19:47
TEDGlobal 2012

Rachel Botsman: The currency of the new economy is trust

レイチェル・ボッツマン「新しい経済の通貨:信頼」

Filmed:

「コラボ消費」が最近 爆発的な広がりを見せています。ウェブを通じて、車、住居、スキルまでもが共有されています。レイチェル・ボッツマンは、AirbnbやTaskrabbitのようなシステムを可能にする通貨を探索し、信頼、影響力などの「評価資本」が 新しい通貨であると説明します。

- Trust researcher
Rachel Botsman is a recognized expert on how collaboration and trust enabled by digital technologies will change the way we live, work, bank and consume. Full bio

So if someone asked you
もし誰かから―
00:16
for the three words that would sum up
あなたの周りからの評価を
3つの言葉にまとめてと
00:17
your reputation, what would you say?
言われたら
あなたは何と答えますか?
00:20
How would people describe your judgment,
さまざまな状況での
あなたの判断や行動 知識は
00:24
your knowledge, your behaviors, in different situations?
どのように評価されるでしょうか
00:27
Today I'd like to explore with you
今日は皆さんと一緒に
00:30
why the answer to this question
この質問の答えがなぜ
00:33
will become profoundly important
今後 大変重要なものとなるのか
考えていきます
00:34
in an age where reputation will be your most valuable asset.
これからは 世評が最も貴重な
資産となる時代です
00:36
I'd like to start by introducing you to someone
まずはある人物を紹介します
00:41
whose life has been changed by a marketplace
この人物は信頼で成り立っている
市場によって
00:44
fueled by reputation.
人生が変わりました
00:47
Sebastian Sandys has been a bed and breakfast host
セバスチャンは
2008年からAirbnb で
00:49
on Airbnb since 2008.
朝食付きの宿を提供しています
00:52
I caught up with him recently, where, over the course
最近 彼に会う機会がありました
00:55
of several cups of tea, he told me how
一緒にお茶を飲みながら
彼は世界中からやってくる
00:58
hosting guests from all over the world
宿泊客が 人生を豊かにしてくれたという
01:01
has enriched his life.
話をしてくれました
01:03
More than 50 people have come to stay in the 18th-century
彼は18世紀に建てられた
番人小屋に住んでいます
01:05
watchhouse he lives in with his cat, Squeak.
これまでに50人以上が
彼の家に泊まりました
01:08
Now, I mention Squeak because Sebastian's first guest
実は この家にはスクィークという
猫がいるのですが
01:11
happened to see a rather large mouse run across the kitchen,
一番最初の宿泊客が
台所で大きなネズミと遭遇し
01:15
and she promised that she would refrain from leaving
猫を飼えばレビューに悪いことは書かないと
01:19
a bad review on one condition: he got a cat.
約束したため
宿の評価を守るために
01:22
And so Sebastian bought Squeak to protect his reputation.
スクィークを飼うことになったそうです
01:25
Now, as many of you know, Airbnb is a peer-to-peer
ご存じのように AirbnbはP2Pのサービスで
01:29
marketplace that matches people who have space to rent
空きスペースを貸したい人と
01:33
with people who are looking for a place to stay
宿泊場所を探している人を
つなぐサイトです
01:37
in over 192 countries.
世界192カ国に利用者がいます
01:39
The places being rented out are things that you might
貸すスペースというと
皆さんは
01:42
expect, like spare rooms and holiday homes,
空き部屋や別荘のようなものを
01:45
but part of the magic is the unique places
想像するしれませんが
01:48
that you can now access: treehouses, teepees,
中にはツリーハウスやテント小屋
01:50
airplane hangars, igloos.
飛行機の格納庫に
イグルーまであります
01:54
If you don't like the hotel, there's a castle down the road
もし普通のホテルが嫌なら
近くに1泊5千ドルで
01:56
that you can rent for 5,000 dollars a night.
泊まれるお城まであるんです
02:00
It's a fantastic example of how technology
今まで市場が無かったところに
02:02
is creating a market
テクノロジーが市場を生み出した
02:06
for things that never had a marketplace before.
好例といえます
02:08
Now let me show you these heat maps of Paris
こちらはパリ市内のヒートマップです
02:10
to see how insanely fast it's growing.
異常な速さで
ホストの宿が増えています
02:13
This image here is from 2008.
これは2008年の図です
02:16
The pink dots represent host properties.
ピンク色の点が ホストの宿を表します
02:18
Even four years ago, letting strangers stay in your home
わずか4年前は
見ず知らずの人を家に泊めるのは
02:22
seemed like a crazy idea.
狂ったアイデアのように思われました
02:26
Now the same view in 2010.
2010 年の同じ地域の図です
02:29
And now, 2012.
そしてこれが2012年です
02:31
There is an Airbnb host on almost every main street in Paris.
ほぼ全ての大通りに
Airbnbのホスト宿があります
02:34
Now, what's happening here is people are realizing
この図からわかるのは
02:39
the power of technology to unlock the idling capacity
テクノロジーの力で
特技から空間や所有物にいたる
02:43
and value of all kinds of assets,
あらゆる資産の価値を
02:48
from skills to spaces to material possessions,
存分に発揮させられるように
なったことに
02:51
in ways and on a scale never possible before.
人々が気づき始めたのです
02:54
It's an economy and culture called collaborative consumption,
これが「コラボ消費」です
02:58
and, through it, people like Sebastian
それを利用して
セバスチャンのような人が
03:01
are becoming micro-entrepreneurs.
マイクロ起業家になっています
03:04
They're empowered to make money and save money
彼らは既存の資産からお金を稼ぎ
03:06
from their existing assets.
またお金を節約しているのです
03:08
But the real magic and the secret source behind
しかし Airbnb のような
03:11
collaborative consumption marketplaces like Airbnb
コラボ消費を可能にするのは
03:14
isn't the inventory or the money.
資産でもお金でもありません
03:16
It's using the power of technology to build trust
テクノロジーの力で
見ず知らずの人同士が
03:19
between strangers.
信頼を構築することです
03:23
This side of Airbnb really hit home to Sebastian last summer
2011年のロンドン暴動中に
セバスチャンはこのことを
03:24
during the London riots.
実感しました
03:28
He woke up around 9, and he checked his email
9時に起床して
メールをチェックすると
03:29
and he saw a bunch of messages all asking him
彼の安否を気遣う大量のメールが
03:32
if he was okay.
届いていました
03:35
Former guests from around the world had seen that
彼の家に以前宿泊した
世界中のゲストが
03:36
the riots were happening just down the street, and wanted
すぐ近くで
暴動が起きていると知り
03:38
to check if he needed anything.
心配してメールをくれたのでした
03:41
Sebastian actually said to me, he said, "Thirteen former guests
セバスチャンによれば
「ゲスト13人から連絡があった
03:43
contacted me before my own mother rang." (Laughter)
母親からの電話よりも 早かった」そうです(笑)
03:46
Now, this little anecdote gets to the heart of why
この逸話は なぜ私がコラボ消費を
愛しているのか
03:50
I'm really passionate about collaborative consumption,
なぜ本を執筆するに飽き足らず
03:55
and why, after I finished my book, I decided
この動きを世界に広めようとしているのか
03:57
I'm going to try and spread this into a global movement.
その理由をずばり示しています
04:00
Because at its core, it's about empowerment.
その理由とは エンパワメントです
04:04
It's about empowering people to make meaningful connections,
空虚な取引ではなく
人と人との関係に基づいた
04:07
connections that are enabling us to rediscover
AirbnbやKickstarter
Etsyのような市場を通じて
04:11
a humanness that we've lost somewhere along the way,
私たちがどこかで
失ってしまった人間らしさを
04:14
by engaging in marketplaces like Airbnb, like Kickstarter,
また見つけられるように
04:18
like Etsy, that are built on personal relationships
有意義な人間同士の
関係を作れるように
04:22
versus empty transactions.
人びとを力づけるものです
04:25
Now the irony is that these ideas are actually taking us back
皮肉なことに
これらのアイデアは私たちを
04:28
to old market principles and collaborative behaviors
おなじみの市場原理と
人間に固有の協調性に
04:32
that are hard-wired in all of us.
立ち返らせます
04:35
They're just being reinvented in ways that are relevant
昔からある考え方を新たな時代に
04:37
for the Facebook age.
合わせただけなのです
04:39
We're literally beginning to realize that we have wired
私たちの世界は 文字通り
繋がり始めています
04:41
our world to share, swap, rent, barter or trade
共有や交換 賃貸に物々交換
04:45
just about anything. We're sharing our cars on WhipCar,
どんな商品でも可能です
04:49
our bikes on Spinlister, our offices on Loosecubes,
WhipCar では車を
Spinlisterでは自転車を
04:53
our gardens on Landshare. We're lending and borrowing
Loosecubesではオフィスを
Landshareでは庭を共有できます
04:56
money from strangers on Zopa and Lending Club.
Zopa やLending Clubで
他人とのお金の貸し借りも可能です
04:59
We are trading lessons on everything from sushi-making
寿司作りからプログラミングまで
あらゆる講座を
05:02
to coding on Skillshare,
Skillshareで受けることができます
05:04
and we're even sharing our pets on DogVacay.
DogVacayを使えば
ペットまでも共有できます
05:06
Now welcome to the wonderful world of collaborative consumption
素晴らしいコラボ消費の世界にようこそ
05:10
that's enabling us to match wants with haves
ここでは自分が持っているものと
欲しいものを
05:14
in more democratic ways.
民主的に交換できます
05:17
Now, collaborative consumption is creating the start
コラボ消費は需要と供給の概念を
05:19
of a transformation in the way we think about supply and demand,
変革しようとしているのです
05:23
but it's also a part of a massive value shift underway,
一方で これは現在進行中の
大きな価値観の変化の一貫でもあります
05:26
where instead of consuming to keep up with the Joneses,
その変化とは 周りの人に合わせるために
消費するのではなく
05:30
people are consuming to get to know the Joneses.
周りの人と親しくなるために消費する
という行動です
05:33
But the key reason why it's taking off now so fast
しかし これほどコラボ消費が
進行している主な理由は
05:37
is because every new advancement of technology
テクノロジーの進歩のおかげで
05:41
increases the efficiency and the social glue of trust
効率性が高まり
信頼が簡単に築けるため
05:44
to make sharing easier and easier.
シェアすることが 容易になったのです
05:48
Now, I've looked at thousands of these marketplaces,
このような市場 どれを見ても
05:52
and trust and efficiency are always the critical ingredients.
信用と効率は
常に重要な役割を担っています
05:55
Let me give you an example.
例えば この方を見てみましょう
05:59
Meet 46-year-old Chris Mok, who has, I bet,
46歳のクリスは
この会場の皆さんがうらやむような
06:01
the best job title here of SuperRabbit.
「SuperRabbit 」という肩書きを持っています
06:06
Now, four years ago, Chris lost his job, unfortunately,
4年前 クリスは
美術品のバイヤーの職を
06:09
as an art buyer at Macy's, and like so many people,
失ってしまいました
06:14
he struggled to find a new one during the recession.
不況のなか新しい仕事を見つけるのに―
06:17
And then he happened to stumble across a post about
苦労していた頃
TaskRabbitに関する投稿に
06:20
TaskRabbit.
偶然出会ったのでした
06:23
Now, the story behind TaskRabbit starts like so many
さてこのTaskRabbit ですが
設立には こんな経緯があります
06:25
great stories with a very cute dog by the name of Kobe.
この話には コービーという名の
かわいい犬が登場します
06:28
Now what happened was, in February 2008,
2008 年 2 月のことでした
06:32
Leah and her husband were waiting for a cab to take them
リアと夫のケビンは
食事に行くため 家を出ようとすると
06:36
out for dinner, when Kobe came trotting up to them
コービーがよだれだらけの顔で
06:38
and he was salivating with saliva.
駆け寄ってきました
06:42
They realized they'd run out of dog food.
二人はドッグフードが
切れていたことに気づきました
06:44
Kevin had to cancel the cab and trudge out in the snow.
そこで外食はキャンセルし
雪の中 買い物に行くはめになりました
06:47
Now, later that evening, the two self-confessed tech geeks
その夜
自称ハイテクオタクの2人は
06:50
starting talking about how cool it would be if some kind of
もしeBayのようなサイトで
誰かに雑用を頼めたら
06:53
eBay for errands existed.
どんなに良いかと話していました
06:57
Six months later, Leah quit her job,
6か月後 リアは仕事を辞め
06:59
and TaskRabbit was born.
TaskRabbit が誕生しました
07:02
At the time, she didn't realize that she was actually hitting
当時の彼女には
思いもよりませんでしたが
07:04
on a bigger idea she later called service networking.
このアイデアは後に
サービス・ネットワークというものに成長します
07:08
It's essentially about how we use our online relationships
これは私たちが現実の世界で
物事を成し遂げるために
07:13
to get things done in the real world.
ネット上の関係を
いかに活用するかということです
07:16
Now the way TaskRabbit works is, people outsource
TaskRabbit の仕組みは
委託したい用事に
07:20
the tasks that they want doing, name the price
希望価格をつけ
ホームページに掲載すると
07:22
they're willing to pay, and then vetted Rabbits
審査にパスした登録者がそれを見て
07:25
bid to run the errand.
名乗りを挙げるという流れです
07:28
Yes, there's actually a four-stage, rigorous interview process
登録者になるには
厳しい採用プロセスが設けられています
07:29
that's designed to find the people that would make
素晴らしい人材を採用し
07:34
great personal assistants and weed out the dodgy Rabbits.
信用できない人を不採用とするためです
07:35
Now, there's over 4,000 Rabbits across the United States
現在アメリカ合衆国全体で
4,000以上の登録者がいます
07:39
and 5,000 more on the waiting list.
さらに5,000 人以上が
補欠リストに載っています
07:44
Now the tasks being posted are things that you might
ご推察の通り 掲載されている用事は
07:47
expect, like help with household chores
家事や―
07:50
or doing some supermarket runs.
スーパーへの買出しなどです
07:53
I actually learned the other day that 12 and a half thousand
先日知ったのですが TaskRabbit登録者が
07:55
loads of laundry have been cleaned and folded
これまでに洗濯した衣類の総数は
07:58
through TaskRabbit.
のべ12,500枚にも上るとのことです
08:01
But I love that the number one task posted,
しかし 私は1日100回以上掲載される―
08:03
over a hundred times a day, is something that many of us
人気No.1の用事が気に入っています
08:07
have felt the pain of doing:
私たちの多くが労力を要すると
考えている仕事―
08:10
yes, assembling Ikea furniture. (Laughter) (Applause)
そうです
イケアの家具の組立です(笑)(拍手)
08:13
It's brilliant. Now, we may laugh, but Chris here
素晴らしいでしょう
お笑いになるかもしれませんが―
08:19
is actually making up to 5,000 dollars a month
クリスは こういった雑用で
08:23
running errands around his life.
月に 5,000 ドルを稼いでいます
08:25
And 70 percent of this new labor force
この新しい労働力の 70 %が
08:28
were previously unemployed or underemployed.
以前は長期の失業者や
不完全雇用者でした
08:32
I think TaskRabbit and other examples of collaborative consumption
TaskRabbitやその他のコラボ消費は
08:35
are like lemonade stands on steroids. They're just brilliant.
お小遣い稼ぎを
パワーアップしたようなものです
08:39
Now, when you think about it, it's amazing, right,
考えてもみてください
08:42
that over the past 20 years, we've evolved
過去 20 年の間に
ネット上の人々を信頼して―
08:46
from trusting people online to share information
情報を提供したり
08:49
to trusting to handing over our credit card information,
クレジットカードの情報を入力するまでに
進歩したのです
08:53
and now we're entering the third trust wave:
そして現在
私たち は信頼の第3波にいます
08:56
connecting trustworthy strangers to create all kinds
つまり 見知らぬ人同士を信頼がつなぎ
08:59
of people-powered marketplaces.
人々の力による市場を開拓できるのです
09:03
I actually came across this fascinating study
ピュー・センターの研究によれば
09:05
by the Pew Center this week that revealed
Facebookをよく使う人は
09:07
that an active Facebook user is three times as likely
インターネットをしない人よりも3倍も
09:09
as a non-Internet user to believe that most people are trustworthy.
他人を信頼していることが分かりました
09:13
Virtual trust will transform the way we trust one another
バーチャルな信頼は
私たちが対面で築くような信頼関係を
09:18
face to face.
変えていくでしょう
09:22
Now, with all of my optimism, and I am an optimist,
さて 私は楽観的なことを述べましたが
09:24
comes a healthy dose of caution, or rather, an urgent need
まだ十分 注意を要することがあります
09:27
to address some pressing, complex questions.
複雑で難しい問題です
緊急に対処する必要があります
09:31
How to ensure our digital identities reflect our
その問題とはネット上と現実の
アイデンティティを一致させることです
09:35
real world identities? Do we want them to be the same?
その問題とはネット上と現実の
アイデンティティを一致させることです
09:38
How do we mimic the way trust is built face-to-face online?
対面で構築されるような信頼関係を
ネット上でどう構築しますか?
09:41
How do we stop people who've behaved badly
他のサイトを悪用した人が
09:45
in one community doing so under a different guise?
違う名前で同じことを繰り返すのを
どう阻止しますか?
09:47
In a similar way that companies often use some kind of
企業が信用格付けを用いて
09:51
credit rating to decide whether to give you a mobile plan,
携帯電話の料金プランや
ローンの利率を決めるように
09:54
or the rate of a mortgage, marketplaces that depend
他人同士の取引に依存する
ネット上の市場にも
09:57
on transactions between relative strangers
例えばセバスチャンやクリスが
10:00
need some kind of device to let you know that Sebastian
信頼できる人間かどうかを伝える
10:03
and Chris are good eggs,
何らかの手段が必要です
10:06
and that device is reputation.
その手段が 評価なのです
10:08
Reputation is the measurement of how much a community trusts you.
評価はコミュニティ内での
あなたの信頼度を表します
10:11
Let's just take a look at Chris.
クリスの場合は
10:16
You can see that over 200 people have given him
200 人以上の人が
5点中平均4.99点以上で
10:18
an average rating over 4.99 out of 5.
彼を評価していることがわかります
10:21
There are over 20 pages of reviews of his work
彼に対するレビューは
20ページ以上に及び―
10:24
describing him as super-friendly and fast,
「フレンドリー」「仕事が速い」
等のコメントがあります
10:26
and he's reached level 25, the highest level,
彼は最高レベルの25に達し
「SupperRabbit」の称号を得ています
10:29
making him a SuperRabbit.
彼は最高レベルの25に達し
「SupperRabbit」の称号を得ています
10:32
Now — (Laughter) -- I love that word, SuperRabbit.
(笑)
「SupperRabbit」 なんて良い称号ですね
10:34
And interestingly, what Chris has noted is that as his reputation
興味深いことに彼の評価が上がるにつれ
10:37
has gone up, so has his chances of winning a bid
仕事を勝ち取るチャンスが増えていき―
10:41
and how much he can charge.
さらに値段も上げられるのです
10:44
In other words, for SuperRabbits, reputation
つまり「SuperRabbit」にとって
10:46
has a real world value.
ネット上の評価は
現実に価値があるのです
10:49
Now, I know what you might be thinking.
別に目新しいものではないと
10:51
Well, this isn't anything new. Just think of power sellers
考える人もいるかも知れません
10:53
on eBay or star ratings on Amazon.
Amazonの星評価と同じことです
10:55
The difference today is that, with every trade we make,
違いはといえば
私たちが取引を行うたび―
10:59
comment we leave, person we flag, badge we earn,
コメントを入力するたび
バッジを獲得するたびに
11:02
we leave a reputation trail
いろいろな所に信頼度を示す
11:06
of how well we can and can't be trusted.
評価の手がかりを残していることです
11:08
And it's not just the breadth but the volume
この評価のデータが
驚異的であるのは
11:11
of reputation data out there that is staggering.
範囲が幅広いだけでなく
量も膨大であるからです
11:14
Just consider this: Five million nights have been booked
考えてみてください 過去半年の間に
11:16
on Airbnb in the past six months alone.
のべ500 万泊分の予約が
Airbnb 経由で行われ
11:20
30 million rides have been shared on Carpooling.com.
Carpooling.com での車の
利用回数は3000万回にのぼるのです
11:23
This year, two billion dollars worth of loans
今年度 P2Pのプラットフォームを介した
お金の貸し借りの総額は
11:27
will go through peer-to-peer lending platforms.
20 億ドルにのぼる見込みだそうです
11:29
This adds up to millions of pieces of reputation data
これらのデータが積み重なって
11:32
on how well we behave or misbehave.
私たちの振る舞いを記録した
無数の評判のデータになるのです
11:36
Now, capturing and correlating the trails of information
異なるサイトに残した情報を
集め関連づけることは
11:39
that we leave in different places is a massive challenge,
非常に難しい課題ですが―
11:43
but one we're being asked to figure out.
その解決こそが
私たちに求められています
11:46
What the likes of Sebastian are starting to rightfully ask
セバスチャンのような人たちは
当然の権利として
11:49
is, shouldn't they own their reputation data?
評価データを自分で所有することを
求め始めています
11:52
Shouldn't the reputation that he's personally invested
彼が個人的にAirbnb上で
築いてきた評判データは
11:55
on building on Airbnb mean that it should travel with him
1つのコミュニティから
他のコミュニティへと
11:58
from one community to another?
彼と共に移動すべきでは
ないでしょうか?
12:01
What I mean by this is, say he started selling second-hand
例えば彼がAmazonで
中古本の販売を始めたとして
12:03
books on Amazon. Why should he have to start from scratch?
ゼロから始める必要があるでしょうか?
12:06
It's a bit like when I moved from New York to Sydney.
私がニューヨークからシドニーに
引っ越した時と少し似ています
12:10
It was ridiculous. I couldn't get a mobile phone plan
おかしなことに
私は携帯電話を契約できなかったのです
12:14
because my credit history didn't travel with me.
私の信用情報は
引っ越していなかったからです
12:17
I was essentially a ghost in the system.
私はシステム上で
存在しない人間になってしまったのです
12:21
Now I'm not suggesting that the next stage
私が提案しているのは
評価経済の次の段階として
12:24
of the reputation economy is about
複数の格付けを足し合わせて
12:27
adding up multiple ratings into some kind of empty score.
何らかの無意味な点数を
つけることではありません
12:28
People's lives are too complex, and who wants to do that?
ただでさえ生活が複雑なのに
誰がそれを望むでしょう?
12:33
I also want to be clear that this isn't about adding up
同様に明確にしておきたいのは
12:36
tweets and likes and friends in a clout-like fashion.
ツイートやいいね! 友達の数も
無関係だと言うことです
12:39
Those guys are measuring influence, not behaviors
ツイートやいいね!が示すのは
影響力であって
12:42
that indicate our trustworthiness.
その人の信頼度には
関係ありません
12:46
But the most important thing that we have to keep in mind
しかし最も大切な事は
12:47
is that reputation is largely contextual.
評価は場合により
異なるということです
12:51
Just because Sebastian is a wonderful host
セバスチャンは泊まり客には
人気があっても
12:55
does not mean that he can assemble Ikea furniture.
イケアの家具の組立が
できるとは限りません
12:58
The big challenge is figuring out what data
どのようなデータを集めるべきか
見極めることが―
13:02
makes sense to pull, because the future's
大きな課題です
未来は単一のアルゴリズムではなく
13:05
going to be driven by a smart aggregation of reputation,
評価を上手く集めることによって
13:08
not a single algorithm.
もたらされるはずだからです
13:11
It's only a matter of time before we'll be able to perform
Facebook やGoogle のような
検索により
13:14
a Facebook- or Google-like search
様々な状況下での長期に渡る
13:18
and see a complete picture of someone's behaviors
誰かの行動の全体像を
見られるようになるのも
13:20
in different contexts over time.
時間の問題です
13:23
I envision a realtime stream of who has trusted you,
誰がいつ どこで なぜ
あなたを信頼しているのか
13:26
when, where and why, your reliability on TaskRabbit,
あなたのTaskrabbitとしての評価
13:30
your cleanliness as a guest on Airbnb,
Airbnbで宿を綺麗に使ったか
13:34
the knowledge that you display on Quora or [unclear],
Quoraでどんな知識を披露したか
13:36
they'll all live together in one place,
リアルタイムで入ってくる情報は全て
一箇所に集められ
13:39
and this will live in some kind of reputation dashboard
ある種の評価のダッシュボードに表示され
13:42
that will paint a picture of your reputation capital.
あなたの評価資本が
一目でわかるようになるでしょう
13:45
Now this is a concept that I'm currently researching
評価資本とは
私が現在研究している概念で―
13:50
and writing my next book on, and currently define
私の次の本のテーマです
13:53
as the worth of your reputation, your intentions,
評価資本の定義は
複数のコミュニティや市場にわたる
13:55
capabilities and values across communities and marketplaces.
あなたの評判 態度
能力や価値のことです
13:59
This isn't some far-off frontier.
何も遥か彼方の
最先端の話ではありません
14:03
There are actually a wave of startups like Connect.Me
実際にConnect.Me やLegit
14:06
and Legit and TrustCloud that are figuring out how
TrustCloud といったサービスが
ネット上の評判を
14:09
you can aggregate, monitor and use your online reputation.
集約 監視し使用する
方法を解明し始めています
14:13
Now, I realize that this concept may sound a little
この構想は 行動を常に誰かに見られている
14:18
Big Brother to some of you, and yes, there are some
感じを与えるかもしれません
確かに透明性やプライバシーについて
14:22
enormous transparency and privacy issues to solve,
解決すべき問題はたくさんあります
14:25
but ultimately, if we can collect our personal reputation,
しかし最終的に個人の評価を
集約することができて
14:28
we can actually control it more, and extract
うまく制御できるようになれば
そこから生じる
14:32
the immense value that will flow from it.
膨大な価値を引き出すことができます
14:35
Also, more so than our credit history,
また 信用情報よりもずっと楽に
14:38
we can actually shape our reputation.
自分たちの評価を形作ることができます
14:41
Just think of Sebastian
セバスチャンを思い出してください
14:43
and how he bought the cat to influence his.
彼が自分の評判のために猫を買ったことを
14:45
Now privacy issues aside, the other really interesting issue
プライバシー問題とは別に
他にも大変興味深い事柄があります
14:48
I'm looking at is how do we empower digital ghosts,
ネット難民を
エンパワメントする方法です
14:52
people [who] for whatever reason, are not active online,
彼らの中には何らかの理由で
ネット上では活動していないが
14:55
but are some of the most trustworthy people in the world?
この世で最も信頼できる人々が
含まれています
14:58
How do we take their contributions to their jobs,
彼らの仕事やコミュニティ
家族への貢献度を
15:01
their communities and their families,
どのように集め
15:04
and convert that value into reputation capital?
その価値を評価資本にできるでしょうか?
15:06
Ultimately, when we get it right, reputation capital
もし これが上手くできれば
評価資本を利用して
15:10
could create a massive positive disruption
権力 信頼性 影響力のある人を見極める方法が
15:14
in who has power, trust and influence.
良い意味で大きく
変わるかもしれません
15:17
A three-digit score, your traditional credit history,
従来の個人の信用情報は
3桁のスコアで表されていますが
15:21
that only 30 percent of us actually know what it is,
その意味を理解できる人は3割しかいません
15:24
will no longer be the determining factor
そんなスコアで 商品の値段や
15:27
in how much things cost, what we can access,
何にアクセスできるかや
生活全般での制約が
15:30
and, in many instances, limit what we can do in the world.
決まる時代は終わるかもしれません
15:33
Indeed, reputation is a currency that I believe will become
評価は信用情報より強力な
15:36
more powerful than our credit history in the 21st century.
21世紀の通貨となると
私は信じています
15:41
Reputation will be the currency that says
評価が「信頼」という価値を持つ
15:46
that you can trust me.
通貨になるのです
15:49
Now the interesting thing is, reputation
面白いことに評価は―
15:51
is the socioeconomic lubricant
コラボ消費活動と規模を発展させる
15:54
that makes collaborative consumption work and scale,
社会経済の潤滑油となり得ますが
15:56
but the sources it will be generated from,
評価の源や 評価の応用は
16:01
and its applications, are far bigger than this space alone.
ずっと幅広く使われる可能性を
持っているのです
16:03
Let me give you one example from the world of recruiting,
求人業界から 例を1つ挙げましょう
16:07
where reputation data will make the résumé seem
評価データによって
16:10
like an archaic relic of the past.
履歴書が時代遅れの
遺物となるかもしれません
16:14
Four years ago, tech bloggers and entrepreneurs
4年前 テックブロガーで
起業家でもある
16:18
Joel Spolsky and Jeff Atwood, decided to start something
スポルスキ氏とアトウッド氏は
「Stack Overflow」を
16:22
called Stack Overflow.
始めることを決意しました
16:27
Now, Stack Overflow is basically a platform where
Stack Overflowは
基本的に経験豊富なプログラマーが
16:30
experienced programmers can ask
他の優秀なプログラマーに
16:33
other good programmers highly detailed technical questions
非常に技術的で専門的な質問―
16:36
on things like tiny pixels and chrome extensions.
例えばピクセルや chrome の拡張機能に関する
質問をできる場でした
16:40
This site receives five and a half thousand questions a day,
このサイトでは 1日の質問数が
5,500にも及びます
16:44
and 80 percent of these receive accurate answers.
そして質問の80%は
的確な回答を得ています
16:48
Now users earn reputation in a whole range of ways,
ユーザーはあらゆる方法で
評価を獲得することができますが
16:52
but it's basically by convincing their peers
基本的には
自分に知識があることを
16:55
they know what they're talking about.
他のプログラマーに
認めてもらって 評判を得ます
16:58
Now a few months after this site launched, the founders
サイトを立ち上げた数か月後
創設者たちは
17:00
heard about something interesting,
面白い話を耳にし
17:03
and it actually didn't surprise them.
なるほどと思ったそうです
17:05
What they heard was that users were putting
ユーザーがこのサイトで得た
自分の評価を―
17:07
their reputation scores on the top of their résumés,
履歴書の最初に
記載しているということでした
17:10
and that recruiters were searching the platform
さらに 採用担当者が
ユニークな才能の発掘のために
17:14
to find people with unique talents.
サイト内を
検索しているとのことでした
17:17
Now thousands of programmers today are finding
現在この方法で
たくさんのプログラマーが
17:19
better jobs this way, because Stack Overflow
より良い仕事を見つけています
17:22
and the reputation dashboards provide a priceless window
Stack Overflowと
その評価ダッシュボードは
17:25
into how someone really behaves,
貴重な窓となっています
この窓を通して その人の行動や
17:28
and what their peers think of them.
他の同業者の評価を
垣間見る事ができるのです
17:31
But the bigger principle of what's happening behind Stack Overflow,
しかしStack Overflowの背後で起こってい
さらに大きな概念こそ
17:33
I think, is incredibly exciting.
非常にエキサイティングなものです
17:36
People are starting to realize that the reputation
1つのコミュニティで
得られた評価が―
17:38
they generate in one place has value
その場を超えて 価値を持つことに
17:42
beyond the environments from which it was built.
人々は気づき始めています
17:45
You know, it's very interesting.
非常に興味深いことです
17:48
When you talk to super-users, whether that's SuperRabbits
スーパーユーザーと話すと
それが SuperRabbits であるか
17:50
or super-people on Stack Overflow, or Uberhosts,
Stack OverflowやUberhostsの
スーパーユーザーであるかに関わらず―
17:53
they all talk about how having a high reputation
皆 高い評価を得たことで―
17:57
unlocks a sense of their own power.
自分が持っている隠された力に
気づいたと言います
18:00
On Stack Overflow, it creates a level playing field,
Stack Overflowは
公平な競争の場を作り
18:04
enabling the people with the real talent to rise to the top.
本当に能力のある人が
頂上に登ることを可能にしました
18:07
On Airbnb, the people often become more important
Airbnb では宿よりも
ホストである人が重要でした
18:10
than the spaces. On TaskRabbit,
TaskRabbit では
18:13
it gives people control of their economic activity.
人々は自分の経済活動を
コントロールする術を得ました
18:15
Now at the end of my tea with Sebastian, he told me how,
セバスチャンは別れ際に
18:19
on a bad, rainy day, when he hasn't had a customer
こう言いました
18:22
in his bookstore, he thinks of all the people around
彼の書店に客が来ない
ついてない憂鬱な雨の日には
18:25
the world who've said something wonderful about him,
世界中の人々が彼に
言ってくれた素敵なこと―
18:29
and what that says about him as a person.
彼の人間としての評価を
思い出すそうです
18:32
He's turning 50 this year, and he's convinced
彼は今年50歳になります
Airbnbで築き上げた―
18:34
that the rich tapestry of reputation he's built on Airbnb
評価の豊かなタペストリーが
18:38
will lead him to doing something interesting
残りの人生を
何か面白い活動へと導いてくれると
18:41
with the rest of his life.
彼は固く信じています
18:44
You know, there are only a few windows in history
社会経済システムを変える―
18:47
where the opportunity exists to reinvent
可能性を持つ出来事は
18:51
part of how our socioeconomic system works.
歴史上ほんの一握りしかありません
18:54
We're living through one of those moments.
私たちはそんな時を生きているのです
18:57
I believe that we are at the start of a collaborative revolution
私は信じています
このコラボ消費革命の始まりは
19:00
that will be as significant as the Industrial Revolution.
産業革命と同じくらい重要であると
19:03
In the 20th century, the invention of traditional credit
20 世紀に考案された信用情報は
19:07
transformed our consumer system, and in many ways
消費のシステムを変え
様々な方法で
19:11
controlled who had access to what.
誰が何を手に入れられるかを
支配してきました
19:14
In the 21st century, new trust networks,
21 世紀には
新しい信頼ネットワークが確立され―
19:17
and the reputation capital they generate, will reinvent
そこでつくられた評価資本が
想像もつかない方法で
19:20
the way we think about wealth, markets, power
富や市場 力
個人のアイデンティティに関する―
19:23
and personal identity, in ways we can't yet even imagine.
考え方を変えていくでしょう
19:27
Thank you very much. (Applause)
ありがとうございました(拍手)
19:32
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:35
Translated by Noriko Matsu
Reviewed by Kohei Kikuchi

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Rachel Botsman - Trust researcher
Rachel Botsman is a recognized expert on how collaboration and trust enabled by digital technologies will change the way we live, work, bank and consume.

Why you should listen

Rachel Botsman is the co-author, with Roo Rogers, of the book What's Mine Is Yours (2010). In it, they developed the concept of "collaborative consumption", which was recognized by Time magazine as one of the "10 ideas that will change the world" and by Thinkers 50 as a Breakthrough Idea. Her newest work focuses on trust, which is the topic of her next book. In 2015, she designed the world’s first MBA course on the collaborative economy, which she teaches at Oxford University’s Saïd School of Business.

Named a "Young Global Leader" by the World Economic Forum, Botsman examines the growth and challenges of startups such as Airbnb, Taskrabbit and Uber, with a focus on technology's impact on trust and relationships, providing context for how and why the world is changing and the broader implications of this new economy.  

More profile about the speaker
Rachel Botsman | Speaker | TED.com