sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2007

Chris Abani: Telling stories from Africa

クリス・アバニ アフリカの物語

June 6, 2007

この個人的な話で、ナイジェリアの作家、クリス・アバニはこう言います。「私たちが、いかにして、自分というものを知り得るか」は物語から。 彼は詩や彼自身の話を含む物語りを通して、アフリカの心を探ります

Chris Abani - Novelist, poet
Imprisoned three times by the Nigerian government, Chris Abani turned his experience into poems that Harold Pinter called "the most naked, harrowing expression of prison life and political torture imaginable." His novels include GraceLand (2004) and The Virgin of Flames (2007). Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I just heard the best joke about Bond Emeruwa.
たった今 ボンド・エメルワへの面白い冗談を聞きました
00:25
I was having lunch with him just a few minutes ago,
僕は数分前まで 彼とお昼を食べていたのですが
00:28
and a Nigerian journalist comes -- and this will only make sense
そこに ナイジェリア人の記者が来て-- このジョークは
00:31
if you've ever watched a James Bond movie --
ジェームス・ボンド映画を見た人しか解らないけど --
00:33
and a Nigerian journalist comes up to him and goes,
ナイジェリアの記者が来て こういいました
00:36
"Aha, we meet again, Mr. Bond!"
「いや~またお会いしましたね ボンドさん 」
00:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:41
It was great.
あ~面白かった
00:43
So, I've got a little sheet of paper here,
さてと 今日は 小さなメモ用紙を用意しました
00:44
mostly because I'm Nigerian and if you leave me alone,
わたしはナイジェリア人なので ほっとくと
00:48
I'll talk for like two hours.
2時間は喋りつづけるでしょう
00:50
I just want to say good afternoon, good evening.
でもまず 挨拶させてください 今日は 今晩は
00:52
It's been an incredible few days.
この数日は大変有意義でした
00:58
It's downhill from now on. I wanted to thank Emeka and Chris.
そして エメカとクリスに感謝します
01:00
But also, most importantly, all the invisible people behind TED
しかしまた 最も重要なのは この場所を これほど多種多様で
01:03
that you just see flitting around the whole place
力強い議論の場するため そこら中を駆け回っている
01:07
that have made sort of this space for such a diverse and robust conversation.
舞台裏の見えない人たちに感謝します
01:10
It's really amazing.
本当に驚くべきことです
01:16
I've been in the audience.
僕は 聴衆の中にいて
01:19
I'm a writer, and I've been watching people with the slide shows
僕は作家なので 皆のスライドショーや科学者や銀行家の人たちを見ていて
01:21
and scientists and bankers, and I've been feeling a bit
自分がまるで バル・ミツバー(13歳の成人式)に臨む
01:25
like a gangsta rapper at a bar mitzvah.
悪ガキのラッパーのような気分になりました
01:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:32
Like, what have I got to say about all this?
いったい僕がこれ全部について何て言ったらいいんだ?
01:34
And I was watching Jane [Goodall] yesterday,
昨日はジェーン[グドール]を見ていて
01:38
and I thought it was really great, and I was watching
とても素晴らしいかったです
01:40
those incredible slides of the chimpanzees, and I thought,
それらの素晴らしいチンパンジーのスライドを見て 考えました
01:42
"Wow. What if a chimpanzee could talk, you know? What would it say?"
「へ~ もしチンパンジーが話せたら 何て言うだろう?」
01:46
My first thought was, "Well, you know, there's George Bush."
最初に思いついたのが「まてよ ジョージ・ブッシュがいるか」
01:51
But then I thought, "Why be rude to chimpanzees?"
でも こう思い直しました「それじゃ チンパンジーに失礼か?」
01:53
I guess there goes my green card.
これで 永住権をなくすかも
01:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:01
There's been a lot of talk about narrative in Africa.
アフリカの話も沢山ありました
02:03
And what's become increasingly clear to me is that
そして 僕にとって ますます明らかになったのは
02:06
we're talking about news stories about Africa;
ここでは ニュース記事でのアフリカの話をしており
02:10
we're not really talking about African narratives.
アフリカ物語を話しているのではないということです
02:13
And it's important to make a distinction, because if the news is anything to go by,
これを区別するのは大切です なぜならニュースの情報のみに頼れば
02:15
40 percent of Americans can't -- either can't afford health insurance
40パーセントのアメリカ人は -- 健康保険を払えないか
02:19
or have the most inadequate health insurance,
全く不適切な健康保険に入っており
02:25
and have a president who, despite the protest
しかも 彼らの大統領は数百万人にのぼる市民の抗議や
02:28
of millions of his citizens -- even his own Congress --
--彼自身の議会の反対さえも--押し切って
02:31
continues to prosecute a senseless war.
無意味な戦争を続けます
02:34
So if news is anything to go by,
ニュースだけを聞いていると
02:37
the U.S. is right there with Zimbabwe, right?
合衆国はジンバブエと一緒みたいですね?
02:39
Which it isn't really, is it?
でも 実はそうじゃありませんね?
02:42
And talking about war, my girlfriend has this great t-shirt
戦争と言えば -- 僕の彼女が面白いTシャツを持っていて
02:46
that says, "Bombing for peace is like fucking for virginity."
「平和の為に爆弾を落とすのは 処女を守る為に性交するようなもの」と書かれています
02:48
It's amazing, isn't it?
驚くようなことではありませんか
02:53
The truth is, everything we know about America,
真実は アメリカ人 -- 私達がアメリカについて知っていること全て
02:56
everything Americans come to know about being American,
アメリカ人が アメリカ人とは何かを知る術は
03:05
isn't from the news.
ニュースからではありません
03:07
I live there.
僕はアメリカに住んでいますが
03:09
We don't go home at the end of the day and think,
仕事を終えて帰宅して
03:11
"Well, I really know who I am now
「僕は自分が何者かやっとわかったよ
03:13
because the Wall Street Journal says that the Stock Exchange
だって ウォールストリートジャーナルが証券取引はいくらで終えたって云ったから」
03:14
closed at this many points."
とは思いません
03:18
What we know about how to be who we are comes from stories.
自分達がどうやって 今の自分達になったかを知るのは 物語からです
03:20
It comes from the novels, the movies, the fashion magazines.
それに ノベルや映画 ファッション雑誌
03:23
It comes from popular culture.
そして大衆文化からです
03:26
In other words, it's the agents of our imagination
言い換えれば 僕達の想像力が生み出すものが
03:28
who really shape who we are. And this is important to remember,
僕達を形作るのです これを忘れてはなりません
03:30
because in Africa
なぜなら ご存知の様に アフリカでは
03:34
the complicated questions we want to ask about
これらのすべてはの意味は何かという
03:37
what all of this means has been asked
僕らの知りたい複雑な質問はすべて
03:41
from the rock paintings of the San people,
サン人の壁画から
03:43
through the Sundiata epics of Mali, to modern contemporary literature.
マリ帝国のスンジャータ叙事詩 そして近代 現代文学にて すでに問われました
03:47
If you want to know about Africa, read our literature --
もし アフリカについて知りたければ 文学を読んでください
03:51
and not just "Things Fall Apart," because that would be like saying,
もし あなたが「崩れゆく絆」だけを読んでアフリカを知っていると思うなら
03:54
"I've read 'Gone with the Wind' and so I know everything about America."
「"風とともに去りぬ"を読んだからアメリカについて全て知っている」と言っているようなものです
03:58
That's very important.
これは重要なことです
04:02
There's a poem by Jack Gilbert called "The Forgotten Dialect of the Heart."
ジャック・ギルバートの詩に "The Fogotten Dialect of the Heart (忘れられた心の方言)"というのがあります
04:04
He says, "When the Sumerian tablets were first translated,
彼は言います「シュメールの粘土板が最初に翻訳されたとき
04:08
they were thought to be business records.
業務記録だと思われていた
04:13
But what if they were poems and psalms?
もしそれが 詩や詩篇だったら?
04:16
My love is like twelve Ethiopian goats
私の愛は朝日にたたずむ
04:18
standing still in the morning light.
12のエチオピアヤギのよう
04:22
Shiploads of thuja are what my body wants to say to your body.
船一杯のヒバの木は私の肉体から貴方の肉体へのメッセージ
04:26
Giraffes are this desire in the dark."
キリンは暗闇のこの欲望」
04:31
This is important.
これは重要なことです
04:35
It's important because misreading is really the chance
なぜなら 誤読は混乱や
04:36
for complication and opportunity.
機会を招くからです
04:39
The first Igbo Bible was translated from English
最初のイボ語の聖書は 1800年代に
04:41
in about the 1800s by Bishop Crowther,
クラウザー司教によって 英語から翻訳されました
04:45
who was a Yoruba.
彼はヨルバ族でした
04:47
And it's important to know Igbo is a tonal language,
イボ語は声調言語なので
04:48
and so they'll say the word "igwe" and "igwe":
例えば"igwe"と "igwe"という単語は
04:51
same spelling, one means "sky" or "heaven,"
スペルは同じですが 一つは"空"や"天国"という意味で
04:55
and one means "bicycle" or "iron."
もう一つは "自転車"や"鉄"という意味です
04:59
So "God is in heaven surrounded by His angels"
ですから「神様は天国にいて天使に囲まれている」
05:02
was translated as --
は こう翻訳されました
05:06
[Igbo].
[イボ語の翻訳]
05:08
And for some reason, in Cameroon, when they tried
どういう理由であれ カメルーンでは
05:12
to translate the Bible into Cameroonian patois,
聖書をカメルーンの方言に翻訳するのに
05:14
they chose the Igbo version.
イボ語版を選びました
05:16
And I'm not going to give you the patois translation;
ここでは 方言への翻訳はしませんが
05:18
I'm going to make it standard English.
英語に言い換えると
05:20
Basically, it ends up as "God is on a bicycle with his angels."
「神様は 天使達と一緒に自転車に乗り」となってしまったのです
05:21
This is good, because language complicates things.
これは良いのです 言葉は物事を複雑にするからです
05:28
You know, we often think that language mirrors
僕達は 言葉は僕らが住んでいる世界を映し出す
05:33
the world in which we live, and I find that's not true.
鏡だとよく思いますが 違います
05:35
The language actually makes the world in which we live.
言葉は 僕らの住んでいる世界を作ります
05:39
Language is not -- I mean, things don't have
言葉というか 物事に
05:44
any mutable value by themselves; we ascribe them a value.
可変的価値などありません 僕達がそれに価値をつけるのです
05:46
And language can't be understood in its abstraction.
言葉は その抽象概念として理解されるのではなく
05:49
It can only be understood in the context of story,
物語の内容としてのみ理解されるのです
05:52
and everything, all of this is story.
そして これらのすべては 物語です
05:54
And it's important to remember that,
これを忘れてはいけません
05:58
because if we don't, then we become ahistorical.
でなければ 僕達は歴史認識をなくします
06:00
We've had a lot of -- a parade of amazing ideas here.
ここで沢山の素晴らしいアイデアを聞きました
06:04
But these are not new to Africa.
でも これはアフリカにとって 新しいことではありません
06:07
Nigeria got its independence in 1960.
ナイジェリアは1960年に独立しました
06:09
The first time the possibility for independence was discussed
最初に独立の可能性について話し合いが持たれたのは
06:12
was in 1922, following the Aba women's market riots.
アバ族女性のマーケット暴動のすぐ後 1922年でした
06:16
In 1967, in the middle of the Biafran-Nigerian Civil War,
1967年 ビアフラ・ナイジェリア内戦の真っ只中に
06:20
Dr. Njoku-Obi invented the Cholera vaccine.
ドクター Njoku-Obi がコレラ接種を発明しました
06:24
So, you know, the thing is to remember that
わかりますね 大切なのは それを覚えていることです
06:28
because otherwise, 10 years from now,
でなければ 今から10年後も
06:30
we'll be back here trying to tell this story again.
僕たちは ここに来て 同じ話しをしているでしょう
06:32
So, what it says to me then is that it's not really --
これが 僕にとって 何を意味するかというと
06:36
the problem isn't really the stories that are being told
何が語られるか または どんな 物語が
06:41
or which stories are being told,
語られるかが 問題なのではなく
06:43
the problem really is the terms of humanity
問題の本質は 人間性という単語
06:45
that we're willing to bring to complicate every story,
それを使って 僕らは全ての物語を複雑にしている
06:48
and that's really what it's all about.
それが 本当のところです
06:51
Let me tell you a Nigerian joke.
ナイジェリアのジョークを話しましょう
06:54
Well, it's just a joke, anyway.
まあ ただのジョークとして聞いてください
06:56
So there's Tom, Dick and Harry and they're working construction.
トムとディックそしてハリーが建築現場で働いていました
06:58
And Tom opens up his lunch box and there's rice in it,
トムが弁当箱を開けると ご飯が入っていました
07:02
and he goes on this rant about, "Twenty years,
彼は怒鳴りました 「20年もの間
07:05
my wife has been packing rice for lunch.
女房は弁当箱に飯を詰めてきたんだ
07:07
If she does it again tomorrow, I'm going to throw myself
もし 明日も同じだったら 俺はこのビルから
07:09
off this building and kill myself."
飛び降りて自殺する」
07:11
And Dick and Harry repeat this.
ディックとハリーも同じ事を言いました
07:13
The next day, Tom opens his lunchbox, there's rice,
翌日 トムが弁当箱を開けると ご飯が入っていました
07:15
so he throws himself off and kills himself,
彼は 建物から飛び降りて 自殺しました
07:17
and Tom, Dick and Harry follow.
そして ディックとハリーも続きます
07:19
And now the inquest -- you know, Tom's wife
検死の時 -- トムの奥さんと
07:21
and Dick's wife are distraught.
ディックの奥さんは悲しみにうちひしがれ
07:23
They wished they'd not packed rice.
ご飯を入れたことを 悔いました
07:24
But Harry's wife is confused, because she said, "You know,
でも ハリーの奥さんは困惑して こう言いました
07:26
Harry had been packing his own lunch for 20 years."
「でも ハリーは過去20年間ずっと 自分でお弁当を詰めていたんです」
07:29
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:32
This seemingly innocent joke, when I heard it as a child in Nigeria,
これは 悪気のない冗談に見えます 私が子供の頃聞かされたとき
07:36
was told about Igbo, Yoruba and Hausa,
イボ ヨルバ そしてハウサ族のうち
07:41
with the Hausa being Harry.
ハリーはハウサ族のことだと聞かされました
07:43
So what seems like an eccentric if tragic joke about Harry
ハリーに関する悲劇的なジョークが
07:45
becomes a way to spread ethnic hatred.
民族差別を広める手段となるのは妙なことです
07:49
My father was educated in Cork, in the University of Cork, in the '50s.
僕の父は50年代にコークのコーク大学で教育を受けました
07:53
In fact, every time I read in Ireland,
実は アイルランドで朗読する度に
07:57
people get me all mistaken and they say,
皆さん僕を間違えてこう言います
07:59
"Oh, this is Chris O'Barney from Cork."
「あぁ これがコークのクリス・オーバーニーさんです」
08:01
But he was also in Oxford in the '50s,
父は50年代にオックスフォードにも滞在しました
08:03
and yet growing up as a child in Nigeria,
そして彼は ナイジェリアで子供時代をすごしました
08:07
my father used to say to me, "You must never eat or drink
父は僕に よくこういいました 「ヨルバ族の家で
08:09
in a Yoruba person's house because they will poison you."
飲んだり 食べたりしては絶対いかんぞ あいつ等は毒を盛るからな」
08:12
It makes sense now when I think about it,
今考えてみると 納得がいきます
08:17
because if you'd known my father,
もし貴方たちが 僕の父を知っていたら
08:19
you would've wanted to poison him too.
きっと毒を盛りたいと思ったでしょうから
08:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:23
So I was born in 1966, at the beginning
僕が生まれたのは 1966年
08:28
of the Biafran-Nigerian Civil War, and the war ended after three years.
ビアフラ・ナイジェリア内戦が始まったころで 戦争は3年後に終わりました
08:32
And I was growing up in school and the federal government
僕は学校に行っていましたが 連邦政府は
08:38
didn't want us taught about the history of the war,
僕らが戦争の歴史を学ぶことを望みませんでした
08:41
because they thought it probably would make us
なぜなら 彼らは それが 新しい世代の
08:44
generate a new generation of rebels.
反逆者を生み出すことになると思ったのでしょう
08:47
So I had a very inventive teacher, a Pakistani Muslim,
僕の先生は パキスタン人でイスラム教徒の とても独創的な先生で
08:49
who wanted to teach us about this.
僕らに戦争の歴史を教えようと
08:52
So what he did was to teach us Jewish Holocaust history,
ユダヤ人のホロコーストを教えました
08:54
and so huddled around books with photographs of people in Auschwitz,
アウシュビッツでの人々の写真集の周りに身を寄せ合って
08:58
I learned the melancholic history of my people
僕達民族の憂鬱な歴史を
09:03
through the melancholic history of another people.
他民族の憂鬱な歴史を通じて学びました
09:06
I mean, picture this -- really picture this.
まあ 思い浮かべてみてください
09:08
A Pakistani Muslim teaching Jewish Holocaust history
パキスタン人のイスラム教徒が ユダヤ人のホロコーストの歴史を
09:10
to young Igbo children.
若いイボ族の子供に教える
09:15
Story is powerful.
物語には力があります
09:16
Story is fluid and it belongs to nobody.
物語は 流動的で誰にも属しません
09:18
And it should come as no surprise
そして 僕が16歳のときに書いた
09:20
that my first novel at 16 was about Neo-Nazis
最初の小説は ネオナチがナイジェリアを乗っ取り
09:22
taking over Nigeria to institute the Fourth Reich.
ナチスの第4帝国を築くというあらすじだったのは
09:25
It makes perfect sense.
無理もないことです
09:28
And they were to blow up strategic targets
そして彼らは戦略目的を爆破し
09:29
and take over the country, and they were foiled
国を征服しようとしたけど ナイジェリアのジェームスボンド
09:33
by a Nigerian James Bond called Coyote Williams,
コヨーテ・ウィリアムスと ユダヤ人の
09:35
and a Jewish Nazi hunter.
ナチ・ハンターのお蔭で失敗する
09:39
And it happened over four continents.
これは4カ国に亘る物語です
09:42
And when the book came out, I was heralded as Africa's answer
本が出版されたとき 僕はアフリカのフレデリック・フォーサイスと称賛を浴び
09:43
to Frederick Forsyth, which is a dubious honor at best.
それは 良く言っても 不名誉なことです
09:46
But also, the book was launched in time for me to be accused
また その本の出版によって僕は
09:50
of constructing the blueprint for a foiled coup attempt.
クーデター未遂事件計画を構想した罪に問われ
09:53
So at 18, I was bonded off to prison in Nigeria.
18歳でナイジェリアの刑務所に入れられました
09:57
I grew up very privileged, and it's important
僕は豊かに育てられました
10:02
to talk about privilege, because we don't talk about it here.
あまりそういう話はしませんが 特権について話すのは大切です
10:03
A lot of us are very privileged.
僕らの殆んどはとても恵まれています
10:06
I grew up -- servants, cars, televisions, all that stuff.
僕は 召使や車 テレビなどの全てに囲まれて育ちました
10:08
My story of Nigeria growing up was very different from the story
僕が刑務所で出くわした物語は 僕がナイジェリアで育った環境と全く別世界で
10:12
I encountered in prison, and I had no language for it.
僕はそこで話される言葉を知らず
10:15
I was completely terrified, completely broken,
完全に恐れ 打ちひしがれ
10:19
and kept trying to find a new language,
新しい言葉を探そうと試みました
10:23
a new way to make sense of all of this.
この状況にどう説明をつけるかをです
10:27
Six months after that, with no explanation,
6ヵ月後に いきなり何の説明もなく
10:30
they let me go.
釈放されました
10:33
Now for those of you who have seen me at the buffet tables know
ビュッフェのテーブルで僕を見た人はわかりますね
10:34
that it was because it was costing them too much to feed me.
それは 僕の食費がかかりすぎたからです
10:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:39
But I mean, I grew up with this incredible privilege,
まあ それはおいといて 僕は大変恵まれた環境で育ちました
10:48
and not just me -- millions of Nigerians
僕だけじゃなく -- 何百人ものナイジェリア人は
10:50
grew up with books and libraries.
本や図書館と一緒に育ちました
10:52
In fact, we were talking last night about how all
実際 昨晩 お話したように
10:54
of the steamy novels of Harold Robbins
ハロルド・ロビンスのエロ小説のすべてが
10:58
had done more for sex education of horny teenage boys in Africa
それまであった性教育のプログラムよりも
11:00
than any sex education programs ever had.
アフリカの発情期の少年の性教育に どれほど役立ったことか
11:04
All of those are gone.
これらはすべて無くなりました
11:08
We are squandering the most valuable resource
僕らはこの大陸で最も価値のある
11:10
we have on this continent: the valuable resource
資源を浪費しています
11:12
of the imagination.
想像力の貴重な資源をです
11:14
In the film, "Sometimes in April" by Raoul Peck,
ラウル・ペックの映画 「ルワンダ流血の4月」で
11:16
Idris Elba is poised in a scene with his machete raised,
アイドリス・エルバが 鉈 を振りかざすシーンがありました
11:19
and he's being forced by a crowd to chop up his best friend --
そして 彼は群衆に彼の親友を殺せと迫られ
11:23
fellow Rwandan Army officer, albeit a Tutsi --
親友はルワンダの陸軍士官 ツチ族です
11:27
played by Fraser James.
フレイザー・ジェームスが演じました
11:30
And Fraser's on his knees, arms tied behind his back,
フレイザーは跪き 両手は後ろに縛られ
11:32
and he's crying.
泣きながら
11:36
He's sniveling.
鼻水をたらし
11:38
It's a pitiful sight.
痛ましい光景です
11:39
And as we watch it, we are ashamed.
見ていると 恥ずかしくなります
11:40
And we want to say to Idris, "Chop him up.
そしてアイドリスに「殺しちまえ
11:45
Shut him up."
黙らせろ」と言いたくなります
11:48
And as Idris moves, Fraser screams, "Stop!
そしてアイドリスが動くと フレイザーが叫びます
11:50
Please stop!"
「やめろ!頼むからやめてくれ!」
11:54
Idris pauses, then he moves again,
アイドリスが止って また動くと
11:56
and Fraser says, "Please!
フレイザーが 「頼む
11:59
Please stop!"
頼むからやめるんだ!」と言います
12:02
And it's not the look of horror and terror on Fraser's face that stops Idris or us;
アイドリスや僕らを止めるのは フレイザーの恐怖に満ちた表情ではなく
12:04
it's the look in Fraser's eyes.
フレイザーの目です
12:10
It's one that says, "Don't do this.
目はこう言います「やめるんだ
12:12
And I'm not saying this to save myself,
俺は自分を救うために言っているんじゃない
12:16
although this would be nice. I'm doing it to save you,
もちろんそれもあるが 俺は お前を救うために言っているんだ
12:18
because if you do this, you will be lost."
もし お前が俺を殺せば おまえは自分を見失う」
12:22
To be so afraid that you're standing in the face
逃れられない死に直面した恐れと
12:26
of a death you can't escape and that you're soiling yourself
尊厳をなくす恐れに泣き
12:29
and crying, but to say in that moment,
そのとき言ったことは
12:31
as Fraser says to Idris, "Tell my girlfriend I love her."
フレイザーはアイドリスに「彼女に愛してるって伝えてくれ」と言いながら
12:33
In that moment, Fraser says,
そのとき フレイザーは
12:37
"I am lost already, but not you ... not you."
「俺はすで自分を見失ったが...お前は違う」と伝えていました
12:41
This is a redemption we can all aspire to.
これは 僕ら皆が目指す 救済です
12:46
African narratives in the West, they proliferate.
西洋でのアフリカのこの手の物語は 急増しています
12:49
I really don't care anymore.
僕はもうどうでもよくなりました
12:53
I'm more interested in the stories we tell about ourselves --
僕は 自分達について話す物語にもっと興味があります
12:54
how as a writer, I find that African writers
作家として 僕が思うのは
12:58
have always been the curators of our humanity on this continent.
アフリカの作家達はずっと 大陸の人間性の管理者でした
13:03
The question is, how do I balance narratives that are wonderful
問題は 素晴らしい物語と 傷を追った自己嫌悪的物語の
13:06
with narratives of wounds and self-loathing?
バランスをどう取るかです
13:12
And this is the difficulty that I face.
これは難しいです
13:16
I am trying to move beyond political rhetoric
政治的修辞を越えて倫理的な問題に
13:19
to a place of ethical questioning.
ふれていこうと思っています
13:21
I am asking us to balance the idea
僕が僕達に求めるのは 僕達が完全に脆弱だという発想と
13:23
of our complete vulnerability with the complete notion
変革または可能性を問う全ての観念との間に
13:26
of transformation of what is possible.
バランスを取ることです
13:30
As a young middle-class Nigerian activist,
若き中級クラスのナイジェリア人活動家として
13:32
I launched myself along with a whole generation of us
僕は同世代の人たちと一緒に
13:34
into the campaign to stop the government.
政府を止める運動を始めました
13:37
And I asked millions of people,
そして 何百万もの人に
13:40
without questioning my right to do so,
自分にそんな権利があるかなんて考えもせず
13:42
to go up against the government.
政府に対して立ち上がるよう働きかけました
13:44
And I watched them being locked up in prison and tear gassed.
彼らが刑務所に入れられ 催涙ガスを浴びせられるのを見ました
13:46
I justified it, and I said, "This is the cost of revolution.
僕はそれを正当化し こういいました「これは革命の代償だ
13:48
Have I not myself been imprisoned?
僕自身も収監されなかったか?
13:51
Have I not myself been beaten?"
僕自身も殴られなかったか?」
13:53
It wasn't until later, when I was imprisoned again,
でも この後再び収監されるまで
13:55
that I understood the real meaning of torture,
私は拷問の本当の意味や
13:58
and how easy your humanity can be taken from you,
人間性がいかに簡単に奪い取られるかを理解していませんでした
14:00
for the time I was engaged in war,
その時 僕は戦争に参加していました
14:03
righteous, righteous war.
正義の戦いです
14:06
Excuse me.
失礼
14:09
Sometimes I can stand before the world --
時々 僕は世界を前にして
14:12
and when I say this, transformation
こう言います 変革は困難で
14:14
is a difficult and slow process --
時間のかかるプロセスです
14:16
sometimes I can stand before the world and say,
時々 僕は世界を前にして こう言います
14:18
"My name is Chris Abani.
「僕の名前はクリス・アバニです
14:21
I have been human six days, but only sometimes."
6日間人間です でも 本当はたまにです」
14:23
But this is a good thing.
でも これは良いことです
14:26
It's never going to be easy.
簡単ではありません
14:28
There are no answers.
答えはありません
14:30
As I was telling Rachel from Google Earth,
僕はグーグルアースのラッシェルに
14:32
that I had challenged my students in America --
アメリカの学生に挑戦した話をしていました
14:34
I said, "You don't know anything about Africa, you're all idiots."
僕が「おまえらはアフリカについて何も知らない みんな阿呆だ」と言うと
14:36
And so they said, "Tell me about Africa, Professor Abani."
彼らは「アバニ教授 アフリカについて教えてください」ときました
14:39
So I went to Google Earth and learned about Africa.
そして私はグーグルアースを見て アフリカについて勉強しました
14:42
And the truth be told, this is it, isn't it?
そして本当のことを言うと これが本当のことじゃありませんか?
14:45
There are no essential Africans,
本質的なアフリカなどないのです
14:48
and most of us are as completely ignorant as everyone else
そして僕らの殆んどは他の人と同様に
14:49
about the continent we come from,
自分が来た大陸について完全に無知なのです
14:51
and yet we want to make profound statements about it.
なのに 僕らは確信的な主張をしたがります
14:53
And I think if we can just admit that we're all trying
もし僕達が 自分達の地域社会の真実に
14:56
to approximate the truth of our own communities,
近づこうと試みているところだと認めれば
14:58
it will make for a much more nuanced
もっと 微妙で
15:01
and a much more interesting conversation.
もっと 面白い会話ができるでしょう
15:03
I want to believe that we can be agnostic about this,
これについては 僕らは不可知論者でいいと思いたいのです
15:06
that we can rise above all of this.
そうすれば それを越えた会話が出来ます
15:10
When I was 10, I read James Baldwin's "Another Country,"
僕は10歳の時に ジェームス・バルドウィンの「もう一つの国」という本を読みました
15:12
and that book broke me.
その本は私を打ちひしぎました
15:16
Not because I was encountering homosexual sex and love
それは ホモセクシュアルの性や愛に出くわしたのが
15:18
for the first time, but because the way James wrote about it
初めてだったからではなく ジェームスの表現は
15:21
made it impossible for me to attach otherness to it.
それは違う世界だ と区別することを不可能にしました
15:24
"Here," Jimmy said.
「ここに」ジミーは言います
15:27
"Here is love, all of it."
「ここに愛がある 全部そうさ」
15:29
The fact that it happens in "Another Country"
「もう一つの国」で起こることは
15:31
takes you quite by surprise.
あなたに驚きをもたらすでしょう
15:33
My friend Ronald Gottesman says there are three kinds of people in the world:
僕の友人のロナルド・ゴテスマンは この世には3種類の人間がいると言います
15:36
those who can count, and those who can't.
計算できる人と 出来ない人
15:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:41
He also says that the cause of all our trouble
彼はこうも言いました 僕らのかかえる全てのトラブルは
15:45
is the belief in an essential, pure identity:
本質的で純粋なアイデンティティというものを僕らが信じていることが原因だ
15:48
religious, ethnic, historical, ideological.
宗教 民族 歴史 イデオロギー
15:51
I want to leave you with a poem by Yusef Komunyakaa
僕は ユーセフ・コマンヤーカの変化を詠った詩で
15:56
that speaks to transformation.
終わりにしたいと思います
15:59
It's called "Ode to the Drum," and I'll try and read it
「ドラムへの叙情詩」と呼ばれています
16:02
the way Yusef would be proud to hear it read.
ユーセフが聞いたら誇りに思うように詠んでみます
16:05
"Gazelle, I killed you for your skin's exquisite touch,
ガゼル 私はその滑らかなスキンのためにおまえを殺した
16:11
for how easy it is to be nailed to a board
その容易に板へ打ち付けられ まるで肉屋の白い紙のごとく乾燥する
16:17
weathered raw as white butcher paper.
スキンのために
16:20
Last night I heard my daughter praying for the meat here at my feet.
昨晩 娘が私の足元で 肉を嘆願した
16:24
You know it wasn't anger that made me stop my heart till the hammer fell.
ハンマーが下りるまで 私が心をなくしたのは怒りではないのだ
16:29
Weeks ago, you broke me as a woman
数週間前 おまえがその草むらに沈黙してうつむく前
16:33
once shattered me into a song beneath her weight,
その肢体の下で歌に酔わせてくれた女のように
16:36
before you slouched into that grassy hush.
私はおまえを組み伏せた
16:40
And now I'm tightening lashes, shaped in hide as if around a ribcage,
そして 今は まるで5本の弓の弦を象った胸郭の周りに皮を張るように
16:43
shaped like five bowstrings.
紐を締め付ける
16:48
Ghosts cannot slip back inside the body's drum.
ゴーストはドラムの中に戻れない
16:50
You've been seasoned by wind, dusk and sunlight.
おまえは風や黄昏 日光で深みを増し
16:53
Pressure can make everything whole again.
圧力はおまえを完璧に作り上げる
16:57
Brass nails tacked into the ebony wood,
真鍮の釘を黒檀の木に打ち込み
17:01
your face has been carved five times.
おまえの顔は5度彫り込まれ
17:03
I have to drive trouble in the hills.
私は 丘の苦悩を追い払うのだ
17:06
Trouble in the valley,
谷の苦悩
17:08
and trouble by the river too.
そして川辺の苦悩もだ
17:10
There is no palm wine, fish, salt, or calabash.
椰子酒も魚も塩やヒョウタンもない
17:12
Kadoom. Kadoom. Kadoom.
カドーン カドーン カドーン
17:16
Ka-doooom.
カ ド ー ン
17:20
Now I have beaten a song back into you.
おまえに歌を打ち戻そう
17:22
Rise and walk away like a panther."
立ち上がれ そしてパンサーのように立ち去るのだ」
17:26
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
17:30
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:32
Translator:Kayo Mizutani
Reviewer:Masahiro Kyushima

sponsored links

Chris Abani - Novelist, poet
Imprisoned three times by the Nigerian government, Chris Abani turned his experience into poems that Harold Pinter called "the most naked, harrowing expression of prison life and political torture imaginable." His novels include GraceLand (2004) and The Virgin of Flames (2007).

Why you should listen

Chris Abani's first novel, published when he was 16, was Masters of the Board, a political thriller about a foiled Nigerian coup. The story was convincing enough that the Nigerian government threw him in jail for inciting a coincidentally timed real-life coup. Imprisoned and tortured twice more, he channeled the experience into searing poetry.

Abani's best-selling 2004 novel GraceLand is a searing and funny tale of a young Nigerian boy, an Elvis impersonator who moves through the wide, wild world of Lagos, slipping between pop and traditional cultures, art and crime. It's a perennial book-club pick, a story that brings the postcolonial African experience to vivid life.

Now based in Los Angeles, Abani published The Virgin of Flames in 2007. He is also a publisher, running the poetry imprint Black Goat Press.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.