sponsored links
TEDxSeoul

Young-ha Kim: Be an artist, right now!

キム・ヨンハ: アーティストになろう、今すぐに!

July 24, 2010

どうして僕たちは、何かを創ったりパフォーマンスをすることを止めてしまうのか? 韓国の作家 キム・ヨンハが、聴衆の中に眠る永遠のアーティスト魂に、ユーモアを交えながら語りかけます。(撮影場所: TEDx Seoul)

Young-ha Kim - Writer
One of the premiere writers of his generation, Korean novelist Young-ha Kim weaves tales that speak to the thrills and challenges of young Koreans in our increasingly globalized and ever-changing world. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
The theme of my talk today is,
今日の僕の話のタイトルは
00:15
"Be an artist, right now."
「アーティストになろう、今すぐに」です
00:17
Most people, when this subject is brought up,
こういう話をしても 多くの人は
00:20
get tense and resist it:
素直に聞いてはくれないようです
00:23
"Art doesn't feed me, and right now I'm busy.
「アートじゃ生活できないし 今は忙しいから」
00:26
I have to go to school, get a job,
「学校に行っているから」「就活が忙しくて」
00:29
send my kids to lessons ... "
「子供の送り迎えがあるし」ってね
00:31
You think, "I'm too busy. I don't have time for art."
「忙しくて アートのための時間なんてない」と思ってる
00:33
There are hundreds of reasons why we can't be artists right now.
今すぐアーティストになれない
理由はたくさんある
00:39
Don't they just pop into your head?
みなさんも すぐ思い浮かぶでしょう?
00:42
There are so many reasons why we can't be,
なれない理由は本当にたくさんある
00:44
indeed, we're not sure why we should be.
そもそも なるべき理由もよく分からない
00:46
We don't know why we should be artists,
アーティストになるべき理由が分からないうえに
00:48
but we have many reasons why we can't be.
なれない理由の方はたくさんあるんだ
00:50
Why do people instantly resist the idea of associating themselves with art?
なぜ 自分とアートを結びつけることに抵抗を感じるのか
00:54
Perhaps you think art is for the greatly gifted
たぶん アートはすごい天才か
00:58
or for the thoroughly and professionally trained.
修行を重ねたプロだけのものだと思っているんだ
01:02
And some of you may think you've strayed too far from art.
アートから遠ざかっているから
と思っている人もいるだろう
01:07
Well you might have, but I don't think so.
その可能性もゼロじゃないけど
僕は疑わしいと思う
01:11
This is the theme of my talk today.
今日はこのことについて話をします
01:16
We are all born artists.
僕らはみんな生まれた時からアーティストだ
01:19
If you have kids, you know what I mean.
子供がいる人は 分かるよね
01:20
Almost everything kids do is art.
子供がやることは ほとんどすべてがアートだ
01:23
They draw with crayons on the wall.
壁にクレヨンで絵を描いたり
01:28
They dance to Son Dam Bi's dance on TV,
テレビのソン・ダムビを真似て踊ったり
01:31
but you can't even call it Son Dam Bi's dance -- it becomes the kids' own dance.
でも真似できずに オリジナルな振付になったりする
01:34
So they dance a strange dance and inflict their singing on everyone.
変なダンスを踊ったり 人に歌を聴かせたりする
01:38
Perhaps their art is something only their parents can bear,
子供のアートに我慢できるのは
その子の親だけかもしれない
01:43
and because they practice such art all day long,
子供の芸術活動は一日中続くから
01:47
people honestly get a little tired around kids.
実際 子供の相手は大変だよね
01:52
Kids will sometimes perform monodramas --
時にはお芝居をすることもある --
01:56
playing house is indeed a monodrama or a play.
ままごとは一人か数人でやる お芝居だ
01:59
And some kids, when they get a bit older,
少し大きくなると 嘘をつくことを
02:02
start to lie.
覚える子もいるよね
02:05
Usually parents remember the very first time their kid lies.
親は 子供が最初に嘘をついた時を覚えている
02:07
They're shocked.
なにしろ ショックだから
02:12
"Now you're showing your true colors," Mom says. She thinks, "Why does he take after his dad?"
「本性が現れて来たようね」とお母さんが言う
『どうしてお父さんに似ちゃったのから』と思いながら
02:13
She questions him, "What kind of a person are you going to be?"
それで子供に尋ねる 「どんな大人になるつもり?」
02:17
But you shouldn't worry.
でも心配することはありません
02:20
The moment kids start to lie is the moment storytelling begins.
子供が嘘をつき始めた瞬間に
物語を創る才能が目覚めるんだ
02:22
They are talking about things they didn't see.
見たことのないものについて話し始める
02:28
It's amazing. It's a wonderful moment.
すばらしい瞬間です
02:30
Parents should celebrate.
親は喜ぶべきです
02:32
"Hurray! My boy finally started to lie!"
「やった! うちの子が初めての嘘をついた!」 って
02:34
All right! It calls for celebration.
お祝いしなくちゃいけない
02:38
For example, a kid says, "Mom, guess what? I met an alien on my way home."
「ママ! 帰り道に誰に合ったか分かる? 宇宙人だよ」 と
02:40
Then a typical mom responds, "Stop that nonsense."
子供に言われたら 普通の親は「やめなさい!」と応える
02:44
Now, an ideal parent is someone who responds like this:
理想的な親はこんな風に応えるだろう
02:48
"Really? An alien, huh? What did it look like? Did it say anything?
「本当?宇宙人がいたの?
どんなだった?何かしゃべった?
02:52
Where did you meet it?" "Um, in front of the supermarket."
どこで会ったの?」
「えっと...スーパーの前だよ」
02:55
When you have a conversation like this,
こんな風に話をすれば
02:57
the kid has to come up with the next thing to say to be responsible for what he started.
子供は次の展開を
ちゃんと考えなきゃいけなくなる
02:59
Soon, a story develops.
そうするうちに
物語がどんどん発展していくのです
03:05
Of course this is an infantile story,
もちろんそれは 子供のお話に過ぎないけど
03:08
but thinking up one sentence after the next
一行 また一行と 考えていく作業は
03:12
is the same thing a professional writer like me does.
僕たちプロの作家と同じだ
03:16
In essence, they are not different.
両者に本質的な違いはない
03:20
Roland Barthes once said of Flaubert's novels,
ロラン・バルトがフロベールの小説について言っている
03:22
"Flaubert did not write a novel.
「フロベールは小説を書こうとしたというよりも
03:25
He merely connected one sentence after another.
1つずつ 文をつなぎ合わせていったに過ぎない
03:28
The eros between sentences, that is the essence of Flaubert's novel."
その行間に潜むエロスこそが 彼の小説の本質だ」
03:31
That's right -- a novel, basically, is writing one sentence,
そのとおりだ -- 小説は まず一文を書いて
03:35
then, without violating the scope of the first one,
その前提からはみ出さないように
03:38
writing the next sentence.
次の行を書いて
03:42
And you continue to make connections.
それを繰り返すことで生み出されるものだ
03:43
Take a look at this sentence:
この文をちょっと見てみましょう
03:45
"One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bug."
「ある朝、グレゴール・ザムザが気がかりな夢から目ざめたとき、自分がベッドの上で一匹の巨大な毒虫に変ってしまっているのに気づいた。」
03:47
Yes, it's the first sentence of Franz Kafka's "The Metamorphosis."
カフカの「変身」の 冒頭の 1 文です
03:49
Writing such an unjustifiable sentence
こんな 有り得ない出だしなのに
03:52
and continuing in order to justify it,
それが説得力を持つように続けることで
03:55
Kafka's work became the masterpiece of contemporary literature.
カフカは現代文学の名作を生み出しました
03:57
Kafka did not show his work to his father.
カフカは父親には自分の作品を見せなかった
04:02
He was not on good terms with his father.
父親とは仲が悪かったのです
04:05
On his own, he wrote these sentences.
カフカはこんなことをこっそり書いています
04:07
Had he shown his father, "My boy has finally lost it," he would've thought.
もし父に見せたら「正気を失った」と思われるだろう
04:11
And that's right. Art is about going a little nuts
実はそうなんです
アートは常識を外れ
04:14
and justifying the next sentence,
いかにも真実の様に
次の文を続けていくという
04:16
which is not much different from what a kid does.
子供の遊びみたいな方法で 創作したのだから
04:18
A kid who has just started to lie
嘘をつき始めた子供は
04:21
is taking the first step as a storyteller.
物語の作者になる第一歩を踏み出したと言えます
04:23
Kids do art.
子供たちはアートを実践しています
04:26
They don't get tired and they have fun doing it.
飽きることもなく 楽しみながらやっている
04:29
I was in Jeju Island a few days ago.
数日前に済州島に行ってきました
04:30
When kids are on the beach, most of them love playing in the water.
ほとんどの子が海に入りたがるけど
04:32
But some of them spend a lot of time in the sand,
中には砂の方が好きな子もいる
04:37
making mountains and seas -- well, not seas,
山や海を作ったり -- 海じゃないか
04:40
but different things -- people and dogs, etc.
何か -- 人とか 犬とか
04:42
But parents tell them,
そういう時に親が言うんだ
04:46
"It will all be washed away by the waves."
「どうせ波に壊されちゃうわよ」
04:47
In other words, it's useless.
つまりムダだし
何の役にも立たないってことだね
04:49
There's no need.
つまりムダだし
何の役にも立たないってことだね
04:51
But kids don't mind.
でも子供たちは気にしない
04:52
They have fun in the moment
その瞬間を楽しんでいて
04:54
and they keep playing in the sand.
無心に砂遊びを続ける
04:55
Kids don't do it because someone told them to.
誰かに言われてそうしているわけじゃない
04:57
They aren't told by their boss
ボスに命令されたわけじゃない
05:00
or anyone, they just do it.
ただそうするんだ
05:01
When you were little, I bet you spent time enjoying the pleasure of primitive art.
子供の頃 夢中に絵を描いたことがあるでしょ
05:04
When I ask my students to write about their happiest moment,
一番幸せだった時について書いて と学生に言うと
05:09
many write about an early artistic experience they had as a kid.
幼い頃の芸術体験について書くことが多い
05:14
Learning to play piano for the first time and playing four hands with a friend,
初めてピアノを弾いたときや連弾したとき
05:20
or performing a ridiculous skit with friends looking like idiots -- things like that.
友達をボケ役にしてコントをしたとき
05:22
Or the moment you developed the first film you shot with an old camera.
初めて撮った写真を現像したときとか
05:28
They talk about these kinds of experiences.
そういう経験について語り始める
05:31
You must have had such a moment.
あなたにも そんな時がありませんでしたか?
05:33
In that moment, art makes you happy
その時 アートはあなたを幸せにしていたはずです
05:35
because it's not work.
仕事と違ってね
05:37
Work doesn't make you happy, does it? Mostly it's tough.
仕事で幸せを感じていますか?
つらいことの方が多いですよね
05:39
The French writer Michel Tournier has a famous saying.
フランスの作家 ミシェル・トゥルニエの
有名な言葉があります
05:42
It's a bit mischievous, actually.
からかっているみたいだけど
05:45
"Work is against human nature. The proof is that it makes us tired."
「仕事は人間性に反する。
仕事をすると疲れるのが その証拠だ」
05:46
Right? Why would work tire us if it's in our nature?
仕事が人間の本性なら なぜ疲れるのか
05:51
Playing doesn't tire us.
遊びでは疲れないのに
05:53
We can play all night long.
徹夜で遊ぶことだって出来る
05:54
If we work overnight, we should be paid for overtime.
徹夜で働いたら 残業代を請求する
05:56
Why? Because it's tiring and we feel fatigue.
うんざりするし疲れるから
05:58
But kids, usually they do art for fun. It's playing.
でも子供は楽しみのためにアートをする
それは遊びなんだ
06:02
They don't draw to sell the work to a client
絵を描いて売ろうとしているわけじゃない
06:06
or play the piano to earn money for the family.
家族を養うためにピアノを弾いているわけじゃない
06:09
Of course, there were kids who had to.
もちろん 昔はそういう子もいた
06:12
You know this gentleman, right?
この人が誰だか分かりますか?
06:15
He had to tour around Europe to support his family --
家族を養うためにヨーロッパ中を旅した
06:16
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart --
モーツァルトです --
06:20
but that was centuries ago, so we can make him an exception.
でも何世紀も前のことだし
モーツァルトは例外扱いでいいでしょう
06:22
Unfortunately, at some point our art -- such a joyful pastime -- ends.
残念なことに 純粋な楽しみであるはずのアートは
やがて終わりを迎えます
06:25
Kids have to go to lessons, to school, do homework
子供たちは学校や習い事に通い始め
宿題も出される
06:29
and of course they take piano or ballet lessons,
ピアノやバレエのレッスンもあるけど
06:32
but they aren't fun anymore.
それまでみたいに楽しくはない
06:36
You're told to do it and there's competition. How can it be fun?
命令されたり 競争させられたり
そんなの楽しくないに決まってる
06:38
If you're in elementary school and you still draw on the wall,
小学校に入ったのに 壁に落書きをしていたら
06:41
you'll surely get in trouble with your mom.
お母さんにも怒られるし
06:47
Besides,
それに
06:50
if you continue to act like an artist as you get older,
いつまでもアーティストのように振る舞っていると
06:54
you'll increasingly feel pressure --
だんだんプレッシャーをかけられるようになる --
06:57
people will question your actions and ask you to act properly.
みんなに変な目で見られて
ちゃんとしろって言われちゃう
07:01
Here's my story: I was an eighth grader and I entered a drawing contest at school in Gyeongbokgung.
僕がそうだった -- 中学のとき
景福宮の写生大会に参加して
07:07
I was trying my best, and my teacher came around
一生懸命描いてた
そしたら先生が回ってきて
07:13
and asked me, "What are you doing?"
「何してるの?」って訊いてきたんだ
07:16
"I'm drawing diligently," I said.
「一生懸命描いてます」って答えたら
07:19
"Why are you using only black?"
「何で黒一色なの?」って
07:21
Indeed, I was eagerly coloring the sketchbook in black.
僕は黒一色でスケッチブックを塗りつぶしていたんだ
07:23
And I explained,
僕は説明した
07:25
"It's a dark night and a crow is perching on a branch."
「闇夜にカラスが樹上で休んでいる図です」
07:29
Then my teacher said,
先生は言った
07:32
"Really? Well, Young-ha, you may not be good at drawing but you have a talent for storytelling."
「ヨンハ君は絵は描けないけど
物語の才能があるよね」
07:33
Or so I wished.
-- だったら良かったんですが
07:38
"Now you'll get it, you rascal!" was the response. (Laughter)
実際は 「ふざけるな!」って怒られた(笑)
07:41
"You'll get it!" he said.
「立っていなさい!」って先生は怒鳴った
07:44
You were supposed to draw the palace, the Gyeonghoeru, etc.,
「今日は宮殿を描きに来たんだぞ」って
07:45
but I was coloring everything in black,
でも僕の絵は真っ黒だった
07:48
so he dragged me out of the group.
先生は僕をグループから引きずり出した
07:50
There were a lot of girls there as well,
周りには女子もたくさんいた
07:52
so I was utterly mortified.
僕は恥ずかしくてたまらなかった
07:54
None of my explanations or excuses were heard,
何を言っても聞いてもらえなかったし
07:56
and I really got it big time.
深く傷ついた
08:00
If he was an ideal teacher, he would have responded like I said before,
理想的な教師なら
僕が望んだような答えが返って来ただろう
08:03
"Young-ha may not have a talent for drawing,
「ヨンハ君は絵は描けないけど
08:08
but he has a gift for making up stories," and he would have encouraged me.
物語の才能があるね」って
励ましてくれたはずだ
08:10
But such a teacher is seldom found.
でもそんな先生は滅多にいない
08:13
Later, I grew up and went to Europe's galleries --
大人になってヨーロッパの美術館に行ったとき --
08:17
I was a university student -- and I thought this was really unfair.
大学生の時だ -- すごく不公平に感じたよ
08:20
Look what I found. (Laughter)
これを見た時に(笑)
08:22
Works like this were hung in Basel while I was punished
僕が自分の絵をくわえて
景福宮の前に立たされていた頃
08:27
and stood in front of the palace with my drawing in my mouth.
この絵はバーゼルの美術館に飾られていたんだ
08:31
Look at this. Doesn't it look just like wallpaper?
これなんか まるで壁紙じゃないか
08:37
Contemporary art, I later discovered, isn't explained by a lame story like mine.
現代美術では
言い訳なんていらないそうだ
08:40
No crows are brought up.
カラスがどうとかね
08:42
Most of the works have no title, Untitled.
ほとんどの作品の題名は「無題」だ
08:46
Anyways, contemporary art in the 20th century
ともあれ 20 世紀の現代美術は
08:49
is about doing something weird and filling the void with explanation and interpretation --
何か変なことをして
説明や解釈で空白を埋めるという
08:52
essentially the same as I did.
僕がやったのと まさに同じようなものだ
08:58
Of course, my work was very amateur,
僕のは完全に素人の作品だったけど
08:59
but let's turn to more famous examples.
代わりにもっと有名な作品を見てみよう
09:02
This is Picasso's.
これはピカソの作品です
09:05
He stuck handlebars into a bike seat and called it "Bull's Head." Sounds convincing, right?
自転車のハンドルにサドルをくっつけて
「牡牛の頭部」という作品名を付けた
09:08
Next, a urinal was placed on its side and called "Fountain".
こちらの小便器は 「泉」という題名の作品
09:13
That was Duchamp.
デュシャンの作品です
09:18
So filling the gap between explanation and a weird act with stories --
つまり 何か変なことをして
それをストーリーで説明するというのが
09:20
that's indeed what contemporary art is all about.
現代美術がやっていることなんだ
09:24
Picasso even made the statement,
ピカソはこうも言っている
09:28
"I draw not what I see but what I think."
「私は見たものを描くのではなく 感じたものを描く」
09:30
Yes, it means I didn't have to draw Gyeonghoeru.
慶會楼を見たままに描く必要はなかったんだ
09:34
I wish I knew what Picasso said back then. I could have argued better with my teacher.
ピカソのこの言葉をもし知っていたら
あの先生に勝てたかもしれない
09:36
Unfortunately, the little artists within us
不幸なことに 僕たちの中にある創造性は
09:40
are choked to death before we get to fight against the oppressors of art.
芸術の抑圧者との戦い方を覚える前に
息の根を止められてしまう
09:44
They get locked in.
檻に閉じ込められて
09:50
That's our tragedy.
それは僕たちの悲劇だ
09:51
So what happens when little artists get locked in, banished or even killed?
創造性が閉じ込められたり 踏みにじられたとき
何が起きるのか?
09:52
Our artistic desire doesn't go away.
アートに対する欲求は消えたりしない
09:58
We want to express, to reveal ourselves,
自己表現への渇望が残る
09:59
but with the artist dead, the artistic desire reveals itself in dark form.
でも創造性を否定されたら
抑圧された形でしか表現できなくなる
10:02
In karaoke bars, there are always people who sing
「追憶のメロディ」や「ホテルカリフォルニア」を
10:07
"She's Gone" or "Hotel California,"
エアギターを弾きながら
10:10
miming the guitar riffs.
カラオケで歌ったり
10:13
Usually they sound awful. Awful indeed.
大抵 すごく下手なんだよね
10:15
Some people turn into rockers like this.
そんな風になったりする人もいるし
10:17
Or some people dance in clubs.
クラブで踊る人もいる
10:20
People who would have enjoyed telling stories
物語を紡ぎだすことの出来たかもしれない人々が
10:22
end up trolling on the Internet all night long.
一晩中 インターネットで騒いでいる
10:25
That's how a writing talent reveals itself on the dark side.
そこでは 文章を書く才能が
暗黒の一面を見せる
10:28
Sometimes we see dads get more excited than their kids
子供のおもちゃを取り上げちゃうお父さんもいる
10:32
playing with Legos or putting together plastic robots.
レゴとかプラモデルで遊ぶときに
10:36
They go, "Don't touch it. Daddy will do it for you."
「触るな! パパがやってやるから」って
10:39
The kid has already lost interest and is doing something else,
子供は飽きて
別のことをし始めるんだけど
10:40
but the dad alone builds castles.
お父さんは構わずお城を作り続ける
10:42
This shows the artistic impulses inside us are suppressed, not gone.
創造性が抑圧されても
完全になくなっていない証だ
10:46
But they can often reveal themselves negatively, in the form of jealousy.
それはしばしば嫉妬という
裏返しの形で現れる
10:51
You know the song "I would love to be on TV"? Why would we love it?
「テレビに出たい」っていう歌を知ってる?
どうしてテレビに出たいのかな?
10:54
TV is full of people who do what we wished to do,
自分が願ってもなれなかったような人たちが
11:00
but never got to.
テレビにはたくさん出ている
11:03
They dance, they act -- and the more they do, they are praised.
踊ったり 演技したり --
やればやるほど称賛される
11:05
So we start to envy them.
そうなると彼らが妬ましくなってくる
11:12
We become dictators with a remote and start to criticize the people on TV.
リモコンを握り テレビの人々を批判し始める
11:15
"He just can't act." "You call that singing? She can't hit the notes."
「演技が下手」
「これが歌? 音程合ってないじゃん」
11:19
We easily say these sorts of things.
こういう言葉がどんどん出てくる
11:25
We get jealous, not because we're evil,
僕らが嫉妬するのは
僕らの性格が悪いからじゃない
11:27
but because we have little artists pent up inside us.
僕らの中に 創造性が閉じ込められているからだ
11:30
That's what I think.
僕はそう思う
11:34
What should we do then?
じゃあ どうすればいいのか?
11:38
Yes, that's right.
そのとおり
11:40
Right now, we need to start our own art.
いますぐ 自分たちのアートを始めるべきだ
11:41
Right this minute, we can turn off TV,
いますぐに テレビを消して
11:44
log off the Internet,
インターネットを止めて
11:45
get up and start to do something.
自分自身で何かを始めるべきだ
11:47
Where I teach students in drama school,
僕は演劇学校で教えている
11:50
there's a course called Dramatics.
演技・演出術のコースだ
11:52
In this course, all students must put on a play.
このコースでは学生全員に
舞台を上演させる
11:54
However, acting majors are not supposed to act.
でも演技専攻の学生には
演技はさせない
11:59
They can write the play, for example,
彼らには台本を書かせたり
12:03
and the writers may work on stage art.
作家志望の学生に舞台美術をさせたり
12:05
Likewise, stage art majors may become actors, and in this way you put on a show.
美術専攻の学生に演技をさせたりして
舞台を完成させる
12:08
Students at first wonder whether they can actually do it,
最初は 学生たちは戸惑うけど
12:10
but later they have so much fun. I rarely see anyone who is miserable doing a play.
そのうち新しい役割を楽しみ始める
楽しくなさそうな学生は滅多にいない
12:14
In school, the military or even in a mental institution, once you make people do it, they enjoy it.
学校でも 軍隊でも 果ては精神病院でも
舞台をやることになれば みんなが楽しむ
12:18
I saw this happen in the army -- many people had fun doing plays.
軍隊でもそうだった --
沢山の人が楽しそうに舞台に参加していた
12:22
I have another experience:
もう一つ 僕の経験を紹介しよう
12:27
In my writing class, I give students a special assignment.
作文の講義で
僕はちょっと変わった課題を出す
12:30
I have students like you in the class -- many who don't major in writing.
講義にはみなさんのような
作家志望でない学生も大勢いて
12:34
Some major in art or music and think they can't write.
美術や音楽を専攻している学生は
自分には書けないと思っている
12:40
So I give them blank sheets of paper and a theme.
僕は学生に白紙とテーマを与える
12:44
It can be a simple theme:
簡単なテーマを与える
12:48
Write about the most unfortunate experience in your childhood.
子供の頃に起きた
最もツイていない経験について書く とか
12:50
There's one condition: You must write like crazy. Like crazy!
ただし一つだけ条件を付ける
狂ったように書け! と
12:52
I walk around and encourage them,
教室を回って学生に声をかける
12:56
"Come on, come on!" They have to write like crazy for an hour or two.
「とにかく書け!」って
1 時間か 2 時間 狂ったように書かせる
12:59
They only get to think for the first five minutes.
考える時間は最初の 5 分くらいだろう
13:02
The reason I make them write like crazy is because
狂ったように書け というのは
13:06
when you write slowly and lots of thoughts cross your mind,
ゆっくり書くといろんなことを考えて
13:09
the artistic devil creeps in.
悪魔に隙を与えることになるから
13:12
This devil will tell you hundreds of reasons
悪魔はいくつもの理由を持ち出して
13:14
why you can't write:
書くことを諦めさせようとする
13:18
"People will laugh at you. This is not good writing!
「みんなに笑われるよ」「下手くそだな!」
13:21
What kind of sentence is this? Look at your handwriting!"
「変な文章!」「字が汚い!」
13:24
It will say a lot of things.
そういうことを次々に言う
13:25
You have to run fast so the devil can't catch up.
この悪魔に捕まらないように
全力疾走しなきゃいけない
13:27
The really good writing I've seen in my class
僕の授業でこれまで一番良かった作品は
13:30
was not from the assignments with a long deadline,
じっくり取り組める長期間の課題ではなく
13:34
but from the 40- to 60-minute crazy writing students did
1 時間以下の短い時間に 僕の目の前で学生が
13:36
in front of me with a pencil.
鉛筆で書きなぐった文章だった
13:40
The students go into a kind of trance.
学生はある種のトランス状態におちいる
13:43
After 30 or 40 minutes, they write without knowing what they're writing.
30 分か 40 分もすると
自分でもよく分からないことを書き始める
13:45
And in this moment, the nagging devil disappears.
そのとき 悪魔がつけ込む隙はなくなる
13:49
So I can say this:
こう言うことができるだろう
13:52
It's not the hundreds of reasons why one can't be an artist,
アーティストになるために必要なのは
13:54
but rather, the one reason one must be that makes us artists.
沢山の否定的な理由ではなく
たった一つの必然的な理由だ
13:58
Why we cannot be something is not important.
成れるはずがないという理由なんて 重要じゃない
14:02
Most artists became artists because of the one reason.
たった一つの必然的な理由こそが
多くのアーティストを生み出す
14:04
When we put the devil in our heart to sleep and start our own art,
悪魔の方を閉じ込めて
自分自身のアートを始めると
14:07
enemies appear on the outside.
今度は外側からの攻撃にさらされる
14:11
Mostly, they have the faces of our parents. (Laughter)
たいていの場合は 自分の両親だ(笑)
14:13
Sometimes they look like our spouses,
妻や夫の場合もある
14:16
but they are not your parents or spouses.
でもそれは本当の両親や配偶者ではなく
14:19
They are devils. Devils.
悪魔が化けているのです
14:21
They came to Earth briefly transformed
悪魔が身近な人に姿を変え
14:24
to stop you from being artistic, from becoming artists.
アーティストになるのを邪魔しに来たのです
14:26
And they have a magic question.
彼らはすごい呪文を使います
14:30
When we say, "I think I'll try acting. There's a drama school in the community center," or
「公民館のクラスで 演技を習ってみようかな」 とか
14:32
"I'd like to learn Italian songs," they ask, "Oh, yeah? A play? What for?"
「カンツォーネを習いたい」というと
「ふーん? 何のために?」と訊かれる
14:38
The magic question is, "What for?"
この「何のために?」というのが
悪魔の呪文なのです
14:42
But art is not for anything.
アートは何かのためにやるものではない
14:46
Art is the ultimate goal.
アートこそが究極のゴールです
14:50
It saves our souls and makes us live happily.
人間の魂に救済を与え
生活を豊かにする
14:52
It helps us express ourselves and be happy without the help of alcohol or drugs.
お酒や薬に頼らなくても
自分を表現して楽しくなれる
14:56
So in response to such a pragmatic question,
だから この呪文を投げかけられても
15:02
we need to be bold.
怯まないでください
15:06
"Well, just for the fun of it. Sorry for having fun without you,"
「面白そうだからだよ! 君も何か見つけたら?」 とか
15:08
is what you should say. "I'll just go ahead and do it anyway."
「とにかくやってみるよ」と言ってください
15:13
The ideal future I imagine is where we all have multiple identities,
僕が考える理想の未来では
誰にでも複数のアイデンティティがあって
15:17
at least one of which is an artist.
少なくともそのうち 1 つはアーティストなんだ
15:22
Once I was in New York and got in a cab. I took the backseat,
ニューヨークでタクシーに乗った時
後部座席の目の前に
15:26
and in front of me I saw something related to a play.
演劇関係の貼り紙がしてあった
15:29
So I asked the driver, "What is this?"
「これ何?」ってドライバーに訊くと
15:33
He said it was his profile. "Then what are you?" I asked. "An actor," he said.
自分のプロフィールだと彼は答えた
「何してるの?」って訊くと「役者だよ」って答えたんだ
15:34
He was a cabby and an actor. I asked, "What roles do you usually play?"
彼は運転手兼役者ってことだ
「どういう役が多いの?」って訊くと
15:38
He proudly said he played King Lear.
嬉しそうに「リア王だよ」って答えた
15:42
King Lear.
リア王
15:44
"Who is it that can tell me who I am?" -- a great line from King Lear.
「我が誰であるかを告げるものは誰か」
15:45
That's the world I dream of.
-- リア王の有名なセリフです
これこそ 僕が夢に見る世界だ
15:47
Someone is a golfer by day and writer by night.
昼間はゴルファーで夜は作家とか
15:50
Or a cabby and an actor, a banker and a painter,
運転手兼 役者とか
銀行員兼 画家であるとか
15:54
secretly or publicly performing their own arts.
人に見せる見せないに関わらず
誰もがアートを実践する
15:57
In 1990, Martha Graham, the legend of modern dance, came to Korea.
1990年に モダンダンスの先駆者
マーサ・グラハムが韓国を訪れた際
16:02
The great artist, then in her 90s, arrived at Gimpo Airport
金浦空港に降り立った 90 代の偉大な芸術家に
16:07
and a reporter asked her a typical question:
記者たちが型どおりの質問をした
16:13
"What do you have to do to become a great dancer?
「優れたダンサーになるために
すべきことはありますか?
16:16
Any advice for aspiring Korean dancers?"
韓国のダンサーたちにアドバイスをお願いします」
16:18
Now, she was the master. This photo was taken in 1948 and she was already a celebrated artist.
彼女は巨匠だった。1948 年にこの写真が
撮られた時彼女はすでにスターだった
16:21
In 1990, she was asked this question.
この質問をされたのは 1990 年だった
16:26
And here's what she answered:
彼女の答えはこうだった
16:28
"Just do it."
「とにかくやってみるのよ」
16:31
Wow. I was touched.
僕は感動した
16:35
Only those three words and she left the airport. That's it.
それだけ言うと 彼女は空港を後にした
16:36
So what should we do now?
僕たちは いま何をすべきなのか?
16:40
Let's be artists, right now. Right away. How?
アーティストになろう! 今すぐに!
でもどうやって?
16:44
Just do it!
とにかくやってみるんだ!
16:47
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
16:48
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:50
Translator:Seiko Hirofuji
Reviewer:Akiko Hicks

sponsored links

Young-ha Kim - Writer
One of the premiere writers of his generation, Korean novelist Young-ha Kim weaves tales that speak to the thrills and challenges of young Koreans in our increasingly globalized and ever-changing world.

Why you should listen

Young-ha Kim wishes that his eighth grade teacher, rather than chiding him for a poorly-executed drawing with a sweeping backstory, had told him, “Well, Young-ha, you may not be good at drawing but you have a talent for storytelling.” Without encouragement, he took the long road toward becoming a writer.

Young-ha Kim published his debut novel, I Have the Right to Destroy Myself, in 1996. It won the esteemed Munhak-dongne prize, and was translated into French two years later. Followed by English and German translations, the book garnered Kim international recognition. Kim has since published five novels -- including The Empire of Light and Your Republic Is Calling You -- plus four collections of short stories.

Kim’s latest book, Black Flower, was sparked by a random conversation on a trans-Pacific flight. It tells the story of 1,033 Korean immigrants who found themselves sold into indentured servitude in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula in 1905. Publisher's Weekly wrote of the novel in October of 2012, “Spare and beautiful, Kim’s novel offers a look at the roots of the little-known tribulations of the Korean diaspora in Mexico.”

Kim’s work mixes high and low genres and focuses on the issue of: what does it mean to be Korean in a globalized, quickly-changing world? His novels have served as a source of inspiration for Korean filmmakers -- two have already been adapted for the big screen with the film version of a third on its way.

Until 2008, Kim was a professor in the Drama School at Korean National University of Arts -- a post he left in 2008 to focus exclusively on writing.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.