TEDxBoston 2012

Andrew McAfee: Are droids taking our jobs?

アンドリュー・マカフィー:アンドロイドに仕事を奪われるのか?

Filmed:

ロボットやアルゴリズムは、車の組み立てや記事を書くこと、また翻訳などの仕事においてどんどん進歩しています。これらはかつて、人間を必要とした仕事です。では、人はこれからどういった仕事を担っていくのでしょうか?アンドリュー・マカフィー氏は最新の雇用データに基づいて、こう言います。「我々はまだ何も見てはいません。しかし、一歩引いて歴史の流れを見てみると、驚くべき、さらに、わくわくするような未来がひろがっています。」(TEDxBoston )

- Management theorist
Andrew McAfee studies how information technology affects businesses and society. Full bio

As it turns out, when tens of millions of people
何千万人もの人が失業したり 十分な仕事が得られない―
00:15
are unemployed or underemployed,
ことが明らかになり テクノロジーが労働人口に
00:18
there's a fair amount of interest in what technology might be doing to the labor force.
どう影響しているかということにが大いに関心を集めています
00:20
And as I look at the conversation, it strikes me
そしてその事に関する見解を目にする時
00:25
that it's focused on exactly the right topic,
話の主題は合っているにもかかわらず
00:27
and at the same time, it's missing the point entirely.
ポイントを完全に見逃してしているという気がするのです
00:30
The topic that it's focused on, the question is whether or not
議論の焦点である問題は
デジタルテクノロジーが
00:33
all these digital technologies are affecting people's ability
人間が生活費を稼ぐという能力に
影響を及ぼしているかどうかということです
00:36
to earn a living, or, to say it a little bit different way,
少し違った言い方をするならば
00:40
are the droids taking our jobs?
アンドロイドたちは仕事を奪っているのでしょうか
00:43
And there's some evidence that they are.
そうだという証拠がいくつかあります
00:45
The Great Recession ended when American GDP resumed
アメリカのGDPがゆっくりながら安定した成長に戻って
大不況が終り
00:47
its kind of slow, steady march upward, and some other
他の経済指標も回復し始めると
00:51
economic indicators also started to rebound, and they got
急ぎ足で健全な状態に戻りました
00:55
kind of healthy kind of quickly. Corporate profits
大企業の収益はかなり高く
00:58
are quite high. In fact, if you include bank profits,
実際 銀行収益も含めれば
01:01
they're higher than they've ever been.
これまでないくらいに高いのです
01:04
And business investment in gear, in equipment
ビジネス投資も勢いがあり 設備投資や
01:06
and hardware and software is at an all-time high.
ハードウェア ソフトウェアの分野では 最高記録です
01:09
So the businesses are getting out their checkbooks.
企業の出資も増えてきました
01:12
What they're not really doing is hiring.
欠けているものは何かというと 雇用です
01:16
So this red line is the employment-to-population ratio,
グラフの赤線は人口に対する雇用率です
01:18
in other words, the percentage of working age people
言い換えるなら アメリカで就業している
01:22
in America who have work.
生産年齢の人の割合です
01:25
And we see that it cratered during the Great Recession,
大不況で落ち込んでいるのがわかると思いますが
01:27
and it hasn't started to bounce back at all.
それからまったく立ち直ってないのです
01:31
But the story is not just a recession story.
しかし これはただの不況の話とは違います
01:34
The decade that we've just been through had relatively
ここ10年 全体的に雇用は停滞してきました
01:36
anemic job growth all throughout, especially when we
10年ごとに比較をしていくと
01:39
compare it to other decades, and the 2000s
記録のある中で2000年代だけが
01:43
are the only time we have on record where there were
10年の始めより終わりの方が
01:46
fewer people working at the end of the decade
働いている人が少ないのです
01:48
than at the beginning. This is not what you want to see.
こんな状況には目も当てられません
01:51
When you graph the number of potential employees
この国で働ける労働者数と
01:54
versus the number of jobs in the country, you see the gap
仕事の数をグラフにしてみると
01:58
gets bigger and bigger over time, and then,
そこには時間とともにどんどん広がっているギャップがあり
02:01
during the Great Recession, it opened up in a huge way.
大不況のときに ギャップが大幅に広がりました
02:05
I did some quick calculations. I took the last 20 years of GDP growth
簡単な計算をしてみました
ここ20年のGDPの成長率と
02:07
and the last 20 years of labor productivity growth
労働生産性の成長を使い
02:12
and used those in a fairly straightforward way
かなり単純な方法で
経済成長を維持するためには
02:15
to try to project how many jobs the economy was going
どれだけの仕事が必要になるか
予想を試みました
02:18
to need to keep growing, and this is the line that I came up with.
これが導き出された線です(赤破線)
02:20
Is that good or bad? This is the government's projection
いかがですか? そしてこちらは
今後の生産年齢の人口に関する
02:24
for the working age population going forward.
政府の予測を示します
02:27
So if these predictions are accurate, that gap is not going to close.
これらの予測が正確なら
ギャップが埋まることはありません
02:31
The problem is, I don't think these projections are accurate.
これらの予測が正確だとは思えない
これが問題です
02:36
In particular, I think my projection is way too optimistic,
特に 私が導き出した仮定は
かなり楽観的すぎると思います
02:39
because when I did it, I was assuming that the future
なぜなら 計算において
未来の労働生産性の成長率は
02:43
was kind of going to look like the past
過去のものと同じであろうと仮定したからです
02:46
with labor productivity growth, and that's actually not what I believe,
でも実際そうなるとは思っていません
02:49
because when I look around, I think that we ain't seen nothing yet
周囲を見ると テクノロジーが労働人口に及ぼす影響について
02:52
when it comes to technology's impact on the labor force.
まだ何も目にしていないと思うからです
02:56
Just in the past couple years, we've seen digital tools
ここ2,3年ほどで 私たちは今まであり得なかったスキルや
02:59
display skills and abilities that they never, ever had before,
能力をもったデジタルツールを目にするようになりました
03:03
and that, kind of, eat deeply into what we human beings
そしてそれは 私たちのする仕事に 深くくいこんできました
03:08
do for a living. Let me give you a couple examples.
いくつか例を挙げたいと思います
03:11
Throughout all of history, if you wanted something
歴史上これまで
03:15
translated from one language into another,
他の言語に翻訳したいものがあった場合
03:17
you had to involve a human being.
人間にやらせてきました
03:20
Now we have multi-language, instantaneous,
現在では 多言語で瞬時の
03:21
automatic translation services available for free
自動翻訳サービスを無料で使用できます
03:25
via many of our devices all the way down to smartphones.
スマートフォンをはじめ
多くの機器で利用できます
03:29
And if any of us have used these, we know that
使ったことがある方もいるでしょうが
03:32
they're not perfect, but they're decent.
これらのサービスは完璧ではありませんが
まずまずではあります
03:35
Throughout all of history, if you wanted something written,
歴史上これまで レポートや記事などの
文章が必要な場合
03:38
a report or an article, you had to involve a person.
誰かにやらせてきました
03:41
Not anymore. This is an article that appeared
今は違います
これは しばらく前の
03:44
in Forbes online a while back about Apple's earnings.
アップルの収益に関する
『フォーブス』オンライン版の記事です
03:47
It was written by an algorithm.
これはアルゴリズムによって書かれています
03:50
And it's not decent, it's perfect.
そしてこれはまずまずなんかではありません
完璧です
03:52
A lot of people look at this and they say, "Okay,
多くの人はこれを見てこう言うでしょう
03:56
but those are very specific, narrow tasks,
「でもね これはとっても特殊で限定されたタスクだ
03:59
and most knowledge workers are actually generalists,
知識労働者のほとんどは実際はジェネラリストであり
04:01
and what they do is sit on top of a very large body
彼らがしていることは
多くの専門技術と知識を基にして
04:04
of expertise and knowledge and they use that
予測のつかないような要求にも
04:06
to react on the fly to kind of unpredictable demands,
即座に反応することだ
04:09
and that's very, very hard to automate."
それを自動化するのは物凄く難しいことなんだよ」と
04:12
One of the most impressive knowledge workers
最近で一番印象深い知識労働者のひとりは
04:14
in recent memory is a guy named Ken Jennings.
ケン・ジェニングスという男です
04:16
He won the quiz show "Jeopardy!" 74 times in a row,
彼は『ジェパディ!』というクイズショーで74連勝し
04:19
took home three million dollars.
300万ドルを手にしました
04:24
That's Ken on the right getting beat three to one by
右に座っているのがケンで
ジェパディ用にプログラムされた―
04:26
Watson, the "Jeopardy!"-playing supercomputer from IBM.
IBM のスーパーコンピューター ワトソンに
3倍の得点で負けたところです
04:30
So when we look at what technology can do
このようにテクノロジーが
04:35
to general knowledge workers, I start to think
一般的な知識労働者に
何ができるかということを垣間見る時
04:37
there might not be something so special about this idea
このジェネラリストという概念に
とりたてて特別な何かが
04:40
of a generalist, particularly when we start doing things
あるわけではない
と思いはじめたのです
04:42
like hooking Siri up to Watson and having technologies
特に ワトソンと Siri をつなげて 言われたことを理解したり
04:45
that can understand what we're saying
それに音声で答えるような
04:49
and repeat speech back to us.
テクノロジーがあれば なおさらです
04:51
Now, Siri is far from perfect, and we can make fun
今のSiriは完璧にはほど遠く
可笑しい間違いもありますが
04:53
of her flaws, but we should also keep in mind that
Siri やワトソンのようなテクノロジーが
04:56
if technologies like Siri and Watson improve
ムーアの法則に従って進歩していくと
04:59
along a Moore's Law trajectory, which they will,
そして実際そうなると思いますが
05:02
in six years, they're not going to be two times better
6年で2倍や4倍どころではなく
05:06
or four times better, they'll be 16 times better than they are right now.
16倍も良くなっているはずだと
覚えておくべきでしょう
05:08
So I start to think that a lot of knowledge work is going to be affected by this.
だから多くの知識労働が
この技術に影響されると思い始めました
05:13
And digital technologies are not just impacting knowledge work.
さらにデジタルテクノロジーは
知識労働だけに影響するのではなく
05:17
They're starting to flex their muscles in the physical world as well.
物理的な世界へも勢力を及ぼし始めています
05:20
I had the chance a little while back to ride in the Google
少し前にGoogleの無人自動車に乗る機会があり
05:24
autonomous car, which is as cool as it sounds. (Laughter)
評判通り 本当にクールなものでした (笑)
05:27
And I will vouch that it handled the stop-and-go traffic
のろのろ運転の国道101号線でも非常にスムーズに
05:32
on U.S. 101 very smoothly.
対応したということは 私が保証します
05:35
There are about three and a half million people
アメリカでは約350万人が
05:38
who drive trucks for a living in the United States.
トラックの運転で生計を立てており
中には
05:40
I think some of them are going to be affected by this
このテクノロジーで
影響される人もいると思います
05:42
technology. And right now, humanoid robots are still
ヒューマノイド ロボットは 現在まだ非常に未熟で
05:45
incredibly primitive. They can't do very much.
そう多くの事はできません
05:48
But they're getting better quite quickly, and DARPA,
しかし 急速に改良が進んでいます
05:51
which is the investment arm of the Defense Department,
国防総省の投資部門であるDARPAはこの動きを
05:54
is trying to accelerate their trajectory.
加速させようとしています
05:57
So, in short, yeah, the droids are coming for our jobs.
要するに アンドロイドは
私たちの仕事に迫ってきています
05:59
In the short term, we can stimulate job growth
短期的には 起業家精神を奨励し インフラ投資することで
06:03
by encouraging entrepreneurship and by investing
雇用を牽引することができます
06:07
in infrastructure, because the robots today still aren't
なぜなら ロボットは今日まだ
06:10
very good at fixing bridges.
橋の補修が不得意だからです
06:13
But in the not-too-long-term, I think within the lifetimes
しかし 遠くない将来
06:15
of most of the people in this room, we're going to transition
ここにいるほとんどの人々が
生きているうちに
06:18
into an economy that is very productive but that
非常に生産的であるが
多くの労働力は必要とされない
06:22
just doesn't need a lot of human workers,
という経済に推移していくことになるでしょう
06:25
and managing that transition is going to be
その移行に対処することが
06:28
the greatest challenge that our society faces.
私たちの社会が直面する
最大の課題となるでしょう
06:29
Voltaire summarized why. He said, "Work saves us
ヴォルテールの言葉は この理由をうまく表しています
06:32
from three great evils: boredom, vice and need."
「仕事は 3つの大いなる悪 すなわち
退屈 非行 貧困から私たちを救ったのだ」と
06:35
But despite this challenge, I'm personally,
しかしこのような課題があっても
私は個人的に
06:40
I'm still a huge digital optimist, and I am
いまだデジタルをものすごく前向きに捉えていて
06:43
supremely confident that the digital technologies that we're
我々が現在開発中であるデジタルテクノロジーが
06:46
developing now are going to take us into a utopian future,
いずれ私たちを 陰鬱な未来ではなく
ユートピア的な未来に
06:49
not a dystopian future. And to explain why,
導いてくれると
絶大な自信を持っているのです
06:52
I want to pose kind of a ridiculously broad question.
ここで 途方もなく広範な質問をしたいと思います
06:55
I want to ask what have been the most important
人類の歴史において
06:58
developments in human history?
最も重要な進歩といえばなんでしょうか?
07:00
Now, I want to share some of the answers that I've gotten
この質問にどんな答えをもらったか
07:03
in response to this question. It's a wonderful question
いくつかお話します
こんな質問をしたら
07:05
to ask and to start an endless debate about,
簡単に終わりのない議論が始まります
07:08
because some people are going to bring up
西洋と東洋の両方における哲学のシステムが
07:10
systems of philosophy in both the West and the East that
多くの人々の世界観を変えたことを
07:12
have changed how a lot of people think about the world.
挙げる人もいるでしょう
07:15
And then other people will say, "No, actually, the big stories,
こう言う人もいるでしょう
「いや実際
07:19
the big developments are the founding of the world's
大きな出来事 進歩といえば
07:21
major religions, which have changed civilizations
文明を変え 無数の人々の生き方に影響した
07:24
and have changed and influenced how countless people
主要な宗教が確立したことだ」
07:27
are living their lives." And then some other folk will say,
また一方で こう言う人もいるでしょう
07:30
"Actually, what changes civilizations, what modifies them
「実際に文明を変えたり手を加えたり
07:33
and what changes people's lives
人々の生活も変えたものは帝国だ
07:36
are empires, so the great developments in human history
人類の偉大な発展とは
07:38
are stories of conquest and of war."
征服と戦争の歴史だ」
07:42
And then some cheery soul usually always pipes up
そうしたら そこへ大体必ず陽気な誰かが
07:45
and says, "Hey, don't forget about plagues." (Laughter)
「ねえ 疫病のことを忘れてないか」
なんて割り込んできます (笑)
07:48
There are some optimistic answers to this question,
この質問に対する楽観的な答えもあります
07:53
so some people will bring up the Age of Exploration
大航海時代によって世界の幕が開いたと
07:56
and the opening up of the world.
指摘する人もいます
07:58
Others will talk about intellectual achievements
また
世界のよりよい操作を可能にする
08:00
in disciplines like math that have helped us get
数学のような知的な業績を語る人もいます
08:02
a better handle on the world, and other folk will talk about
また芸術と科学が
08:05
periods when there was a deep flourishing
大いに花開いた時代を語る人もいます
08:08
of the arts and sciences. So this debate will go on and on.
こうして議論は延々と続きます
08:10
It's an endless debate, and there's no conclusive,
それは無限の議論であり 決定的な唯一の解はありません
08:13
no single answer to it. But if you're a geek like me,
しかし 私のような頭でっかちはこう言います
08:16
you say, "Well, what do the data say?"
「データではどうなんだ?」
08:20
And you start to do things like graph things that we might
そこで 興味あるもののグラフを作り始めます
08:22
be interested in, the total worldwide population, for example,
例えば世界の総人口や
08:25
or some measure of social development,
社会発展の指標や
08:29
or the state of advancement of a society,
社会の高度化の状況などをグラフにします
08:32
and you start to plot the data, because, by this approach,
こうしたアプローチによって
08:34
the big stories, the big developments in human history,
大きな出来事や人間の歴史上の主要な発展があれば
08:38
are the ones that will bend these curves a lot.
グラフのカーブは大きく曲がるはずだからです
08:41
So when you do this, and when you plot the data,
さてこうしてデータをプロットすると
08:44
you pretty quickly come to some weird conclusions.
たちどころに不思議な結論に至ります
08:46
You conclude, actually, that none of these things
実際 どの答えも
08:48
have mattered very much. (Laughter)
たいして重要ではないのです
(笑)
08:51
They haven't done a darn thing to the curves. (Laughter)
グラフに 何の影響も与えないのです
(笑)
08:56
There has been one story, one development
人間の歴史においてグラフを曲げたもの
09:00
in human history that bent the curve, bent it just about
90度近く曲げてしまった ただ1つの事件 出来事は
09:04
90 degrees, and it is a technology story.
テクノロジーの発達です
09:07
The steam engine, and the other associated technologies
蒸気エンジンと関連したテクノロジーは
09:11
of the Industrial Revolution changed the world
産業革命によって世界を変えて
09:14
and influenced human history so much,
人間の歴史に多大な影響を与えました
09:17
that in the words of the historian Ian Morris,
歴史家イアン・モリスの言葉によれば
09:19
they made mockery out of all that had come before.
それ以前のものすべてを
お笑い草にしてしまいました
09:21
And they did this by infinitely multiplying the power
私たちの筋肉の力を無限に増幅して
09:25
of our muscles, overcoming the limitations of our muscles.
筋力の限界を克服してしまったからです
09:28
Now, what we're in the middle of now
私たちは今
09:31
is overcoming the limitations of our individual brains
個々の脳の限界を克服して
09:34
and infinitely multiplying our mental power.
知能を無限に増幅しようとしています
09:37
How can this not be as big a deal as overcoming
これが 筋力の限界を克服することに匹敵する
09:40
the limitations of our muscles?
重大な事でないわけがありませんよね?
09:43
So at the risk of repeating myself a little bit, when I look
繰り返しになるかもしれませんが
09:46
at what's going on with digital technology these days,
昨今のデジタルテクノロジーの変化には
09:49
we are not anywhere near through with this journey,
まだまだ先があるということや
09:52
and when I look at what is happening to our economies
経済と社会の状況を考えると
09:55
and our societies, my single conclusion is that
私の唯一の結論は
09:58
we ain't seen nothing yet. The best days are really ahead.
我々はまだ何も見ていないということ
お楽しみはこれからです
10:00
Let me give you a couple examples.
いくつか例を挙げましょう
10:04
Economies don't run on energy. They don't run on capital,
経済はエネルギーによって回るのではありません
10:06
they don't run on labor. Economies run on ideas.
資本や労働でもありません
アイデアによって回るのです
10:10
So the work of innovation, the work of coming up with
イノベーションや
新しいアイデアを生み出す仕事が
10:14
new ideas, is some of the most powerful,
経済生活において我々に可能な
10:16
some of the most fundamental work that we can do
最も強力で基本的な仕事です
10:18
in an economy. And this is kind of how we used to do innovation.
かつて我々はこのように革新を行ってきました
10:20
We'd find a bunch of fairly similar-looking people
どことなく似ている人を集めてきて
10:24
— (Laughter) —
(笑)
10:28
we'd take them out of elite institutions, we'd put them into
エリート機関から引き抜いてきて
10:32
other elite institutions, and we'd wait for the innovation.
別のエリート機関に送り込み
イノベーションを待つのです
10:34
Now — (Laughter) —
さて--(笑)
10:37
as a white guy who spent his whole career at MIT
キャリアの全てをMITと―
10:41
and Harvard, I got no problem with this. (Laughter)
ハーバードで過ごしてきた
白人にとってこれは何の問題もありません(笑)
10:44
But some other people do, and they've kind of crashed
でも問題だと思う人もおり パーティーに勝手にやってきて
10:50
the party and loosened up the dress code of innovation.
技術革新のドレスコードを緩めてしまいました
10:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:55
So here are the winners of a Top Coder programming challenge,
写真はトップコーダー・プログラミング・チャレンジの受賞者で
10:56
and I assure you that nobody cares
この子達がどこで育って
11:00
where these kids grew up, where they went to school,
どこの学校に通ったとか
見た目がどうかなど
11:03
or what they look like. All anyone cares about
誰も気にも留めないでしょう
皆が気にすることは
11:06
is the quality of the work, the quality of the ideas.
仕事の質や アイデアの質です
11:09
And over and over again, we see this happening
技術に促進される世界で 幾度となく
11:11
in the technology-facilitated world.
実際に目の当たりにすることです
11:14
The work of innovation is becoming more open,
技術革新の仕事はよりオープンになってきます
11:16
more inclusive, more transparent, and more merit-based,
より包括的で 透明性が増し
メリット重視になります
11:18
and that's going to continue no matter what MIT and Harvard
MIT やハーバードがどう思おうと続くのです
11:22
think of it, and I couldn't be happier about that development.
こんな展開について
私はこの上なく嬉しく思っています
11:25
I hear once in a while, "Okay, I'll grant you that,
時々こう言われます
「テクノロジーは大事でも
11:29
but technology is still a tool for the rich world,
まだ豊かな世界に向けたツールにすぎない
11:31
and what's not happening, these digital tools are not
これらのデジタルツールは
11:35
improving the lives of people at the bottom of the pyramid."
低所得層が生活を向上するのに
何の役にも立っていない」
11:37
And I want to say to that very clearly: nonsense.
はっきり言います
そんなことはない
11:41
The bottom of the pyramid is benefiting hugely from technology.
テクノロジーは低所得層に多大に寄与しています
11:43
The economist Robert Jensen did this wonderful study
経済学者のロバート・ジェンセンは
11:47
a while back where he watched, in great detail,
すばらしい研究をしました
少し前のこと
11:50
what happened to the fishing villages of Kerala, India,
インドの漁村であるケララ州で
人々が携帯電話を手に入れたとき
11:53
when they got mobile phones for the very first time,
何が起こったか詳細に観察したのです
11:56
and when you write for the Quarterly Journal of Economics,
『Quarterly Journal of Economics』 のような
経済学専門誌への原稿では
11:59
you have to use very dry and very circumspect language,
非常に冷静で慎重な言葉づかいが求められますが
12:02
but when I read his paper, I kind of feel Jensen is trying
彼の論文を読むと感じることは ジェンセンが
12:05
to scream at us, and say, look, this was a big deal.
おい これは大事だぞと
私たちに叫びかけているということ
12:07
Prices stabilized, so people could plan their economic lives.
出荷価格を安定させ
経済的生活の見通しが立ちました
12:10
Waste was not reduced; it was eliminated.
水揚げの廃棄は
減るどころか皆無になりました
12:14
And the lives of both the buyers and the sellers
どの村でも買い手と売り手 双方の生活が
12:18
in these villages measurably improved.
眼に見えて改善したのです
12:21
Now, what I don't think is that Jensen got extremely lucky
ジェンセンが非常に運よく
12:23
and happened to land in the one set of villages
テクノロジーによって物事が改善された漁村に
12:27
where technology made things better.
たまたま居合わせたのだとは思いません
12:29
What happened instead is he very carefully documented
そうではなく
テクノロジーがある環境や―
12:32
what happens over and over again when technology
コミュニティーに初めて導入されるたびに
12:35
comes for the first time to an environment and a community.
幾度となく起こることを
非常に注意深く記録に残したのです
12:37
The lives of people, the welfares of people, improve dramatically.
人々の生活や福祉は劇的に改善します
12:40
So as I look around at all the evidence, and I think about
だからすべての証拠を見回して
12:44
the room that we have ahead of us, I become a huge
この先の伸びしろを考えると
12:47
digital optimist, and I start to think that this wonderful
私は絶大なデジタル楽観主義者となります
12:49
statement from the physicist Freeman Dyson
物理学者フリーマン・ダイソンの言葉が
誇張ではないと思い始めます
12:52
is actually not hyperbole. This is an accurate assessment of what's going on.
これは実際に起こっている出来事の正確な評価だと
12:55
Our digital -- our technologies are great gifts,
「デジタル テクノロジーは 素晴らしいギフトです」
13:00
and we, right now, have the great good fortune
デジタルテクノロジーが花開き
13:02
to be living at a time when digital technology is flourishing,
拡大し 深まり
13:05
when it is broadening and deepening and
世界中でより重要になっている今
13:09
becoming more profound all around the world.
この時代に生きていることは
素晴らしい幸運なのです
13:11
So, yeah, the droids are taking our jobs,
確かに
アンドロイドは私たちの仕事を奪っています
13:14
but focusing on that fact misses the point entirely.
しかし その事実に注目しすぎると
ポイントを完全に見逃します
13:17
The point is that then we are freed up to do other things,
ポイントは 私たちが違う何かをできるようになり
13:21
and what we are going to do, I am very confident,
これから取り組もうとしているのは
世界中の貧困と―
13:24
what we're going to do is reduce poverty and drudgery
重労働と不幸を減らそうということに違いないと
確信しています
13:27
and misery around the world. I'm very confident
私たちは地球への負担をより軽くする
13:30
we're going to learn to live more lightly on the planet,
術を学んでいくだろうと
確信しています
13:33
and I am extremely confident that what we're going to do
新しいデジタルツールによって起こることが
13:36
with our new digital tools is going to be so profound
とても大規模で非常に有益で
13:39
and so beneficial that it's going to make a mockery
それ以前のすべてのものが
お笑い草になるほどのものだと
13:42
out of everything that came before.
確信しています
13:45
I'm going to leave the last word to a guy who had
最後に デジタルの進歩を
13:47
a front row seat for digital progress,
最前列の席で見てきた
13:49
our old friend Ken Jennings. I'm with him.
ご存知ケン・ジェニングスに賛同し
彼の言葉で締めたいと思います
13:51
I'm going to echo his words:
こんな言葉です
13:54
"I, for one, welcome our new computer overlords." (Laughter)
「私は 個人的に コンピューターによる君主制を歓迎します」(笑)
13:55
Thanks very much. (Applause)
どうもありがとうございました
(拍手)
13:59
Translated by Motoko Plewes
Reviewed by Natsuhiko Mizutani

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Andrew McAfee - Management theorist
Andrew McAfee studies how information technology affects businesses and society.

Why you should listen

Andrew McAfee studies the ways that information technology (IT) affects businesses, business as a whole, and the larger society. His research investigates how IT changes the way companies perform, organize themselves and compete. At a higher level, his work also investigates how computerization affects competition, society, the economy and the workforce.

He's a principal research scientist at the Center for Digital Business at the MIT Sloan School of Management. His books include Enterprise 2.0 and Race Against the Machine (with Erik Brynjolfsson). Read more on his blog.

 

More profile about the speaker
Andrew McAfee | Speaker | TED.com