sponsored links
TEDMED 2012

Robert Gupta: Between music and medicine

ロバート・グプタ:音楽と医学の間で

April 15, 2012

ロバート・グプタは、医師になるべきかバイオリン奏者になるべきか思い悩んでいた時、自分の進路はその中間にあるのだと気づきました。手にはバイオリンを持ち、心には社会的公正の意識を抱いて進むことにしたのです。社会の周縁にいる人々と、従来の医学では上手くいかない領域で成果を上げている音楽療法の力について語った感動的なスピーチです。

Robert Gupta - Violinist
Violinist Robert Gupta joined the LA Philharmonic at the age of 19 -- and maintains a passionate parallel interest in neurobiology and mental health issues. He's a TED Senior Fellow. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
(Music)
(音楽)
00:23
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:38
Thank you very much. (Applause)
ありがとうございます(拍手)
02:41
Thank you. It's a distinct privilege to be here.
この場に立てて光栄です
02:46
A few weeks ago, I saw a video on YouTube
数週間前 ユーチューブの
動画を見ました
02:50
of Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords
ガブリエル・ギフォーズ下院議員が
02:52
at the early stages of her recovery
銃で撃たれた
頭のひどい怪我からの
02:54
from one of those awful bullets.
回復に向けたリハビリを
始めたという動画です
02:56
This one entered her left hemisphere, and
銃弾は 彼女の
左脳に撃ち込まれ
02:58
knocked out her Broca's area, the speech center of her brain.
脳内の言語を司る中心である
ブローカ野を破壊しました
03:00
And in this session, Gabby's working with a speech therapist,
この時 ギャビーさんは
言語療法士の治療を受け
03:04
and she's struggling to produce
簡単な単語を発しようと
03:08
some of the most basic words, and you can see her
もがいていましたが
徐々に打ちのめされ
03:10
growing more and more devastated, until she ultimately
ついにはすすり泣きを始め
03:13
breaks down into sobbing tears, and she starts sobbing
言語療法士の腕に抱かれて
03:16
wordlessly into the arms of her therapist.
言葉もなくむせび泣く様子が
映されていました
03:19
And after a few moments, her therapist tries a new tack,
少しすると 療法士は
別の方法を試そうと
03:23
and they start singing together,
歌を歌い始めました
03:25
and Gabby starts to sing through her tears,
ギャビーさんも涙にぬれた顔で
歌い始めました
03:27
and you can hear her clearly able to enunciate
歌の中では 彼女の思いを
表すような言葉を
03:29
the words to a song that describe the way she feels,
はっきりと発音することが
できたのです
03:32
and she sings, in one descending scale, she sings,
ギャビーさんは 下降音階に合わせて
こう歌いました
03:34
"Let it shine, let it shine, let it shine."
「輝かせよう 輝かせよう 輝かせよう」
03:37
And it's a very powerful and poignant reminder of how
このことが力強く
示しているように
03:41
the beauty of music has the ability to speak
音楽が持つ美は 言葉にできないことを
伝えることができるのです
03:44
where words fail, in this case literally speak.
ギャビーさんの場合は文字通り
言葉にできなかったのにです
03:47
Seeing this video of Gabby Giffords reminded me
ギャビー議員の動画を見て
03:52
of the work of Dr. Gottfried Schlaug,
ゴットフリード・シュラーグ博士
のことを思い出しました
03:54
one of the preeminent neuroscientists studying music and the brain at Harvard,
ハーバード大学で音楽と脳の研究をしている
優れた神経科学者で
03:56
and Schlaug is a proponent of a therapy called
メロディック・イントネーション・
セラピーという
04:00
Melodic Intonation Therapy, which has become very popular in music therapy now.
今では広く使われている
音楽療法の主唱者でもあります
04:03
Schlaug found that his stroke victims who were aphasic,
シュラーグ博士が気づいたのは
脳梗塞を起こして失語症になり
04:08
could not form sentences of three- or four-word sentences,
3,4語の文章ですら
発することができない患者でも
04:12
but they could still sing the lyrics to a song,
曲の歌詞なら歌える
ということでした
04:17
whether it was "Happy Birthday To You"
「ハッピー・バースデー」や
お気に入りの
04:20
or their favorite song by the Eagles or the Rolling Stones.
イーグルスやローリング・
ストーンズの曲などです
04:22
And after 70 hours of intensive singing lessons,
そして 70時間の歌の
集中レッスンを受けると
04:24
he found that the music was able to literally rewire
音楽が患者の
脳神経をつなぎ直し
04:27
the brains of his patients and create a homologous
代替的な言語中枢を
04:31
speech center in their right hemisphere
右脳に作り出し
04:34
to compensate for the left hemisphere's damage.
損傷を受けた左脳を補完することを
博士は発見したのです
04:36
When I was 17, I visited Dr. Schlaug's lab, and in one afternoon
17歳の時 私はシュラーグ博士の
研究室を訪ねました
04:39
he walked me through some of the leading research
博士は 音楽と脳についての
研究の最先端を
04:43
on music and the brain -- how musicians had
見せてくれました
音楽家の脳の構造が
04:45
fundamentally different brain structure than non-musicians,
ほかの人とは根本的に
違っていること
04:49
how music, and listening to music,
音楽を演奏したり
聴いたりすることが
04:52
could just light up the entire brain, from
前頭葉前部皮質から
小脳に至るまで
04:54
our prefrontal cortex all the way back to our cerebellum,
脳全体を照らすように
刺激を与えること
04:56
how music was becoming a neuropsychiatric modality
音楽が 自閉症の子どもや
ストレスや不安
04:59
to help children with autism, to help people struggling
鬱を抱える人たちを
救うための
05:02
with stress and anxiety and depression,
神経精神病学における
治療法になっていること
05:06
how deeply Parkinsonian patients would find that their tremor
音楽を聴くことで
パーキンソン病患者の
05:09
and their gait would steady when they listened to music,
震えが収まり 足取りが
しっかりすること
05:12
and how late-stage Alzheimer's patients, whose dementia
そして 認知症が進み
家族のこともわからなくなった
05:15
was so far progressed that they could no longer recognize
後期アルツハイマー病の患者でも
05:19
their family, could still pick out a tune by Chopin
ピアノの前に座ると
子どもの頃に学んだ
05:22
at the piano that they had learned when they were children.
ショパンの曲を演奏することができる
といった話です
05:24
But I had an ulterior motive of visiting Gottfried Schlaug,
でもその日の私の訪問には
胸に秘めた目的がありました
05:28
and it was this: that I was at a crossroads in my life,
音楽と医学の
どちらを選ぶべきか
05:31
trying to choose between music and medicine.
人生の岐路にあったのです
05:34
I had just completed my undergraduate, and I was working
私はちょうど学部課程を終え
ハーバード大学の
05:37
as a research assistant at the lab of Dennis Selkoe,
デニス・セルコー博士の研究室で
助手として働きながら
05:40
studying Parkinson's disease at Harvard, and I had fallen
パーキンソン病の
研究をしていました
05:43
in love with neuroscience. I wanted to become a surgeon.
神経科学に心惹かれ
外科医になりたいと思っていました
05:46
I wanted to become a doctor like Paul Farmer or Rick Hodes,
ポール・ファーマーや リック・ホーズ
のような勇敢な医師になって
05:49
these kind of fearless men who go into places like Haiti or Ethiopia
ハイチやエチオピア
のような場所に赴き
05:53
and work with AIDS patients with multidrug-resistant
エイズ患者や 多剤耐性の結核
外見を損ねる—
05:57
tuberculosis, or with children with disfiguring cancers.
ガンに冒された子どもなどの
治療にあたりたかったのです
06:00
I wanted to become that kind of Red Cross doctor,
赤十字や 国境なき医師団で
働くような
06:04
that doctor without borders.
医師です
06:07
On the other hand, I had played the violin my entire life.
その一方で 私は幼いころから
ずっとバイオリンを弾いてきました
06:09
Music for me was more than a passion. It was obsession.
音楽は私にとってただの情熱ではなく
なくてはならない—
06:12
It was oxygen. I was lucky enough to have studied
酸素のようなものです
幸運にもジュリアード音楽院で学び
06:16
at the Juilliard School in Manhattan, and to have played
テルアビブでのデビュー公演では
ズービン・メータ指揮の
06:19
my debut with Zubin Mehta and the Israeli philharmonic orchestra in Tel Aviv,
イスラエル・フィルと
共演することができました
06:22
and it turned out that Gottfried Schlaug
シュラーグ博士を訪問して
知ったのですが
06:27
had studied as an organist at the Vienna Conservatory,
博士はオルガン奏者として
ウィーン音楽院で学び
06:29
but had given up his love for music to pursue a career
その後 医学の道を究めるため
音楽をあきらめた人でした
06:32
in medicine. And that afternoon, I had to ask him,
その日の午後 こう聞かずには
いられませんでした
06:34
"How was it for you making that decision?"
「その結論を下すのは
どんな気持ちだったのですか?」
06:38
And he said that there were still times when he wished
博士はこう言いました
「当時に戻って昔のように
06:40
he could go back and play the organ the way he used to,
オルガンを弾きたく
なることもある
06:43
and that for me, medical school could wait,
君にとって 医大は後からでも
行くことができるが
06:45
but that the violin simply would not.
バイオリンはそうはいかないよ」
06:49
And after two more years of studying music, I decided
その後2年間 音楽の勉強を続け
私は決心しました
06:51
to shoot for the impossible before taking the MCAT
医大の試験を受ける前に
不可能に挑戦してみよう—
06:54
and applying to medical school like a good Indian son
親孝行なインド人として
医大を受験し
06:57
to become the next Dr. Gupta. (Laughter)
グプタ医師になるのは
その後でいいと(笑)
06:59
And I decided to shoot for the impossible and I took
不可能に挑戦しようと
名高いロサンゼルス・フィルの
07:02
an audition for the esteemed Los Angeles Philharmonic.
オーディションを受けたのです
私にとって初のオーディションで
07:05
It was my first audition, and after three days of playing
1週間の選考期間中に 3日間
ついたて越しに演奏をし
07:08
behind a screen in a trial week, I was offered the position.
採用されることになりました
07:11
And it was a dream. It was a wild dream to perform
まさに夢のようでした
オーケストラで演奏するなんて
07:14
in an orchestra, to perform in the iconic Walt Disney Concert Hall
あのウォルト・ディズニー・
コンサートホールで
07:18
in an orchestra conducted now by the famous Gustavo Dudamel,
しかも指揮者は かの有名な
グスターボ・ドゥダメルです
07:21
but much more importantly to me to be surrounded
でも もっと大切だったのは
音楽家や指導者に囲まれ
07:25
by musicians and mentors that became my new family,
彼らが私の 新しい家族
そして新しい音楽の拠点に
07:28
my new musical home.
なったということです
07:32
But a year later, I met another musician who had also
その1年後には 音楽家としての
自分の考え方や
07:35
studied at Juilliard, one who profoundly helped me
あり方を形作る上で
大きな手助けをしてくれた
07:38
find my voice and shaped my identity as a musician.
ジュリア―ド出身の音楽家との
出会いがありました
07:42
Nathaniel Ayers was a double bassist at Juilliard, but
ナサニエル・エアーズはジュリアードで
コントラバスを学びましたが
07:46
he suffered a series of psychotic episodes in his early 20s,
20代前半に一連の
精神病症状に襲われ
07:49
was treated with thorazine at Bellevue,
ベルビューで向精神薬の
治療を受け
07:53
and ended up living homeless on the streets of Skid Row
30年後には ロサンゼルスの
中心部にある
07:55
in downtown Los Angeles 30 years later.
スキッド・ロウで
路上生活を送っていました
07:59
Nathaniel's story has become a beacon for homelessness
ナサニエルの物語は全米で
ホームレスや
08:01
and mental health advocacy throughout the United States,
メンタルヘルス問題について
考える導き手となり
08:05
as told through the book and the movie "The Soloist,"
「路上のソリスト」として
書籍化・映画化されました
08:08
but I became his friend, and I became his violin teacher,
私は彼と友達になり
彼のバイオリンの先生になりました
08:10
and I told him that wherever he had his violin,
2人がバイオリンを
持っている時であれば
08:13
and wherever I had mine, I would play a lesson with him.
どこであれレッスンをする
という約束をしました
08:15
And on the many times I saw Nathaniel on Skid Row,
スキッド・ロウで私が
何度も目にしたのは
08:18
I witnessed how music was able to bring him back
素人の私には
08:21
from his very darkest moments, from what seemed to me
統合失調症の発作の
兆しに思える
08:24
in my untrained eye to be
暗い深みから
08:27
the beginnings of a schizophrenic episode.
音楽が彼を救い出す様です
08:29
Playing for Nathaniel, the music took on a deeper meaning,
ナサニエルのために演奏することで
音楽はより深い意味を持つようになりました
08:32
because now it was about communication,
今や音楽がコミュニケーションと
なったからです
08:36
a communication where words failed, a communication
音楽は 言葉が届かない領域での
コミュニケーションであり
08:38
of a message that went deeper than words, that registered
ナサニエルの心のもっとも奥深い部分に
しまい込まれているけれど
08:41
at a fundamentally primal level in Nathaniel's psyche,
私との交流を通じて
表に現れてくる
08:44
yet came as a true musical offering from me.
メッセージのやり取りなのです
08:48
I found myself growing outraged that someone
ナサニエルのような人が
精神疾患を抱えているからといって
08:52
like Nathaniel could have ever been homeless on Skid Row
スキッド・ロウで路上生活を強いられていることに
私は怒りを覚えました
08:56
because of his mental illness, yet how many tens of thousands
でも ナサニエルと同じぐらい
悲しい体験をしていながら
09:00
of others there were out there on Skid Row alone
書籍や映画に
取り上げられることもなく
09:04
who had stories as tragic as his, but were never going to have a book or a movie
路上生活を続けなければ
ならない人が
09:07
made about them that got them off the streets?
スキッド・ロウだけでも
一体何万人いるのでしょう?
09:11
And at the very core of this crisis of mine, I felt somehow
このことに ひどく
思い悩んでいるとき
09:14
the life of music had chosen me, where somehow,
ふと 音楽の精が私を選んだのだ
という気持ちになりました
09:18
perhaps possibly in a very naive sense, I felt what Skid Row
そして おそらくは世間知らず
ゆえにこう思いました
09:22
really needed was somebody like Paul Farmer
スキッド・ロウに必要なのは
ディズニー・ホールで演奏する
09:25
and not another classical musician playing on Bunker Hill.
音楽家ではなく ポール・
ファーマーのような人なのだと
09:28
But in the end, it was Nathaniel who showed me
でも最後には ナサニエルが
教えてくれました
09:32
that if I was truly passionate about change,
もし私が本当に
変えることに情熱を持ち
09:34
if I wanted to make a difference, I already had the perfect instrument to do it,
状況を変えたいのであれば
そのための道具を既に手にしているのだと
09:37
that music was the bridge that connected my world and his.
私の世界とナサニエルの世界を
つないでくれた 音楽がそうです
09:41
There's a beautiful quote
ドイツのロマン派を代表する
作曲家シューマンが
09:46
by the Romantic German composer Robert Schumann,
こんな美しい言葉を
残しています
09:48
who said, "To send light into the darkness of men's hearts,
「闇に覆われた人の心に
光を届けることこそ
09:50
such is the duty of the artist."
芸術家の責務である」
09:55
And this is a particularly poignant quote
この言葉が格別に
胸を打つのは
09:58
because Schumann himself suffered from schizophrenia
シューマン自身が
統合失調症に苦しめられ
10:00
and died in asylum.
精神病院で亡くなった
人だからです
10:03
And inspired by what I learned from Nathaniel,
私は ナサニエルから
学んだことに後押しされて
10:05
I started an organization on Skid Row of musicians
スキッド・ロウで
「ストリート・シンフォニー」という
10:07
called Street Symphony, bringing the light of music
団体を作り 暗闇に音楽の光をもたらす
活動を始めました
10:10
into the very darkest places, performing
スキッロ・ロウの路上や
救護施設に暮らす
10:13
for the homeless and mentally ill at shelters and clinics
ホームレスの人たち
10:16
on Skid Row, performing for combat veterans
PTSD(心的外傷後ストレス障害)に
悩む退役軍人
10:18
with post-traumatic stress disorder, and for the incarcerated
囚人や 触法精神障害者と
された人たちのために
10:22
and those labeled as criminally insane.
演奏をするのです
10:26
After one of our events at the Patton State Hospital
サンバーナーディーノにある
パットン州立病院での
10:29
in San Bernardino, a woman walked up to us
演奏会で 一人の女性が
私たちに歩み寄ってきました
10:32
and she had tears streaming down her face,
顔に幾筋も涙を流し
10:34
and she had a palsy, she was shaking,
けいれんし 震えながらも
10:37
and she had this gorgeous smile, and she said
見事な笑顔を浮かべて
言いました
10:39
that she had never heard classical music before,
クラシックもバイオリンも
聴いたことがなく
10:42
she didn't think she was going to like it, she had never
気に入ることもないだろうと
思っていたけれど
10:44
heard a violin before, but that hearing this music was like hearing the sunshine,
あなた方の音楽は
陽の光を聞くようだった
10:47
and that nobody ever came to visit them, and that for the first time in six years,
自分たちを訪れる者など誰もなかったが
今日の音楽を聴いて
10:51
when she heard us play, she stopped shaking without medication.
この6年間で初めて
薬なしで震えがとまった と
10:54
Suddenly, what we're finding with these concerts,
ステージも照明もなく
タキシードもない
10:59
away from the stage, away from the footlights, out
こうしたコンサート活動を
通じて気づいたのは
11:02
of the tuxedo tails, the musicians become the conduit
コンサートホールになど
来ることができず
11:05
for delivering the tremendous therapeutic benefits
私たちが普段演奏
するような音楽に
11:08
of music on the brain to an audience that would never
接する機会のない
人たちに対して
11:12
have access to this room,
演奏家は
この音楽の持つ
11:15
would never have access to the kind of music that we make.
大きな癒しの力を伝える
パイプになれるということです
11:16
Just as medicine serves to heal more
医学が治すのが
11:22
than the building blocks of the body alone,
体の部品だけではないのと
同じように
11:26
the power and beauty of music transcends the "E"
音楽が持つ力と美は
TEDの “E” が表す
11:29
in the middle of our beloved acronym.
エンターテインメントを
超えたものです
11:33
Music transcends the aesthetic beauty alone.
音楽が表すのは 美学上の
美しさだけではありません
11:36
The synchrony of emotions that we experience when we
ワーグナーのオペラや
ブラームスの交響曲
11:39
hear an opera by Wagner, or a symphony by Brahms,
ベートーベンの室内楽を聴くとき
共有される感情体験には
11:42
or chamber music by Beethoven, compels us to remember
私たちが共通の人間性や
深い部分でつながった
11:45
our shared, common humanity, the deeply communal
共通の意識 共感の思いを
持ち合わせていることを
11:49
connected consciousness, the empathic consciousness
思い起こさずにはいられません
11:53
that neuropsychiatrist Iain McGilchrist says is hard-wired
精神神経科医のイアン・マギルクリスト
によると こうした感情は
11:56
into our brain's right hemisphere.
人間の右脳に生まれつき
備わっているものです
12:00
And for those living in the most dehumanizing conditions
精神疾患を抱えながら ホームレスや
囚人でいるという
12:03
of mental illness within homelessness
もっとも非人間的な状況で
暮らす人にとって
12:06
and incarceration, the music and the beauty of music
音楽 そして音楽が持つ美は
12:09
offers a chance for them to transcend the world around them,
周囲の環境に関わらず
自分たちは今でも
12:11
to remember that they still have the capacity to experience
美しいものを体験することができ
人々はまだ
12:16
something beautiful and that humanity has not forgotten them.
自分たちのことを忘れていないのだと
気づかせる機会になります
12:19
And the spark of that beauty, the spark of that humanity
そして そのような人間性や
美のきらめきは
12:23
transforms into hope,
希望へと形を変えるのです
12:26
and we know, whether we choose the path of music
選んだ道が音楽であっても
医学であっても
12:29
or of medicine, that's the very first thing we must instill
内からの癒しを後押し
したいのであれば
12:32
within our communities, within our audiences,
自らのコミュニティや観客に
12:35
if we want to inspire healing from within.
このことをまず
伝えなければなりません
12:37
I'd like to end with a quote by John Keats,
最後に イギリスのロマン派詩人
12:41
the Romantic English poet,
ジョン・キーツの言葉を紹介します
12:44
a very famous quote that I'm sure all of you know.
とても有名なので
皆さんご存知かと思います
12:46
Keats himself had also given up a career in medicine
キーツもまた 医学の道をあきらめて
詩の世界に入った人でしたが
12:49
to pursue poetry, but he died when he was a year older than me.
今の私より1歳年上の
25歳で亡くなりました
12:52
And Keats said, "Beauty is truth, and truth beauty.
彼の言葉です
「美は真実であり 真実は美である
12:55
That is all ye know on Earth, and all ye need to know."
それが地上で知ることのすべて
知るべきことのすべてである」
13:00
(Music)
(音楽)
13:09
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:53
Translator:Wataru Narita
Reviewer:Yasushi Aoki

sponsored links

Robert Gupta - Violinist
Violinist Robert Gupta joined the LA Philharmonic at the age of 19 -- and maintains a passionate parallel interest in neurobiology and mental health issues. He's a TED Senior Fellow.

Why you should listen

Violinist Robert Vijay Gupta joined the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the age of 19. He made his solo debut, at age 11, with the Israel Philharmonic under Zubin Mehta. He has a Master's in music from Yale. But his undergraduate degree? Pre-med. As an undergrad, Gupta was part of several research projects in neuro- and neurodegenerative biology. He held Research Assistant positions at CUNY Hunter College in New York City, where he worked on spinal cord neuronal regeneration, and at the Harvard Institutes of Medicine Center for Neurologic Diseases, where he studied the biochemical pathology of Parkinson's disease.

Gupta is passionate about education and outreach, both as a musician and as an activist for mental health issues. He has the privilege of working with Nathaniel Ayers, the brilliant, schizophrenic musician featured in "The Soloist," as his violin teacher.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.