17:12
TEDGlobal 2007

Andrew Mwenda: Aid for Africa? No thanks.

アンドゥリュー・ムエンダの新しいアフリカの見方

Filmed:

この刺激的なスピーチの中で、ジャーナリストのアンドゥリュー・ムエンダが "アフリカの疑問" について、主にメディアによって伝えられている貧困、内戦、無力感の枠組みを超えて、富や幸せをアフリカ大陸全体に広げていく可能性に注目するようにと私達に訴えかけます。

- Journalist
Journalist Andrew Mwenda has spent his career fighting for free speech and economic empowerment throughout Africa. He argues that aid makes objects of the poor -- they become passive recipients of charity rather than active participants in their own economic betterment. Full bio

I am very, very happy to be amidst some of the most --
私は、このような光栄な...
00:16
the lights are really disturbing my eyes
照明が気になって仕方ないなぁ。
00:20
and they're reflecting on my glasses.
メガネに反射してるんだ。
00:22
I am very happy and honored to be amidst
私はこうして、改新的で知的な人に囲まれていることを
00:24
very, very innovative and intelligent people.
とても幸せに、そして光栄に思います。
00:28
I have listened to the three previous speakers,
私の前に話した3人のスピーチを聞いたけど、
00:31
and guess what happened?
何があったと思う?
00:34
Every single thing I planned to say, they have said it here,
私が言おうと思ってた事すべてを、彼らが言ってしまったんだ。
00:36
and it looks and sounds like I have nothing else to say.
だからもう私には言うべき事が何もないみたいでしょ?
00:39
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
00:44
But there is a saying in my culture
でも私の故郷のことわざで
00:45
that if a bud leaves a tree without saying something,
「もしも芽が何も言わないまま木を去ってしまうと、
00:48
that bud is a young one.
その芽は若憎だ」と言うんです。
00:53
So, I will -- since I am not young and am very old,
私は若くないうえに、もう結構年だから
00:56
I still will say something.
しっかり話すつもりでいますよ。
01:01
We are hosting this conference at a very opportune moment,
今回の会議はとても良い時期に開催されています、
01:03
because another conference is taking place in Berlin.
なぜなら、ベルリンでも他の会議が行われているからです。
01:08
It is the G8 Summit.
それはG8 サミット(主要国首脳会議)です。
01:10
The G8 Summit proposes that the solution to Africa's problems
G8サミットにおいて、アフリカの問題を解決するためには、
01:13
should be a massive increase in aid,
大規模に補助金を増やすことが大切だと提案されいますが、
01:20
something akin to the Marshall Plan.
それはマーシャルプラン(欧州復興計画)と同じような考えですね。
01:23
Unfortunately, I personally do not believe in the Marshall Plan.
残念ですが、個人的にマーシャルプランは信頼できません。
01:25
One, because the benefits of the Marshall Plan have been overstated.
まず、マーシャルプランがもたらす利益は大げさに言われているからです。
01:29
Its largest recipients were Germany and France,
特にフランスとドイツが補助金を多く受けていましたが、
01:34
and it was only 2.5 percent of their GDP.
合計は国内生産量の2.5パーセントに過ぎませんでした。
01:37
An average African country receives foreign aid
平均的にアフリカの国が受け取る補助金は
01:40
to the tune of 13, 15 percent of its GDP,
国内生産量の13~15パーセントにもなる額なので、
01:43
and that is an unprecedented transfer of financial resources
という事は、前例のないほどの金融資源が
01:49
from rich countries to poor countries.
裕福な国から貧しい国に移動していることになります。
01:52
But I want to say that there are two things we need to connect.
でもそこで2つ、つなげなくてはならない事があるのです。
01:55
How the media covers Africa in the West, and the consequences of that.
西洋諸国のメディアがどうアフリカを映し出しているか、そしてその影響です。
01:58
By displaying despair, helplessness and hopelessness,
無力感や絶望感を目立たせることによって、
02:04
the media is telling the truth about Africa, and nothing but the truth.
メディアは、アフリカの真実以外の何でもない「真実」だけを伝えているのです。
02:07
However, the media is not telling us the whole truth.
ですが、真実すべてを伝えているわけではありません。
02:13
Because despair, civil war, hunger and famine,
なぜなら、絶望、内戦、飢餓は
02:17
although they're part and parcel of our African reality,
確かにアフリカが置かれている状況の一片なのですが、
02:21
they are not the only reality.
それだけが事実ではないのです。
02:25
And secondly, they are the smallest reality.
そのうえ、それらは小さな事実にしか過ぎません。
02:27
Africa has 53 nations.
アフリカには53国あります。
02:29
We have civil wars only in six countries,
内戦が起きているのはそのうち6国で、
02:31
which means that the media are covering only six countries.
と言う事は、メディアはその6国だけを報道しているのです。
02:34
Africa has immense opportunities that never navigate
アフリカには広大な機会があるにもかかわらず、
02:38
through the web of despair and helplessness
絶望と無力感の網を抜け出せないのは、
02:42
that the Western media largely presents to its audience.
西洋のメディアが聴衆にむけてその網を描写しているからなのです。
02:44
But the effect of that presentation is, it appeals to sympathy.
その描写は同情心に訴えかける効果があります。
02:49
It appeals to pity. It appeals to something called charity.
同情心に訴えかけ、そしてそれがチャリティーにつながるのです。
02:53
And, as a consequence, the Western view
その結果、西洋から見る
02:58
of Africa's economic dilemma is framed wrongly.
アフリカの経済的ジレンマは間違って枠取られているのです。
03:01
The wrong framing is a product of thinking
その間違った枠組は、アフリカが絶望的な場所だと
03:06
that Africa is a place of despair.
決めつける考えから来るのです。
03:10
What should we do with it? We should give food to the hungry.
その絶望をどうすればいいのか?飢えている人には食料を与えるべきです。
03:13
We should deliver medicines to those who are ill.
病気の人々には、薬を配るべきなのです。
03:16
We should send peacekeeping troops
そして国際平和維持活動隊を派遣して、
03:19
to serve those who are facing a civil war.
内戦に苦しむ人々を助けるべきなのです。
03:21
And in the process, Africa has been stripped of self-initiative.
その段階を通して、アフリカの自主性は失われていきます。
03:23
I want to say that it is important to recognize
もちろん、アフリカには根本的な
03:28
that Africa has fundamental weaknesses.
弱みがあることを認識するのは大切です。
03:31
But equally, it has opportunities and a lot of potential.
だけど同時に、機会や可能性もたくさんあるのです。
03:34
We need to reframe the challenge that is facing Africa,
アフリカが直面している難問についての考え方を、
03:38
from a challenge of despair,
貧困撲滅などの、
03:42
which is called poverty reduction,
絶望的な挑戦から、
03:44
to a challenge of hope.
希望のための挑戦に変えなければなりません。
03:48
We frame it as a challenge of hope, and that is worth creation.
希望のための挑戦と考えることによって、挑戦することに価値が出てくるのです。
03:50
The challenge facing all those who are interested in Africa
アフリカに興味がある人々が直面している挑戦は、
03:54
is not the challenge of reducing poverty.
貧困を減らすことではありません。
03:57
It should be a challenge of creating wealth.
富を増やすための挑戦なのです。
03:59
Once we change those two things --
この2つを変えることで、
04:02
if you say the Africans are poor and they need poverty reduction,
もしもアフリカの人々が貧しいから貧困撲滅が必要だというと、
04:05
you have the international cartel of good intentions
良心の集まりでできた国際カルテルが、
04:10
moving onto the continent, with what?
アフリカ大陸に何を持ってやっってくるでしょう?
04:14
Medicines for the poor, food relief for those who are hungry,
貧しい者には薬を、空腹な者には食料を、
04:17
and peacekeepers for those who are facing civil war.
そして内戦に直面する者には国際平和維持活動隊を。
04:20
And in the process, none of these things really are productive
このような方法では収益性が少ないですし、
04:25
because you are treating the symptoms, not the causes
症状を治療しているだけであって、
04:29
of Africa's fundamental problems.
アフリカの根本的な問題の原因は解決されないままなのです。
04:31
Sending somebody to school and giving them medicines,
誰かを学校に行かせて薬をあたえたりするだけでは、
04:34
ladies and gentlemen, does not create wealth for them.
みなさんいいですか、彼らの富を作る事は出せません。
04:37
Wealth is a function of income, and income comes from you finding
富と言うのは収入が機能することであり、そして収入は利益的な
04:42
a profitable trading opportunity or a well-paying job.
貿易のチャンス又は高収入な仕事を見つけることからくるのです。
04:46
Now, once we begin to talk about wealth creation in Africa,
さて、アフリカで富を生み出すことを話すにあたって、
04:50
our second challenge will be,
私達の2つ目の挑戦は、
04:53
who are the wealth-creating agents in any society?
どの社会でも、誰が富を生み出すエージェントなのか?です。
04:55
They are entrepreneurs. [Unclear] told us they are always
それは起業家達なのです。(不明)から、彼らはいつでも
04:58
about four percent of the population, but 16 percent are imitators.
人口の4パーセントくらいですが、16パーセントは模倣者だと聞きました。
05:02
But they also succeed at the job of entrepreneurship.
でも、彼らは事業において成功してるのです。
05:06
So, where should we be putting the money?
そこで、どこにお金を投資すればいいのか?
05:11
We need to put money where it can productively grow.
お金は生産的に増えるように投資されなければなりません。
05:14
Support private investment in Africa, both domestic and foreign.
そこでアフリカでの国内と国外両方の民間投資をサポートするのです。
05:19
Support research institutions,
研究施設も支持しましょう、
05:23
because knowledge is an important part of wealth creation.
なぜなら知識は富を作り出す上でとても大切だからです。
05:26
But what is the international aid community doing with Africa today?
でも、現在、国際援助コミュニティーはアフリカで何をしているでしょう?
05:30
They are throwing large sums of money for primary health,
多額のお金が基礎健康、
05:34
for primary education, for food relief.
初等教育、食料救助確保のためにつぎ込まれているのです。
05:37
The entire continent has been turned into
そしてアフリカ大陸全体が、
05:40
a place of despair, in need of charity.
絶望的でチャリティーが必要な場所と化すのです。
05:42
Ladies and gentlemen, can any one of you tell me
みなさんの中で一人でも、
05:45
a neighbor, a friend, a relative that you know,
隣人や、友達、又は親戚が
05:47
who became rich by receiving charity?
チャリティーのおかげで裕福になったという人はいますか?
05:50
By holding the begging bowl and receiving alms?
ものごいして、施し物を受け取るだけで?
05:54
Does any one of you in the audience have that person?
皆さんのなかに一人でもそんな人を知ってる人はいますか?
05:57
Does any one of you know a country that developed because of
誰か、親切で気前がいい国のおかげで発展した国を
06:00
the generosity and kindness of another?
ご存知でしょうか?
06:05
Well, since I'm not seeing the hand,
誰も手を上げていないと言うことは、
06:08
it appears that what I'm stating is true.
私が言っていることは正しいと言うことですね。
06:10
(Bono: Yes!)
ボノ:知ってます!
06:13
Andrew Mwenda: I can see Bono says he knows the country.
ボノがそんな国を知っているようですね。
06:15
Which country is that?
どの国ですか?
06:17
(Bono: It's an Irish land.)
ボノ:アイルランド名です。
06:18
(Laughter)
笑い声
06:19
(Bono: [unclear])
ボノ:(不明)
06:21
AM: Thank you very much. But let me tell you this.
どうもありがとう。だけど、これは言わせて欲しいのです。
06:23
External actors can only present to you an opportunity.
外部の者は、機会を与えることしかできないのです。
06:27
The ability to utilize that opportunity and turn it into an advantage
その機会をうまく生かして有益なものにしていくかは
06:31
depends on your internal capacity.
内部の、つまり自身の才能にかかっているのです。
06:36
Africa has received many opportunities.
アフリカはたくさんの機会を与えられていますが、
06:38
Many of them we haven't benefited much.
そのほとんどを有益なものにできていないのです。
06:40
Why? Because we lack the internal, institutional framework
なぜ?それは内部の制度構成が整っていない上に、
06:43
and policy framework that can make it possible for us
外部との関係を有益にできる政策の構成も
06:48
to benefit from our external relations. I'll give you an example.
整っていないからです。例えば、
06:51
Under the Cotonou Agreement,
コトノウ条約の中で、
06:54
formerly known as the Lome Convention,
以前はロメ協定とよばれていたんですが、
06:56
African countries have been given an opportunity by Europe
ヨーロッパ諸国はアフリカが、
06:59
to export goods, duty-free, to the European Union market.
免税で商品を欧州連合にむけて輸出できるという機会を与えました。
07:02
My own country, Uganda, has a quota to export 50,000 metric tons
私の祖国、ウガンダは砂糖を5万トンまで欧州に
07:07
of sugar to the European Union market.
輸出できることになっています。
07:13
We haven't exported one kilogram yet.
今のところまだ1キロも輸出していません。
07:16
We import 50,000 metric tons of sugar from Brazil and Cuba.
そしてウガンダは、ブラジルとキューバから5万トンの砂糖を輸入しています。
07:18
Secondly, under the beef protocol of that agreement,
次に、条約内での牛肉プロトコルでは
07:27
African countries that produce beef
牛肉を生産しているアフリカの国々は
07:30
have quotas to export beef duty-free to the European Union market.
牛肉を免税で欧州連合の市場に輸出できる割り当てがあります。
07:32
None of those countries, including Africa's most successful nation, Botswana,
アフリカでどの国ひとつとして、一番成功しているボツワナでさえ、
07:37
has ever met its quota.
その割り当てを満たしたことがありません。
07:41
So, I want to argue today that the fundamental source of Africa's
そこでわたしはアフリカが
07:44
inability to engage the rest of the world
世界のほかの国々と
07:49
in a more productive relationship
有益な関係を築くことができない根本的な
07:51
is because it has a poor institutional and policy framework.
原因は、制度とポリシー構成の不十分さだと言いたいのです。
07:54
And all forms of intervention need support,
どんな干渉にしても、
07:58
the evolution of the kinds of institutions that create wealth,
富を増やすための制度を発展させたり
08:01
the kinds of institutions that increase productivity.
生産率を上げるための制度に対してのサポートが欠かせないのです。
08:05
How do we begin to do that, and why is aid the bad instrument?
どうやってそうするのか、そしてなぜ援助がそれにふさわしくないのか?
08:08
Aid is the bad instrument, and do you know why?
なぜ援助がふさわしくないか、わかりますか?
08:12
Because all governments across the world need money to survive.
世界中すべての政府は生き残るためにお金が必要だからです。
08:14
Money is needed for a simple thing like keeping law and order.
法律や秩序を保つなどシンプルな事でもお金がかかります。
08:18
You have to pay the army and the police to show law and order.
法律や秩序を保つには軍隊や警察にお金をはらわなければなりません。
08:22
And because many of our governments are quite dictatorial,
そして、ほとんどのアフリカの政府は独裁的ですから、
08:24
they need really to have the army clobber the opposition.
反対勢力を制圧できる強い軍隊が必要となってくるのです。
08:28
The second thing you need to do is pay your political hangers-on.
2つめに、政治的包囲網を固めるのにもお金を払わなければなりません。
08:32
Why should people support their government?
なぜ国民は政府をサポートするべきなのでしょう?
08:37
Well, because it gives them good, paying jobs,
それは政府がよい収入の仕事を与えてくれるからです。
08:38
or, in many African countries, unofficial opportunities
または、ほとんどのアフリカの国では贈収賄など不正により
08:40
to profit from corruption.
非公式的に利益を得られるのです。
08:44
The fact is no government in the world,
実際は、世界中の政府で
08:46
with the exception of a few, like that of Idi Amin,
イディ・アミンのような数少ない例外を除いては、
08:49
can seek to depend entirely on force as an instrument of rule.
武力だけで政権を保てる政府など、ひとつもありません。
08:51
Many countries in the [unclear], they need legitimacy.
(不明) にある多くの国は、正当性が必要です。
08:56
To get legitimacy, governments often need to deliver things like primary education,
正当性を得るために政府は度々、初等教育や
08:59
primary health, roads, build hospitals and clinics.
基礎健康の確保や、道路、病院、クリニックなどを建てなければなりません。
09:05
If the government's fiscal survival
もしも政府の財政的な生き残りが
09:10
depends on it having to raise money from its own people,
国民からお金を集めることにかかっているなら
09:12
such a government is driven by self-interest
そのような政府はもっと啓蒙的に統治しようという
09:16
to govern in a more enlightened fashion.
自己利益に基づいて行動することでしょう。
09:18
It will sit with those who create wealth.
そして、富を生み出せる人々と向き合うでしょう。
09:20
Talk to them about the kind of policies and institutions
彼らと、どのような制度やポリシーが
09:23
that are necessary for them to expand a scale and scope of business
ビジネスを拡大するために必要なのか話し合い、
09:26
so that it can collect more tax revenues from them.
彼らからさらに多くの税金を集めようとするのです。
09:30
The problem with the African continent
アフリカ大陸の問題は、
09:33
and the problem with the aid industry
そして援助産業の問題は、
09:35
is that it has distorted the structure of incentives
アフリカの政府を目の前に、
09:36
facing the governments in Africa.
動機の仕組みをゆがませてしまうのです。
09:39
The productive margin in our governments' search for revenue
政府が収入を探す上での生産的利益率は
09:42
does not lie in the domestic economy,
国内の経済ではなく、
09:45
it lies with international donors.
国際援助国にかかってしまっているのです。
09:48
Rather than sit with Ugandan --
ウガンダの...
09:50
(Applause) --
(拍手)
09:52
rather than sit with Ugandan entrepreneurs,
ウガンダの起業家達や、
09:56
Ghanaian businessmen, South African enterprising leaders,
ガーナのビジネスマン、南アフリカの起業のリーダー達、と話すよりも
09:59
our governments find it more productive
私達の政府は国際通貨基金(IMF)や
10:05
to talk to the IMF and the World Bank.
世界銀行と話すほうが生産的だと思っているのです。
10:08
I can tell you, even if you have ten Ph.Ds.,
言わせてもらうと、もしあなたが10もの博士号を持っていたとしても、
10:11
you can never beat Bill Gates in understanding the computer industry.
コンピューター産業の理解において、ビル・ゲイツを越える事はまずないでしょう。
10:15
Why? Because the knowledge that is required for you to understand
なぜ?ビジネスを拡大するのに必要な動機を
10:20
the incentives necessary to expand a business --
理解するための知識を得るには
10:24
it requires that you listen to the people, the private sector actors in that industry.
産業内での民間の人々の話を聞くことを必要とするからです。
10:26
Governments in Africa have therefore been given an opportunity,
その結果、アフリカの政府は
10:32
by the international community, to avoid building
国民と生産的な協定を育むことを避ける機会を
10:35
productive arrangements with your own citizens,
国際コミュニティーから与えられて、
10:38
and therefore allowed to begin endless negotiations with the IMF
そして、世界通貨基金や世界銀行と終わりのない交渉を
10:40
and the World Bank, and then it is the IMF and the World Bank
はじめる事になり、世界通貨基金や世界銀行は政府に
10:46
that tell them what its citizens need.
国民は何が必要なのか教えるのです。
10:49
In the process, we, the African people, have been sidelined
その過程のなかで、アフリカの人々は
10:51
from the policy-making, policy-orientation, and policy-
自分の国での政策立案、順応、実施から
10:55
implementation process in our countries.
外に出されているのです。
10:59
We have limited input, because he who pays the piper calls the tune.
アフリカで経済投入量が限られているのは、費用を負担する人が取り仕切るからなのです。
11:01
The IMF, the World Bank, and the cartel of good intentions in the world
国際通貨基金、世界銀行、そして世界中の良心の集まりが
11:05
has taken over our rights as citizens,
アフリカの人々から国民としての権利を奪い取り、
11:09
and therefore what our governments are doing, because they depend on aid,
その結果、アフリカの政府は援助に頼ることで、
11:12
is to listen to international creditors rather than their own citizens.
国民ではなく国際貸方ばかりに耳を傾けています。
11:15
But I want to put a caveat on my argument,
でも、私自身の話にも警告したいのですが、
11:19
and that caveat is that it is not true that aid is always destructive.
その警告とは、援助はいつもかならずしも破滅的ではないということです。
11:21
Some aid may have built a hospital, fed a hungry village.
時により援助は病院を建てたり、空腹の村を救ったこともあるでしょう。
11:29
It may have built a road, and that road
時には道を建設し、その道が
11:36
may have served a very good role.
とてもいい役割を果たした事もあるでしょう。
11:38
The mistake of the international aid industry
国際援助産業で間違っているのは
11:40
is to pick these isolated incidents of success,
こういった少しの成功に注目し、
11:42
generalize them, pour billions and trillions of dollars into them,
当たり前のようにしてそこに何億ものお金を注ぎ込み、
11:46
and then spread them across the whole world,
それを世界中に広げていく中で、
11:51
ignoring the specific and unique circumstances in a given village,
特別でユニークな、ある村、
11:53
the skills, the practices, the norms and habits
技能、習慣、そして基準など、
11:58
that allowed that small aid project to succeed --
援助の成功につながった特別な状況を無視していることです --
12:01
like in Sauri village, in Kenya, where Jeffrey Sachs is working --
例えばジェフェリー・サックが働いているケニヤのサウリ村など ‐‐
12:04
and therefore generalize this experience
その結果、一部の成功の経験を
12:07
as the experience of everybody.
みんなが成功したかのように一般化してしまうのです。
12:10
Aid increases the resources available to governments,
援助は政府が使用可能な資源を増やし、
12:13
and that makes working in a government the most profitable thing
そのため、政府で働く事が、アフリカで職を探している人にとっては
12:18
you can have, as a person in Africa seeking a career.
もっとも有益な仕事の機会となるのです。
12:22
By increasing the political attractiveness of the state,
国家としての政治的な魅力を増やすことで、
12:25
especially in our ethnically fragmented societies in Africa,
特に、アフリカの民族的に分割された社会では、
12:29
aid tends to accentuate ethnic tensions
援助は民族間での緊迫を高めるのです、
12:33
as every single ethnic group now begins struggling to enter the state
なぜなら、どの民族も外国からの援助の分け前を確保するために
12:36
in order to get access to the foreign aid pie.
国家になろうと葛藤するからです。
12:42
Ladies and gentlemen, the most enterprising people in Africa
みなさん、アフリカでほとんどの企業家たちが
12:45
cannot find opportunities to trade and to work in the private sector
貿易や民間部門での仕事の機会を見つけられずにいるのは
12:50
because the institutional and policy environment is hostile to business.
制度や政策などがビジネスにとって敵対的だからです。
12:55
Governments are not changing it. Why?
政府はそれを変えようとしていません。なぜでしょう?
12:58
Because they don't need to talk to their own citizens.
それは国民たちと話す必要がないからです。
13:00
They talk to international donors.
国際援助提供者と話してばかりですから。
13:05
So, the most enterprising Africans end up going to work for government,
なのでアフリカではほとんどの起業家が、政府で働くことになり、
13:07
and that has increased the political tensions in our countries
我々の国々は援助に頼っているせいで、
13:12
precisely because we depend on aid.
政治的緊張が高まるのです。
13:15
I also want to say that it is important for us to
もうひとつ言いたいのが、
13:18
note that, over the last 50 years, Africa has been receiving increasing aid
アフリカが過去50年で国際コミュニティーから受け取った援助は
13:22
from the international community,
増え続けていて、
13:26
in the form of technical assistance, and financial aid,
技術的、そして金銭的な援助だけでなく
13:28
and all other forms of aid.
いろいろな形の援助なのです。
13:31
Between 1960 and 2003, our continent received 600 billion dollars of aid,
1960年から2003年の間でアフリカ大陸は6000億ドルもの援助を受け取り、それでもまだ
13:33
and we are still told that there is a lot of poverty in Africa.
アフリカには大量の貧困が存在すると言われています。
13:43
Where has all the aid gone?
その援助はどこに消えてしまったのでしょう?
13:46
I want to use the example of my own country, called Uganda,
ここで、私の祖国ウガンダの例を使って、
13:49
and the kind of structure of incentives that aid has brought there.
援助がもたらした動機の仕組みを説明しましょう。
13:53
In the 2006-2007 budget, expected revenue: 2.5 trillion shillings.
2006‐2007年の予算では2.5兆シリングの収入が予想されていました。
13:58
The expected foreign aid: 1.9 trillion.
そして、外国からの援助は1.9兆と予想されていました。
14:04
Uganda's recurrent expenditure -- by recurrent what do I mean?
ウガンダのリカレントの支出 - リカレントとは?
14:07
Hand-to-mouth is 2.6 trillion.
その日暮らしという意味ですが - 2.6兆です。
14:11
Why does the government of Uganda budget spend 110 percent
なぜウガンダの政府の予算は収入の110パーセントにも
14:15
of its own revenue?
のぼるのでしょう?
14:20
It's because there's somebody there called foreign aid, who contributes for it.
それは、援助と呼ばれるものが収入に貢献するからです。
14:21
But this shows you that the government of Uganda
と言う事は、ウガンダ政府は
14:26
is not committed to spending its own revenue
政府の収入を生産的な投資をすることに
14:28
to invest in productive investments,
費やすのではなく、
14:32
but rather it devotes this revenue
そのかわり、収入を
14:34
to paying structure of public expenditure.
公共の支出という形で使っているのです。
14:36
Public administration, which is largely patronage, takes 690 billion.
行政、といってもほとんどが支援ですが、に6900億使われています。
14:40
The military, 380 billion.
軍事に3800億。
14:45
Agriculture, which employs 18 percent of our poverty-stricken citizens,
貧困に直面している国民の18パーセントが働く農業には
14:47
takes only 18 billion.
たったの180億しか使われていないのです。
14:52
Trade and industry takes 43 billion.
貿易と産業には430億使われています。
14:55
And let me show you, what does public expenditure --
ウガンダでの公共目的の支出、
14:59
rather, public administration expenditure -- in Uganda constitute?
いや、行政目的の支出は何に使われているか教えましょうか?
15:03
There you go. 70 cabinet ministers, 114 presidential advisers,
そうですね、70人の内閣大臣と114人の大統領アドバイザー達 ‐‐
15:07
by the way, who never see the president, except on television.
ちなみに、彼らもテレビ以外で大統領に会った事がないんですけどね。
15:13
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
15:16
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:19
And when they see him physically, it is at public functions like this,
彼らが実際に大統領に会う時は、このような感じですが
15:24
and even there, it is him who advises them.
それでも彼がアドバイザーとなるわけです。
15:29
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
15:33
We have 81 units of local government.
ウガンダには81の地方政府があり、
15:35
Each local government is organized like the central government --
それぞれの地方政府は国の政府のような組織になっていて ‐‐
15:38
a bureaucracy, a cabinet, a parliament,
官僚、内閣、国会、
15:40
and so many jobs for the political hangers-on.
そしてもっといろいろな仕事があります。
15:42
There were 56, and when our president wanted to
もともと56の地方政府があったのですが、大統領が
15:45
amend the constitution and remove term limits,
憲法を変更し、期間制限をなくそうとした時に、
15:48
he had to create 25 new districts, and now there are 81.
25の新しい地区を作らなければならなくて、その結果81あるのです。
15:51
Three hundred thirty-three members of parliament.
国会には333人メンバーがいます。
15:55
You need Wembley Stadium to host our parliament.
なので国会を開催するには、ウェンブリースタジアムが必要です。
15:57
One hundred thirty-four commissions
134の委員会、
15:59
and semi-autonomous government bodies,
そしてある程度、主動的な政府達は、
16:01
all of which have directors and the cars. And the final thing,
すべてディレクターや車を持っています -- そして最後に、
16:06
this is addressed to Mr. Bono. In his work, he may help us on this.
ボノさんが言っていました。彼が手助けしてくれるかもしれませんね。
16:10
A recent government of Uganda study found
最近のウガンダ政府の調査でわかったのですが、
16:14
that there are 3,000 four-wheel drive motor vehicles
3000もの四駆車が
16:16
at the Minister of Health headquarters.
保健省の本部にあるんです。
16:20
Uganda has 961 sub-counties, each of them with a dispensary,
ウガンダには961の郡があって、それぞれに医局があるのに、
16:22
none of which has an ambulance.
救急車はどれにもないんです。
16:27
So, the four-wheel drive vehicles at the headquarters
といことは本部にある四駆車は
16:29
drive the ministers, the permanent secretaries, the bureaucrats
大臣、国会秘書、官僚、
16:32
and the international aid bureaucrats who work in aid projects,
国際援助のプロジェクトの官僚などを運転するためで、
16:35
while the poor die without ambulances and medicine.
貧しいものは救急車も薬もなく死んでしまうのです。
16:38
Finally, I want to say that before I came to speak here,
最後に、私はここで話に来る前に、
16:44
I was told that the principle of TEDGlobal
教わったのですが、TEDグローバルの原則では
16:48
is that the good speech should be like a miniskirt.
いいスピーチはミニスカートのようだということでした --
16:52
It should be short enough to arouse interest,
興味をそそる短さでいて、
16:55
but long enough to cover the subject.
だけど題材をかばう長さもある。
16:57
I hope I have achieved that.
成し遂げられたかな。
16:59
(Laughter)
笑い声
17:00
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございました。
17:01
(Applause)
拍手
17:02
Translated by Hikari Fukuda
Reviewed by Akari Takenishi

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Andrew Mwenda - Journalist
Journalist Andrew Mwenda has spent his career fighting for free speech and economic empowerment throughout Africa. He argues that aid makes objects of the poor -- they become passive recipients of charity rather than active participants in their own economic betterment.

Why you should listen

Andrew Mwenda is a print, radio and television journalist, and an active critic of many forms of Western aid to Africa. Too much of the aid from rich nations, he says, goes to the worst African countries to fuel war and government abuse. Such money not only never gets to its intended recipients, Africa's truly needy -- it actively plays a part in making their lives worse.

Mwenda worked at the Daily Monitor newspaper in Kampala starting in the mid-1990s, and hosted a radio show, Andrew Mwenda Live, since 2001; in 2005, he was charged with sedition by the Ugandan government for criticizing the president of Uganda on his radio show, in the wake of the helicopter crash that killed the vice president of Sudan. He has produced documentaries and commentary for the BBC on the dangers of aid and debt relief to Africa, and consulted for the World Bank and Transparency international, and was a Knight Fellow at Stanford in 2007.

In December 2007, he launched a new newspaper in Kampala, The Independent, a leading source of uncensored news in the country. The following spring, he was arrested and accused of publishing inflammatory articles about the Ugandan government. Since being released, he has gone on to be recognized by the World Economic Forum as a Young Global Leader and to win the CPJ International Press Freedom Award.    

More profile about the speaker
Andrew Mwenda | Speaker | TED.com