sponsored links
TEDxCaltech

Michael Dickinson: How a fly flies

マイケル・ディキンソン: ハエはどうやって飛ぶの?

January 18, 2013

昆虫が飛べるようになったことは、生物の進化において最も重要な出来事の一つに違いない。マイケル・ディキンソンが、身近な昆虫、ハエの飛行について語ります。小さな羽・巧みな羽ばたき・大きな力筋が生み出す、すばしこくて力強いハエの飛行。でも、一番の秘密はその脳の中に隠されています。(撮影地: TEDxCaltech)

Michael Dickinson - Biologist
Most people are irritated by the buzzing of a fly's wings. But biologist Michael Dickinson views the sound with a deep sense of wonder. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I grew up watching Star Trek. I love Star Trek.
僕はスタートレックを見て育った。
スタートレックが好きでたまらない。
00:15
Star Trek made me want to see alien creatures,
好きが高じて、エイリアンに会いたいと思うようになった
00:19
creatures from a far-distant world.
遠い世界から来た生物にね
00:23
But basically, I figured out that I could find
まあ 自分が出会えるのはせいぜい
00:26
those alien creatures right on Earth.
地球上の変な生物くらいだろうと
分かってたけどね
00:28
And what I do is I study insects.
大人になって 僕は昆虫の研究者になった
00:31
I'm obsessed with insects, particularly insect flight.
僕は昆虫に夢中で、
特にその飛び方に興味を持ってる
00:34
I think the evolution of insect flight is perhaps
昆虫の飛行という進化は、おそらく
00:37
one of the most important events in the history of life.
生命の歴史において最も重要な
出来事のひとつだろう
00:40
Without insects, there'd be no flowering plants.
昆虫がいなければ 被子植物も出現せず
00:43
Without flowering plants, there would be no
被子植物が存在しなければ 賢いサルたちが
00:45
clever, fruit-eating primates giving TED Talks.
TED で話をすることもなかっただろうからね
00:47
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
00:51
Now,
さて 先ほどの
00:53
David and Hidehiko and Ketaki
デヴィッドとヒデヒコとケタキの3人が
00:55
gave a very compelling story about
とても興味深い話をした
00:58
the similarities between fruit flies and humans,
ミバエと人間の類似点について
01:01
and there are many similarities,
確かに、類似点がたくさんあるから
01:04
and so you might think that if humans are similar to fruit flies,
ミバエと人間が似ているのかと
思う人がいるかもしれない
01:06
the favorite behavior of a fruit fly might be this, for example --
たとえば ミバエの好きな行動はこれだとか --
01:09
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
01:12
but in my talk, I don't want to emphasize on the similarities
でも、今日は、人間とミバエの類似点ではなく
01:15
between humans and fruit flies, but rather the differences,
両者の違いについて、
01:18
and focus on the behaviors that I think fruit flies excel at doing.
そして、ミバエの長所について紹介しようと思う
01:21
And so I want to show you a high-speed video sequence
まずは、高速カメラで撮影したものをお見せしましょう
01:26
of a fly shot at 7,000 frames per second in infrared lighting,
毎秒7000コマの赤外線映像だ
01:29
and to the right, off-screen, is an electronic looming predator
画面から外れた右の方に
捕食者が迫っていて
01:33
that is going to go at the fly.
ハエを狙っている
01:37
The fly is going to sense this predator.
ハエが捕食者を察知している
01:39
It is going to extend its legs out.
脚を伸ばして
01:40
It's going to sashay away
スッと逃げる
01:43
to live to fly another day.
命拾いしたね
01:45
Now I have carefully cropped this sequence
この映像は人間の瞬きと
01:47
to be exactly the duration of a human eye blink,
同じ時間にカットしてある
01:49
so in the time that it would take you to blink your eye,
人間が一回瞬きをする間に
01:53
the fly has seen this looming predator,
ミバエが捕食者を発見して
01:55
estimated its position, initiated a motor pattern to fly it away,
位置を確認して
飛び去るための筋肉運動を開始した
01:59
beating its wings at 220 times a second as it does so.
毎秒220回も羽ばたきながら
02:05
I think this is a fascinating behavior
これはハエの脳がいかに高速に
02:09
that shows how fast the fly's brain can process information.
情報を処理しているかを示す
興味深い動きだ
02:11
Now, flight -- what does it take to fly?
では飛行だけど -- 飛ぶには何が必要かな?
02:15
Well, in order to fly, just as in a human aircraft,
飛ぶためには飛行機と同じように
02:18
you need wings that can generate sufficient aerodynamic forces,
十分な空気力を生み出す翼が必要だ
02:21
you need an engine sufficient to generate the power required for flight,
飛行するための力を生み出す十分なエンジンと
02:24
and you need a controller,
制御装置も必要だ
02:27
and in the first human aircraft, the controller was basically
人類初の飛行機の制御装置は、基本的に
02:29
the brain of Orville and Wilbur sitting in the cockpit.
コクピットのライト兄弟の脳みそだった
02:32
Now, how does this compare to a fly?
これをハエと比べるとどうだろう
02:36
Well, I spent a lot of my early career trying to figure out
研究者になりたての頃 僕は
02:39
how insect wings generate enough force to keep the flies in the air.
ハエの羽がどのようにして十分な浮力を
生み出しているか、との謎を解き明かそうと必死で研究していた
02:42
And you might have heard how engineers proved
聞いたことないかな?
航空力学の計算によると
02:46
that bumblebees couldn't fly.
マルハナバチは飛べないことになるって
02:48
Well, the problem was in thinking that the insect wings
昆虫の羽の働きを飛行機と同じように
02:50
function in the way that aircraft wings work. But they don't.
考えていたのが間違いだったんだ
02:53
And we tackle this problem by building giant,
この問題を解くため 動力学的に拡大した
02:56
dynamically scaled model robot insects
巨大な昆虫のロボットを作って 実験を行った
02:59
that would flap in giant pools of mineral oil
ロボットを大きな鉱物油の中で羽ばたかせ
03:03
where we could study the aerodynamic forces.
空気力学の力を観察した
03:06
And it turns out that the insects flap their wings
そこで分かったんだけど
03:08
in a very clever way, at a very high angle of attack
昆虫の羽ばたき方は とても賢くて
03:10
that creates a structure at the leading edge of the wing,
大きな迎角によって羽の先端に
03:13
a little tornado-like structure called a leading edge vortex,
前縁渦と呼ばれる
竜巻状の流れを生み出す
03:16
and it's that vortex that actually enables the wings
この渦によって昆虫の羽は
03:19
to make enough force for the animal to stay in the air.
十分な浮力を生み出すことができるんだ
03:22
But the thing that's actually most -- so, what's fascinating
しかしながら、一番興味深いのは
03:25
is not so much that the wing has some interesting morphology.
羽の形ではなくて羽の形状組織だ。
03:28
What's clever is the way the fly flaps it,
なんて賢い羽の動かし方をしているんだろう!
03:31
which of course ultimately is controlled by the nervous system,
羽の動きは、結局のところ、神経で制御されていて
03:35
and this is what enables flies to perform
そのおかげで ハエは自在に飛び回れる
03:38
these remarkable aerial maneuvers.
注目すべきは、飛行の巧みさ
03:40
Now, what about the engine?
じゃあ エンジンはどうだろう?
03:43
The engine of the fly is absolutely fascinating.
ハエのエンジンはとても面白い
03:45
They have two types of flight muscle:
ハエには2種類の飛行筋があるんだ
03:48
so-called power muscle, which is stretch-activated,
力筋と呼ばれるものは 伸展活性型なんだけど
03:50
which means that it activates itself and does not need to be controlled
それ自体が活性型なので、
03:53
on a contraction-by-contraction basis by the nervous system.
伸縮の度に神経による制御を必要としない
03:56
It's specialized to generate the enormous power required for flight,
飛ぶための大きな力を生み出す
目的に特化した筋肉で
04:00
and it fills the middle portion of the fly,
ハエの胸部を占めている
04:04
so when a fly hits your windshield,
それ故、フロントガラスにハエが衝突した時
04:06
it's basically the power muscle that you're looking at.
見えるのは ほとんどこの力筋なんだ
04:08
But attached to the base of the wing
でもその他に 羽の付け根には
04:10
is a set of little, tiny control muscles
力は弱いけど 反応が非常に速い
小さな制御筋があって
04:12
that are not very powerful at all, but they're very fast,
力は弱いけど 反応が非常に速い
小さな制御筋があって
04:15
and they're able to reconfigure the hinge of the wing
羽ばたきごとに 羽の蝶番を
04:18
on a stroke-by-stroke basis,
調整することができる
04:22
and this is what enables the fly to change its wing
これによって ハエは羽ばたきを調整して
04:23
and generate the changes in aerodynamic forces
空気を操って
04:27
which change its flight trajectory.
違う方向に飛ぶことができる
04:29
And of course, the role of the nervous system is to control all this.
これを全て制御しているのが 神経系統だ
04:32
So let's look at the controller.
では制御装置を見てみよう
04:36
Now flies excel in the sorts of sensors
ハエは優れたセンサーの持ち主だが
04:37
that they carry to this problem.
それがいいことばかりとは限らない
04:40
They have antennae that sense odors and detect wind detection.
彼らは、匂いと風向きを感知するアンテナの持ち主だ
04:42
They have a sophisticated eye which is
彼らは高度な眼を持っている
04:46
the fastest visual system on the planet.
それは、地上最速の視覚システムなんだ
04:48
They have another set of eyes on the top of their head.
さらに 頭頂部にも一対の眼がある
04:50
We have no idea what they do.
その眼はどんな役割りをはたすのか、
私達がさっぱり分からない。
04:52
They have sensors on their wing.
それらが、羽にセンサーがある。
04:54
Their wing is covered with sensors, including sensors
羽がセンサーで覆われていて、
04:57
that sense deformation of the wing.
そのセンサーの中で、
形状の変形を感知するセンサーもある。
05:01
They can even taste with their wings.
羽で味覚まで備えている
05:03
One of the most sophisticated sensors a fly has
ハエのセンサーの中でも優れているのが
05:05
is a structure called the halteres.
平均棍と呼ばれる器官だ
05:08
The halteres are actually gyroscopes.
平均棍はジャイロスコープのような器官で
05:10
These devices beat back and forth about 200 hertz during flight,
飛行中は200ヘルツで振り子運動する
05:12
and the animal can use them to sense its body rotation
ハエはこれを使って 体の回転を感知し
05:16
and initiate very, very fast corrective maneuvers.
素早く 飛行姿勢を修正することができる
05:19
But all of this sensory information has to be processed
しかし センサーからの情報は、すべて
脳で処理しなければならない
05:23
by a brain, and yes, indeed, flies have a brain,
そうだよ ハエにも脳があるんだ
05:25
a brain of about 100,000 neurons.
10万個の神経細胞からなる脳がね
05:29
Now several people at this conference
このコンファレンスの出席者の中にも
05:32
have already suggested that fruit flies could serve neuroscience
ミバエの脳機能は単純だから
05:34
because they're a simple model of brain function.
神経科学の研究に適している
なんて言う人がいるようだね
05:39
And the basic punchline of my talk is,
でも、侮るなかれ!
05:42
I'd like to turn that over on its head.
僕に言わせれば、それは全くの勘違いだよ
05:44
I don't think they're a simple model of anything.
ハエの脳は単純なんかじゃないと思うんだ
05:47
And I think that flies are a great model.
素晴らしいモデルだ
05:49
They're a great model for flies.
ハエにしてみればね
05:52
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
05:54
And let's explore this notion of simplicity.
では なぜ単純だと思われてしまうのだろうか?
05:57
So I think, unfortunately, a lot of neuroscientists,
残念ながら、神経科学者はね、
06:00
we're all somewhat narcissistic.
僕たちは自己中に考えがちだと思う
06:02
When we think of brain, we of course imagine our own brain.
「脳」というと 自分たちの脳を基準に考える
06:04
But remember that this kind of brain,
でも、思い出してみて。こんな脳だよ。
06:08
which is much, much smaller
こんなとても小さい脳が
06:10
— instead of 100 billion neurons, it has 100,000 neurons —
-- 1000億個ではなく 10万個の細胞しかない --
06:11
but this is the most common form of brain on the planet
地球上で最も一般的な形態であって
06:14
and has been for 400 million years.
それは4億年前から続いている
06:17
And is it fair to say that it's simple?
これを単純だと言い切って良いのかな?
06:20
Well, it's simple in the sense that it has fewer neurons,
神経細胞の数は確かに少ない
06:22
but is that a fair metric?
でもその基準で大丈夫なのか?
06:24
And I would propose it's not a fair metric.
僕は違うと思う
06:26
So let's sort of think about this. I think we have to compare --
ちょっとこれについて考えてみよう
まずこの比較から見てもらおう --
06:28
(Laughter) —
(笑い声)
06:31
we have to compare the size of the brain
脳の大きさとでその脳が何ができるか
06:33
with what the brain can do.
比較しなくちゃならない
06:38
So I propose we have a Trump number,
トランプ数という指数があるとしよう
06:40
and the Trump number is the ratio of this man's
トランプ数の行動パターンの数を
06:43
behavioral repertoire to the number of neurons in his brain.
神経細胞の数で割った値だ
06:46
We'll calculate the Trump number for the fruit fly.
同様にハエについても計算してみる
06:49
Now, how many people here think the Trump number
どうだろう! ハエのトランプ数の方が高い
06:52
is higher for the fruit fly?
と思う人いますか?
06:55
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:57
It's a very smart, smart audience.
今日お越しの皆さんは頭がいいね
07:00
Yes, the inequality goes in this direction, or I would posit it.
そうなんだ、大きさと機能は必ずしも比例しない
07:03
Now I realize that it is a little bit absurd
ハエと人間の行動パターンの数を比べるのは
07:06
to compare the behavioral repertoire of a human to a fly.
あまり合理的じゃないかも知れない
07:09
But let's take another animal just as an example. Here's a mouse.
じゃあ 他の動物はどうだろう?
たとえばネズミ
07:12
A mouse has about 1,000 times as many neurons as a fly.
ネズミはハエの1000倍の神経細胞をもっている
07:17
I used to study mice. When I studied mice,
昔 ネズミを研究していた。その当時は
07:21
I used to talk really slowly.
僕だって ゆっくり喋っていた
07:23
And then something happened when I started to work on flies.
でもハエの研究を始めてから 何かが変わったんだ
07:26
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
07:28
And I think if you compare the natural history of flies and mice,
ハエとネズミは 博物学的に見て共通点がある
07:31
it's really comparable. They have to forage for food.
食べ物を漁ったり
07:34
They have to engage in courtship.
求愛行動をしたり
07:37
They have sex. They hide from predators.
交尾をしたり 捕食者から隠れたりする
07:40
They do a lot of the similar things.
共通点はたくさんあるけど
07:43
But I would argue that flies do more.
ハエの方が行動パターンが多いと 僕は思う
07:45
So for example, I'm going to show you a sequence,
たとえば これから見せる映像
07:47
and I have to say, some of my funding comes from the military,
ああ、ちょっと言っておかなくちゃ。
実を言うと、僕は、軍から一部、資金援助を受けているんだ。
07:50
so I'm showing this classified sequence
だから、この極秘映像を見たことは内緒だよ
07:55
and you cannot discuss it outside of this room. Okay?
決して誰にも口外しないでね! OK?
07:57
So I want you to look at the payload
ハエのお尻にぶら下がっている
08:01
at the tail of the fruit fly.
爆弾に注意しながら見てほしい
08:03
Watch it very closely,
近くに来て、よく見てごらん。
08:06
and you'll see why my six-year-old son
うちの6歳の息子が 神経科学者になると
08:08
now wants to be a neuroscientist.
言い出した理由が分かるから
08:12
Wait for it.
タイミングを計って
08:17
Pshhew.
ドーン
08:18
So at least you'll admit that if fruit flies are not as clever as mice,
少なくとも、ハエがネズミほど賢くない、という事はお分かりでしょう。
08:20
they're at least as clever as pigeons. (Laughter)
少なくとも、ハト並の知能を持っている。
(笑い声)
08:23
Now, I want to get across that it's not just a matter of numbers
まずはね、それは、神経細胞の数だけじゃなく、
08:28
but also the challenge for a fly to compute
ハエはあんなに小さな神経細胞で
08:32
everything its brain has to compute with such tiny neurons.
全ての情報を処理しているんだ、という事をお伝えしたい。
08:34
So this is a beautiful image of a visual interneuron from a mouse
これはジェフ・リックマンから借りてきた
08:37
that came from Jeff Lichtman's lab,
ネズミの神経細胞の美しい写真だ
08:40
and you can see the wonderful images of brains
その脳の美しい画像を見られるよ
08:43
that he showed in his talk.
彼は、講演で画像を見せたんだ。
08:46
But up in the corner, in the right corner, you'll see,
右端の上にあるのは 同じ縮尺で示された
08:49
at the same scale, a visual interneuron from a fly.
ハエの神経細胞だ
08:52
And I'll expand this up.
拡大してみよう
08:56
And it's a beautifully complex neuron.
素晴らしく細かな神経細胞だよね。
08:58
It's just very, very tiny, and there's lots of biophysical challenges
生物物理学的には こんな小さな神経細胞で
09:00
with trying to compute information with tiny, tiny neurons.
大量の情報を処理しようとするんだ。
09:03
How small can neurons get? Well, look at this interesting insect.
神経細胞はどこまで小さくなれるのか?
ここに面白い虫がいる
09:07
It looks sort of like a fly. It has wings, it has eyes,
見た目はハエに似ているね
09:10
it has antennae, its legs, complicated life history,
羽・眼・アンテナ・脚があり
ライフサイクルも複雑
09:13
it's a parasite, it has to fly around and find caterpillars
実は毛虫に寄生する寄生虫なんだ
09:15
to parasatize,
実は毛虫に寄生する寄生虫なんだ
09:19
but not only is its brain the size of a salt grain,
そして、それは、塩粒と同じ大きさの脳というだけでなく、
09:20
which is comparable for a fruit fly,
ミバエと比べると
09:24
it is the size of a salt grain.
体全体が塩粒くらいの大きさしかない
09:26
So here's some other organisms at the similar scale.
他の生命体と大きさを比べてみよう
09:29
This animal is the size of a paramecium and an amoeba,
ゾウリムシやアメーバと同じくらいの大きさだけど
09:33
and it has a brain of 7,000 neurons that's so small --
非常に小さな7000個の神経細胞からなる脳を持っている
09:37
you know these things called cell bodies you've been hearing about,
君達、聞いた事があるかな?これらの細胞体と呼ばれるもので
09:41
where the nucleus of the neuron is?
神経細胞の核は細胞体に入っているんだ。
09:43
This animal gets rid of them because they take up too much space.
これは、この大きさでさえ、あまりに場所を取りすぎるから
取り除かれている
09:45
So this is a session on frontiers in neuroscience.
今回のテーマは神経科学の最前線なんだ
09:48
I would posit that one frontier in neuroscience is to figure out how the brain of that thing works.
ある神経科学の最前線では、脳が機能する仕組みを解き明かすことができる、と仮定してみよう
含まれているだろう
09:51
But let's think about this. How can you make a small number of neurons do a lot?
一緒に考えみよう。少数の神経細胞でたくさんの処理を行うには
どうすればいいのか?
09:56
And I think, from an engineering perspective,
工学的観点から見ると
10:02
you think of multiplexing.
君たちは、多重化と考えるかもしれないね。
10:04
You can take a hardware and have that hardware
ある機器を用いて、その装置に
10:06
do different things at different times,
違う時間にに違う処理をさせる
10:09
or have different parts of the hardware doing different things.
又は、その装置の他の部分で違う処理をさせるんだ。
10:10
And these are the two concepts I'd like to explore.
僕が調べてみたいのは2つある
10:13
And they're not concepts that I've come up with,
これらの概念は僕が思いついたものではなく
10:16
but concepts that have been proposed by others in the past.
他の人たちが過去に提唱していたものだ
10:18
And one idea comes from lessons from chewing crabs.
その一つは カニの噛み方からヒントを得ている
10:23
And I don't mean chewing the crabs.
僕らがカニを噛むんじゃないよ
10:26
I grew up in Baltimore, and I chew crabs very, very well.
僕はボルチモア育ちだから
カニを噛むのは超得意だけどね
10:28
But I'm talking about the crabs actually doing the chewing.
いま話してるのは
カニ自身の咀嚼行動についてだ
10:31
Crab chewing is actually really fascinating.
カニの咀嚼行動は実に興味深い
10:34
Crabs have this complicated structure under their carapace
カニの甲羅の下には
複雑な器官があって
10:36
called the gastric mill
咀嚼器と呼ばれる
10:39
that grinds their food in a variety of different ways.
いろんな風に食べ物をかみ砕くことができる
10:41
And here's an endoscopic movie of this structure.
これは咀嚼器の内視鏡映像
10:43
The amazing thing about this is that it's controlled
咀嚼器の何がすごいかというと
10:48
by a really tiny set of neurons, about two dozen neurons
わずか20個程度の神経細胞で
10:51
that can produce a vast variety of different motor patterns,
多様な筋肉運動のパターンを
作り出している点だ
10:54
and the reason it can do this is that this little tiny ganglion
これが可能なのは カニの小さな神経節が
10:59
in the crab is actually inundated by many, many neuromodulators.
多種の神経調節物質に浸されているからだ
11:04
You heard about neuromodulators earlier.
神経調整物質については、さっきのスピーチにも登場したね
11:08
There are more neuromodulators
神経細胞よりも多くの 神経調節物質があって
11:10
that alter, that innervate this structure than actually neurons in the structure,
それを変化させたり、実際に、その器官の神経細胞の数よりも多くを刺激したりしている
11:12
and they're able to generate a complicated set of patterns.
そして、その事が 複雑な運動パターンを生み出す事を可能にしている
11:18
And this is the work by Eve Marder and her many colleagues
ここにイブ・マーダーと仲間たちの長年の研究成果がある
11:22
who've been studying this fascinating system
彼らは素晴らしい組織の研究していて
11:25
that show how a smaller cluster of neurons
それは、どんな少数の神経細胞の集まりでも
11:28
can do many, many, many things
いろんなことができる という事を明らかにしているんだ
11:30
because of neuromodulation that can take place on a moment-by-moment basis.
というのも、根本的に、神経調節は刻々と発生するからね
11:32
So this is basically multiplexing in time.
すなわち、これは基本的には、時間的多重化という事だ
11:36
Imagine a network of neurons with one neuromodulator.
1つの神経調節物質に、1つの神経細胞網があると想像してごらん。
11:39
You select one set of cells to perform one sort of behavior,
ある神経調整物質といくつかの細胞に
ある行動を割り当てて
11:42
another neuromodulator, another set of cells,
別の神経調節物質と細胞に
別の行動を割り当てていくと
11:45
a different pattern, and you can imagine
非常に複雑な運動パターンが可能になることが
11:48
you could extrapolate to a very, very complicated system.
これで想像できるだろう
11:49
Is there any evidence that flies do this?
ハエも同じだろうか?
11:53
Well, for many years in my laboratory and other laboratories around the world,
長年に渡り 私の研究所でも、世界中の研究所でも
11:55
we've been studying fly behaviors in little flight simulators.
小さな飛行シミュレーターを使って
ハエの行動を研究してきた
11:59
You can tether a fly to a little stick.
ハエを棒の先にくっつけて
12:01
You can measure the aerodynamic forces it's creating.
空気力を計測するんだ
12:03
You can let the fly play a little video game
ハエがテレビゲームをやっているような格好になる
12:06
by letting it fly around in a visual display.
映像の中にハエを飛ばしておくことによって
12:08
So let me show you a little tiny sequence of this.
この続きを少しお見せしましょう
12:12
Here's a fly
一匹のハエがいるね
12:14
and a large infrared view of the fly in the flight simulator,
飛行シミュレーターの中のハエの大きな赤外線映像で、
12:16
and this is a game the flies love to play.
これは、ハエが好むゲームの一つなんだ。
12:19
You allow them to steer towards the little stripe,
ハエが 小さな縞模様の方に飛んでいくように仕向けると
12:21
and they'll just steer towards that stripe forever.
ハエは 長時間 これを続けようとする。
12:23
It's part of their visual guidance system.
ハエの視線誘導システムに
もともと組み込まれている働きなんだ
12:26
But very, very recently, it's been possible
でも、ごく最近では こうした行動領域を
12:30
to modify these sorts of behavioral arenas for physiologies.
生理学的に変更することが可能になっている
12:32
So this is the preparation that one of my former post-docs,
これは、以前、ここでギャビー・メイモンがポスドクだった頃に研究していた準備段階のものなんだけど、
12:37
Gaby Maimon, who's now at Rockefeller, developed,
今、彼はロックフェラー大学でこれを完成させたんだ。
12:40
and it's basically a flight simulator
それは 単なる飛行シミュレーターではなく
12:42
but under conditions where you actually can stick an electrode
ハエの脳に電極を挿入して
12:44
in the brain of the fly and record
遺伝子的に特定された神経細胞の
12:47
from a genetically identified neuron in the fly's brain.
電流を記録することができる
12:49
And this is what one of these experiments looks like.
これらの実験の様子のひとつがこちら。
12:53
It was a sequence taken from another post-doc in the lab,
実験室では、ポスドクから後任のポスドクへ実験が引き継がれていたんだ。
12:55
Bettina Schnell.
後任者は ベッティナ・シュネル。
12:58
The green trace at the bottom is the membrane potential
画面下の緑の線は
12:59
of a neuron in the fly's brain,
ハエの脳細胞の膜電位だ。
13:03
and you'll see the fly start to fly, and the fly is actually
ほら、ハエが飛び始めたよ。
13:05
controlling the rotation of that visual pattern itself
模様の回転は ハエ自身が羽の動きで制御している
13:08
by its own wing motion,
模様の回転は ハエ自身が羽の動きで制御している
13:11
and you can see this visual interneuron
視覚介在神経が見えるよね
13:12
respond to the pattern of wing motion as the fly flies.
ハエが飛ぶ時に、 これが羽の運動パターンに
反応するんだ
13:14
So for the first time we've actually been able to record
だから、初めて我々が
13:18
from neurons in the fly's brain while the fly
ハエの脳神経の電流を記録することができるようになったんだ
13:21
is performing sophisticated behaviors such as flight.
飛行など という高度な行動を行っているときでもね
13:24
And one of the lessons we've been learning
その結果、我々が学んだ事の一つは
13:28
is that the physiology of cells that we've been studying
細胞生理学だ。
13:30
for many years in quiescent flies
我々は長年に渡って、 静止状態のハエの神経細胞を研究してきたんだけど、
13:32
is not the same as the physiology of those cells
そこには 生理学的な違いがある
13:35
when the flies actually engage in active behaviors
彼らが運動中の時のハエの神経細胞では-
13:37
like flying and walking and so forth.
飛行や歩行などの運動って事なんだけど。
13:40
And why is the physiology different?
なぜ生理学的な違いが生じるのか?
13:43
Well it turns out it's these neuromodulators,
実はね、神経調節物質が重要な役割を
果たしていることが分かったんだ。
13:46
just like the neuromodulators in that little tiny ganglion in the crabs.
カニの場合と同様 ここでも
13:48
So here's a picture of the octopamine system.
これはオクトパミン系の写真だ
13:52
Octopamine is a neuromodulator
オクトパミンは神経調節物質だ。
13:54
that seems to play an important role in flight and other behaviors.
それは、飛行などの行動に重要な役割を果たすらしい
13:56
But this is just one of many neuromodulators
これは、多くの神経調節物質の一つだ
14:00
that's in the fly's brain.
そう、ハエの脳だよ
14:03
So I really think that, as we learn more,
だから研究を進めていけば
14:04
it's going to turn out that the whole fly brain
その事が明らかになるだろう。
14:07
is just like a large version of this stomatogastric ganglion,
ハエの脳全体が、カニの咀嚼器の神経節と同じようであり、
14:09
and that's one of the reasons why it can do so much with so few neurons.
そして、どうして少ない神経細胞で多くの処理を行えるのか、という理由の一つ
14:12
Now, another idea, another way of multiplexing
もう一つの考え方、そして他の多重化の方法について考えてみよう
14:17
is multiplexing in space,
空間的多重化では
14:19
having different parts of a neuron
神経細胞の別々の部分で
14:21
do different things at the same time.
同時に別々の処理を行う
14:23
So here's two sort of canonical neurons
これは2種類の標準的な神経細胞
14:25
from a vertebrate and an invertebrate,
脊椎動物と無脊椎動物からの
14:27
a human pyramidal neuron from Ramon y Cajal,
ラモン・イ・カハールによる
人間の錐体細胞の図
14:29
and another cell to the right, a non-spiking interneuron,
右にある他の細胞は、ノンスパイキング介在神経細胞の図
14:32
and this is the work of Alan Watson and Malcolm Burrows many years ago,
そして、これは、ずっと以前のアラン・ワトソンとマルコム・バロウズの業績なんだ
14:36
and Malcolm Burrows came up with a pretty interesting idea
マルコムは面白い考え方を提案した
14:40
based on the fact that this neuron from a locust
ある昆虫の神経細胞に基づいていて、
14:43
does not fire action potentials.
活動電位を発火させないんだ。
14:46
It's a non-spiking cell.
それがノンスパイキング細胞だ。
14:48
So a typical cell, like the neurons in our brain,
僕たちの脳神経細胞の様な 、一般的な神経細胞は
14:50
has a region called the dendrites that receives input,
樹状突起と呼ばれる部分があって
14:53
and that input sums together
そこで受けた入力がたまると
14:55
and will produce action potentials
活動電位が発生して
14:58
that run down the axon and then activate
軸索突起を伝わり
15:00
all the output regions of the neuron.
神経細胞の出力部分を活性化させる
15:03
But non-spiking neurons are actually quite complicated
でも、ノンスパイキング神経細胞は
もっと複雑だ
15:05
because they can have input synapses and output synapses
というのも、入力シナプスと出力シナプスが
複雑に絡み合っていて
15:08
all interdigitated, and there's no single action potential
全ての出力を駆動する
単一の活動電位というものがない
15:11
that drives all the outputs at the same time.
つまり同じ時間に全てを出力するようにできているからなんだね。
15:15
So there's a possibility that you have computational compartments
とすれば ある可能性が出てくる。それは計算用のブロックが区切られていて
15:18
that allow the different parts of the neuron
一つの神経細胞の別々の部分で
15:22
to do different things at the same time.
別々の処理を行っている可能性がある
という事なんだ。
15:26
So these basic concepts of multitasking in time
時間的な多重化という これらの基本的考え、
15:28
and multitasking in space,
そして 空間的な多重化は
15:33
I think these are things that are true in our brains as well,
基礎概念としては 人間の脳にも当てはまる
15:35
but I think the insects are the true masters of this.
でも 昆虫の多重化の方が発達しているんだ
15:38
So I hope you think of insects a little bit differently next time,
今日の話で 昆虫に対する考え方が変わったかな?
15:41
and as I say up here, please think before you swat.
今度ハエたたきを振り回す前に
今日の話を思い出してください
15:44
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:47
Translator:Seiko Hirofuji
Reviewer:Darryl Cook

sponsored links

Michael Dickinson - Biologist
Most people are irritated by the buzzing of a fly's wings. But biologist Michael Dickinson views the sound with a deep sense of wonder.

Why you should listen

Some things are so commonplace that they barely register our attention. Michael Dickinson has dedicated much of his research to one such thing -- the flight of the fly. Dickinson aims to understand how a fly's nervous system allows it to accomplish such incredible aerodynamic feats. Affectionately dubbed the "Fly Guy" by The Scientist, Dickinson's research brings together zoology, neuroscience and fluid mechanics.

Dickinson was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2001. He is now a professor of biology at the University of Washington, where he heads The Dickinson Lab. The lab conducts research into insect flight control, animal brain recordings, animal/robot interactions and animal visual navigation and welcomes students with an interest in studying insect flight, behavior and evolution from an interdisciplinary approach perspective. 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.