19:03
TEDGlobal 2012

Jason McCue: Terrorism is a failed brand

ジェイソン・マッキュー: テロという悪いブランド

Filmed:

この心を捉えるスピーチでは、テロと戦うために、テロという「ブランド」に対する「消費者」の信頼感を弱めてリクルートを妨害しよう、と弁護士ジェイソン・マッキューが論じます。この考え方に基づいて彼ら活動家たちがもたらした変化の実例を紹介します。

- Lawyer
Jason McCue litigates against terrorists, dictators and others who seem above the law, using the legal and judicial system in innovative ways. Full bio

We most certainly do talk to terrorists, no question about it.
テロリストとの対話が必要だということ
これは間違いのない事実です
00:16
We are at war with a new form of terrorism.
私達が闘っているテロは かつてのテロとは違います
00:21
It's sort of the good old, traditional form of terrorism,
テロは昔から存在していますが
00:27
but it's sort of been packaged for the 21st century.
21世紀になり テロの形は変わってきています
00:30
One of the big things about countering terrorism
テロとの闘いで重要なことは
00:34
is, how do you perceive it?
テロをどのように感じるのか ということです
00:38
Because perception leads to your response to it.
なぜなら感じ方によって 私達の反応は変わるからです
00:41
So if you have a traditional perception of terrorism,
従来 テロは犯罪行為 あるいは戦争の一種だと
00:45
it would be that it's one of criminality, one of war.
受け止められていました
00:49
So how are you going to respond to it?
この場合 テロに対してどのように対応しますか
00:53
Naturally, it would follow that you meet kind with kind.
当然「目には目を 歯には歯を」ということになります
00:55
You fight it. If you have a more modernist approach,
より現代的な考え方をして
00:58
and your perception of terrorism is almost cause-and-effect,
テロに走ったのには何か理由があったと見れば
01:02
then naturally from that, the responses that come out of it
正面対決以外の対応が
01:06
are much more asymmetrical.
自ずから出てくるでしょう
01:10
We live in a modern, global world.
私達が暮らす現代のグローバル化した世界に
01:14
Terrorists have actually adapted to it.
テロリストは適応してきました
01:18
It's something we have to, too, and that means the people
私達もこの事態に適応しなければなりません
01:22
who are working on counterterrorism responses
テロに対抗した活動に関わる人は
01:25
have to start, in effect, putting on
まず Google でも何でも使って
01:28
their Google-tinted glasses, or whatever.
現状を知るべきです
01:31
For my part, what I wanted us to do was just to look at
私が皆さんにしてほしいことは テロを
01:36
terrorism as though it was a global brand,
ある種のブランドとして見ることです
01:40
say, Coca-Cola.
たとえばコカコーラのような
01:44
Both are fairly bad for your health. (Laughter)
どちらも健康には悪いですよね(笑)
01:45
If you look at it as a brand in those ways,
テロをブランドとして捉えると
01:52
what you'll come to realize is, it's a pretty flawed product.
それが欠陥だらけだということがすぐにわかります
01:56
As we've said, it's pretty bad for your health,
まず 今申し上げたように 健康に悪いです
01:59
it's bad for those who it affects,
テロは 人々に害を与えますし
02:02
and it's not actually good if you're a suicide bomber either.
自殺の方法としても いい方法だとは言えません
02:04
It doesn't actually do what it says on the tin.
テロはいつもうまくいくわけではありませんし
02:07
You're not really going to get 72 virgins in heaven.
天国でいい思いができるわけでもありません
02:11
It's not going to happen, I don't think.
そんなことは きっとないと思います
02:16
And you're not really going to, in the '80s, end capitalism
1980年代にあったように
ある特定のテロリスト集団を支持することで
02:18
by supporting one of these groups. It's a load of nonsense.
資本主義を崩壊させるということも
できるわけがないです
02:22
But what you realize, it's got an Achilles' heel.
こう考えると 私達は テロの大きな弱点に気付きます
02:25
The brand has an Achilles' heel.
そう このブランドには弱点があるのです
02:28
We've mentioned the health,
先ほど 健康に悪いと言いましたが
02:31
but it needs consumers to buy into it.
このブランドには消費者が必要なのです
02:33
The consumers it needs are the terrorist constituency.
ここでいう消費者とは テロリストの支援者です
02:36
They're the people who buy into the brand, support them,
彼らはブランドを支持し 活動を支援するのです
02:40
facilitate them, and they're the people
私達はそういった人たちに対して
02:43
we've got to reach out to.
アクションを起こすべきです
02:46
We've got to attack that brand in front of them.
彼らに テロが悪いブランドだと知らせるのです
02:49
There's two essential ways of doing that, if we carry on this brand theme.
これには主に2つの方法があります
02:52
One is reducing their market. What I mean is,
まず テロリストの市場を縮小させること つまり
02:56
it's their brand against our brand. We've got to compete.
私達のブランドでテロリストの市場を奪うのです
02:59
We've got to show we're a better product.
そして私達はよりよい製品だと証明するのです
03:04
If I'm trying to show we're a better product,
ただ より優れた製品だと示そうとするなら
03:06
I probably wouldn't do things like Guantanamo Bay.
米軍がテロリスト収容基地でしたことは間違いでした
03:10
We've talked there about curtailing the underlying need
テロという製品に対するニーズを
減らして行こうという話をしているのに
03:14
for the product itself. You could be looking there at
その基地では
03:18
poverty, injustice, all those sorts of things
貧困や不正といった テロを助長するあらゆるものを
03:22
which feed terrorism.
目にすることができました
03:25
The other thing to do is to knock the product,
もうひとつの方法は 製品を批判し
03:27
attack the brand myth, as we've said.
ブランドの欠陥を暴くことです
03:31
You know, there's nothing heroic about killing a young kid.
当然ですが 少年を殺すことは勇敢なことではないのです
03:33
Perhaps we need to focus on that and get that message back across.
このことに焦点を当てて このメッセージを広く伝える必要があります
03:36
We've got to reveal the dangers in the product.
製品の危険性を暴くのです
03:41
Our target audience, it's not just the producers of terrorism,
それはテロの生産者
03:44
as I've said, the terrorists.
つまりテロリストや
03:48
It's not just the marketeers of terrorism,
テロの商人 つまり
03:49
which is those who finance, those who facilitate it,
テロに資金を出して支援する人だけでなく
03:51
but it's the consumers of terrorism.
テロの消費者に向けたメッセージでもあるのです
03:56
We've got to get in to those homelands.
その際 テロリストの母国へ飛び込む必要があるでしょう
03:58
That's where they recruit from. That's where they get their power and strength.
彼らはそこで兵を集め 力を得るのです
04:01
That's where their consumers come from.
つまり そこで消費者が生まれるのです
04:05
And we have to get our messaging in there.
なので 彼らの国でメッセージを広める必要があります
04:07
So the essentials are, we've got to have interaction
ここで重要な事は テロリストやその支援者達と
04:11
in those areas, with the terrorists, the facilitators, etc.
交流をする必要があるということです
04:15
We've got to engage, we've got to educate,
互いに関わり 分かり合い
04:18
and we've got to have dialogue.
対話を行うのです
04:21
Now, staying on this brand thing for just a few more seconds,
もう少しこのブランドについての話を続けましょう
04:24
think about delivery mechanisms.
次はブランドのマーケティングについて考えます
04:28
How are we going to do these attacks?
どのような戦略がいいのでしょうか
04:31
Well, reducing the market is really one for governments
市場を縮小させるというのは政府や社会のすることです
04:33
and civil society. We've got to show we're better.
私達がすべきことは 私達が優れた製品であると
04:36
We've got to show our values.
示すことであり
04:40
We've got to practice what we preach.
テロリストに伝えたことを実行することなのです
04:43
But when it comes to knocking the brand,
でも 例えばブランドを攻撃するときに
04:46
if the terrorists are Coca-Cola and we're Pepsi,
テロリストがコカコーラで
私達がペプシだとしましょう
04:48
I don't think, being Pepsi, anything we say about Coca-Cola,
ペプシがコカコーラのことを非難しても
04:52
anyone's going to believe us.
誰も信じてくれませんよね
04:56
So we've got to find a different mechanism,
そこで 違うアプローチが必要です
04:58
and one of the best mechanisms I've ever come across
私が考えついたアプローチの中でもっとも有効なものは
05:01
is the victims of terrorism.
テロリストの被害者を出すことです
05:03
They are somebody who can actually stand there and say,
彼らはこう証言してくれるでしょう
05:06
"This product's crap. I had it and I was sick for days.
「この製品は最悪だ このせいで怪我をした
05:09
It burnt my hand, whatever." You believe them.
やけどをした」 信憑性がありますよね
05:13
You can see their scars. You trust them.
彼らの傷を見る すると彼らを信じることができる
05:17
But whether it's victims, whether it's governments,
ただ 被害者であろうが政府であろうが
NGO であろうが
05:19
NGOs, or even the Queen yesterday, in Northern Ireland,
あるいは先日の女王の北アイルランド訪問であろうが
05:24
we have to interact and engage with those different
様々なレベルでテロと関わって
対話をすることが必要であり
05:30
layers of terrorism, and, in effect,
現実的には
05:34
we do have to have a little dance with the devil.
大きなリスクを取ることも必要となるでしょう
05:39
This is my favorite part of my speech.
これから私のスピーチの山場を迎えます
05:43
I wanted to blow you all up to try and make a point,
本当はいきなりの爆発で
テロを体験してもらいたかったんです
05:46
but — (Laughter) —
けれど…(笑)
05:49
TED, for health and safety reasons, have told me
健康上、安全上の理由でTED側から
05:53
I've got to do a countdown, so
カウントダウンをするよう言われました
05:56
I feel like a bit of an Irish or Jewish terrorist,
今私はテロリストになった気分です
05:57
sort of a health and safety terrorist, and I — (Laughter) —
健康や安全に配慮したテロリストですが
(笑)
06:00
I've got to count 3, 2, 1, and
カウントダウンの後に
06:06
it's a bit alarming, so thinking of what my motto would be,
少し大きな音が出ます
この目的は「心臓発作でなく
06:09
and it would be, "Body parts, not heart attacks."
身体的な傷害を与えること」だと考えてください
06:12
So 3, 2, 1. (Explosion sound)
それでは 3 2 1 (爆発音)
06:15
Very good. (Laughter)
すばらしい(笑)
06:21
Now, lady in 15J was a suicide bomber amongst us all.
15Jの席の女性は自爆テロ犯でした
06:26
We're all victims of terrorism.
私達はテロの被害を受けました
06:33
There's 625 of us in this room. We're going to be scarred for life.
この部屋には625人がいますが
全員 今後の人生で癒せない傷を負いました
06:36
There was a father and a son who sat in that seat over there.
そちらの席には父と息子が座っていました
06:40
The son's dead. The father lives.
息子は死に 父は生き延びました
06:45
The father will probably kick himself for years to come
父は何年も自分を責め続けるでしょう
06:47
that he didn't take that seat instead of his kid.
なぜ息子の席にいたのが自分ではなかったのだと
06:53
He's going to take to alcohol, and he's probably
統計によれば 彼はアルコール漬けになり
06:57
going to kill himself in three years. That's the stats.
3年以内に自殺を図ります
06:59
There's a very young, attractive lady over here,
そちらにいたのは若く 美しい女性でした
07:04
and she has something which I think's the worst form
しかし彼女が負ったのは 自爆テロの被害の中で
07:07
of psychological, physical injury I've ever seen
考えうる限り最悪の
07:10
out of a suicide bombing: It's human shrapnel.
精神的 身体的な傷でした 人間榴弾という症状です
07:13
What it means is, when she sat in a restaurant
彼女は10年後 15年後でも
07:17
in years to come, 10 years to come, 15 years to come,
レストランやビーチに座っているときに
07:19
or she's on the beach, every so often she's going to start
時々肌をこすります
07:22
rubbing her skin, and out of there will come
すると肌の中から
07:24
a piece of that shrapnel.
爆弾の破片が出てくるのです
07:27
And that is a hard thing for the head to take.
これは受け入れがたい症状でしょう
07:30
There's a lady over there as well who lost her legs
そちらの女性は爆発により
07:35
in this bombing.
両足を失いました
07:38
She's going to find out that she gets a pitiful amount
彼女の傷害に対して政府が助成するお金は
07:41
of money off our government
ほんの僅かだということを
07:45
for looking after what's happened to her.
彼女はじきに知ります
07:50
She had a daughter who was going to go to one of the best
彼女には優秀な娘がおり 名門大学へいく予定でした
07:53
universities. She's going to give up university
しかしその夢は絶たれ 母親の世話をしなくては
07:55
to look after Mum.
ならなくなりました
07:58
We're all here, and all of those who watch it
ここにいるすべての人は
08:01
are going to be traumatized by this event,
自爆テロの現場を目にし トラウマを抱えます
08:04
but all of you here who are victims are going to learn
しかしそれ以上に辛い真実を 被害者は
08:07
some hard truths.
目の当たりにするのです
08:10
That is, our society, we sympathize, but after a while,
私達の社会はしばらくは被害者に同情します しかし
08:11
we start to ignore. We don't do enough as a society.
しばらくするともう無関心になるのです
08:16
We do not look after our victims, and we do not enable them,
社会は被害者のケアをしてはくれません
08:20
and what I'm going to try and show is that actually,
ここで私が言おうとしていることは
08:24
victims are the best weapon we have
テロの被害者こそが テロに対する
08:27
against more terrorism.
最大の武器だということです
08:29
How would the government at the turn of the millennium
21世紀になってから今日に至るまで
08:32
approach today? Well, we all know.
政府はテロとどう闘ってきたでしょうか
08:37
What they'd have done then is an invasion.
政府のしてきたことは侵略です
08:39
If the suicide bomber was from Wales,
もし自爆テロの犯人がウェールズ人だったら
08:42
good luck to Wales, I'd say.
ウェールズはひどい目にあったことでしょう
08:45
Knee-jerk legislation, emergency provision legislation --
危機に対する準備のための法律を
反射的に求めてしまうことは
08:47
which hits at the very basis of our society, as we all know --
私達の社会を不安定にしてしまう
08:51
it's a mistake.
過ちなのです
08:54
We're going to drive prejudice throughout Edinburgh,
それはエジンバラ中に そしてイギリス中に
08:58
throughout the U.K., for Welsh people.
ウェールズに対する偏見をばらまきかねませんでした
09:01
Today's approach, governments have learned from their mistakes.
政府は過去の過ちから学習をして テロとの闘い方は変わりつつあります
09:06
They are looking at what I've started off on,
政府はテロとの正面対決をやめ
09:11
on these more asymmetrical approaches to it,
より現代的な見方で
テロの因果関係に
09:13
more modernist views, cause and effect.
目を向けようとしています
09:17
But mistakes of the past are inevitable.
しかし 過去と同じ失敗をすることも
避けられません
09:20
It's human nature.
それは人間の性です
09:22
The fear and the pressure to do something on them
恐怖や
相手に対抗すべきという圧力は
09:24
is going to be immense. They are going to make mistakes.
激しいものとなり
彼らはいずれまた 失敗を犯すでしょう
09:28
They're not just going to be smart.
政府は完璧な存在ではないのです
09:30
There was a famous Irish terrorist who once summed up
アイルランドのあるテロリストがこの点をとてもわかりやすく
09:34
the point very beautifully. He said,
まとめて 述べています
09:37
"The thing is, about the British government, is, is that it's got
「イギリス政府は常に幸運でいる必要がある
09:40
to be lucky all the time, and we only have to be lucky once."
一方 テロリストは一度だけ幸運をつかめば成功する」
09:42
So what we need to do is we have to effect it.
そこで 私達がすべきことは
「常に幸運である」ことなのです
09:47
We've got to start thinking about being more proactive.
そのために もっと将来のことを見越す必要があります
09:50
We need to build an arsenal of noncombative weapons
このテロとの闘いにおいて
相手を傷つけるためではない武器を
09:53
in this war on terrorism.
蓄える必要があるのです
09:57
But of course, it's ideas -- is not something that governments do very well.
しかしもちろんこれは
政府が上手くできることではありません
09:59
I want to go back just to before the bang, to this idea of
先ほどの爆発の前に ブランドの話をしました
10:07
brand, and I was talking about Coke and Pepsi, etc.
コカコーラとペプシの話などです
10:12
We see it as terrorism versus democracy in that brand war.
我々から見ればテロと民主主義というブランドの闘いです
10:16
They'll see it as freedom fighters and truth
テロリスト側から見れば 自由への闘いであり
10:20
against injustice, imperialism, etc.
不正や大国の帝国主義に対抗する真実の闘いです
10:22
We do have to see this as a deadly battlefield.
私達はこの闘いを真剣に考える必要があります
10:29
It's not just [our] flesh and blood they want.
テロリストは私達を単に傷つけたいわけではありません
10:33
They actually want our cultural souls, and that's why
テロの真の目的は
民主主義の消費者を奪うことなのです
10:36
the brand analogy is a very interesting way of looking at this.
だからブランドを通じてテロを考えることに
意味があるのです
10:39
If we look at al Qaeda. Al Qaeda was essentially
アルカイダを例に取ってみましょう アルカイダは
10:43
a product on a shelf in a souk somewhere
誰も知らないような店の
10:47
which not many people had heard of.
棚に置かれている商品のようなものです
10:52
9/11 launched it. It was its big marketing day,
そして9.11の悲劇が起こりました
アルカイダにとってマーケティングの好機です
10:54
and it was packaged for the 21st century. They knew what they were doing.
21世紀に向けて商品をパッケージ化しました
彼らは目的を明確に打ち出しています
10:58
They were effectively [doing] something in this brand image
ブランドイメージに沿った活動を続け
11:03
of creating a brand which can be franchised around
魅力的なブランドとして貧困や不正にあふれる
11:07
the world, where there's poverty, ignorance and injustice.
世界に発信をしているのです
11:10
We, as I've said, have got to hit that market,
先ほども言ったように 彼らの市場を縮小させるべきです
11:16
but we've got to use our heads rather than our might.
しかしその時には
力ではなく知恵を用いなければなりません
11:20
If we perceive it in this way as a brand, or other ways of thinking at it like this,
テロをブランドとして捉えると 力に頼るのでは
11:23
we will not resolve or counter terrorism.
テロに対抗することはできないことがわかります
11:27
What I'd like to do is just briefly go through a few examples
ここからは 私がしてきたことから いくつかの例をあげて
11:32
from my work on areas where we try and approach these things differently.
簡単に紹介をさせていただきたいと思います
11:35
The first one has been dubbed "lawfare,"
まずはじめに lawfare と呼ぶ法的取り組みです
11:40
for want of a better word.
他にいい名前がないか考えているところです
11:44
When we originally looked at bringing civil actions against terrorists,
私達がテロに対する市民の活動に目を向け始めた時
11:47
everyone thought we were a bit mad and mavericks
誰もが私達のことを 変人 奇人だと
11:51
and crackpots. Now it's got a title. Everyone's doing it.
言いました
今はそんなことはありません 誰しもが目を向けています
11:53
There's a bomb, people start suing.
爆破テロに対して 人々は声をあげています
11:57
But one of the first early cases on this was the Omagh Bombing.
こういった動きの始まりは
北アイルランドのオマーで起きた爆破テロです
11:59
A civil action was brought from 1998.
市民の活動は1998年以来続いています
12:02
In Omagh, bomb went off, Real IRA,
オマーでは 和平交渉中に武装組織が
12:06
middle of a peace process.
爆破テロを行いました
12:09
That meant that the culprits couldn't really be prosecuted
しかし 和平というより大きな目標を達成するためなどの理由で
12:12
for lots of reasons, mostly to do with the peace process
爆破テロの犯人は告訴されることが
12:16
and what was going on, the greater good.
ありませんでした
12:19
It also meant, then, if you can imagine this,
想像してみてください
12:21
that the people who bombed your children
あなたの地区で散歩をしていた時に
12:24
and your husbands were walking around the supermarket
自分の子供や夫がテロに巻き込まれた
12:26
that you lived in.
人々の気持ちを
12:31
Some of those victims said enough is enough.
彼らの中には「もうたくさんだ」という人もいます
12:33
We brought a private action, and thank God, 10 years later,
しかし私達は市民活動を始め 10年がたってようやく
12:37
we actually won it. There is a slight appeal on
勝訴することができました
まだ上告がされるのですが
12:40
at the moment so I have to be a bit careful,
私達は勝つことができるだろうと
12:43
but I'm fairly confident.
確信しています
12:45
Why was it effective?
なぜこの活動が成功したのでしょうか
12:47
It was effective not just because justice was seen to be done
正義が 喪失感を抱える人々に希望を与えたからだけでは
12:48
where there was a huge void.
ありません
12:51
It was because the Real IRA and other terrorist groups,
「真のIRA」などの武装集団は 自分たちが社会的な弱者であるという事実から
12:53
their whole strength is from the fact that they are
力を得ています
12:57
an underdog. When we put the victims as the underdog
そこでテロの被害者こそが社会的弱者であると強調することで
12:59
and flipped it, they didn't know what to do.
状況は逆転します 武装集団は拠り所を失うのです
13:04
They were embarrassed. Their recruitment went down.
彼らは困惑し グループへの勧誘はうまくいかなくなります
13:07
The bombs actually stopped -- fact -- because of this action.
実際 この活動のおかげで爆破テロは止みました
13:12
We became, or those victims became, more importantly,
私達は あるいは被害者達は テログループに取り憑く
13:16
a ghost that haunted the terrorist organization.
亡霊のような存在となったのです
13:20
There's other examples. We have a case called Almog
続いての例は Almog というシステムの話です
13:24
which is to do with a bank that was,
これは 自爆テロ犯に
13:26
allegedly, from our point of view,
銀行が報酬を払うシステムだと
13:31
giving rewards to suicide bombers.
私達は考えています
13:34
Just by bringing the very action,
市民が起こしたたったひとつの行動で
13:38
that bank has stopped doing it, and indeed,
銀行は Almog を止めました
13:41
the powers that be around the world, which for real politic
世界中の政府は様々な政治的要因から
13:43
reasons before, couldn't actually deal with this issue,
この問題に対処することが出来ませんでした
13:45
because there was lots of competing interests,
多くの衝突する利害関係があったからです
13:49
have actually closed down those loopholes in the banking system.
しかし市民活動がこのシステムの抜け穴をシャットダウンすることに成功しました
13:50
There's another case called the McDonald case,
次はマクドナルドと呼ばれる例です
13:53
where some victims of Semtex, of the Provisional IRA bombings,
リビアのカダフィにより支援されたアイルランドの
13:56
which were supplied by Gaddafi, sued,
武装集団による爆破テロの被害者が訴訟を起こし
14:00
and that action has led to amazing things for new Libya.
この行動がリビアの再建に大きな意味を持ちました
14:07
New Libya has been compassionate towards those victims,
新しくなったリビア政権は被害者達を思いやり
14:12
and started taking it -- so it started a whole new dialogue there.
そこではまったく新しい形の対話が生まれました
14:15
But the problem is, we need more and more support
しかし問題は これらの活動をしていく中でより多くの
14:18
for these ideas and cases.
支援が必要となることです
14:23
Civil affairs and civil society initiatives.
支援とは市民の関心 市民の行動のことです
14:26
A good one is in Somalia. There's a war on piracy.
ソマリアの海賊との闘いがいい例です
14:30
If anyone thinks you can have a war on piracy
海賊との戦いは
14:33
like a war on terrorism and beat it, you're wrong.
テロとの闘いと同じように考えることは出来ません
14:34
What we're trying to do there is turn pirates to fisherman.
そこで私達がしたことは海賊を漁師にすることです
14:37
They used to be fisherman, of course,
海賊は元は漁師だったのですが
14:40
but we stole their fish and dumped a load of toxic waste
人々が彼らの魚を奪い 海に有毒物質を廃棄していたのです
14:42
in their water, so what we're trying to do is create
そこでまずはじめに 沿岸警備隊を漁に同行させ
14:45
security and employment by bringing a coastguard
漁業の安全性と雇用を確保しました
14:49
along with the fisheries industry, and I can guarantee you,
皆さんに自信を持ってお伝え出来ますが
14:51
as that builds, al Shabaab and such likes will not have
この過程で アル・シャバブのようなイスラム勢力が
14:54
the poverty and injustice any longer to prey on those people.
つけ入るすきとなる貧困や不正は無くなるでしょう
14:57
These initiatives cost less than a missile,
このプロジェクトの費用はミサイル1基よりも安く
15:01
and certainly less than any soldier's life,
どんな兵士の命よりも安いでしょう
15:05
but more importantly, it takes the war to their homelands,
さらに重要なことに
戦いの舞台は彼らの祖国となり
15:08
and not onto our shore,
こちらには向かってきません
15:11
and we're looking at the causes.
因果をきちんと見たからこそです
15:13
The last one I wanted to talk about was dialogue.
最後に 対話についてお話ししたいと思います
15:15
The advantages of dialogue are obvious.
対話のもたらす便益は明らかです
15:18
It self-educates both sides, enables a better understanding,
両者を啓蒙し よりよい理解を可能にし
15:21
reveals the strengths and weaknesses,
強さと弱さを自覚させ
15:25
and yes, like some of the speakers before,
これまで登壇された方々のように
15:27
the shared vulnerability does lead to trust, and
弱さを共有することは信頼を育み
15:30
it does then become, that process, part of normalization.
そのプロセスの中で 両者がひとつになれるのです
15:34
But it's not an easy road. After the bomb,
しかしこれは簡単なことではありません
テロの被害者は
15:37
the victims are not into this.
対話を持ちたいとは思いません
15:41
There's practical problems.
実際に行うのは困難です
15:45
It's politically risky for the protagonists
さらに両者にとって 政治的に
15:46
and for the interlocutors. On one occasion
リスクが大きいです
15:49
I was doing it, every time I did a point that they didn't like,
ある対話では 相手の気に喰わないことを
言うたびに
15:52
they actually threw stones at me,
石を投げられ
15:55
and when I did a point they liked,
彼らの気に入るようなことを言うと
15:56
they starting shooting in the air, equally not great. (Laughter)
空に向かって発砲することもありました
どちらも好ましくないですね(笑)
15:58
Whatever the point, it gets to the heart of the problem,
ですが なにをするにしても なにを話すにしても
16:03
you're doing it, you're talking to them.
私達は問題の核心に近づくことができます
16:06
Now, I just want to end with saying, if we follow reason,
この言葉を最後にお伝えします
もし理性に従えば
16:08
we realize that I think we'd all say that we want to
テロを軍事的に捉えるのではなく
16:12
have a perception of terrorism which is not just a pure
純粋にテロを知りたいと
16:17
military perception of it.
誰もが思うでしょう
16:20
We need to foster more
私達はより
16:24
modern and asymmetrical responses to it.
現代的な対応をしていくべきなのです
16:26
This isn't about being soft on terrorism.
テロに寛容になれと言っているわけではありません
16:29
It's about fighting them on contemporary battlefields.
テロリストとは違う 現代の方法で彼らと闘うのです
16:32
We must foster innovation, as I've said.
イノベーションを育む必要もあります
16:35
Governments are receptive. It won't come from those dusty corridors.
政府は受動的です
イノベーションはそんなところからは生まれません
16:38
The private sector has a role.
民間セクターが大きな役割を果たすのです
16:42
The role we could do right now is going away
私達が今すぐにできることは
16:44
and looking at how we can support victims around the world
世界中のテロの被害者を
どう支えることができるのか見て回り
16:47
to bring initiatives.
行動を起こすことです
16:51
If I was to leave you with some big questions here which
ここで皆さんに大きな問いを残していきたいと思います
16:52
may change one's perception to it, and who knows what
これはテロに対する認識を変えるかもしれません
この質問から
16:55
thoughts and responses will come out of it,
どんなアイデアや行動が生まれるか 楽しみです
16:58
but did myself and my terrorist group actually need
「テロリストは自分たちの主張を伝えるために
17:01
to blow you up to make our point?
私達を吹き飛ばす必要があったのだろうか?」
17:05
We have to ask ourselves these questions, however unpalatable.
不快な質問ですが
私達はこれを問い続けなければなりません
17:08
Have we been ignoring an injustice or a humanitarian
私達は 世界のどこかで起こっている不正や苦しみを
17:12
struggle somewhere in the world?
無視してきたのではないだろうか?
17:16
What if, actually, engagement on poverty and injustice
テロリストは私達に 貧困や不正に
17:18
is exactly what the terrorists wanted us to do?
立ち向かって欲しいだけなのではないだろうか?
17:21
What if the bombs are just simply wake-up calls for us?
爆破テロは私達に対する緊急信号なのではないだろうか?
17:23
What happens if that bomb went off
爆破テロが起こったのは
17:26
because we didn't have any thoughts and things in place
私達がそれらの問題を解決するための対話を
17:30
to allow dialogue to deal with these things and interaction?
怠ってきたからなのかもしれません
17:33
What is definitely uncontroversial
はっきりとわかることは
17:38
is that, as I've said, we've got to stop being reactive,
その場しのぎの対応を続けることをやめて
17:41
and more proactive, and I just want to leave you
より先を見越すことです
最後にこのアイデアを
17:43
with one idea, which is that
皆さんにお伝えします
17:46
it's a provocative question for you to think about,
これはとても示唆に富んだ問いで
17:50
and the answer will require sympathy with the devil.
答えるためには悪に同情する心を持たなくてはなりません
17:53
It's a question that's been tackled by many great thinkers
多くの思想家 作家がこの問いについて考えてきました
17:57
and writers: What if society actually needs crisis to change?
「社会が変化のために危機を必要としているとしたら?
18:00
What if society actually needs terrorism
社会が変化のため よりよい社会のために
18:05
to change and adapt for the better?
テロを必要としているとしたら?」
18:09
It's those Bulgakov themes, it's that picture of Jesus
これはブルガーコフの命題です
写真にある
18:10
and the Devil hand in hand in Gethsemane
キリストと悪魔がゲッセマネで手を取り
18:15
walking into the moonlight.
月夜を歩いていくのです
18:18
What it would mean is that humans,
これが示唆するところは
18:20
in order to survive in development,
人間は ダーウィンの言う「進化」の中で
18:23
quite Darwinian spirit here,
生き延びていくために
18:26
inherently must dance with the devil.
悪魔と手を結ぶことも必要であるということです
18:28
A lot of people say that communism was defeated
共産主義はローリング・ストーンズによって崩壊したと
18:32
by the Rolling Stones. It's a good theory.
多くの人が言います
面白い主張ですね
18:37
Maybe the Rolling Stones has a place in this.
彼らの曲がこの場にぴったりでしょう
18:41
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
18:43
(Music) (Applause)
(『悪魔を憐れむ歌』 ローリング・ストーンズ)(拍手)
18:46
Bruno Giussani: Thank you. (Applause)
ブルーノ・ジウサーニ:ありがとう(拍手)
18:55
Translated by Mizuhiro Suzuki
Reviewed by Jeff Yamamoto

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jason McCue - Lawyer
Jason McCue litigates against terrorists, dictators and others who seem above the law, using the legal and judicial system in innovative ways.

Why you should listen

Jason McCue uses the legal system of the UK (and increasingly the world) to fight for human rights. In 2009, he won a landmark civil case at the high court in Belfast that resulted in a settlement for victims of the 1998 Omagh bombing by the Real IRA -- after attempts to prosecute the group in criminal courts had failed. It was a bold legal strategy now being copied for other victims, such as those of Libyan-supported terrorism and of the attacks in London and Mumbai. In September 2011 he and his firm launched another strategy for prosecuting Alexander Lukashenko, the dictator of Belarus, on counts of torture and hostage-taking: creating a "prosecution kit" to be sent to courts around the world. Wherever Lukashenko travels, he now faces the prospect of prosecution.

McCue is also a partner, with his wife, TV star Mariella Frostrup, of the GREAT Initiative: the Gender Rights and Equality Action Trust.

More profile about the speaker
Jason McCue | Speaker | TED.com