sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2012

Susan Solomon: The promise of research with stem cells

スーザン・ソロモン: 幹細胞研究の将来

June 28, 2012

スーザン・ソロモンは幹細胞を「私たちの体の修理道具」と呼び、研究室で育てた幹細胞を用いた研究を提唱します。彼女のチームは多能性幹細胞株(iPS細胞株)を育てることで、疾患治療に関する研究を促進し得る試験環境を作り上げました。これは将来的には特定の疾患でなく特定の人を対象としたオーダーメード医療につながります。

Susan Solomon - Stem cell research advocate
Susan Solomon enables support for human stem cell research, aiming to cure major diseases and empower more personalized medicine. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So, embryonic stem cells
胚幹細胞は
00:16
are really incredible cells.
実に驚くべき細胞です
00:19
They are our body's own repair kits,
私たちの体の修理セットであり
00:22
and they're pluripotent, which means they can morph into
分化能を持ちます — つまり
00:25
all of the cells in our bodies.
体のどんな細胞にも変身できるのです
00:28
Soon, we actually will be able to use stem cells
じきに幹細胞を使って
00:30
to replace cells that are damaged or diseased.
損傷したり病気になった細胞を
交換できるようになるでしょう
00:33
But that's not what I want to talk to you about,
でも今日は別の話をします
00:36
because right now there are some really
現在幹細胞の応用研究が進行中で
00:39
extraordinary things that we are doing with stem cells
それにより様々なことが変わります
00:41
that are completely changing
例えば
00:45
the way we look and model disease,
病気を捉えてモデル化する方法も変われば
00:47
our ability to understand why we get sick,
病気になる理由を理解できるようにもなるでしょう
00:50
and even develop drugs.
創薬プロセスも大きく変わるでしょう
00:52
I truly believe that stem cell research is going to allow
幹細胞の研究により
00:55
our children to look at Alzheimer's and diabetes
私たちの子供が大人になる頃には
00:59
and other major diseases the way we view polio today,
アルツハイマーや糖尿病などの病気も
01:03
which is as a preventable disease.
ポリオのように予防可能になると信じています
01:08
So here we have this incredible field, which has
そんなわけでこの分野は
01:11
enormous hope for humanity,
人類にとって大きな希望なのです
01:14
but much like IVF over 35 years ago,
しかし 35年以上 時を遡り
ルイーズが健康に生まれてくるまでの
01:19
until the birth of a healthy baby, Louise,
体外受精を鑑みると分かるように
01:22
this field has been under siege politically and financially.
この分野は政治的・財政的に包囲網に囲まれています
01:24
Critical research is being challenged instead of supported,
重要な研究が 支援されるどころか問題視されているので
01:30
and we saw that it was really essential to have
この研究に干渉されない
01:34
private safe haven laboratories where this work
民間の研究所を設立することが
01:38
could be advanced without interference.
不可欠だと考えました
01:42
And so, in 2005,
そこで2005年に
01:45
we started the New York Stem Cell Foundation Laboratory
ニューヨーク幹細胞財団研究所を設立し
01:47
so that we would have a small organization that could
小さな組織ではありますが この研究を進めたり
01:50
do this work and support it.
支援したりできるようにしました
01:53
What we saw very quickly is the world of both medical
間もなくして気付きましたが
01:57
research, but also developing drugs and treatments,
医学だけでなく薬学や治療の世界は
02:00
is dominated by, as you would expect, large organizations,
みなさんの想像通り大きな組織に支配されていますが
02:03
but in a new field, sometimes large organizations
新しい分野では大きな組織は
02:07
really have trouble getting out of their own way,
自分たちの方法から抜け出すのに苦労し
02:10
and sometimes they can't ask the right questions,
時には適切な質問さえできなくなるのです
02:12
and there is an enormous gap that's just gotten larger
そのためアカデミックな研究と
02:15
between academic research on the one hand
薬や治療を提供する役目を負った
02:18
and pharmaceutical companies and biotechs
製薬企業やバイオテクノロジー企業の間には
02:21
that are responsible for delivering all of our drugs
大きなギャップが生じています
02:24
and many of our treatments, and so we knew that
そこで医学療法の発展を促進するために
02:27
to really accelerate cures and therapies, we were going
我々はこの問題を
02:30
to have to address this with two things:
2つのものにより解決する必要があります
02:34
new technologies and also a new research model.
新しい技術 そして新しい研究モデルです
02:36
Because if you don't close that gap, you really are
そのギャップを埋めることができなければ
進歩はありえません
02:40
exactly where we are today.
これこそが私がお伝えしたいことです
02:43
And that's what I want to focus on.
これこそが私がお伝えしたいことです
02:45
We've spent the last couple of years pondering this,
我々はここ数年この問題について考え
02:47
making a list of the different things that we had to do,
するべきことのリストを作りました
02:50
and so we developed a new technology,
また新しい技術の開発も行いました
ソフトウェアとハードウェアなんですが
02:53
It's software and hardware,
また新しい技術の開発も行いました
ソフトウェアとハードウェアなんですが
02:55
that actually can generate thousands and thousands of
遺伝子的に多様な何千何万もの
02:57
genetically diverse stem cell lines to create
幹細胞株群を生成します
03:00
a global array, essentially avatars of ourselves.
本質的には我々の分身たちなのです
03:03
And we did this because we think that it's actually going
こんな考えから この技術を開発しました
03:07
to allow us to realize the potential, the promise,
この技術はヒトゲノム解読の
03:10
of all of the sequencing of the human genome,
持てる力を引き出して活用し
03:14
but it's going to allow us, in doing that,
幹細胞株群を生成することで
03:17
to actually do clinical trials in a dish with human cells,
ヒトの細胞を用いてシャーレで
臨床試験を行えるようになります
03:19
not animal cells, to generate drugs and treatments
動物の細胞ではなくです 
そうすることで
03:24
that are much more effective, much safer,
創薬と医療はより効率的に より安全に
03:29
much faster, and at a much lower cost.
より迅速に そしてより低コストになります
03:32
So let me put that in perspective for you
これを理解するための
03:35
and give you some context.
背景をご説明しましょう
03:37
This is an extremely new field.
この分野は非常に新しい分野です
03:39
In 1998, human embryonic stem cells
1998年 ヒト胚幹細胞が初めて発見され
03:44
were first identified, and just nine years later,
そのわずか9年後には
03:47
a group of scientists in Japan were able to take skin cells
日本の科学者グループが 抽出した皮膚の細胞を
03:50
and reprogram them with very powerful viruses
非常に強力なウィルスを用いて
再プログラム化することに成功しました
03:54
to create a kind of pluripotent stem cell
その結果できあがったのが
03:58
called an induced pluripotent stem cell,
胚幹細胞の一種である
04:02
or what we refer to as an IPS cell.
人工多能性幹細胞 通称iPS細胞です
04:04
This was really an extraordinary advance, because
これは非常に大きな進歩でした 
なぜなら
04:07
although these cells are not human embryonic stem cells,
これらの細胞は 現在も標準的に用いられる
04:10
which still remain the gold standard,
ヒト胚幹細胞ではないにもかかわらず
04:13
they are terrific to use for modeling disease
疾患のモデル化
04:14
and potentially for drug discovery.
そして将来的には創薬に有用だからです
04:18
So a few months later, in 2008, one of our scientists
その数ヶ月後 2008年に我々の科学者の一人が
04:21
built on that research. He took skin biopsies,
その研究を発展させました
彼は皮膚の細胞生検試料を取り出しました
04:24
this time from people who had a disease,
今度はALSと呼ばれる
04:27
ALS, or as you call it in the U.K., motor neuron disease.
運動神経細胞の病気の患者からです
04:29
He turned them into the IPS cells
その試料から先ほどお話しした iPS細胞を作りました
04:32
that I've just told you about, and then he turned those
その試料から先ほどお話しした iPS細胞を作りました
04:34
IPS cells into the motor neurons that actually
そのiPS細胞から作った運動神経は病気で死んでいきました
04:36
were dying in the disease.
そのiPS細胞から作った運動神経は病気で死んでいきました
04:39
So basically what he did was to take a healthy cell
つまり彼がしたのは健康な細胞を
04:40
and turn it into a sick cell,
病気にかかった細胞に変え
04:43
and he recapitulated the disease over and over again
シャーレの中で何度も繰り返し発病させたのです
04:45
in the dish, and this was extraordinary,
これは驚くべきことです
04:49
because it was the first time that we had a model
生きた患者の細胞から疾患モデルを得るのは
04:52
of a disease from a living patient in living human cells.
これが初めてだったんですから
04:54
And as he watched the disease unfold, he was able
病気が進行するのを観察するにつれ
04:58
to discover that actually the motor neurons were dying
ALSでは運動神経が
05:02
in the disease in a different way than the field
それまで考えられていたのとは違う形で
05:05
had previously thought. There was another kind of cell
死んでいくことを発見しました
05:07
that actually was sending out a toxin
毒素を送り出している細胞が別に存在し
05:09
and contributing to the death of these motor neurons,
運動神経の死を引き起こしていたのです
05:11
and you simply couldn't see it
ヒトのモデルが無ければわからなかったことです
05:14
until you had the human model.
ヒトのモデルが無ければわからなかったことです
05:15
So you could really say that
ここで言えるのは
05:17
researchers trying to understand the cause of disease
病気の原因を突き止めようとする研究者が
05:20
without being able to have human stem cell models
ヒト幹細胞モデルを使うことができないのは
05:24
were much like investigators trying to figure out
飛行機事故の調査委員が
05:28
what had gone terribly wrong in a plane crash
事故の原因究明に
05:31
without having a black box, or a flight recorder.
ブラックボックス つまりフライトレコーダーを
使うことができないようなものです
05:34
They could hypothesize about what had gone wrong,
どこがおかしかったのか仮説を立てるでしょうが
05:38
but they really had no way of knowing what led
実際に何が悲惨な事故を招いたのかを
05:40
to the terrible events.
知る術はありません
05:44
And stem cells really have given us the black box
幹細胞は病気に対する一連の記録を与えてくれます
05:46
for diseases, and it's an unprecedented window.
まるで前例のない窓です
05:50
It really is extraordinary, because you can recapitulate
これは大変素晴らしいことで
05:54
many, many diseases in a dish, you can see
シャーレ上で実に多くの病気を再現することができ
05:57
what begins to go wrong in the cellular conversation
対話的に細胞内で何がおかしくなるのか分かります
06:00
well before you would ever see
患者に病気の兆しが
06:04
symptoms appear in a patient.
見られる前にです
06:06
And this opens up the ability,
これにより
06:09
which hopefully will become something that
きっと近い将来には
06:11
is routine in the near term,
ヒト細胞を薬の治験に使うことが
06:14
of using human cells to test for drugs.
一般的になるでしょう
06:17
Right now, the way we test for drugs is pretty problematic.
現行の薬の治験法は問題だらけです
06:21
To bring a successful drug to market, it takes, on average,
薬が市場に出回るまでに平均で
06:26
13 years — that's one drug —
13年かかります — 1つの薬に対してです
06:30
with a sunk cost of 4 billion dollars,
また40億ドルもの埋没費用も発生します
06:32
and only one percent of the drugs that start down that road
開発に着手した薬のうち たった1パーセントしか
06:35
are actually going to get there.
市場にはたどり着きません
06:40
You can't imagine other businesses
他の分野でこんな数字が出されたら
06:42
that you would think of going into
だれも手を付けようとしないでしょう
06:45
that have these kind of numbers.
だれも手を付けようとしないでしょう
06:46
It's a terrible business model.
これはひどいビジネスモデルですが
06:48
But it is really a worse social model because of
それ以上に社会モデルとしても 皆に多大な
06:50
what's involved and the cost to all of us.
負担を強いるものとなっています
06:54
So the way we develop drugs now
現在のところ創薬は
効きそうな化合物を試すことで進められます
06:57
is by testing promising compounds on --
ヒト細胞を用いた疾患モデルはありませんでした
07:01
We didn't have disease modeling with human cells,
ヒト細胞を用いた疾患モデルはありませんでした
07:04
so we'd been testing them on cells of mice
だからマウスなどの生物の細胞や
07:06
or other creatures or cells that we engineer,
改変した細胞でテストしていました
07:09
but they don't have the characteristics of the diseases
しかしそれらの細胞は必ずしも治療対象とする
07:13
that we're actually trying to cure.
病気の特性を持っているわけではありません
07:16
You know, we're not mice, and you can't go into
我々はマウスではありませんので
07:18
a living person with an illness
生きた患者から
07:21
and just pull out a few brain cells or cardiac cells
脳細胞や心臓の細胞を取り出して
07:24
and then start fooling around in a lab to test
あれこれ試していくことも
07:27
for, you know, a promising drug.
単なる候補薬ではできません
07:29
But what you can do with human stem cells, now,
しかしヒト幹細胞があれば
07:32
is actually create avatars, and you can create the cells,
分身をつくったり細胞をつくったりできます
07:36
whether it's the live motor neurons
生きた運動神経であろうと
07:40
or the beating cardiac cells or liver cells
拍動する心細胞や肝細胞であろうと
07:42
or other kinds of cells, and you can test for drugs,
他のどんな細胞であろうと
07:45
promising compounds, on the actual cells
薬 つまり効き目のありそうな化合物を
07:49
that you're trying to affect, and this is now,
実際にターゲットとする細胞でテストできるのです
07:53
and it's absolutely extraordinary,
これは実に素晴らしいことで
07:56
and you're going to know at the beginning,
薬効試験や治験の
07:59
the very early stages of doing your assay development
極めて早い段階で
08:02
and your testing, you're not going to have to wait 13 years
実は効かないとか毒性があるとか 分かってしまうのです
08:06
until you've brought a drug to market, only to find out
薬が市場に出回るまでの
08:09
that actually it doesn't work, or even worse, harms people.
13年もの期間を待つ必要はありません
08:13
But it isn't really enough just to look at
しかしごく少数の人の細胞を見るだけでは
08:18
the cells from a few people or a small group of people,
十分ではありません 一歩離れて見てみましょう
08:22
because we have to step back.
十分ではありません 一歩離れて見てみましょう
08:26
We've got to look at the big picture.
大きな枠組みで見なければなりません
08:27
Look around this room. We are all different,
この部屋を見回してみてください
私たちはみんな違っています
08:29
and a disease that I might have,
病気に関してもそうです
08:32
if I had Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease,
もし私がアルツハイマー病や
パーキンソン病にかかったら
08:35
it probably would affect me differently than if
みなさんがその病気にかかったときとは
異なる影響が出るでしょう
08:38
one of you had that disease,
みなさんがその病気にかかったときとは
異なる影響が出るでしょう
08:42
and if we both had Parkinson's disease,
二人がパーキンソン病にかかって
08:44
and we took the same medication,
同じ薬を投与したとしても
08:48
but we had different genetic makeup,
遺伝子の構成が違っているので
08:50
we probably would have a different result,
異なる結果が出るでしょう
08:53
and it could well be that a drug that worked wonderfully
私に対しては驚くほど効果を発揮した薬が
08:55
for me was actually ineffective for you,
あなたには効かないということも十分あり得ます
08:59
and similarly, it could be that a drug that is harmful for you
同様にあなたに対しては有害だった薬が
09:02
is safe for me, and, you know, this seems totally obvious,
私にとっては安全ということも考えられます
明白なことだと思われるでしょうが
09:07
but unfortunately it is not the way
残念なことに製薬業界が新薬を開発する際には
09:11
that the pharmaceutical industry has been developing drugs
そのことは考慮されてきませんでした
09:14
because, until now, it hasn't had the tools.
今まではそのための道具が無かったのですから
09:17
And so we need to move away
従来のフリーサイズ一辺倒のモデルから
09:21
from this one-size-fits-all model.
離れる必要があります
09:24
The way we've been developing drugs is essentially
これまでの創薬プロセスは本質的には
09:27
like going into a shoe store,
こうでした
09:30
no one asks you what size you are, or
ダンスやハイキングに行くというのに
09:31
if you're going dancing or hiking.
靴屋がサイズを訊かないのです
09:33
They just say, "Well, you have feet, here are your shoes."
「足にはこの靴をどうぞ」と言うだけです
09:36
It doesn't work with shoes, and our bodies are
靴を買うのにそんなことではいけませんし 
ましてや
09:38
many times more complicated than just our feet.
我々の体は単なる足の何倍も複雑にできているので
09:42
So we really have to change this.
現状を変える必要があります
09:46
There was a very sad example of this in the last decade.
過去10年の間に悲しい事例がありました
09:48
There's a wonderful drug, and a class of drugs actually,
素晴らしく効き目のある種の薬がありました
09:53
but the particular drug was Vioxx, and
そのうちの1つがVioxxです
09:56
for people who were suffering from severe arthritis pain,
関節炎に苦しむ人々にとっては
09:59
the drug was an absolute lifesaver,
確かにVioxxは救世主でしたが
10:03
but unfortunately, for another subset of those people,
残念なことに別の集団に対しては
10:06
they suffered pretty severe heart side effects,
心臓に深刻な副作用をもたらしました
10:11
and for a subset of those people, the side effects were
さらに一部の人に対しては
副作用の影響の方があまりにも大きく
10:16
so severe, the cardiac side effects, that they were fatal.
心細胞に致命的な影響を及ぼしました
10:19
But imagine a different scenario,
しかし別のシナリオを考えてみてください
10:23
where we could have had an array, a genetically diverse array,
遺伝子的に多様な心細胞のアレイを手に入れ
10:27
of cardiac cells, and we could have actually tested
実際にVioxxを
10:31
that drug, Vioxx, in petri dishes, and figured out,
シャーレ上でテストすることができたらどうでしょう
10:35
well, okay, people with this genetic type are going to have
この遺伝子型をもつ人は
心臓への副作用が出ると分かります
10:40
cardiac side effects, people with these genetic subgroups
またこのような遺伝子型の2万5千人には
10:44
or genetic shoes sizes, about 25,000 of them,
—靴のサイズのようなものですね—
10:49
are not going to have any problems.
全く問題ないことが あらかじめ分かるのです
10:54
The people for whom it was a lifesaver
Vioxxで救われる人たちは
安心してのみ続けられたでしょう
10:57
could have still taken their medicine.
Vioxxで救われる人たちは
安心してのみ続けられたでしょう
10:59
The people for whom it was a disaster, or fatal,
逆にVioxxが致命的な事態を引き起こす人たちは
11:01
would never have been given it, and
Vioxxを投与されることもなく
11:05
you can imagine a very different outcome for the company,
Vioxx を回収しなければならなかった製薬会社の
11:07
who had to withdraw the drug.
迎える結末も違ったことでしょう
11:10
So that is terrific,
この事件は痛ましく
11:13
and we thought, all right,
この問題を解決しようとする中で
11:15
as we're trying to solve this problem,
改めて考えると
11:17
clearly we have to think about genetics,
遺伝子のことも
11:20
we have to think about human testing,
人体実験のことも考えなければなりませんが
もっと根本的な問題も存在します
11:22
but there's a fundamental problem,
人体実験のことも考えなければなりませんが
もっと根本的な問題も存在します
11:25
because right now, stem cell lines,
現在のところ幹細胞株は
11:27
as extraordinary as they are,
非常に素晴らしいものですが
11:29
and lines are just groups of cells,
株は細胞の集団であるため
11:31
they are made by hand, one at a time,
一度に一株ずつ手作業で作らねばならず
11:33
and it takes a couple of months.
その作業に数ヶ月かかってしまいます
11:37
This is not scalable, and also when you do things by hand,
これでは大量生産が不可能です
手作業で幹細胞株をつくるときには
11:39
even in the best laboratories,
最高の設備を備えた研究所でさえも
11:44
you have variations in techniques,
手技にばらつきがあります
11:45
and you need to know, if you're making a drug,
例えば薬を作っているのなら
11:48
that the Aspirin you're going to take out of the bottle
月曜日に瓶から取り出したアスピリンは
11:52
on Monday is the same as the Aspirin
水曜日に取り出すアスピリンと
11:54
that's going to come out of the bottle on Wednesday.
同じものと分かっている必要があります
11:56
So we looked at this, and we thought, okay,
こうして考えていくと
11:58
artisanal is wonderful in, you know, your clothing
職人技は服飾や
12:02
and your bread and crafts, but
パンや工芸に関しては素晴らしいのですが
12:05
artisanal really isn't going to work in stem cells,
幹細胞に関しては 向いていません
12:08
so we have to deal with this.
そこでこの問題を解決しなければなりません
12:11
But even with that, there still was another big hurdle,
それができたとしても 
また別の大きなハードルが存在し
12:13
and that actually brings us back to
ヒトゲノムのマッピングから
12:17
the mapping of the human genome, because
始めなければなりません
12:21
we're all different.
我々はみな異なっているからです
12:23
We know from the sequencing of the human genome
ヒトゲノム配列解読により
12:26
that it's shown us all of the A's, C's, G's and T's
我々の遺伝子を構成する全ての
12:29
that make up our genetic code,
ACGT は示されていますが
12:31
but that code, by itself, our DNA,
しかしコードだけの DNA は
12:34
is like looking at the ones and zeroes of the computer code
1と0からなるコンピューターコードを
12:38
without having a computer that can read it.
解読用コンピュータ無しで読んでいるようなものです
12:43
It's like having an app without having a smartphone.
スマートフォンを持ってないのに
アプリだけ持っているようなもの
12:45
We needed to have a way of bringing the biology
そこで生物学が登場して
12:49
to that incredible data,
有用なデータへ変える必要があります
12:53
and the way to do that was to find
その方法は
12:55
a stand-in, a biological stand-in,
生物の代役を用意し
12:58
that could contain all of the genetic information,
遺伝情報を全て詰め込み
13:01
but have it be arrayed in such a way
解読可能なように
13:05
as it could be read together
アレイに並べ
13:07
and actually create this incredible avatar.
分身を作ってみることです
13:10
We need to have stem cells from all the genetic sub-types
あらゆる亜型からつくった幹細胞で
13:13
that represent who we are.
私たちがどのようなものかを表現することが
必要となります
13:17
So this is what we've built.
これが私たちのつくったものです
13:20
It's an automated robotic technology.
自動化ロボット技術です
13:23
It has the capacity to produce thousands and thousands
何千何万もの幹細胞株を生産することができ
13:26
of stem cell lines. It's genetically arrayed.
それらの株は遺伝情報に応じてアレイ状に並べられます
13:29
It has massively parallel processing capability,
並列処理能力も優れており
13:33
and it's going to change the way drugs are discovered,
創薬プロセスを変えることが期待されます
13:37
we hope, and I think eventually what's going to happen
そのうち起こるだろうと私が思うことは
13:40
is that we're going to want to re-screen drugs,
このようなアレイ上で薬を
13:44
on arrays like this, that already exist,
再スクリーニングすることです
13:46
all of the drugs that currently exist,
今存在する全ての薬をです
13:48
and in the future, you're going to be taking drugs
将来の薬や治療法は
13:50
and treatments that have been tested for side effects
事前に副作用を精査されていることでしょう
13:53
on all of the relevant cells,
関連のある細胞全てで
13:56
on brain cells and heart cells and liver cells.
脳細胞や心細胞 肝細胞でもです
13:58
It really has brought us to the threshold
この技術によりオーダーメード医療は
14:02
of personalized medicine.
目の前まで近づいています
14:05
It's here now, and in our family,
私の家族に関して言えば
14:07
my son has type 1 diabetes,
息子がI型糖尿病にかかっており
14:12
which is still an incurable disease,
現在も完治は不可能です
14:14
and I lost my parents to heart disease and cancer,
両親も心臓病とガンで亡くしました
14:17
but I think that my story probably sounds familiar to you,
どこかで聞いた話のようだ
と思われるかもしれません
14:21
because probably a version of it is your story.
皆さんも似たような経験をお持ちでしょうから
14:24
At some point in our lives, all of us,
人生のどこかで誰もが 自分や愛する人たちが
14:29
or people we care about, become patients,
病気の患者となります
14:32
and that's why I think that stem cell research
だからこそ幹細胞研究は
14:35
is incredibly important for all of us.
我々全員にとってとても重要です
14:38
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございました
14:41
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:45
Translator:Tomoshige Ohno
Reviewer:Natsuhiko Mizutani

sponsored links

Susan Solomon - Stem cell research advocate
Susan Solomon enables support for human stem cell research, aiming to cure major diseases and empower more personalized medicine.

Why you should listen

Susan Solomon’s health care advocacy stems from personal medical trials—namely, her son’s Type 1 diabetes and her mother’s fatal cancer. Following a successful career as a lawyer and business entrepreneur, Solomon, frustrated by the slow pace of medical research, was inspired to use those skills to follow another passion: accelerating medical research with real-world results as a social entrepreneur. And through her own research and conversations with medical experts, she decided that stem cells (cells that have the ability to morph into any other kind of cell) had the greatest potential to impact peoples’ health.

In 2005, Solomon founded the New York Stem Cell Foundation, now one of the largest nonprofit research institutions and laboratories in this field in the world. The NYSCF Research Institute conducts all facets of stem cell research from growing the cells to drug discovery.

At TEDGlobal 2012, Solomon announced the NYSCF Global Stem Cell Array, the new technology to create thousands of stem cell avatars and genetically array them to functionalize the data from the human genome to revolutionize the way we develop cures and treatments so they are better, safer, less expensive and happen much more quickly.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.