
and to change the device.
機械を改良させたのです
09:57
Joe was what a lot of people might think of
ジョーは 言ってみれば告発者のような
10:01
as a whistle-blower,
人間になりました
10:05
except that like almost all whistle-blowers,
しかし普通の告発者とは違い
10:07
he wasn't a crank at all,
彼は風変わりではなく
10:10
he was passionately devoted to the organization
むしろ組織に対して そして組織の
10:12
and the higher purposes that that organization served.
高い目標に対して情熱的に貢献しました
10:15
But he had been so afraid of conflict,
もちろん彼は 対立を非常に嫌がっていました
10:19
until finally he became more afraid of the silence.
沈黙の方にもっと不安を抱くようになるまで
10:23
And when he dared to speak,
そして 敢えて口にしたときには
10:28
he discovered much more inside himself
自分の中にあるものや システムに貢献できることが
10:30
and much more give in the system than he had ever imagined.
想像していたよりもずっと大きいことに気付いたのです
10:33
And his colleagues don't think of him as a crank.
そして彼の同僚は彼を風変りだなどとは思っていません
10:38
They think of him as a leader.
むしろ彼をリーダーと認めています
10:42
So, how do we have these conversations more easily
では どうすればこういった対話を
もっと簡単に もっと頻繁に
10:47
and more often?
できるのでしょう?
10:51
Well, the University of Delft
デルフト工科大学はPhD(博士学位)を
10:53
requires that its PhD students
取得しようとする学生に
10:55
have to submit five statements that they're prepared to defend.
自身で弁護する5つの声明を提出することを課しています
10:57
It doesn't really matter what the statements are about,
実際内容はそれほど関係なく
11:01
what matters is that the candidates are willing and able
むしろ大事なのは 学生の権威に立ち向かう意欲と
11:05
to stand up to authority.
能力です
11:08
I think it's a fantastic system,
私はこれは素晴らしいシステムだと思います
11:11
but I think leaving it to PhD candidates
しかし PhDの候補生のみが対象というのは
11:13
is far too few people, and way too late in life.
少なすぎるし 年齢的に遅すぎるのではないでしょうか
11:16
I think we need to be teaching these skills
我々はこういった技能を 全ての年齢における
11:20
to kids and adults at every stage of their development,
子供や青年に教えるべきではないでしょうか
11:23
if we want to have thinking organizations
もし我々が「考える組織」や
11:28
and a thinking society.
「考える社会」を望むのならば
11:30
The fact is that most of the biggest catastrophes that we've witnessed
事実 我々が目撃してきた大惨事というのは
11:34
rarely come from information that is secret or hidden.
情報が隠されたことが原因ではありません
11:39
It comes from information that is freely available and out there,
情報が公開され 自由に取得できるのにもかかわらず
11:46
but that we are willfully blind to,
その情報が生まれる対立を処理できない
11:50
because we can't handle, don't want to handle,
処理したくないと 我々が意識的に目をそむけたことに
11:52
the conflict that it provokes.
よるのです
11:55
But when we dare to break that silence,
しかしもし思い切ってその沈黙を破れば
12:00
or when we dare to see,
そして思い切って見
12:03
and we create conflict,
思い切って対立すれば
12:05
we enable ourselves and the people around us
自分たちや周囲の人間に
12:08
to do our very best thinking.
最高の思考をさせられるのです
12:10
Open information is fantastic,
情報の公開は素晴らしいし
12:15
open networks are essential.
ネットワークの公開も不可欠です
12:18
But the truth won't set us free
しかし 対立の技能
12:21
until we develop the skills and the habit and the talent
習慣 才能や それを使うマナーを身に着けない限り
12:23
and the moral courage to use it.
我々は問題を解決できません
12:27
Openness isn't the end.
公開性は終わりではなく
12:31
It's the beginning.
始まりなのです
12:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:37
Translated by Yohei Komatsuzaki
Reviewed by Kayo Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Margaret Heffernan - Management thinker
The former CEO of five businesses, Margaret Heffernan explores the all-too-human thought patterns -- like conflict avoidance and selective blindness -- that lead organizations and managers astray.

Why you should listen

How do organizations think? In her book Willful Blindness, Margaret Heffernan examines why businesses and the people who run them often ignore the obvious -- with consequences as dire as the global financial crisis and Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster.

Heffernan began her career in television production, building a track record at the BBC before going on to run the film and television producer trade association IPPA. In the US, Heffernan became a serial entrepreneur and CEO in the wild early days of web business. She now blogs for the Huffington Post and BNET.com. Her latest book, Beyond Measure, a TED Books original, explores the small steps companies can make that lead to big changes in their culture.

More profile about the speaker
Margaret Heffernan | Speaker | TED.com