17:24
TEDGlobal 2012

Beth Noveck: Demand a more open-source government

ベス・ノヴェック:もっとオープンソースの政府を

Filmed:

政府はオープンデータ革命から何を学ぶでしょうか? この活発なトークで、ベス・ノヴェック(ホワイトハウスの前の副CTO )は、実践的なオープンさのビジョンを共有します - 官僚と市民をつなぎ、データを共有し、真に参加する民主主義 「書き込み可能な社会」を想像してみてください…。

- Open-government expert
A lawyer by training and a techie by inclination, Beth Noveck works to build data transparency into government. Full bio

So when the White House was built
19世紀初めに建てられた頃
00:16
in the early 19th century, it was an open house.
ホワイトハウスはオープンハウスでした
00:18
Neighbors came and went. Under President Adams,
ご近所の方も出入りしてました アダムス大統領のとき
00:21
a local dentist happened by.
地元の歯科医がやってきました
00:24
He wanted to shake the President's hand.
彼は大統領と握手をしたかったのですね
00:26
The President dismissed the Secretary of State,
大統領は 会議中だった国務長官を
00:28
whom he was conferring with, and asked the dentist
退席させて そして歯科医に
00:30
if he would remove a tooth.
歯を抜いてくれないかって頼みました
00:32
Later, in the 1850s, under President Pierce,
後の1850年代 ピアス大統領のとき
00:34
he was known to have remarked
こう言ったのが知られていて
00:37
— probably the only thing he's known for —
おそらく彼が知られている唯一のことで
00:39
when a neighbor passed by and said, "I'd love to see
近所の人が通りがかって「きれいなお宅を
00:41
the beautiful house," and Pierce said to him,
拝見したい」と言われて ピアス大統領は
00:44
"Why my dear sir, of course you may come in.
「もちろんどうぞお入りください
00:46
This isn't my house. It is the people's house."
私の家ではなくて 人民の家ですからね」と答えました
00:49
Well, when I got to the White House in the beginning
さて 私がホワイトハウスに着任した2009年はじめ
00:53
of 2009, at the start of the Obama Administration,
オバマ政権の開始のときですが
00:55
the White House was anything but open.
ホワイトハウスはまったくオープンではなく
00:58
Bomb blast curtains covered my windows.
防爆カーテンが窓を覆っていました
01:01
We were running Windows 2000.
私たちはWindows2000を使っていました
01:03
Social media were blocked at the firewall.
ソーシャルメディアはファイアウォールで止められ
01:05
We didn't have a blog, let alone a dozen twitter accounts
ブログもなければ 今のようにはツイッターの
01:08
like we have today.
アカウントを使えませんでした
01:10
I came in to become the head of Open Government,
私は「オープン政府」のトップになり
01:12
to take the values and the practices of transparency,
透明性 参加 協力についての
01:15
participation and collaboration, and instill them
価値を高め 植え付け
01:18
into the way that we work, to open up government,
政府をオープンにするために
01:21
to work with people.
人々と働いてきました
01:24
Now one of the things that we know
私たちが知っているとおり
01:25
is that companies are very good at getting people to work
企業は クルマやコンピュータの
01:28
together in teams and in networks to make
ような複雑な製品を作るために 人々を
01:31
very complex products, like cars and computers,
チームやネットワークで働かせることが上手ですね
01:33
and the more complex the products are a society creates,
社会がもっと複雑なものをつくれるなら
01:37
the more successful the society is over time.
社会は少しずつうまくいくでしょう
01:41
Companies make goods, but governments,
企業は製品をつくり 政府は
01:43
they make public goods. They work on the cure for cancer
公益をつくります がんの治療法や
01:46
and educating our children and making roads,
子供たちの教育 道路を作ったり…
01:49
but we don't have institutions that are particularly good
でも良い制度ではありません
01:52
at this kind of complexity. We don't have institutions
社会の複雑さにみあっている 良い制度が無いのです
01:56
that are good at bringing our talents to bear,
才能を集め オープンで
01:58
at working with us in this kind of open and collaborative way.
共同して働くための制度が無いのです
02:01
So when we wanted to create our Open Government policy,
オープン政府の政策を作るにあたって
02:06
what did we do? We wanted, naturally, to ask public sector
私たちは何をしたでしょう?当然 公共部門の職員に
02:08
employees how we should open up government.
どうやって政府をオープンにするか聞いたのです
02:11
Turns out that had never been done before.
しかし一度も実施されたことがないことがわかりました
02:14
We wanted to ask members of the public to help us
私たちは政策議論に一般の人にも手伝っていただきたかった
02:17
come up with a policy, not after the fact, commenting
規則が文書になった後でから
02:20
on a rule after it's written, the way is typically the case,
コメントをつけるのではなく
02:23
but in advance. There was no legal precedent,
そこには判例も 文化的な慣例も
02:26
no cultural precedent, no technical way of doing this.
技術的な方法もありませんでした
02:30
In fact, many people told us it was illegal.
実際たくさんの人から法律に抵触していると言われました
02:33
Here's the crux of the obstacle.
ここに障害の要点があります
02:36
Governments exist to channel the flow of two things,
政府というのは価値と専門性とを
02:39
really, values and expertise to and from government
政府と市民の間でフローさせて
02:41
and to and from citizens to the end of making decisions.
政策決定に至らせるための存在です
02:45
But the way that our institutions are designed,
けれども制度がデザインされたのは
02:49
in our rather 18th-century, centralized model,
18世紀の中央集権化モデルであり
02:51
is to channel the flow of values through voting,
選挙によって価値がフローされるだけです
02:54
once every four years, once every two years, at best,
4年に一度 2年に一度 せいぜい1年に一度です
02:58
once a year. This is a rather anemic and thin way, in this
まるで貧血気味の方法であって
03:00
era of social media, for us to actually express our values.
ソーシャルメディアの時代には自分で価値を出すべきです
03:03
Today we have technology that lets us express ourselves
今日私たちは自分を表現させる技術がたくさんあります
03:07
a great deal, perhaps a little too much.
多すぎるぐらいです
03:10
Then in the 19th century, we layer on
19世紀に 複雑で巨大な社会を
03:13
the concept of bureaucracy and the administrative state
統治するために官僚制度と 行政組織とが
03:15
to help us govern complex and large societies.
社会に根づきました
03:18
But we've centralized these bureaucracies.
しかし 私たちは官僚制度を中央集権化し
03:21
We've entrenched them. And we know that
確固たるものにしました 最も賢い人は常に
03:24
the smartest person always works for someone else.
人のために働くと思ってます
03:27
We need to only look around this room to know that
また この部屋を見るだけでわかるとおり
03:29
expertise and intelligence is widely distributed in society,
専門知識と知性は社会全体に広がっていることがわかります
03:32
and not limited simply to our institutions.
私たちの体制側だけに有るのではなく
03:36
Scientists have been studying in recent years
科学者たちは フローという現象を
03:40
the phenomenon that they often describe as flow,
自然あるいは社会の両方でのシステムの
03:42
that the design of our systems, whether natural or social,
デザインにおいて あらゆる流れを
03:45
channel the flow of whatever runs through them.
研究してきました
03:48
So a river is designed to channel the flow of water,
川は水のフローであり
03:50
and the lightning bolt that comes out of a cloud channels
雲から出る稲妻は電気のフローであり
03:54
the flow of electricity, and a leaf is designed to channel
葉は木への栄養のフローとしてデザインされ
03:56
the flow of nutrients to the tree,
時にはその経路に
04:00
sometimes even having to route around an obstacle,
障害物があったとしても
04:02
but to get that nutrition flowing.
それでも栄養をフローします
04:05
The same can be said for our social systems, for our
同じことは 私たちの社会システム
04:07
systems of government, where, at the very least,
政府のシステムについて言えます 少なくとも
04:10
flow offers us a helpful metaphor for understanding
フローはメタファーとして役立ちます
04:12
what the problem is, what's really broken,
何が問題なのか 何が壊れているのか が分かります
04:15
and the urgent need that we have, that we all feel today,
そして 緊急にすべきことと 今日全員が感じていることは
04:18
to redesign the flow of our institutions.
私たちの体制のフローを再デザインすることです
04:22
We live in a Cambrian era of big data, of social networks,
現代はビッグデータとソーシャルネットの
04:25
and we have this opportunity to redesign these institutions
カンブリア紀と言えます すぐにでも現体制を
04:29
that are actually quite recent.
再デザインする機会があるのです
04:34
Think about it: What other business do you know,
考えてみてください 経済セクタや
04:37
what other sector of the economy, and especially one
公共セクタ以外の巨大なところで
04:40
as big as the public sector, that doesn't seek to reinvent
ビジネスモデルを作り直そうとしない
04:42
its business model on a regular basis?
ところは無いでしょう
04:46
Sure, we invest plenty in innovation. We invest
もちろん私たちはイノベーションにかなり投資しています
04:49
in broadband and science education and science grants,
ブロードバンド 科学教育 研究助成に投資してます
04:52
but we invest far too little in reinventing and redesigning
でも現体制の再発明 再デザインには
04:56
the institutions that we have.
ほとんどまったく投資していません
04:59
Now, it's very easy to complain, of course, about
もちろん 派閥政治や強固な官僚制に不平を
05:02
partisan politics and entrenched bureaucracy, and we love
言うのは簡単ですし 政府に不平を言うのは
05:04
to complain about government. It's a perennial pastime,
楽しいものです 尽きない娯楽ともいえます
05:08
especially around election time, but
とくに選挙期間には。
05:11
the world is complex. We soon will have 10 billion people,
世界は複雑です じきに人口は100億を超え
05:13
many of whom will lack basic resources.
そのうちの多くは生きるための資源を欠いています
05:17
So complain as we might, what actually can replace
今の世の中をいったいどのように変えてくれるのかと
05:20
what we have today?
不平を言うことでしょう
05:23
What comes the day after the Arab Spring?
アラブの春のあと 何がくるのでしょう?
05:25
Well, one attractive alternative that obviously presents itself
魅力的な選択肢は まさしく
05:29
to us is that of networks. Right? Networks
ネットワークです そうでしょ?
05:33
like Facebook and Twitter. They're lean. They're mean.
Facebookやツイッターのような。頼りになり よくできています
05:36
You've got 3,000 employees at Facebook
Facebookには3千の従業員で
05:39
governing 900 million inhabitants.
9億のユーザーを管理しています
05:41
We might even call them citizens, because they've recently
市民と呼んでもいいかもしれません なぜなら彼らは最近
05:44
risen up to fight against legislative incursion,
法的な攻撃に対して立ち上がったからです
05:47
and the citizens of these networks work together
これらのネットワークの市民は素晴らしい方法で
05:50
to serve each other in great ways.
お互いに支えあっています
05:53
But private communities, private, corporate,
しかし民間団体 私営 法人 民営化団体は
05:56
privatizing communities, are not bottom-up democracies.
ボトムアップ式の民主主義ではありません
05:59
They cannot replace government.
政府の代わりにはなりません
06:02
Friending someone on Facebook is not complex enough
Facebookで友達登録することは
06:04
to do the hard work of you and I collaborating
お互いに協力して困難な仕事をこなしたり
06:07
with each other and doing the hard work of governance.
行政の困難な仕事を行うほど複雑ではありません
06:10
But social media do teach us something.
とはいえソーシャルメディアから分かることがあります
06:14
Why is Twitter so successful? Because it opens up its platform.
ツイッターの成功は何故か?プラットホームを開放したからです
06:17
It opens up the API to allow hundreds of thousands
多くの新しいアプリが作れるようにAPIを
06:21
of new applications to be built on top of it, so that we can
開放したので 私たちは新鮮で刺激的な方法で
06:24
read and process information in new and exciting ways.
情報を読んだり 扱うことができます
06:27
We need to think about how to open up the API
どのように政府のAPIを開放するか またそれを
06:32
of government, and the way that we're going to do that,
やる方法を考えてみる必要があります
06:34
the next great superpower is going to be the one
そうすることで 次の巨大なスーパーパワーは
06:38
who can successfully combine the hierarchy of institution --
上手に結びあわせられるでしょう
06:41
because we have to maintain those public values,
いろいろな制度の階層を…私たちがそういう公共の
06:47
we have to coordinate the flow -- but with the diversity
価値を維持し フローを調整しなければなりません…しかし
06:50
and the pulsating life and the chaos and the excitement
多様性 躍動する生活 ネットワークのカオスと興奮でもって
06:53
of networks, all of us working together to build
私たちみんなでこのイノベーションを現体制の上に
06:55
these new innovations on top of our institutions,
組みあげ 行政の活動に
06:58
to engage in the practice of governance.
結びつけなければなりません
07:02
We have a precedent for this. Good old Henry II here,
これには先例があります あのヘンリー2世が
07:04
in the 12th century, invented the jury.
12世紀に陪審制度を発明しました
07:07
Powerful, practical, palpable model for handing power
強力で 実践的で わかりやすいモデルで
07:11
from government to citizens.
政府から市民へ権力を移譲するものです
07:16
Today we have the opportunity, and we have
現在 私たちはネットワークと体制を相互に結ぶ
07:18
the imperative, to create thousands of new ways
沢山の新しい方法をつくる機会と
07:22
of interconnecting between networks and institutions,
緊急性があります
07:25
thousands of new kinds of juries: the citizen jury,
たくさんの新しい種類の陪審員:市民陪審員
07:28
the Carrotmob, the hackathon, we are just beginning
Carrotmob ハッカソンのようなものを
07:31
to invent the models by which we can cocreate
私たちは行政プロセスを 協力して作り
07:35
the process of governance.
モデルを作りはじめているところです
07:38
Now, we don't fully have a picture of what this will look like
現時点では完全にはこれがどのような形になるか
07:40
yet, but we're seeing pockets of evolution
わからないのですが 私たちの回りに出現する
07:42
emerging all around us -- maybe not even evolution,
進化が見えてきます 進化ではなくて 統治の
07:45
I'd even start to call it a revolution -- in the way that we govern.
革命と 私は呼びはじめてさえいます
07:48
Some of it's very high-tech,
いくつかはハイテクで
07:52
and some of it is extremely low-tech,
いくつかは とってもローテクです
07:53
such as the project that MKSS is running in Rajasthan,
MKSS がインドのラジャスタンで行なっている
07:55
India, where they take the spending data of the state
プロジェクトでは 国家の出費データを集めて
07:58
and paint it on 100,000 village walls,
10万もの村の壁に描き
08:02
and then invite the villagers to come and comment
そして村民を招いて
08:05
who is on the government payroll, who's actually died,
誰が国の支払を担当しているか 誰が死亡しているとか
08:08
what are the bridges that have been built to nowhere,
橋が架かっていないところはどこかなどなど
08:10
and to work together through civic engagement to save
市民の参画でお金を節約し 予算への参加や
08:13
real money and participate and have access to that budget.
アクセスを持つことについて話合ってもらいました
08:15
But it's not just about policing government.
でもそれは政府を取り締まることだけではありません
08:19
It's also about creating government.
それは政府を作ることでもあります
08:21
Spacehive in the U.K. is engaging in crowd-funding,
英国のSpacehiveはクラウドファンドを立ち上げ
08:23
getting you and me to raise the money to build
皆さんからの資金を募って
08:26
the goalposts and the park benches that will actually
ゴールポストや公園のベンチを作り
08:29
allow us to deliver better services in our communities.
より良いサービスを行うようにしています
08:32
No one is better at this activity of actually getting us
このような活動に使えるようなサービスを
08:35
to engage in delivering services,
何も無いようなところから実現してきた
08:39
sometimes where none exist, than Ushahidi.
プロジェクトがあります Ushahidiです
08:42
Created after the post-election riots in Kenya in 2008,
2008年のケニアでの選挙後の暴動の後に
08:45
this crisis-mapping website and community is actually able
危機マップサイトとコミュニティを構築しました
08:49
to crowdsource and target the delivery of
クラウドソースができ
08:53
better rescue services to people trapped under the rubble,
ハイチや もっと最近のイタリアでの地震の後に
08:56
whether it's after the earthquakes in Haiti,
瓦礫の下にいる人々へ より良い救命活動を
08:59
or more recently in Italy.
届けることを目標としています
09:02
And the Red Cross too is training volunteers and Twitter
そして赤十字社もボランティアを訓練し
09:04
is certifying them, not simply to supplement existing
ツイッターで本人確認し 既成の政府機構の補完でなく
09:07
government institutions, but in many cases, to replace them.
多くの場合 置き換えます
09:10
Now what we're seeing lots of examples of, obviously,
私たちの知る多くの例は あきらかに
09:14
is the opening up of government data,
政府データの公開です まだ十分な例では
09:17
not enough examples of this yet, but we're starting
ありませんが 政府のデータを使って刷新的な
09:19
to see this practice of people creating and generating
アプリケーションを作ったり生み出す活動が
09:22
innovative applications on top of government data.
見られるようになりました
09:25
There's so many examples I could have picked, and I
多くの例がありますが
09:29
selected this one of Jon Bon Jovi. Some of you
ジョン・ボン・ジョビのものを取り上げます
09:31
may or may not know that he runs a soup kitchen
皆さんの中には 彼がニュージャージーで無料食堂を
09:34
in New Jersey, where he caters to and serves the homeless
営むのをご存知かもしれません ホームレス 特に
09:37
and particularly homeless veterans.
退役軍人のホームレスにまかない等のサービスをしています
09:39
In February, he approached the White House, and said,
二月には 彼はホワイトハウスで言いました
09:41
"I would like to fund a prize to create scalable national
「私は ホームレスだけでなく サービスを届ける人にも
09:44
applications, apps, that will help not only the homeless
助けになるような スケーラブルなアプリケーションを
09:48
but those who deliver services [to] them to do so better."
作る賞に資金を提供したい」
09:51
February 2012 to June of 2012,
2012年2月から2012年6月に
09:55
the finalists are announced in the competition.
決勝出場者が発表されます
09:58
Can you imagine, in the bureaucratic world of yesteryear,
みなさんは 往年の官僚的な世界では
10:01
getting anything done in a four-month period of time?
何でも4か月間で終わせるって想像できますか?
10:04
You can barely fill out the forms in that amount of time,
それでは書類に記入することさえできませんし
10:07
let alone generate real, palpable innovations
まして人々の暮らしを改善する 本当で
10:09
that improve people's lives.
わかりやすいイノベーションを生み出すことなどとてもできません
10:12
And I want to be clear to mention that this open government
このオープン政府革命は 政府を民営化することでは
10:14
revolution is not about privatizing government,
ないということを 私は明確にしておきます
10:17
because in many cases what it can do when we have
多くの場合に私達がしようと思っているのは
10:21
the will to do so is to deliver more progressive
より進歩的で より正しい
10:23
and better policy than the regulations and the legislative
政策をつくることであり
10:27
and litigation-oriented strategies
今日のような訴訟社会をもたらすような
10:31
by which we make policy today.
規則や立法ではありません
10:34
In the State of Texas, they regulate 515 professions,
テキサス州では 515の職業に規制があります
10:36
from well-driller to florist.
井戸掘削から花屋までにも
10:40
Now, you can carry a gun into a church in Dallas,
ダラスでは 教会の中で銃を持ち込める一方で
10:42
but do not make a flower arrangement without a license,
許可なしで フラワーアレンジメントはできません
10:45
because that will land you in jail.
刑務所に入れられてしまいます
10:48
So what is Texas doing? They're asking you and me,
それで テキサスは何をしているのでしょうか
10:51
using online policy wikis, to help not simply get rid of
オンラインの政策ウィキを使っています
10:55
burdensome regulations that impede entrepreneurship,
起業家精神を妨げる厄介な規制を取り除くだけでなく
10:59
but to replace those regulations with more innovative
新しいiPhoneのアプリケーションで
11:03
alternatives, sometimes using transparency in the creation
政策の透明性を利用し これらの規制から
11:06
of new iPhone apps that will allows us
もっと刷新的なものに置き換えるように
11:09
both to protect consumers and the public
消費者と大衆を守ることと
11:11
and to encourage economic development.
経済的発展との両方を成し遂げようとしています
11:13
That is a nice sideline of open government.
これはオープン政府の良い副産物です
11:16
It's not only the benefits that we've talked about with regard
これまで私たちが話してきた開発にともなう利益だけでは
11:19
to development. It's the economic benefits and the
ありません このオープンなイノベーションからの
11:22
job creation that's coming from this open innovation work.
経済利益と雇用創出なのです
11:26
Sberbank, the largest and oldest bank in Russia,
Sberbankは ロシアで最大かつ最も古い銀行で
11:30
largely owned by the Russian government,
大部分はロシア政府によって所有されていますが
11:33
has started practicing crowdsourcing, engaging
クラウドソーシングを始めて 従業員と市民が
11:35
its employees and citizens in the public in developing innovations.
イノベーションを進めるためにつながっています
11:38
Last year they saved a billion dollars, 30 billion rubles,
去年 オープンな刷新で10億ドル 300億ルーブルを節約しました
11:41
from open innovation, and they're pushing radically
彼らはクラウドソーシングの拡大を
11:46
the extension of crowdsourcing, not only from banking,
銀行業務だけでなく公共部門にむけて
11:48
but into the public sector.
ラジカルに推し進めています
11:51
And we see lots of examples of these innovators using
イノベーターたちがオープン政府データを
11:53
open government data, not simply to make apps,
利用している例が多いのですが アプリを作るだけでなく
11:56
but then to make companies and to hire people
政府と共に働いたり 会社を作ったり
11:59
to build them working with the government.
人々を雇ったりもしています
12:01
So a lot of these innovations are local.
このようなイノベーションの多くは地域的です
12:03
In San Ramon, California, they published an iPhone app
カリフォルニア州サンラモンでは
12:05
in which they allow you or me to say we are certified
心肺蘇生法の資格を証明するiPhoneアプリが
12:08
CPR-trained, and then when someone has a heart attack,
できました もし誰かが心臓発作を起こした時は
12:12
a notification goes out so that you
アプリからの通知で その人のところへ
12:15
can rush over to the person over here and deliver CPR.
駆けつけて心肺蘇生を行うことができます
12:18
The victim who receives bystander CPR
居合わせた人による心臓蘇生を受けた患者は
12:22
is more than twice as likely to survive.
生存率が2倍以上高いのです
12:24
"There is a hero in all of us," is their slogan.
「みんなのなかに英雄がいる」がスローガンです
12:26
But it's not limited to the local.
もちろん地域だけに限りません
12:30
British Columbia, Canada, is publishing a catalogue
カナダのブリティッシュ・コロンビアでは 市民が
12:33
of all the ways that its residents and citizens can engage
州とともに協力できることの取り組みの
12:35
with the state in the cocreation of governance.
すべての方法についてが載っているカタログを出版しています
12:38
Let me be very clear,
ここではっきりさせましょう
12:42
and perhaps controversial,
おそらく物議をかもすことでしょう
12:45
that open government is not
オープン政府というのは
12:47
about transparent government.
透明な政府という意味ではありません
12:49
Simply throwing data over the transom doesn't change
単に政府のデータを公開しただけでは
12:51
how government works.
政府を変えられません
12:54
It doesn't get anybody to do anything with that data
暮らしを変え 問題を解決するために
12:56
to change lives, to solve problems, and it doesn't change
データを使い様々な仕事をする人を得られません
12:58
government.
政府を変えることもできません
13:02
What it does is it creates an adversarial relationship
データ公開だけでは 市民側と政府との間に
13:03
between civil society and government
情報のコントロールと所有を巡って
13:06
over the control and ownership of information.
敵対関係が作られます
13:08
And transparency, by itself, is not reducing the flow
データ公開自身は 政治への金銭の流入を
13:11
of money into politics, and arguably,
減らしていません データ公開を用いた
13:14
it's not even producing accountability as well as it might
参加と協力によって 私たちの働き方を
13:16
if we took the next step of combining participation and
変えていく次の段階へ進んだとしても
13:19
collaboration with transparency to transform how we work.
おそらく 説明責任も生み出すことがないでしょう
13:22
We're going to see this evolution really in two phases,
進展には二つの段階があるだろうと
13:26
I think. The first phase of the open government revolution
私は考えます オープン政府革命の第一段階は
13:29
is delivering better information from the crowd
バラバラなところから より良い情報を
13:32
into the center.
まとめることです
13:36
Starting in 2005, and this is how this open government
2005年に どのようにオープン政府が
13:38
work in the U.S. really got started,
合衆国で始まったのか説明しましょう
13:40
I was teaching a patent law class to my students and
私は特許法のクラスをもっていて
13:42
explaining to them how a single person in the bureaucracy
官僚機構では 一人の官僚が
13:45
has the power to make a decision
どの出願が特許になるかを決定をする権限を
13:48
about which patent application becomes the next patent,
持っており その分野全体で20年間も
13:51
and therefore monopolizes for 20 years the rights
権利を独占させてしまうことを
13:55
over an entire field of inventive activity.
生徒に教えていました
13:58
Well, what did we do? We said, we can make a website,
私たちは何をしたでしょう?
14:01
we can make an expert network, a social network,
Webサイトによって 特許局の決定を
14:04
that would connect the network to the institution
支援する より良い情報を科学者や
14:06
to allow scientists and technologists to get
科学技術者に伝えるため
14:08
better information to the patent office
専門家のネットワーク、ソーシャルネットワークを
14:11
to aid in making those decisions.
作ることができると言いました
14:13
We piloted the work in the U.S. and the U.K. and Japan
私たちは合衆国 英国 日本
14:16
and Australia, and now I'm pleased to report
オーストラリアで業務を実験的に試み これから
14:18
that the United States Patent Office will be rolling out
合衆国の特許局は
14:21
universal, complete, and total openness,
普遍的で 完全で 全面的に オープンになります
14:24
so that all patent applications will now be open
すべての特許出願は
14:28
for citizen participation, beginning this year.
市民参加のためにオープンになります 今年開始です
14:31
The second phase of this evolution — Yeah. (Applause)
進化の第二段階!イェー!(拍手)
14:35
They deserve a hand. (Applause)
これは拍手に値します(拍手)
14:38
The first phase is in getting better information in.
第一段階は より良い情報を手に入れることです
14:41
The second phase is in getting decision-making power out.
第二段階は 意志決定力を打ち出すものです
14:43
Participatory budgeting has long been practiced
直接参加の予算編成は ブラジルのポルト・アレグレで
14:47
in Porto Alegre, Brazil.
長い間行われてきました
14:50
They're just starting it in the 49th Ward in Chicago.
シカゴの第49区ではこれを始めようとしています
14:51
Russia is using wikis to get citizens writing law together,
ロシアではウィキを使って リトアニアでも同様に
14:54
as is Lithuania. When we start to see
市民が法律を書いています。私たちが政府の
14:58
power over the core functions of government
主要機能を見始めることで
15:00
— spending, legislation, decision-making —
-- 支出 立法 政策決定という機能を見ることで--
15:02
then we're well on our way to an open government revolution.
オープン政府革命へ向かって着実に進むのです
15:06
There are many things that we can do to get us there.
そこに到るまでには することがたくさんあります
15:10
Obviously opening up the data is one,
データをオープンにするのはその一つですが
15:14
but the important thing is to create lots more --
重要なことは もっとたくさんクリエートし
15:16
create and curate -- lots more participatory opportunities.
キュレートし もっと参加の機会を作ることです
15:19
Hackathons and mashathons and working with data
ハッカソンやマシャソンや データを使ってアプリを作ることは
15:23
to build apps is an intelligible way for people to engage
陪審員のように人々が参加する
15:26
and participate, like the jury is,
わかりやすい方法ですが
15:29
but we're going to need lots more things like it.
このようなものがもっとたくさん必要になります
15:32
And that's why we need to start with our youngest people.
それが もっとも若い人たちから始める理由なのです
15:35
We've heard talk here at TED about people
このTEDGlobal 2012で バイオハッキングであったり
15:40
biohacking and hacking their plants with Arduino,
Arduinoで植物の状態を監視したり
15:42
and Mozilla is doing work around the world in getting
またMozillaでは若者が世界中でウェブサイトを構築し
15:46
young people to build websites and make videos.
映像を作れるようにしている話を聞きましたね
15:49
When we start by teaching young people that we live,
私たちは 受動的で リードオンリーな社会に
15:53
not in a passive society, a read-only society,
いるのではなく 書き込み可能な社会にいることを
15:55
but in a writable society, where we have the power
若者に教えるべきです。コミュニティを変え
15:59
to change our communities, to change our institutions,
制度を変えることで
16:01
that's when we begin to really put ourselves on the pathway
オープン政府のイノベーションへ
16:05
towards this open government innovation,
オープン政府の活動へ
16:08
towards this open government movement,
オープン政府の革命へと
16:11
towards this open government revolution.
向かわせるのです
16:13
So let me close by saying that I think the important thing
さて結びとして 私が重要だと思っているのは
16:16
for us to do is to talk about and demand this revolution.
革命を語り 求めることです
16:18
We don't have words, really, to describe it yet.
私たちには 本当はまだ説明できるような言葉がありません
16:24
Words like equality and fairness and the traditional
平等 公平 従来型選挙 民主主義と
16:27
elections, democracy, these are not really great terms yet.
いった言葉に匹敵するような偉大な言葉がないのです
16:29
They're not fun enough. They're not exciting enough
まだ大して面白くありません。エキサイティングでも
16:34
to get us engaged in this tremendous opportunity
ありません 素晴らしい機会に取り組んでいられるほどには
16:36
that awaits us. But I would argue that if we want to see
しかし もしイノベーションを見たいのであれば
16:40
the kinds of innovations, the hopeful and exciting
TEDで見聞きするクリーンなエネルギー クリーンな教育
16:43
innovations that we hear talked about here at TED,
そして社会の発展のような 希望あふれ
16:46
in clean energy, in clean education,
エキサイティングなイノベーションを見たいのであれば
16:49
in development, if we want to see those adopted
受け入れられて 拡大されるものを見たいのであれば
16:51
and we want to see those scaled,
明日の政府の姿を
16:53
we want to see them become the governance of tomorrow,
見たいのであれば
16:56
then we must all participate,
みんなで関与し
16:58
then we must get involved.
参加しなくてはなりません
17:00
We must open up our institutions, and like the leaf,
私たちの体制をオープンにしなくてはなりません
17:02
we must let the nutrients flow throughout our body politic,
葉のように栄養を 政治の隅々に
17:05
throughout our culture, to create open institutions
文化の隅々に流し 体制をオープンにし
17:09
to create a stronger democracy, a better tomorrow.
より強力な民主主義 より良い明日を作りましょう
17:12
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございます(拍手)
17:15
Translated by Keisuke Oki
Reviewed by kenichi ebara

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Beth Noveck - Open-government expert
A lawyer by training and a techie by inclination, Beth Noveck works to build data transparency into government.

Why you should listen

How can our data strengthen our democracies? In her work, Beth Noveck explores what "opengov" really means--not just freeing data from databases, but creating meaningful ways for citizens to collaborate with their governments.

As the US's first Deputy CTO, Beth Noveck founded the White House Open Government Initiative, which developed administration policy on transparency, participation, and collaboration. Among other projects, she designed and built Peer-to-Patent, the U.S. government’s first expert network. She's now working on the design for ORGPedia, a platform for mashing up and visualizing public and crowdsourced data about corporations. Her book The Networked State will appear in 2013.

Must-read: Noveck's 2012 essay Open Data -- The Democratic Imperative.

More profile about the speaker
Beth Noveck | Speaker | TED.com