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TEDxBoston 2012

Kent Larson: Brilliant designs to fit more people in every city

ケント・ラーソン:より多くの人が都市に居住するための優れたデザイン

June 22, 2012

どうすればもっと多くの人々が過密にならずに、都市で暮らすことができるでしょうか。。ケント・ラーソンは、折り畳み式の車、間取りが簡単に変更できるアパートや、その他の発明を紹介しながら、未来の都市がまるで昔の小さな村のように機能する様子を語ります。

Kent Larson - Architect
Kent Larson designs new technologies that solve the biggest questions facing our cities. Full bio

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Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I thought I would start with a very brief
はじめに都市の発達の歴史を
00:16
history of cities.
簡単にご紹介しましょう
00:19
Settlements typically began
集落は井戸の周りに
00:21
with people clustered around a well, and the size
人々が集まることから始まりました
00:23
of that settlement was roughly the distance you could walk
その大きさは 頭に水瓶を乗せて
00:26
with a pot of water on your head.
歩ける距離だったのです
00:29
In fact, if you fly over Germany, for example,
ドイツを飛行機から見下ろすと
00:31
and you look down and you see these hundreds
無数の小さな村が見えるでしょう
00:34
of little villages, they're all about a mile apart.
それらは全て約1.6キロ離れているのです
00:36
You needed easy access to the fields.
畑に歩いて行ける距離です
00:39
And for hundreds, even thousands of years,
何百年 何千年もの間
00:42
the home was really the center of life.
家が生活の中心でした
00:45
Life was very small for most people.
生活は規模の小さなもので
00:48
It was the center of entertainment, of energy production,
娯楽とエネルギー生産
00:50
of work, the center of health care.
仕事と医療も家が中心でした
00:55
That's where babies were born and people died.
人は家で生まれ 家で死んだのです
00:57
Then, with industrialization, everything started
工業化が進むと
01:01
to become centralized.
全てが集中しはじめました
01:04
You had dirty factories that were moved
汚染物質を出す工場は
01:06
to the outskirts of cities.
郊外に移り
01:08
Production was centralized in assembly plants.
生産は組み立て工場で行われ
01:10
You had centralized energy production.
エネルギー生産も集中化され
01:14
Learning took place in schools. Health care took place
教育は学校で
01:18
in hospitals.
医療は病院で行われました
01:21
And then you had networks that developed.
ネットワークが発達しました
01:23
You had water, sewer networks that allowed for this
水道や下水道システムができ
01:26
kind of unchecked expansion.
際限ない拡張を支えました
01:30
You had separated functions, increasingly.
機能がますます分化していき
01:32
You had rail networks that connected residential,
鉄道網が工業・商業・居住地を結びました
01:36
industrial, commercial areas. You had auto networks.
道路網も整備されました
01:39
In fact, the model was really, give everybody a car,
モデルとされたのは 皆に車を与え
01:42
build roads to everything, and give people a place to park
どこでも道路を作り 駐車場を設ける
01:45
when they get there. It was not a very functional model.
あまり機能的なモデルではありませんが
01:48
And we still live in that world,
私たちはまだその世界で生活し
01:51
and this is what we end up with.
その結果 こうなりました
01:54
So you have the sprawl of LA,
膨張するロサンゼルス市街地です
01:56
the sprawl of Mexico City.
これはメキシコ・シティー
01:58
You have these unbelievable new cities in China
中国の途方もない新都市
02:00
which you might call tower sprawl.
空中への膨張と言えましょう
02:03
They're all building cities on the model that we invented
中国の都市計画は50-60年代の欧米を
02:05
in the '50s and '60s, which is really obsolete, I would argue,
モデルにしており 時代遅れです
02:08
and there are hundreds and hundreds of new cities
無数の新都市が
02:12
that are being planned all over the world.
世界中で計画されています
02:14
In China alone, 300 million people,
今後15年間に中国だけでも
02:16
some say 400 million people,
3億人から4億人が
02:18
will move to the city over the next 15 years.
都市に移動します
02:20
That means building the entire, the equivalent
つまり15年間で 今の米国と
02:22
of the entire built infrastructure of the U.S. in 15 years.
同規模のインフラを作るのです
02:25
Imagine that.
大変ですね
02:28
And we should all care about this
都市生活者か否かに関係なく
02:29
whether you live in cities or not.
これは覚えておかねばなりません
02:31
Cities will account for 90 percent of the population growth,
人口増加の90%は都市です
02:34
80 percent of the global CO2, 75 percent of energy use,
CO2増加の80% エネルギー使用の75%もしかり
02:37
but at the same time it's where people want to be,
しかも 人々は好んで続々と
02:41
increasingly.
都市に移住します
02:45
More than half the people now in the world live in cities,
世界の人口の半分以上が都市に住み
02:46
and that will just continue to escalate.
割合は今後増加します
02:49
Cities are places of celebration, personal expression.
都市は祝祭と個人表現の場所です
02:52
You have the flash mobs of pillow fights that —
枕投げのフラッシュモブなどはその例です
02:55
I've been to a couple. They're quite fun. (Laughter)
私も数回参加したことがあります 楽しいですよ (笑)
02:58
You have — (Laughs)
あなた方も?(笑)
03:01
Cities are where most of the wealth is created,
都市は富の大部分が生まれる場所です
03:03
and particularly in the developing world,
特に発展途上国では
03:06
it's where women find opportunities. That's
都市は女性が活躍できる場所です
03:08
a lot of the reason why cities are growing very quickly.
それで都市が急速に発達しているのです
03:10
Now there's some trends that will impact cities.
都市のあり方を変貌させる力があります
03:14
First of all, work is becoming distributed and mobile.
まず第一に労働が分散流動化します
03:16
The office building is basically obsolete
オフィスビルは個人の労働の場としては
03:19
for doing private work.
もやは時代遅れになり
03:21
The home, once again, because of distributed computation --
コンピュータとコミュニケーションの分散化によって
03:23
communication, is becoming a center of life,
家が再び生活の中心となります
03:27
so it's a center of production and learning and shopping
生産 学び 購買
03:29
and health care and all of these things that we used
健康管理など家の外で行われると
03:32
to think of as taking place outside of the home.
考えていたものの中心となるのです
03:36
And increasingly, everything that people buy,
人々が購入するもの
03:39
every consumer product, in one way or another,
消費財は 何らかの形で
03:42
can be personalized.
個別化されるのです
03:44
And that's a very important trend to think about.
この傾向は大変重要です
03:46
So this is my image of the city of the future.
これが私の想像する未来都市です
03:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:52
In that it's a place for people, you know.
人々のための場所なのです
03:54
Maybe not the way people dress, but --
服装は別にして
03:57
You know, the question now is, how can we have all
今日の問題は都市が持つ
03:59
the good things that we identify with cities
良い側面を悪い側面を避けて
04:01
without all the bad things?
どう実現するかです
04:04
This is Bangalore. It took me a couple of hours
バンガロールです 昨年行ったとき
04:06
to get a few miles in Bangalore last year.
数キロ進むのに数時間かかりました
04:08
So with cities, you also have congestion and pollution
都市には渋滞と汚染
04:11
and disease and all these negative things.
病気などのマイナス面がつきものです
04:14
How can we have the good stuff without the bad?
どうしたら良い面だけを得られるでしょう
04:17
So we went back and started looking at the great cities
そこで車社会以前から発展した
04:18
that evolved before the cars.
大都市を見てみました
04:21
Paris was a series of these little villages
パリは小さな村々からできていました
04:23
that came together, and you still see that structure today.
村が合体し現在の形になりました
04:26
The 20 arrondissements of Paris
パリの20の行政区は
04:30
are these little neighborhoods.
これらの小さな村々なのです
04:31
Most of what people need in life can be
日常生活は
04:32
within a five- or 10-minute walk.
徒歩で5分から10分の範囲で事足ります
04:35
And if you look at the data, when you have that kind
データを見ると そのような構造の
04:37
of a structure, you get a very even distribution
パリの街には
04:40
of the shops and the physicians and the pharmacies
商店 医院 薬局 カフェなどが
04:43
and the cafes in Paris.
均等に分布しています
04:46
And then you look at cities that evolved after
車社会を前提に発達した都市は
04:48
the automobile, and it's not that kind of a pattern.
そのような構造ではありません
04:50
There's very little that's within a five minute walk
例えばピッツバーグは
04:53
of most areas of places like Pittsburgh.
徒歩5分内にはほとんど何もありません
04:55
Not to pick on Pittsburgh, but most American cities
ピッツバーグ以外の 多くのアメリカの
04:58
really have evolved this way.
都市も同様に発達したのです
05:01
So we said, we'll, let's look at new cities, and we're involved
そこで新しい街を考えてみましょう
05:03
in a couple of new city projects in China.
今中国で新しい都市の設計に関わっています
05:07
So we said, let's start with that neighborhood cell.
住宅地の集合体から始めます
05:10
We think of it as a compact urban cell.
それを小さな都市構成単位とします
05:12
So provide most of what most people want
生活に必要なものは
05:14
within that 20-minute walk.
徒歩20分内にあります
05:16
This can also be a resilient electrical microgrid,
そこに柔軟で小さな電力網を設置し
05:18
community heating, power, communication networks,
地域の暖房 電力 コミュニケーションを
05:22
etc., can be concentrated there.
集約できます
05:25
Stewart Brand would put a micro-nuclear reactor
スチュアート・ブランドならば 小型原子炉を
05:27
right in the center, probably. (Laughter)
中心に据えるでしょうね (笑)
05:30
And he might be right.
良い考えでしょう
05:32
And then we can form, in effect, a mesh network.
そうすれば網目状のネットワークを作れます
05:34
It's something of an Internet typology pattern,
それはインターネットに似た構造で
05:37
so you can have a series of these neighborhoods.
集合体をつなぎます
05:41
You can dial up the density -- about 20,000 people per cell
単位あたりの人口は
05:43
if it's Cambridge. Go up to 50,000
ケンブリッジならば2万人
05:46
if it's Manhattan density. You connect everything
マンハッタンならば5万人で
05:48
with mass transit and you provide most of what most people
公共交通機関があり 必要なものは
05:50
need within that neighborhood.
その区域で手に入ります
05:54
You can begin to develop a whole typology of streetscapes
道路の形状とそれに合った車の設計に
05:56
and the vehicles that can go on them. I won't go through
着手できます 詳細は省きますが
05:59
all of them. I'll just show one.
一つだけお見せしましょう
06:03
This is Boulder. It's a great example of kind of a mobility
これはコロラドのボルダーです この通りは
06:05
parkway, a superhighway for joggers and bicyclists
ジョガーやサイクリスト専用の道路で
06:07
where you can go from one end of the city to the other
車道を横切らずに 街の端から端に
06:11
without crossing the street, and they also have bike-sharing,
移動できます シェアバイクも整備しています
06:14
which I'll get into in a minute.
これには後で詳しく触れます
06:18
This is even a more interesting solution in Seoul, Korea.
これはさらに興味深いソウルでの試みです
06:20
They took the elevated highway, they got rid of it,
ここでは高架道路を取り去ってしまいました
06:23
they reclaimed the street, the river down below,
遊歩道とその脇を流れる川を取り戻し
06:25
below the street, and you can go from one end of Seoul
遊歩道を歩けばソウル市の端から端まで
06:29
to the other without crossing a pathway for cars.
車道を横断せずに行くことができます
06:32
The Highline in Manhattan is very similar.
マンハッタンの高架鉄道跡も同様です
06:36
You have these rapidly emerging bike lanes
自転車専用レーンは世界中で見かけます
06:40
all over the world. I lived in Manhattan for 15 years.
私はマンハッタンに15年住んでいます
06:45
I went back a couple of weekends ago, took this photograph
この写真は数週間前のものです
06:47
of these fabulous new bike lanes that they have installed.
すばらしい自転車レーンが整備されていますね
06:50
They're still not to where Copenhagen is, where something
でもコペンハーゲンはさらに優れています
06:55
like 42 percent of the trips within the city
コペンハーゲン市内の交通量の
06:58
are by bicycle. It's mostly just because they have
42%は自転車です 自転車用インフラが
07:01
fantastic infrastructure there.
すばらしく完備しているのです
07:03
We actually did exactly the wrong thing in Boston.
ボストンは大きな誤りを犯しました
07:06
We -- the Big Dig -- (Laughter)
ビッグディグ計画により (笑)
07:09
So we got rid of the highway but we created a traffic island
高速道路を廃止しましたが できた安全地帯は
07:14
and it's certainly not a mobility pathway for anything
車以外にはなんの役にも
07:17
other than cars.
立ちません
07:21
Mobility on demand is something we've been thinking
需要対応型の交通手段を
07:22
about, so we think we need an ecosystem
我々は考えてきました シェアできる乗り物と
07:24
of these shared-use vehicles connected to mass transit.
公共交通機関を接続する仕組みが要ります
07:26
These are some of the vehicles that we've been working on.
このような乗り物を現在開発中です
07:30
But shared use is really key. If you share a vehicle,
シェアすることは非常に大切です シェアすれば
07:33
you can have at least four people use one vehicle,
1台の車に1人ではなく
07:36
as opposed to one.
4人が乗ることができます
07:39
We have Hubway here in Boston, the Vélib' system in Paris.
ボストンではハブウェイ パリにはヴェリブシステムがあります
07:41
We've been developing at the Media Lab this little
メディアラボではこの小さな都市向けの
07:46
city car that is optimized for shared use in cities.
車を開発しています 都市でのシェアユース専用車です
07:50
We got rid of all the useless things like engines
エンジンや変速機のような無駄なものは省き
07:55
and transmissions. We moved everything to the wheels,
すべてを車輪の中に収めました
07:58
so you have the drive motor, the steering motor,
車輪の中に駆動や操舵のためのモーター
08:00
the breaking all in the wheel.
減速装置などが入っています
08:02
That left the chassis unencumbered, so you can do things
車台が自由になり 折りたたむこともできます
08:04
like fold, so you can fold this little vehicle up
この小さな車を折りたたんで
08:07
to occupy a tiny little footprint.
小さくしまうこともできます
08:10
This was a video that was on European television last week
このビデオは先週ヨーロッパのテレビで放映されました
08:13
showing the Spanish Minister of Industry driving
スペインの産業大臣が
08:17
this little vehicle, and when it's folded, it can spin.
この車を運転しています たたむと回転もできます
08:21
You don't need reverse. You don't need parallel parking.
バックも縦列駐車も不要です
08:24
You just spin and go directly in. (Laughter)
回転して直進します (笑)
08:28
So we've been working with a company to
ある企業と商品化を進めています
08:30
commercialize this. My PhD student Ryan Chin presented
博士課程のライアン・チンが2年前に
08:32
these early ideas two years ago at a TEDx conference.
このアイディアをTEDxで紹介しました
08:35
So what's interesting is, then if you begin to add
さらに加えて 新たな機能たとえば
08:39
new things to it, like autonomy, you get out of the car,
自律性を与えれば 目的地に着いて
08:43
you park at your destination, you pat it on the butt,
駐車するとき 車体を軽くたたけば
08:46
it goes and it parks itself, it charges itself,
自走して駐車し 充電しはじめます
08:49
and you can get something like seven times
現在の車に比べると 同じ面積に
08:51
as many vehicles in a given area as conventional cars,
7倍の数の車を駐車することができます
08:54
and we think this is the future. Actually we could do this today.
未来と思うでしょうが 今日でも可能です
08:59
It's not really a problem.
全く問題ありません
09:02
We can combine shared use and folding and autonomy
シェアと 折りたたみと 自律性の技術を
09:04
and we get something like 28 times the land utilization
組み合わせて用いれば 土地の利用効率は
09:08
with that kind of strategy.
28倍にもなります
09:11
One of our graduate students then says, well,
院生の一人が言いました
09:13
how does a driverless car communicate with pedestrians?
無人車と歩行者の意志疎通はどうしましょう
09:15
You have nobody to make eye contact with.
目を合わせる相手がいません
09:19
You don't know if it's going to run you over.
車にひかれるかもしれません
09:21
So he's developing strategies so the vehicle can
この院生は車が歩行者に話しかける
09:23
communicate with pedestrians, so -- (Laughter)
装置を開発しています (笑)
09:26
So the headlights are eyeballs, the pupils can dilate,
ヘッドライトが眼球 瞳孔も開きます
09:29
we have directional audio, we can throw sound
指向性音声で通行人に
09:32
directly at people.
話しかけることもできます
09:34
What I love about this project is he solved a problem
このプロジェクトのすごさは
09:36
that hasn't, that doesn't exist yet, so -- (Laughter)
将来の問題を解決してしまったことです (笑)
09:39
(Laughter) (Applause)
(笑) (拍手)
09:42
We also think that we can democratize access to bike lanes.
自転車レーンをより公平に利用することも検討中です
09:44
You know, bike lanes are mostly used by young guys
今はもっぱら若い連中
09:48
in stretchy pants, you know. So -- (Laughter)
サイクル・パンツをはいた連中ばかりですね (笑)
09:50
We think we can develop a vehicle that operates
自転車レーン用の新しい乗り物があれば
09:54
on bike lanes, accessible to elderly and disabled,
高齢者 障がい者 スカートの女性
09:57
women in skirts, businesspeople, and address the issues
ビジネスマンが利用でき いろんな問題―
09:59
of energy congestion, mobility, aging and obesity
エネルギー 交通 高齢化 肥満などを
10:04
simultaneously. That's our challenge.
一気に解決しようと奮闘中です
10:06
This is an early design for this little three-wheel,
これは3輪自転車のプロトタイプです
10:09
it's an electronic bike. You have to pedal
電動自転車で 自転車レーンではペダルを
10:11
to operate it in a bike lane, but if you're an older person,
こぐ必要がありますが 高齢の方には
10:14
that's a switch. If you're a healthy person,
スイッチがあります 健康な方ならば
10:18
you might have to work really hard to go fast.
頑張れば速度がでます
10:21
You can dial in 40 calories going into work
出社時には40カロリーにセット
10:23
and 500 going home, when you can take a shower.
シャワーを浴びれる帰宅時には500カロリーにセット
10:25
We hope to have that built this fall.
この秋までには完成させたいと思っています
10:27
Housing is another area where we can really improve.
他に改善できるのは住宅事情です
10:32
Mayor Menino in Boston says lack of affordable housing
ボストン市長メニーノ氏は ボストンにとって
10:35
for young people is one of the biggest problems
最大の問題のひとつは 若者向けの
10:39
the city faces.
住宅不足だと言っています
10:42
Developers say, okay, we'll build little teeny apartments.
業者はちっちゃなアパートを建てると言います
10:43
People say, we don't really want to live in a little teeny
人々は 個性のない小さなアパートを
10:46
conventional apartment.
敬遠します
10:49
So we're saying let's build a standardized chassis,
私たちの提案は シャーシを自動車のように
10:50
much like our car. Let's bring advanced technology
標準化することです そこに先進技術を
10:55
into the apartment, technology-enabled infill,
組み入れてみましょう 革新的な家具調度です
10:58
give people the tools within this open-loft chassis
各自のニーズ 価値観 生活様式に応じた間取りを
11:04
to go through a process of defining what their needs
この枠組みの中で設計します
11:08
and values and activities are, and then
設計図にしたがって カスタマイズされた
11:11
a matching algorithm will match a unique assembly
間仕切りや家具やキャビネットを
11:14
of integrated infill components, furniture, and cabinetry,
取りそろえ 組み合わせていきます
11:17
that are personalized to that individual, and they give them
洗練された対話型アプリのおかげで
11:21
the tools to go through the process and to refine it,
住む人はあたかも
11:25
and it's something like working with an architect,
建築家と共同作業するように
11:28
where the dialogue starts when you give an alternative
さまざまな選択肢を検討しながら
11:30
to a person to react to.
詳細を設計できます
11:34
Now, the most interesting implementation of that for us
この中でも最も興味深いのは
11:37
is when you can begin to have robotic walls, so
ロボット壁を利用することです
11:42
your space can convert from exercise to a workplace,
エクササイズ部屋も仕事部屋に早変わりします
11:45
if you run a virtual company.
仮想会社経営者向けです
11:48
You have guests over, you have two guestrooms
泊まり客があれば
11:49
that are developed.
ゲストルームを作ることができます
11:52
You have a conventional one-bedroom arrangement
必要に応じて通常の1ベッドルームも可能です
11:55
when you need it. Maybe that's most of the time.
おそらくそうしておくのが普通でしょうが
11:59
You have a dinner party. The table folds out
ディナーパーティがしたければ
12:00
to fit 16 people in otherwise a conventional one-bedroom,
変更して16名の客をもてなすこともできます
12:03
or maybe you want a dance studio.
ダンススタジオにだってできますよ
12:07
I mean, architects have been thinking about these ideas
建築家が長年持っていた発想です
12:08
for a long time. What we need to do now,
今我々が挑戦しているのは
12:10
develop things that can scale to those 300 million Chinese
都市での快適な生活を望んでいる
12:14
people that would like to live in the city,
3億人に上る中国人に提供可能な
12:19
and very comfortably.
方法を開発することです
12:22
We think we can make a very small apartment
先ほどの技術を使えば 小さなアパートを
12:24
that functions as if it's twice as big
その2倍の大きさに使うことができます
12:26
by utilizing these strategies. I don't believe in smart homes.
スマートホームはダメです
12:29
That's sort of a bogus concept.
役立たずのアイディアです
12:33
I think you have to build dumb homes
スマートではない家を建てて
12:35
and put smart stuff in it. (Laughter)
スマートなものを入れてください (笑)
12:37
And so we've been working on a chassis of the wall itself.
壁のシャーシを研究してきました
12:40
You know, standardized platform with the motors
標準化された壁にモーターと
12:46
and the battery when it operates, little solenoids
バッテリーを組み込み 低圧電流で動かし
12:49
that will lock it in place and get low-voltage power.
円筒コイルで定位置に固定します
12:51
We think this can all be standardized, and then people
これらは全て標準化でき
12:55
can personalize the stuff that goes into that wall,
使う人がカスタマイズして壁に組み込めます
12:57
and like the car, we can integrate all kinds of sensing
車と同じように 人を感知するあらゆるセンサーを
13:01
to be aware of human activity, so if there's a baby or
組み入れるので 子供や子犬がいても
13:03
a puppy in the way, you won't have a problem. (Laughter)
問題ありません (笑)
13:07
So the developers say, well this is great. Okay,
業者は皆 大賛成です
13:11
so if we have a conventional building,
部屋が2倍に使えるのならば
13:15
we have a fixed envelope, maybe we can put in 14 units.
これまでと同じ建物に
13:17
If they function as if they're twice as big,
14区画の代わりに
13:20
we can get 28 units in.
28区画を取ることができます
13:22
That means twice as much parking, though.
そうすると駐車場も2倍必要になります
13:24
Parking's really expensive. It's about 70,000 dollars
駐車場料金は大変高額です 建屋の中に
13:26
per space to build a conventional parking spot
従来型の駐車場を作ると
13:29
inside a building.
一区画7万ドルもします
13:32
So if you can have folding and autonomy,
車に折りたたみと自律性の機能を持たせると
13:34
you can do that in one seventh of the space.
従来の1/7のスペースしか必要ありません
13:37
That goes down to 10,000 dollars per car,
駐車料金は1台あたり1万ドルで
13:40
just for the cost of the parking.
済むことになります
13:42
You add shared use, and you can even go further.
カーシェアを組み入れると さらに安価になります
13:44
We can also integrate all kinds of advanced technology
この過程に先端技術を組み込めます
13:48
through this process. There's a path to market
独創的な会社には家庭向けテクノロジーの
13:51
for innovative companies to bring technology into the home.
市場を開拓するチャンスにもなります
13:53
In this case, a project we're doing with Siemens,
この例ではシーメンスと共同開発を行い
13:57
we have sensors on all the furniture, all the infill,
家具やすべての調度品にセンサーを取り付けました
14:00
that understands where people are and what they're doing.
人がどこにいて何をしているかがわかります
14:02
Blue light is very efficient, so we have these tunable
青色光のエネルギー効率が良いので
14:04
24-bit LED lighting fixtures.
24 ビットの LED 照明器具を導入しています
14:07
It recognizes where the person is, what they're doing,
人の位置を知り何をしているかを検知し
14:10
fills out the light when necessary to full spectrum white light,
必要に応じて白色光に変わります
14:14
and saves maybe 30, 40 percent in energy consumption,
従来型の最新調光システムに比較して
14:18
we think, over even conventional state-of-the-art
30%から40%の電力を
14:24
lighting systems.
節約できると考えています
14:28
This just shows you the data that comes from the sensors
これは家具に埋め込んだ
14:31
that are embedded in the furniture.
センサーが取得するデータです
14:34
We don't really believe in cameras to do things in homes.
家庭内ではカメラは不適当です
14:36
We think these little wireless sensors are more effective.
これらのワイヤレスセンサーがより効果的です
14:39
We think we can also personalize sunlight.
採光もカスタマイズできます
14:43
That's sort of the ultimate personalization in some ways.
究極のカスタマイズと言えるでしょうね
14:45
So we, we've looked at articulating mirrors of the facade
建物正面の鏡を調整して
14:48
that can throw shafts of sunlight anywhere into the space,
部屋のどこへでも太陽光を導くことができます
14:51
therefore allowing you to shade most of the glass
暑い日には ガラス扉のほとんどに
14:55
on a hot day like today.
ブラインドをかけることもできます
14:57
In this case, she picks up her phone, she can map
ここではスマホで操作し 食事を用意する
14:59
food preparation at the kitchen island to a particular
キッチンへと光を導いています
15:02
location of sunlight. An algorithm will keep it in that location
プログラムによって 食事の準備中
15:07
as long as she's engaged in that activity.
光はその場を照らしつづけます
15:10
This can be combined with LED lighting as well.
これはLED照明と組み合わせることもできます
15:13
We think workplaces should be shared.
仕事場は共有されるべきです
15:18
I mean, this is really the workplace of the future, I think.
これは将来の仕事場の形です
15:20
This is Starbucks, you know. (Laughter)
これはご存じスタバです (笑)
15:22
Maybe a third — And you see everybody has their back
皆壁に背中を向けて
15:24
to the wall and they have food and coffee down the way
食べ物とコーヒーが手前にあります
15:26
and they're in their own little personal bubble.
皆それぞれの個人スペースで仕事をしています
15:29
We need shared spaces for interaction and collaboration.
交流と協働の共有空間も必要ですが
15:32
We're not doing a very good job with that.
まだ成功していません
15:35
At the Cambridge Innovation Center, you can have
ケンブリッジイノベーションセンターでは
15:37
shared desks. I've spent a lot of time in Finland
机を共有しています フィンランドのアアルト大学の
15:40
at the design factory of Aalto University,
デザイン工房で研究しましたが
15:43
where the they have a shared shop and shared Fablab,
そこには共有の作業場とファブラボ
15:46
shared quiet spaces,
休憩室
15:49
electronics spaces,
電子機器実験室
15:50
recreation places.
レクリエーション室があります
15:52
We think ultimately all of this stuff can come together,
最終的にはこれらのものが一つになって
15:55
a new model for mobility, a new model for housing,
新たな移動性 新たな住居 職と住の新たな
15:58
a new model for how we live and work,
モデルができあがり
16:02
a path to market for advanced technologies,
先端技術の市場になると思います
16:04
but in the end the main thing we need to focus on
しかし結局 最も大切なものは人々です
16:07
are people. Cities are all about people.
都市の主人公は人々です
16:09
They're places for people.
都市は人々のためにあります
16:11
There's no reason why we can't dramatically improve
都市の居住性や創造性は
16:13
the livability and creativity of cities like they've done
必ず劇的に向上できます
16:16
in Melbourne with the laneways while
メルボルンではレーンウェイを刷新して
16:19
at the same time dramatically reducing CO2 and energy.
CO2とエネルギーを大幅に削減しました
16:22
It's a global imperative. We have to get this right.
世界的な課題として解決が求められます
16:27
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとう(拍手)
16:30
Translator:Haruo Nishinoh
Reviewer:Akira Kan

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Kent Larson - Architect
Kent Larson designs new technologies that solve the biggest questions facing our cities.

Why you should listen

Kent Larson has been the director of the MIT House_n  research consortium in the School of Architecture and Planning since 1998 and is also the current director of the MIT Media Lab's Changing Places group. Both projects are dedicated to developing technologies that solve contemporary issues in the home, the workplace, and the city. Larson practiced architecture in New York City for 15 years and wrote for several architectural publications and the New York Times. In 2000, his book, Louis I. Kahn: Unbuilt Masterworks, was selected among the Ten Best Books in Architecture by the New York Times Review of Books. His current work has three focusses: responsive urban housing, ubiquitous technologies, and living lab experiments to test his group's designs in practical environments.

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