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TEDGlobal 2012

Melissa Marshall: Talk nerdy to me

メリッサ・マーシャル 「私に科学を熱く語って!」

June 26, 2012

メリッサ・マーシャルは、科学の門外漢として、全ての科学者にメッセージを送ります。「あんたたちのしていることに興味あるわ。だから語って聞かせてよ。ただしわかる言葉でお願い」。 マーシャルは、複雑な科学のアイデアを一般の人に紹介する時に有効となるコツを、たった4分で語り明かしてくれます。

Melissa Marshall - Communications teacher
Melissa Marshall aims to teach great communication skills to scientists and engineers, so that they can effectively share their work. Full bio

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Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Five years ago, I experienced a bit
5年前 私は
00:16
of what it must have been like to be Alice in Wonderland.
『不思議の国のアリス』のアリスに
なったような体験をしました
00:19
Penn State asked me, a communications teacher,
ペンシルバニア州立大学から
00:22
to teach a communications class for engineering students.
工学部の学生相手に コミュニケーションの
授業をするよう頼まれたんですけど
00:25
And I was scared. (Laughter)
恐怖を感じたものです(笑)
00:28
Really scared. Scared of these students with their big brains
工学部の学生は頭が良くて
分厚い本を抱え
00:31
and their big books and their big, unfamiliar words.
分からない言葉を使うものだと思って
怖かったんです
00:34
But as these conversations unfolded,
でも 彼らと会話をするにつれ 私は
00:38
I experienced what Alice must have when she went down
アリスがウサギ穴に落ちて
00:41
that rabbit hole and saw that door to a whole new world.
新世界への扉を見たときに感じた
であろう体験をしました
00:44
That's just how I felt as I had those conversations
不思議の国というのが まさに
私が学生と話して
00:48
with the students. I was amazed at the ideas
感じたことです
00:51
that they had, and I wanted others to experience this wonderland as well.
彼らのアイデアには驚かされました そして他の人にも
この不思議の国を体験してほしいと思いました
00:54
And I believe the key to opening that door
その扉を開ける鍵こそが 素晴らしい
コミュニケーションであると
00:59
is great communication.
私は信じています
01:01
We desperately need great communication from our
世界を変えるために 私たちは
01:02
scientists and engineers in order to change the world.
科学者やエンジニアと 意思疎通を
図る必要があります
01:05
Our scientists and engineers are the ones
私たちの抱える最も難しい問題に
01:08
that are tackling our grandest challenges, from energy
立ち向かってくれるのは 彼らなのです
01:11
to environment to health care, among others,
エネルギー問題 環境問題
ヘルス・ケアなど
01:14
and if we don't know about it and understand it,
私たちがそれらの問題を
理解しなければ
01:17
then the work isn't done, and I believe it's our responsibility
問題解決には至らないでしょうし
01:21
as non-scientists to have these interactions.
門外漢の私たちにも 問題を理解する
責任があると思います
01:24
But these great conversations can't occur if our scientists
こういった意思疎通を図るためには
01:27
and engineers don't invite us in to see their wonderland.
彼らに 不思議の国へと
招待してもらう必要があります
01:30
So scientists and engineers, please, talk nerdy to us.
科学者とエンジニアの皆さん
どうか私たちに熱く科学を語ってください
01:33
I want to share a few keys on how you can do that
科学の素晴らしさや工学の魅力を
01:38
to make sure that we can see that your science is sexy
私たち 門外漢にも分からせるための
01:41
and that your engineering is engaging.
重要なポイントを紹介します
01:45
First question to answer for us: so what?
まずは「それがどうした?」
という疑問に答えることです
01:48
Tell us why your science is relevant to us.
その科学が私たちにどう関わるのか
説明するのです
01:51
Don't just tell me that you study trabeculae,
単に「骨梁を研究しています」
ではなく こう言うのです
01:55
but tell me that you study trabeculae, which is the mesh-like structure of our bones
「骨にある網目状の構造の
骨梁を研究していますが
01:58
because it's important to understanding and treating osteoporosis.
これは骨粗しょう症の理解と
治療のために重要なんです」
02:02
And when you're describing your science, beware of jargon.
そして科学について語るときは
専門用語に注意してください
02:06
Jargon is a barrier to our understanding of your ideas.
専門用語は アイデア理解の障壁となります
02:11
Sure, you can say "spatial and temporal," but why not just say
時空なんたらという用語がありますけど
02:15
"space and time," which is so much more accessible to us?
もっと分かりやすく
「時間と空間」と言えませんか?
02:18
And making your ideas accessible is not the same as dumbing it down.
ただ 話を分かりやすくしても
不正確な内容にはしないことです
02:21
Instead, as Einstein said, make everything
アインシュタインが言ったようにするんです
02:26
as simple as possible, but no simpler.
可能な限り簡潔に でもそれ以上
簡潔にしようとはしないこと
02:29
You can clearly communicate your science
誤魔化しを入れずに
02:33
without compromising the ideas.
科学を明確に語ることだって可能なのです
02:35
A few things to consider are having examples, stories
良い方法は 説明に 例やストーリーや
比喩を交えることです
02:38
and analogies. Those are ways to engage
そうすることで
02:42
and excite us about your content.
専門的な話が 私たちにとっても
魅力的になります
02:44
And when presenting your work, drop the bullet points.
研究を紹介するのに
箇条書き(bullet point) はやめましょう
02:46
Have you ever wondered why they're called bullet points? (Laughter)
なんで bullet point (銃弾点) と
呼ばれているか分かりますか?(笑)
02:52
What do bullets do? Bullets kill,
銃弾が何をするものか考えてください
02:56
and they will kill your presentation.
そう プレゼンテーションを
殺してしまうのです
02:59
A slide like this is not only boring, but it relies too much
こういったスライドは退屈なだけでなく
03:01
on the language area of our brain, and causes us to become overwhelmed.
脳の言語野に大きな負担をかけ
見る人を圧倒します
03:05
Instead, this example slide by Genevieve Brown is
一方 ジュヌビエーブ・ブラウンが
作ったこのスライドは
03:09
much more effective. It's showing that the special structure
ずっと効果的です
03:13
of trabeculae are so strong that they actually inspired
骨梁が特殊で頑丈な構造を持つ
ことを示していて
03:16
the unique design of the Eiffel Tower.
エッフェル塔の独特な設計にも
応用されたことが分かります
03:19
And the trick here is to use a single, readable sentence
コツは 文を1つに絞ることです
03:22
that the audience can key into if they get a bit lost,
聴衆が筋を見失っても
立ち戻れるように
03:26
and then provide visuals which appeal to our other senses
そして視覚的イメージを貼ることで
言語野ではない部分を刺激し
03:29
and create a deeper sense of understanding
説明されていることに対する理解を
03:32
of what's being described.
いっそう深めることができます
03:34
So I think these are just a few keys that can help
この何点かに注意するだけで
03:36
the rest of us to open that door and see the wonderland
門外漢を不思議の国へと誘う上で
03:39
that is science and engineering.
ずっと違ってくるんです
03:42
And because the engineers that I've worked with have
さて 受講している工学部の学生たちに
03:45
taught me to become really in touch with my inner nerd,
内に秘めたオタク心をくすぐられたので
03:47
I want to summarize with an equation. (Laughter)
今回の内容を方程式に書いて
まとめたいと思います (笑)
03:51
Take your science, subtract your bullet points
「科学」から 「箇条書き」と
「専門用語」を差し引き
03:54
and your jargon, divide by relevance,
聴き手にどう関わるかを意味する
03:58
meaning share what's relevant to the audience,
「関連性」で割り
04:01
and multiply it by the passion that you have for
研究に注いでいる「情熱」を
04:03
this incredible work that you're doing,
掛け合わせると
04:06
and that is going to equal incredible interactions
高い「理解度」を伴う
04:08
that are full of understanding.
素晴らしい意思疎通が得られます
04:11
And so, scientists and engineers, when you've solved
科学者やエンジニアの皆さん
04:14
this equation, by all means, talk nerdy to me. (Laughter)
この方程式を解いて ぜひとも
私に熱く科学を語ってください (笑)
04:17
Thank you. (Applause)
(拍手)
04:22
Translator:Naoki Funahashi
Reviewer:Yasushi Aoki

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Melissa Marshall - Communications teacher
Melissa Marshall aims to teach great communication skills to scientists and engineers, so that they can effectively share their work.

Why you should listen
Melissa Marshall is a crusader against bullet points and an evangelist for effective slide design in scientific presentations. She believes that the future depends on the innovations of scientists and engineers, and is passionate about helping them effectively tell the story of their work.

A faculty member with the Department of Communication Arts & Sciences at Penn State University, Melissa specializes in teaching speaking skills to engineering students and has also lectured at Harvard Medical School, the New York Academy of Sciences, Cornell University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Melissa is the co-founder and advisor for the Penn State Engineering Ambassadors, an award-winning science and engineering outreach communication program. She is also an organizer and the faculty advisor for TEDxPSU, a student-run TEDx event held at Penn State each year.

 

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