sponsored links
TEDxDublin

Emma Teeling: The secret of the bat genome

エマ・ティーリング: コウモリゲノムに隠された秘密

September 22, 2012

西洋社会ではコウモリは気味悪く、邪悪だとすら見なされています。動物学者エマ・ティーリングはコウモリに対する態度を見直すよう勧め、コウモリの独特かつ魅力的な生態により我々自身の遺伝情報に関する新たな知見が得られると説きます。(TEDxDublinにて録画)

Emma Teeling - Zoologist
Emma Teeling, Director of the Centre for Irish Bat Research, thinks we have a lot to learn from the biology of bats. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
What I want you all to do right now
皆さん
00:15
is to think of this mammal that I'm going to describe to you.
私がこれからお話しする
哺乳動物を想像してみてください
00:18
The first thing I'm going to tell you about this mammal
この哺乳動物についてまず言えるのは
00:22
is that it is essential for our ecosystems to function correctly.
我々の生態系が 正しく機能するのに
不可欠だということです
00:25
If we remove this mammal from our ecosystems,
生態系からこの動物を排除すると
00:29
they simply will not work.
機能しなくなってしまいます
00:32
That's the first thing.
それが1つ目です
00:35
The second thing is that due to the unique sensory abilities
2つ目は この動物の感覚能力は独特なため
00:37
of this mammal, if we study this mammal,
この動物を研究すれば
00:42
we're going to get great insight into our diseases
盲目や難聴のような視聴覚の病気について
00:46
of the senses, such as blindness and deafness.
大きな知見が得られるということです
00:49
And the third really intriguing aspect of this mammal
3つ目 この動物は面白いことに
00:54
is that I fully believe that the secret of everlasting youth
私の持論ですが 永遠の若さの秘訣が
00:59
lies deep within its DNA.
DNAに深く刻み込まれていることです
01:04
So are you all thinking?
お分かりですか?
01:08
So,
すばらしい生物でしょう?
01:10
magnificent creature, isn't it?
すばらしい生物でしょう?
01:13
Who here thought of a bat?
コウモリだと分かった方は おられますか?
01:16
Ah, I can see half the audience agrees with me,
半分ですね
01:19
and I have a lot of work to do to convince the rest of you.
残り半分の方を説得するために
頑張らないといけませんね
01:22
So I have had the good fortune for the past 20 years
私は幸いなことに過去20年間
01:25
to study these fascinating and beautiful mammals.
このすばらしく 美しい動物を研究してきました
01:29
One fifth of all living mammals is a bat,
哺乳類の5分の1はコウモリであり
01:34
and they have very unique attributes.
とても独特な特性を持っています
01:37
Bats as we know them have been around on this planet
分かっている限り コウモリは約6400万年にもわたり
01:40
for about 64 million years.
地球上に存在しています
01:43
One of the most unique things that bats do
コウモリの特徴の1つは
01:47
as a mammal is that they fly.
哺乳類なのに飛ぶことです
01:50
Now flight is an inherently difficult thing.
飛行は本来難しいことです
01:53
Flight within vertebrates has only evolved three times:
脊椎動物の飛行が進化したのは
3回しかありません
01:56
once in the bats, once in the birds,
コウモリで1回 鳥類で1回
02:00
and once in the pterodactyls.
そしてプテロダクティルスで1回です
02:04
And so with flight, it's very metabolically costly.
飛行は多大なエネルギーを必要とします
02:06
Bats have learned and evolved how to deal with this.
コウモリはこれを解決する方法を学び 進化しました
02:10
But one other extremely unique thing about bats
しかしコウモリの特徴的な点は
02:14
is that they are able to use sound
周囲の環境を認識するために
02:18
to perceive their environment. They use echolocation.
音を使えることです
反響定位を行っているのです
02:20
Now, what I mean by echolocation --
ここで言う反響定位とは
02:25
they emit a sound from their larynx out through their mouth
喉から口や鼻を経由して音を出すことを指します
02:27
or through their nose. This sound wave comes out
この音波は周囲にある物体に反射し
02:31
and it reflects and echoes back off objects in their environment,
コウモリの元へ返ります
02:35
and the bats then hear these echoes
コウモリはその反射音を聴き取り
02:39
and they turn this information into an acoustic image.
情報を聴覚像へと変換します
02:42
And this enables them to orient in complete darkness.
こうすることで コウモリは
真っ暗闇にも適応できるのです
02:45
Indeed, they do look very strange. We're humans.
たしかにコウモリの見た目は奇妙です
我々は人間であり
02:50
We're a visual species. When scientists first realized
視覚により周囲を認識します
02:53
that bats were actually using sound to be able to fly
コウモリが夜間にも音を用いて 飛び
方向を認識し 動いていると
02:57
and orient and move at night, we didn't believe it.
研究者が発見した時も
我々はそれを信じませんでした
03:00
For a hundred years, despite evidence to show
コウモリはそのようにしているという根拠があるのに
03:03
that this is what they were doing, we didn't believe it.
我々は100年間にもわたって
それを信じようとはしませんでした
03:06
Now, if you look at this bat, it looks a little bit alien.
このコウモリを見ると 異様な印象を受けます
03:10
Indeed, the very famous philosopher Thomas Nagel
有名な哲学者トマス・ネーゲルはかつてこう言いました
03:14
once said, "To truly experience an alien life form
「地球上で異星の生命体を実際に経験するには
03:17
on this planet, you should lock yourself inside a room
真っ暗闇の中で超音波を出して飛び回るコウモリと
03:20
with a flying, echolocating bat in complete darkness."
部屋に閉じこもってみればよい」
03:24
And if you look at the actual physical characteristics
このキクガシラコウモリの
03:28
on the face of this beautiful horseshoe bat,
顔立ちに注目すると
03:31
you see a lot of these characteristics are dedicated
音を出したり知覚したりするための
03:34
to be able to make sound and perceive it.
特徴が多数あることに気がつくことでしょう
03:37
Very big ears, strange nose leaves, but teeny-tiny eyes.
耳はとても大きく 鼻には奇妙な葉のようなものを
持つのに対し 目はとても小さいです
03:41
So again, if you just look at this bat, you realize
やはり このコウモリを見ると
03:45
sound is very important for its survival.
このコウモリの生存に
音が非常に大切だとわかります
03:49
Most bats look like the previous one.
ほとんどのコウモリは
この様な外見をしています
03:52
However, there are a group that do not use echolocation.
しかし 反響定位を行わない種も存在します
03:57
They do not perceive their environment using sound,
そのような種は周囲を認識するのに音を用いません
04:01
and these are the flying foxes.
オオコウモリです
04:04
If anybody has ever been lucky enough to be in Australia,
オーストラリアに行ったことがあるなら
04:05
you've seen them coming out of the Botanic Gardens in Sydney,
シドニー王立植物園でオオコウモリを
見たことかと思いますが
04:09
and if you just look at their face, you can see
オオコウモリの顔に目をやると
04:12
they have much, much larger eyes and much smaller ears.
目はずっと大きく 耳はずっと小さいことが分かります
04:15
So among and within bats is a huge variation
コウモリ同士でも感覚器官の能力に
04:19
in their ability to use sensory perception.
大きな違いがあるのです
04:22
Now this is going to be important for what I'm going
これは後にお話しする事に対して
04:25
to tell you later during the talk.
大きな意味を持ちます
04:27
Now, if the idea of bats in your belfry terrifies you,
コウモリが頭上を飛び回るのを考えると
怖いとおっしゃるかもしれませんし
04:29
and I know some people probably are feeling a little sick
またコウモリの大きな画像を見て
04:34
looking at very large images of bats,
気持ち悪くなった方もおられるかと思いますが
04:37
that's probably not that surprising,
それほど驚くことではありません
04:40
because here in Western culture,
なぜなら西洋文化においては コウモリは
04:43
bats have been demonized.
悪魔の象徴とされてきたからです
04:45
Really, of course the famous book "Dracula,"
ダブリン北部出身の
ブラム・ストーカーが書いた
04:47
written by a fellow Northside Dubliner Bram Stoker,
かの有名な本「ドラキュラ」も
04:50
probably is mainly responsible for this.
イメージ形成にもちろん一役買っています
04:53
However, I also think it's got to do with the fact
しかし同時に コウモリは夜に活動するため
04:55
that bats come out at night, and we don't
我々が生態を知らないことにも起因すると思います
04:58
really understand them. We're a little frightened by things
我々は自分たちとは違う方法で世界を認識する生物に
05:00
that can perceive the world slightly differently than us.
少しおびえているのです
05:03
Bats are usually synonymous with some type of evil events.
コウモリは不吉な出来事の同義語としてよく使われます
05:06
They are the perpetrators in horror movies,
有名な「ナイトウィング」のような
05:09
such as this famous "Nightwing."
ホラー映画の悪者などです
05:12
Also, if you think about it, demons
また考えてみると 悪魔はいつも
05:14
always have bat wings, whereas birds, they typically --
コウモリの翼を持っている一方で
05:17
or angels have bird wings.
天使は鳥のような翼を持っています
05:20
Now, this is Western society, and what I hope to do tonight
西洋社会はこのような現状ですが
今晩はみなさんに
05:23
is to convince you of the Chinese traditional culture,
伝統的な中国文化を
受け入れて頂ければと思います
05:28
that they perceive bats as
中国ではコウモリは幸運をもたらす生き物とされ
05:33
creatures that bring good luck, and indeed, if you walk
中国家屋に足を踏み入れれば
05:36
into a Chinese home, you may see an image such as this.
こんな像を見かけることもあるかもしれません
05:39
This is considered the Five Blessings.
これは5つの恩恵とされています
05:44
The Chinese word for "bat" sounds like the Chinese word
「コウモリ」という意味の中国語の言葉は
05:46
for "happiness," and they believe that bats
「幸福」のように聞こえ 中国人の間では
05:49
bring wealth, health, longevity, virtue and serenity.
コウモリは富 健康 長寿 美徳 平穏を
もたらすと信じられています
05:52
And indeed, in this image, you have a picture of longevity
この像には 5匹のコウモリに囲まれた
05:56
surrounded by five bats.
長寿の絵が描かれています
05:59
And what I want to do tonight is to talk to you
これらの恩恵のうち少なくとも3つは
06:02
and to show you that at least three of these blessings
間違いなくコウモリに象徴され
06:05
are definitely represented by a bat, and that if we study bats
コウモリを研究することで
これらの恩恵に近付くことができると
06:09
we will get nearer to getting each of these blessings.
今夜皆さんにお話したいと思います
06:12
So, wealth -- how can a bat possibly bring us wealth?
まず富です
コウモリがどうして富をもたらすことができるのでしょう?
06:16
Now as I said before, bats are essential for our ecosystems
先ほど申し上げた通り
コウモリは我々の生態系が
06:22
to function correctly. And why is this?
正しく機能するのに不可欠ですが
なぜでしょう?
06:25
Bats in the tropics are major pollinators of many plants.
熱帯に生息するコウモリは
多くの植物の授粉に重要です
06:29
They also feed on fruit, and they disperse the seeds
また 果実も食べ
それらの種子を拡散させます
06:33
of these fruits. Bats are responsible for pollinating
コウモリはテキーラの原料となる植物に授粉する役割を持ち
06:36
the tequila plant, and this is a multi-million dollar industry
メキシコでは何百万ドルもの産業を形成しています
06:40
in Mexico. So indeed, we need them
このように確かに我々の生態系が
06:44
for our ecosystems to function properly.
正しく機能するにはコウモリが必要なのです
06:47
Without them, it's going to be a problem.
コウモリがいなければ 問題が生じます
06:49
But most bats are voracious insect predators.
ほとんどのコウモリは大食いで
大量の昆虫を補食します
06:52
It's been estimated in the U.S., in a tiny colony
アメリカではオオクビワコウモリの
06:57
of big brown bats, that they will feed
ごく小さなコロニーが
07:00
on over a million insects a year,
年間100万匹以上の昆虫を食べていると推定されています
07:02
and in the United States of America, right now
現在アメリカでは
07:06
bats are being threatened by a disease known as white-nose syndrome.
コウモリは白い鼻症候群という
病気の脅威に晒されています
07:09
It's working its way slowly across the U.S. and wiping out
この病気は徐々にアメリカ全体に広がり
07:12
populations of bats, and scientists have estimated
コウモリに集団感染しつつあり
07:15
that 1,300 metric tons of insects a year are now
コウモリの減少により年間1300トンの昆虫が
07:19
remaining in the ecosystems due to the loss of bats.
生態系の中で生き残っていると 科学者は推定しています
07:24
Bats are also threatened in the U.S.
アメリカではコウモリは
07:28
by their attraction to wind farms. Again, right now
風車への吸引にも脅かされています
繰り返しますが —
07:30
bats are looking at a little bit of a problem.
コウモリは現在問題に直面しています
07:34
They're going to -- They are very threatened
アメリカ国内だけでも
07:36
in the United States of America alone.
コウモリは危機に瀕しているのです
07:38
Now how can this help us?
ではこれがどう役立つのでしょう?
07:42
Well, it has been calculated that if we were to remove bats
方程式からコウモリを除外したとすると
07:43
from the equation, we're going to have to then use
農作物を食べてしまう有害な虫を駆除するために
07:47
insecticides to remove all those pest insects
殺虫剤を使用しなければなりません
07:49
that feed on our agricultural crops.
殺虫剤を使用しなければなりません
07:52
And for one year in the U.S. alone, it's estimated
コウモリがいないとアメリカだけでも1年間に
07:55
that it's going to cost 22 billion U.S. dollars,
220億ドルかかる計算になります
07:59
if we remove bats. So indeed, bats then do bring us wealth.
つまりコウモリはそれだけの富を
もたらしてくれているのです
08:02
They maintain the health of our ecosystems,
コウモリは我々の生態系を安定させるだけでなく
08:06
and also they save us money.
お金も節約してくれるのです
08:09
So again, that's the first blessing. Bats are important
繰り返しますがこれが1つ目の恩恵です
08:11
for our ecosystems.
コウモリは我々の生態系にとって重要なのです
08:14
And what about the second? What about health?
2つ目についてはどうでしょう? 健康については?
08:17
Inside every cell in your body lies your genome.
体内の全ての細胞にはゲノムが含まれています
08:21
Your genome is made up of your DNA,
ゲノムは 生命を機能・相互作用させ
08:25
your DNA codes for proteins that enable you to function
生命たらしめるタンパク質を暗号化する
08:28
and interact and be as you are.
DNAで構成されます
08:31
Now since the new advancements in modern molecular technologies,
最近の分子技術の発展により
08:34
it is now possible for us to sequence our own genome
今では驚く程 短時間・低コストで
08:39
in a very rapid time and at a very, very reduced cost.
自分のゲノム配列を解読することができます
08:43
Now when we've been doing this, we've realized
多数のゲノム配列を解読しているうちに
08:47
that there's variations within our genome.
ゲノムに個体差があることに気がつきました
08:49
So I want you to look at the person beside you.
側の人を見てみてください
08:53
Just have a quick look. And what we need to realize
チラッとでいいんです
ここで大切なのは
08:56
is that every 300 base pairs in your DNA, you're a little bit different.
DNAの300塩基対ごとに違いがあるということです
08:59
And one of the grand challenges right now
現代の分子医学における大きな課題の一つは
09:03
in modern molecular medicine is to work out
個体差が病気にかかりやすくさせるのか
09:05
whether this variation makes you more susceptible to diseases,
それとも単に違いを生んでいるだけなのかを
09:08
or does this variation just make you different?
見極めることです
09:13
Again, what does it mean here? What does this variation
ここでそれはどのような意味を持つのでしょう?
09:16
actually mean? So if we are to capitalize on all of this
個体差は何を意味するのでしょうか?
09:18
new molecular data and personalized genomic information
数年内にオンラインで新たに利用可能になる
分子データや個人のゲノム情報全てを
09:22
that is coming online that we will be able to have
利用しようとするなら
09:26
in the next few years, we have to be able to differentiate
この2つの違いを明らかにしなければなりません
09:28
between the two. So how do we do this?
どうすればよいでしょうか?
09:31
Well, I believe we just look at nature's experiments.
自然界の実験に注目すればよいと考えます
09:35
So through natural selection, over time,
タンパク質の機能を破壊するような
09:38
mutations, variations that disrupt the function of a protein
突然変異や個体差は
09:43
will not be tolerated over time.
時間とともに自然淘汰されます
09:48
Evolution acts as a sieve. It sieves out the bad variation.
進化はふるいのように振る舞います
悪い個体差をふるい落とすのです
09:51
And so therefore, if you look at the same region
そのため 進化学的にも生態学的にも
09:55
of a genome in many mammals that have been
全く異なる哺乳類を多数集めて
09:57
evolutionarily distant from each other
それらの動物のゲノムの同じ領域に注目してみると
10:00
and are also ecologically divergent, you will get a better
その部位においてどのような進化が起きたのか
10:04
understanding of what the evolutionary prior of that site is,
つまりその動物の生命機能や生存に重要なのかが
10:07
i.e., if it is important for the mammal to function,
より深く理解できます
10:11
for its survival, it will be the same
重要な配列は 異なる部族 種 群にわたって
10:15
in all of those different lineages, species, taxa.
保存されているはずです
10:17
So therefore, if we were to do this,
そのため 我々がすべきことは
それらの動物に対して
10:22
what we'd need to do is sequence that region
同一のゲノム領域の配列を解読し
10:25
in all these different mammals and ascertain if it's the same
配列が等しいのか異なっているのか確かめることです
10:27
or if it's different. So if it is the same,
もし同じであれば
10:30
this indicates that that site is important for a function,
その部位はある機能に対して重要であり
10:34
so a disease mutation should fall within that site.
病気を引き起こす変異はこの部位に
存在するはずだということが示されます
10:37
So in this case here, if all the mammals that we look at
ここでの場合 対象とする全ての動物が
10:41
have a yellow-type genome at that site,
その部位で黄色型ゲノムを持つなら
10:44
it probably suggests that purple is bad.
おそらく紫は悪いということを示します
10:48
This could be even more powerful if you look at mammals
違いが微妙な動物同士を比較すると
10:50
that are doing things slightly differently.
さらに有効となります
10:54
So say, for example, the region of the genome
例えば 私が注目していたゲノム領域は
10:56
that I was looking at was a region that's important for vision.
視覚に対して重要であるような領域でした
10:59
If we look at that region in mammals that don't see so well,
コウモリのように 視覚が発達していない動物の
11:02
such as bats, and we find that bats that don't see so well
その領域に注目し 視覚が発達していないコウモリは
11:06
have the purple type, we know that this is probably
紫型ゲノムを持つことが分かれば
11:10
what's causing this disease.
それが病気の原因であろうことが分かります
11:12
So in my lab, we've been using bats to look at two different
私のラボでは 2つの感覚に関する病気に注目するために
11:16
types of diseases of the senses.
コウモリを用いてきました
11:20
We're looking at blindness. Now why would you do this?
我々は盲目に注目しています
なぜですかって?
11:23
Three hundred and fourteen million people are visually impaired, and
3億4000万人が視覚障害を持ち
そのうち4500万人が盲目です
11:26
45 million of these are blind. So blindness is a big problem,
盲目は大きな問題であり
11:31
and a lot of these blind disorders come from inherited diseases,
視覚障害の多くは遺伝病に由来するので
11:35
so we want to try and better understand
遺伝子のどんな変異がその病気を
11:39
which mutations in the gene cause the disease.
引き起こしているのかを
解明したいと考えています
11:41
Also we look at deafness. One in every 1,000
また我々は聴覚障害にも注目しています
11:45
newborn babies are deaf, and when we reach 80,
新生児の1000人に一人は聴覚障害を持ち
11:49
over half of us will also have a hearing problem.
80歳になる頃にはそれが2人に1人の
割合にまで高まります
11:52
Again, there's many underlying genetic causes for this.
繰り返しになりますが この原因の多くは遺伝子にあります
11:55
So what we've been doing in my lab
我々はラボで
11:59
is looking at these unique sensory specialists, the bats,
独特な感覚器官のスペシャリストであるコウモリに注目し
12:02
and we have looked at genes that cause blindness
視覚障害や聴覚障害の原因遺伝子に
12:05
when there's a defect in them,
視覚障害や聴覚障害の原因遺伝子に
12:08
genes that cause deafness when there's a defect in them,
注目してきました
12:09
and now we can predict which sites are most likely to cause disease.
今ではどの部位が病気を引き起こし得るのか予測できます
12:12
So bats are also important for our health,
コウモリは我々の健康に対しても重要であり
12:17
to enable us to better understand how our genome functions.
ゲノムがどのように機能するかを理解する助けになります
12:19
So this is where we are right now,
これが現在の段階ですが
12:24
but what about the future?
将来についてはどうでしょう?
12:27
What about longevity?
長寿については?
12:29
This is where we're going to go, and as I said before,
この様な研究も進めて行きたいのです
12:30
I really believe that the secret of everlasting youth
永遠の若さの秘訣は コウモリのゲノムに存在すると
12:34
lies within the bat genome.
私は強く信じています
12:37
So why should we be interested in aging at all?
そもそも我々は
なぜ老化に興味を持つのでしょう?
12:39
Well, really, this is a picture drawn from the 1500s
これは1500年代に描かれた若返りの泉の絵です
12:43
of the Fountain of Youth. Aging is considered
老化は 生物の見地の中で
12:45
one of the most familiar, yet the least well-understood,
最も馴染みがありながら理解されていないものの
12:49
aspects of all of biology, and really,
1つとして見なされ
12:53
since the dawn of civilization, mankind has sought to avoid it.
文明の発生以来 人類は老化を避けようと努力してきました
12:56
But we are going to have to understand it a bit better.
しかしまだもっと深く理解する必要があるようです
13:00
In Europe alone, by 2050, there is going to be
2050年までにヨーロッパだけでも
13:03
a 70 percent increase of individuals over 65,
65歳以上の人は70%増え
13:07
and 170 percent increase in individuals over 80.
80歳以上の人は170%増えると予測されています
13:11
As we age, we deteriorate, and this deterioration
年を取り 衰弱するにつれ
13:14
causes problems for our society, so we have to address it.
社会問題が引き起こされます
そのためこれを解決しなければなりません
13:17
So how could the secret of everlasting youth actually lie
永遠の若さの秘訣はどのようにコウモリゲノムに
13:22
within the bat genome? Does anybody want to hazard
隠されているのでしょうか?
13:27
a guess over how long this bat could live for?
どなたかコウモリがどのくらい
長生きするか想像がつきますか?
13:29
Who -- put up your hands -- who says two years?
挙手をお願いします
2年だと思う方?
13:33
Nobody? One? How about 10 years?
いませんか?1人?
10年だと思う方?
13:36
Some? How about 30?
数人でしょうか
30年だと思う方?
13:40
How about 40? Okay, it's a whole varied response.
40年だと思う方?
はい 様々な答えが返ってきました
13:44
This bat is myotis brandtii. It's the longest-living bat.
このコウモリはプラントホオヒゲコウモリです
最も長生きするコウモリです
13:48
It lived for up to 42 years,
最大42年も生きました
13:52
and this bat's still alive in the wild today.
現在も野生に存在しています
13:54
But what would be so amazing about this?
しかしこのコウモリの何が驚きなんでしょうか?
13:56
Well, typically, in mammals there is a relationship
哺乳動物では通常 体長と代謝率と寿命に
13:59
between body size, metabolic rate,
相関が見られ
14:04
and how long you can live for, and you can predict
体長が分かれば
14:06
how long a mammal can live for given its body size.
だいたいの寿命が予測できます
14:08
So typically, small mammals live fast, die young.
通常 小さな哺乳動物の成長は速く
若くして死にます
14:12
Think of a mouse. But bats are very different.
ネズミが良い例です
しかしコウモリは全く違います
14:15
As you can see here on this graph, in blue,
このグラフの青い点は
14:18
these are all other mammals, but bats
コウモリ以外の哺乳類ですが
14:21
can live up to nine times longer than expected
コウモリは代謝率がとても高いわりに
14:23
despite having a really, really high metabolic rate,
予測の9倍も長生きしますが
ここである疑問が浮かびます
14:26
and the question is, how can they do that?
コウモリはどうやって
そんなに長生きできるのでしょう?
14:29
There are 19 species of mammal that live longer
体長に基づく予測よりも
14:31
than expected, given their body size, than man,
長生きする哺乳類は19種いますが
14:35
and 18 of those are bats.
そのうち18種はコウモリです
14:38
So therefore, they must have something within their DNA
そのため コウモリはDNAの中に
特に飛行による代謝ストレスの処理を可能にする
14:40
that ables them to deal with the metabolic stresses,
何かを持っているに違いありません
14:45
particularly of flight. They expend three times more energy
コウモリは同じ体長の哺乳動物の
3倍ものエネルギーを消費しているのですが
14:48
than a mammal of the same size,
コウモリは同じ体長の哺乳動物の
3倍ものエネルギーを消費しているのですが
14:52
but don't seem to suffer the consequences or the effects.
その影響があるようには見えません
14:54
So right now, in my lab, we're combining
現在私のラボでは 外に出て
長生きしているコウモリを捕まえて来て
14:57
state-of-the-art bat field biology, going out and catching
最先端のコウモリのフィールド生物学と
15:01
the long-lived bats, with the most up-to-date,
最先端の分子技術を融合し
15:05
modern molecular technology to understand better
コウモリが老化を止めるために何をしているか
15:07
what it is that they do to stop aging as we do.
より深く理解しようと試みています
15:11
And hopefully in the next five years, I'll be giving you a TEDTalk on that.
これから5年でそれについての
TEDトークができれば と思います
15:15
Aging is a big problem for humanity,
人類にとって老化は大きな問題ですが
15:19
and I believe that by studying bats, we can uncover
コウモリを研究することにより
15:22
the molecular mechanisms that enable mammals
哺乳動物に信じられないほどの長寿を実現させる
15:25
to achieve extraordinary longevity. If we find out
分子機構を解明できると信じています
15:28
what they're doing, perhaps through gene therapy,
それが分かれば おそらく遺伝子治療を通じて
15:31
we can enable us to do the same thing.
我々も同じことができるようになります
15:34
Potentially, this means that we could halt aging or maybe even reverse it.
もしかすると 我々も老化を止めたり
逆に若返ったりできるようになるかもしれません
15:37
Just imagine what that would be like.
どんな世界か想像してみてください
15:42
So really, I don't think we should be thinking of them
コウモリは暗黒に飛び回る悪魔ではなく
15:46
as flying demons of the night, but more as our superheroes.
スーパーヒーローであると考えるべきです
15:49
And the reality is that bats can bring us so much benefit
現実として 適切に見さえすれば
コウモリはたくさんの恩恵をもたらしてくれます
15:54
if we just look in the right place. They're good for our ecosystem,
生態系のバランスを保ち
15:58
they allow us to understand how our genome functions,
ゲノムが機能する仕組みを理解する手助けをしてくれ
16:00
and they potentially hold the secret to everlasting youth.
永遠の若さの秘訣を持っている可能性があります
16:03
So tonight, when you walk out of here and you look up
今夜この会場から出て夜空を見上げたときに
16:07
in the night skies, and you see this beautiful flying mammal,
この美しい空飛ぶ哺乳動物を見かけたら
16:09
I want you to smile. Thank you. (Applause)
皆さんに微笑んで頂きたいです
ありがとうございました (拍手)
16:13
Translator:Tomoshige Ohno
Reviewer:Jun Kaneko

sponsored links

Emma Teeling - Zoologist
Emma Teeling, Director of the Centre for Irish Bat Research, thinks we have a lot to learn from the biology of bats.

Why you should listen

One-fifth of all mammals in the world are bats -- so why are they so stigmatized in Western culture? Dr. Emma Teeling believes that these fascinating creatures have a lot to teach us, with their uniquely high metabolic rates and surprisingly long lifespans. Teeling studies mammalian phylogenetics and comparative genomics, with particular expertise in bat biology and the bat's genetic signatures of survival.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.