18:25
TED2013

Stewart Brand: The dawn of de-extinction. Are you ready?

スチュアート・ブランド: 絶滅種再生の夜明けとそれが意味すること

Filmed:

人類の歴史上、私たちは多くの種を絶滅に追いやりました。リョコウバト、イースタンクーガー、ドードー等です。しかし、スチュアート・ブランドは、人類が死滅に追いやった種を再生する技術と生物学的知識を私たちは今や手にしていると言います。はたして、そのような試みをすべきなのでしょうか。その場合、どの種から始めるのでしょうか。氏は大きな問題を問いかけます。その答えは皆さんが考えるよりも身近にあることかもしれません。

- Environmentalist, futurist
Since the counterculture '60s, Stewart Brand has been creating our internet-worked world. Now, with biotech accelerating four times faster than digital technology, Stewart Brand has a bold new plan ... Full bio

Now, extinction is a different kind of death.
絶滅は普通の死とは違います
00:16
It's bigger.
より甚大です
00:21
We didn't really realize that until 1914,
それに気付いたのは1914年に
00:24
when the last passenger pigeon, a female named Martha,
マーサという名の最後の一羽だったリョコウバトが
00:27
died at the Cincinnati zoo.
シンシナティ動物園で死んだ時です
00:30
This had been the most abundant bird in the world
この種はかつて世界で最も数多かった鳥で
00:33
that'd been in North America for six million years.
北アメリカに6百万年もの間生息していました
00:37
Suddenly it wasn't here at all.
それが忽然と消えてしまったのです
00:40
Flocks that were a mile wide and 400 miles long
かつては幅2キロ 長さ500キロに渡る群れの帯が
00:44
used to darken the sun.
太陽を遮ったものです
00:48
Aldo Leopold said this was a biological storm,
アルド・レオポルドは生物的嵐
00:51
a feathered tempest.
羽根の吹雪と称しました
00:54
And indeed it was a keystone species
この鳥は重要な生物種として
00:56
that enriched the entire eastern deciduous forest,
ミシシッピ川から大西洋
00:59
from the Mississippi to the Atlantic,
カナダからメキシコ湾にわたって
01:03
from Canada down to the Gulf.
広く落葉樹林の生態系を支えました
01:05
But it went from five billion birds to zero in just a couple decades.
ほんの数十年で生息数が 50億からゼロになったのです
01:08
What happened?
その原因は
01:12
Well, commercial hunting happened.
商業狩猟でした
01:13
These birds were hunted for meat that was sold by the ton,
食肉として捕獲され大量に売られたのです
01:15
and it was easy to do because when those big flocks
捕獲は容易でした 群れが地上に降り立つと
01:19
came down to the ground, they were so dense
あまりに密集していたので
01:21
that hundreds of hunters and netters could show up
多数の捕獲者がやって来ては
01:24
and slaughter them by the tens of thousands.
大量殺戮を繰り返したのです
01:26
It was the cheapest source of protein in America.
肉はアメリカで最も安いたんぱく質でした
01:29
By the end of the century, there was nothing left
世紀末にはその名残は
01:32
but these beautiful skins in museum specimen drawers.
博物館の標本箱に保管されたはく製のみになりました
01:34
There's an upside to the story.
ひとつだけ良い話は
01:39
This made people realize that the same thing
人々がアメリカ・バイソンも絶滅に
01:41
was about to happen to the American bison,
瀕していることに気づいたのです
01:43
and so these birds saved the buffalos.
いわば鳥がバッファローを救いました
01:45
But a lot of other animals weren't saved.
しかし他に多くの動物が死滅しました
01:49
The Carolina parakeet was a parrot that lit up backyards everywhere.
カロライナ・インコはかつて裏庭でも見かけました
01:50
It was hunted to death for its feathers.
しかし羽毛が狙われ絶滅しました
01:55
There was a bird that people liked on the East Coast called the heath hen.
東海岸に生息したニューイングランド・ソウゲンライチョウは
01:57
It was loved. They tried to protect it. It died anyway.
可愛がられ保護されたのに絶滅しました
02:00
A local newspaper spelled out, "There is no survivor,
地元紙が悲しみを伝えました "生存者はない
02:03
there is no future, there is no life to be recreated in this form ever again."
未来もない もはやこの生き物が二度と誕生することはない"
02:07
There's a sense of deep tragedy that goes with these things,
絶滅には深い悲しみが伴います
02:12
and it happened to lots of birds that people loved.
人々に愛された鳥たちにも悲劇は襲いました
02:14
It happened to lots of mammals.
哺乳類も同様です
02:17
Another keystone species is a famous animal
別の重要種で有名だった動物には
02:19
called the European aurochs.
オーロックスがいます
02:22
There was sort of a movie made about it recently.
最近映画が作られました
02:24
And the aurochs was like the bison.
オーロックスはバイソンに似ていました
02:26
This was an animal that basically kept the forest
この動物はいわば森と草原の仲介役として
02:29
mixed with grasslands across the entire Europe and Asian continent,
ヨーロッパ全土およびアジア大陸 スペインから朝鮮まで
02:32
from Spain to Korea.
広く分布していました
02:37
The documentation of this animal goes back
この動物はラスコー洞窟の壁画にも
02:39
to the Lascaux cave paintings.
描かれました
02:41
The extinctions still go on.
絶滅種は他にもいます
02:45
There's an ibex in Spain called the bucardo.
スペインに生息したヤギの一種ブカルドは
02:47
It went extinct in 2000.
2000年に絶滅しました
02:50
There was a marvelous animal, a marsupial wolf
オーストラリア南部のタスマニア島には
02:52
called the thylacine in Tasmania, south of Australia,
タスマニア・タイガーと呼ばれたすばらしい有袋類の
02:55
called the Tasmanian tiger.
フクロオオカミがいました
02:59
It was hunted until there were just a few left to die in zoos.
動物園で死滅した最後の数頭に減るまで狩りが続きました
03:01
A little bit of film was shot.
貴重なフィルムが残っています
03:05
Sorrow, anger, mourning.
後悔 怒り 悲しみ
03:19
Don't mourn. Organize.
悲しむのは止めて 計画を立てましょう
03:24
What if you could find out that, using the DNA in museum specimens,
もしも博物館の標本や 20万年前の化石から
03:27
fossils maybe up to 200,000 years old
DNAを採取してそれを基に
03:31
could be used to bring species back,
絶滅種を再生できたとしたらどうでしょうか
03:34
what would you do? Where would you start?
どこから手をつけますか
03:36
Well, you'd start by finding out if the biotech is really there.
まず バイオ技術の最先端を見てみましょう
03:38
I started with my wife, Ryan Phelan,
妻のライアン・フィーランと話しました
03:41
who ran a biotech business called DNA Direct,
彼女は DNA ダイレクトというバイオ企業の経営者です
03:43
and through her, one of her colleagues, George Church,
そして彼女の同僚のジョージ・チャーチ
03:46
one of the leading genetic engineers
彼は一流の遺伝子工学者ですが
03:50
who turned out to be also obsessed with passenger pigeons
彼もまたリョコウバトに取り憑かれていて
03:53
and a lot of confidence
自分の研究成果を大いに
03:56
that methodologies he was working on
活用できるのではと
03:58
might actually do the deed.
自信を持っていました
04:00
So he and Ryan organized and hosted a meeting
そこで妻とジョージはハーバードの
04:02
at the Wyss Institute in Harvard bringing together
ヴィース研究所で会合を催しリョコウバトの専門家
04:05
specialists on passenger pigeons, conservation ornithologists, bioethicists,
鳥類保護学者 生命倫理学者に呼び掛けました
04:08
and fortunately passenger pigeon DNA had already been sequenced
嬉しいことにベス・シャピロという分子生物学者が
04:12
by a molecular biologist named Beth Shapiro.
既にリョコウバトのDNAを解読したことが分かりました
04:16
All she needed from those specimens at the Smithsonian
この学者はスミソニアン博物館にある
04:20
was a little bit of toe pad tissue,
標本の爪先の組織を使いました
04:22
because down in there is what is called ancient DNA.
そこに古生代DNAがあったのです
04:25
It's DNA which is pretty badly fragmented,
DNAは極めて損傷していましたが
04:28
but with good techniques now, you can basically reassemble the whole genome.
今日の優れた技術でゲノム全体を再構築できます
04:31
Then the question is, can you reassemble,
そこで問題は そのゲノムを使って
04:36
with that genome, the whole bird?
絶滅した鳥を再生できるかどうかです
04:39
George Church thinks you can.
ジョージ・チャーチはできると考えています
04:41
So in his book, "Regenesis," which I recommend,
彼の著書 「再創造」 はお勧めです
04:44
he has a chapter on the science of bringing back extinct species,
絶滅種を再生する科学について記述しています
04:47
and he has a machine called
彼は複合自動ゲノム工学機という装置も保有しています
04:50
the Multiplex Automated Genome Engineering machine.
彼は複合自動ゲノム工学機という装置も保有しています
04:52
It's kind of like an evolution machine.
いわば進化用の装置です
04:55
You try combinations of genes that you write
様々な遺伝子の組み合わせを細胞
04:57
at the cell level and then in organs on a chip,
そして器官レベルでチップに記述して
05:00
and the ones that win, that you can then put
成功した個体を
05:03
into a living organism. It'll work.
生体の器官に移植すると機能するのです
05:05
The precision of this, one of George's famous unreadable slides,
この方式の精度はというと
05:07
nevertheless points out that there's a level of precision here
この読解不能なジョージのスライドによると
05:11
right down to the individual base pair.
精度は各々の塩基対まで至ります
05:15
The passenger pigeon has 1.3 billion base pairs in its genome.
リョコウバトのゲノムには13億の塩基対があります
05:18
So what you're getting is the capability now
そして今日ではひとつの遺伝子を
05:22
of replacing one gene with another variation of that gene.
その派生形で置き換えられます
05:25
It's called an allele.
対立遺伝子と呼びます
05:28
Well that's what happens in normal hybridization anyway.
対立遺伝子は普通の交配でも起きます
05:30
So this is a form of synthetic hybridization of the genome
この場合は絶滅種および
05:33
of an extinct species
よく類似する生存種の
05:36
with the genome of its closest living relative.
ゲノム同士の合成交配です
05:38
Now along the way, George points out that
研究中にジョージが指摘するのは
05:42
his technology, the technology of synthetic biology,
彼が取り組んでいる合成生物学の技術は
05:45
is currently accelerating at four times the rate of Moore's Law.
ムーアの法則の4倍の速さで加速中という点です
05:48
It's been doing that since 2005, and it's likely to continue.
2005年以来加速しており今後も継続するでしょう
05:52
Okay, the closest living relative of the passenger pigeon
さてリョコウバトに一番近い生存種は
05:56
is the band-tailed pigeon. They're abundant. There's some around here.
オビオバトです 多数生息しておりこの辺でも見かけます
05:59
Genetically, the band-tailed pigeon already is
遺伝子的にはオビオバトはほとんど
06:02
mostly living passenger pigeon.
生きたリョコウバトです
06:07
There's just some bits that are band-tailed pigeon.
オビオバトの違いはほんのわずかです
06:09
If you replace those bits with passenger pigeon bits,
それらの違いをリョコウバトに置き換えれば
06:11
you've got the extinct bird back, cooing at you.
絶滅種が復活してクークー鳴くのです
06:14
Now, there's work to do.
すべきことは色々あります
06:18
You have to figure out exactly what genes matter.
重要な遺伝子の識別が必要です
06:20
So there's genes for the short tail in the band-tailed pigeon,
オビオバトの短い尻尾を成す遺伝子と
06:23
genes for the long tail in the passenger pigeon,
リョコウバトの長い尻尾を成す遺伝子があります
06:26
and so on with the red eye, peach-colored breast, flocking, and so on.
目の赤い色 桃色をした胸 群れの習性 等も同様です
06:28
Add them all up and the result won't be perfect.
全てを混ぜた結果は完璧ではないでしょう
06:32
But it should be be perfect enough,
しかし十分に近いでしょう
06:35
because nature doesn't do perfect either.
自然も完璧ではないですから
06:37
So this meeting in Boston led to three things.
ボストンでの会合では3つの成果がありました
06:39
First off, Ryan and I decided to create a nonprofit
まず妻と私はリバイブ・アンド・リストアというNPOを興し
06:43
called Revive and Restore that would push de-extinction generally
絶滅種再生活動の推進と責任の所在を
06:47
and try to have it go in a responsible way,
明確にした上で研究を進め リョコウバトの
06:51
and we would push ahead with the passenger pigeon.
再生に取り込むことにしました
06:54
Another direct result was a young grad student named Ben Novak,
次にベン・ノバックという若い大学院生に出会いました
06:57
who had been obsessed with passenger pigeons since he was 14
彼は14歳からリョコウバトに興味を持ち
07:01
and had also learned how to work with ancient DNA,
独学で古生代DNAを学習し
07:04
himself sequenced the passenger pigeon,
家族と友人の資金を頼りに
07:07
using money from his family and friends.
リョコウバトのDNAを解析したのです
07:11
We hired him full-time.
彼を正規採用することにしました
07:13
Now, this photograph I took of him last year at the Smithsonian,
これは去年スミソニアン博物館で撮った彼の写真です
07:16
he's looking down at Martha,
彼が見つめているのがリョコウバト
07:19
the last passenger pigeon alive.
最後の一羽のマーサです
07:21
So if he's successful, she won't be the last.
再生が成功すれば最後の一羽にはなりません
07:24
The third result of the Boston meeting was the realization
ボストン会合の3つ目の成果は絶滅再生に取り組んでいる
07:27
that there are scientists all over the world
科学者が世界中にいるにも関わらず
07:30
working on various forms of de-extinction,
一同に会したことがない事実に
07:32
but they'd never met each other.
気づいたのです
07:34
And National Geographic got interested
そこでナショナル・ジオグラフィックも注目しました
07:35
because National Geographic has the theory that
ナショナル・ジオグラフィックの考えでは
07:37
the last century, discovery was basically finding things,
前世紀の発見は新たに見つけることだったが
07:40
and in this century, discovery is basically making things.
今世紀は発見とは新たに作ることだ と言うのです
07:43
De-extinction falls in that category.
絶滅再生はそれに該当します
07:47
So they hosted and funded this meeting. And 35 scientists,
そこで別の会合が設定され 35人の科学者が集合しました
07:49
they were conservation biologists and molecular biologists,
彼らは自然保護生物学者や分子生物学者で
07:53
basically meeting to see if they had work to do together.
共同研究する分野を話し合ったのです
07:56
Some of these conservation biologists are pretty radical.
自然保護生物学者の数人はとても大胆です
08:00
There's three of them who are not just re-creating ancient species,
特にその中の3人は死滅種を再生するだけでなく
08:02
they're recreating extinct ecosystems
破壊された生態系を 北シベリア オランダ
08:06
in northern Siberia, in the Netherlands, and in Hawaii.
ハワイで復元しようというのです
08:09
Henri, from the Netherlands,
オランダのアンリです
08:13
with a Dutch last name I won't try to pronounce,
オランダ名の苗字を発音するのはお許しを
08:15
is working on the aurochs.
彼はオーロックスに取り組んでいます
08:18
The aurochs is the ancestor of all domestic cattle,
オーロックスは家畜の牛全ての祖先ですから
08:20
and so basically its genome is alive, it's just unevenly distributed.
ゲノムは引き継がれています ただ散在しています
08:24
So what they're doing is working with seven breeds
彼らは上に見えるずんぐりした
08:30
of primitive, hardy-looking cattle like that Maremmana primitivo on the top there
マレンマーナ原種のような7種類の原始種をかけ合わせ
08:32
to rebuild, over time, with selective back-breeding,
人為選択を時間をかけて行いオーロックスを
08:37
the aurochs.
再現しようとしています
08:40
Now, re-wilding is moving faster in Korea
野生環境の復元は米国よりも韓国が先行しています
08:43
than it is in America,
野生環境の復元は米国よりも韓国が先行しています
08:46
and so the plan is, with these re-wilded areas all over Europe,
計画では欧州中で復元された
08:47
they will introduce the aurochs to do its old job,
野生環境にオーロックスを導入し
08:51
its old ecological role,
元来の生態的役割で
08:54
of clearing the somewhat barren, closed-canopy forest
痩せた土地を豊かな森林にしてもらい
08:56
so that it has these biodiverse meadows in it.
多様な生物種を育もうとしています
08:59
Another amazing story
別の驚くべき話です
09:03
came from Alberto Fernández-Arias.
主人公はアルベルト・フェルナンデス-アリアスです
09:05
Alberto worked with the bucardo in Spain.
彼はスペインでブカルドに取り組みました
09:08
The last bucardo was a female named Celia
最後のブカルドはシーリアというメスでした
09:12
who was still alive, but then they captured her,
当時はまだ生存しており一時的に捕獲して
09:15
they got a little bit of tissue from her ear,
耳から小さな細胞を採取しました
09:19
they cryopreserved it in liquid nitrogen,
そして液体窒素で冷凍保存したうえで
09:22
released her back into the wild,
自然に戻したのですが
09:25
but a few months later, she was found dead under a fallen tree.
数か月後に倒木の下敷きで死亡したのです
09:27
They took the DNA from that ear,
彼らは耳からDNAを摘出し
09:30
they planted it as a cloned egg in a goat,
山羊にクローン卵を移植しました
09:33
the pregnancy came to term,
妊娠期間が過ぎ
09:36
and a live baby bucardo was born.
生きたブカルドの赤ちゃんが誕生したのです
09:38
It was the first de-extinction in history.
歴史上初の絶滅種再生でした
09:41
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:44
It was short-lived.
ただし短命でした
09:47
Sometimes interspecies clones have respiration problems.
時折 種をまたがるクローンには呼吸器系の障害が起きます
09:48
This one had a malformed lung and died after 10 minutes,
この個体は肺が未発達だったため10分後に死亡しました
09:52
but Alberto was confident that
しかしアルベルトはクローン技術の
09:55
cloning has moved along well since then,
進展を確信しており
09:58
and this will move ahead, and eventually
やがては
10:00
there will be a population of bucardos
ブカルドの群れが北スペインの
10:02
back in the mountains in northern Spain.
山々に蘇ると考えています
10:04
Cryopreservation pioneer of great depth is Oliver Ryder.
冷凍保存技術の優れた先駆者であるオリバー・ライダーです
10:07
At the San Diego zoo, his frozen zoo
サンディエゴ動物園内には冷凍された
10:11
has collected the tissues from over 1,000 species
千種以上の細胞が過去35年以上に渡り
10:13
over the last 35 years.
保管されています
10:17
Now, when it's frozen that deep,
零下196℃の温度で
10:20
minus 196 degrees Celsius,
冷凍されている
10:22
the cells are intact and the DNA is intact.
細胞とそのDNAは いわば
10:25
They're basically viable cells,
生きたままの状態です
10:28
so someone like Bob Lanza at Advanced Cell Technology
アドバンスト・セル・テクノロジー社のボブ・ランザは
10:30
took some of that tissue from an endangered animal
ジャワ・バンテンという絶滅危惧種の細胞を
10:33
called the Javan banteng, put it in a cow,
採取して牝牛に移植しました
10:37
the cow went to term, and what was born
牝牛は妊娠し やがて健康な
10:39
was a live, healthy baby Javan banteng,
ジャワ・バンテンの赤ちゃんが生まれ
10:42
who thrived and is still alive.
順調に育ち今も健在です
10:47
The most exciting thing for Bob Lanza
今ボブ・ランザが注目しているのは
10:50
is the ability now to take any kind of cell
iPS細胞を使って あらゆる細胞から
10:53
with induced pluripotent stem cells
卵子や精子等の
10:56
and turn it into germ cells, like sperm and eggs.
胚細胞を作ることです
10:58
So now we go to Mike McGrew
次にマイク・マグリューです
11:02
who is a scientist at Roslin Institute in Scotland,
彼はスコットランドにあるロスリン研究所の科学者で
11:05
and Mike's doing miracles with birds.
鳥に奇跡を起こそうとしています
11:08
So he'll take, say, falcon skin cells, fibroblast,
例えばタカの皮膚細胞を使って
11:10
turn it into induced pluripotent stem cells.
iPS細胞を作製します
11:14
Since it's so pluripotent, it can become germ plasm.
iPS細胞から胚プラズマを作ります
11:17
He then has a way to put the germ plasm
彼はこの胚プラズマを
11:20
into the embryo of a chicken egg
鶏卵の胚細胞に埋め込む技術を確立しました
11:22
so that that chicken will have, basically,
いわば鶏がタカの生殖腺を持つのです
11:26
the gonads of a falcon.
いわば鶏がタカの生殖腺を持つのです
11:29
You get a male and a female each of those,
鶏のつがいを用意すれば
11:31
and out of them comes falcons.
タカが生まれるというわけです
11:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:36
Real falcons out of slightly doctored chickens.
少しだけ細工した鶏がタカを生むのです
11:38
Ben Novak was the youngest scientist at the meeting.
ベン・ノバックは最年少の参加者でした
11:43
He showed how all of this can be put together.
まとめ役を彼は買って出ました
11:45
The sequence of events: he'll put together the genomes
こんな具合です オビオバトとリョコウバトの
11:48
of the band-tailed pigeon and the passenger pigeon,
ゲノムを集めます
11:50
he'll take the techniques of George Church
ジョージ・チャーチの技術を使って
11:53
and get passenger pigeon DNA,
リョコウバトのDNAを取得します
11:56
the techniques of Robert Lanza and Michael McGrew,
そしてロバート・ランザとマイケル・マグリューの技術で
11:58
get that DNA into chicken gonads,
DNAを鶏の生殖腺に移植します
12:01
and out of the chicken gonads get passenger pigeon eggs, squabs,
そして生んだ卵の中からハトが生まれ
12:03
and now you're getting a population of passenger pigeons.
リョコウバトの群れが再生するのです
12:07
It does raise the question of,
そこで起きる問題は
12:11
they're not going to have passenger pigeon parents
新しい群れにリョコウバトの習性を教える
12:13
to teach them how to be a passenger pigeon.
親バトがいないことです
12:15
So what do you do about that?
どうしましょうか
12:17
Well birds are pretty hard-wired, as it happens,
実は鳥の習性の多くは先天的です
12:19
so most of that is already in their DNA,
つまりDNAに受け継がれているのです
12:22
but to supplement it, part of Ben's idea
それを補完するために伝書鳩を
12:25
is to use homing pigeons
使うことをベンは考えています
12:27
to help train the young passenger pigeons how to flock
それでリョコウバトの若鳥が群れを作ったり
12:29
and how to find their way to their old nesting grounds
営巣地や餌場を探す方法を
12:32
and feeding grounds.
学べるでしょう
12:35
There were some conservationists,
自然保護活動家の中には
12:38
really famous conservationists like Stanley Temple,
自然保護生物学の創始者として
12:40
who is one of the founders of conservation biology,
有名なスタンリー・テンプルや
12:43
and Kate Jones from the IUCN, which does the Red List.
レッドリストに関わっているIUCN(国際自然保護連合)
のケート・ジョーンズがいます
12:45
They're excited about all this,
彼らも大いに興味を示しています
12:50
but they're also concerned that it might be competitive
同時にまだ生存している
12:52
with the extremely important efforts to protect
絶滅危惧種の非常に重要な
12:54
endangered species that are still alive,
保護活動と競合しないか
12:58
that haven't gone extinct yet.
心配もしています
13:00
You see, you want to work on protecting the animals out there.
つまり野生動物の保護活動は継続したい
13:02
You want to work on getting the market for ivory in Asia down
アジアの象牙市場を壊滅する取り込みをして
13:04
so you're not using 25,000 elephants a year.
毎年殺戮される2万5千頭の象を保護したい
13:08
But at the same time, conservation biologists are realizing
しかしその一方自然保護生物学者は暗い話題が
13:12
that bad news bums people out.
人々を委縮させることにも気づいています
13:15
And so the Red List is really important, keep track of
レッドリストは絶滅危惧や絶滅寸前の
13:18
what's endangered and critically endangered, and so on.
種を守るためにとても重要です
13:20
But they're about to create what they call a Green List,
一方彼らはグリーン・リストを作成しようとしています
13:24
and the Green List will have species that are doing fine, thank you,
グリーン・リストは健全な種を列挙します
13:27
species that were endangered, like the bald eagle,
白頭ワシはじめ以前は絶滅に瀕したものの
13:31
but they're much better off now, thanks to everybody's good work,
人々の努力や世界中の管理が
13:33
and protected areas around the world
とても行き届いた保護区のおかげで
13:37
that are very, very well managed.
順調に回復した種のリストです
13:39
So basically, they're learning how to build on good news.
明るい話題で活動を盛り上げようとしているのです
13:41
And they see reviving extinct species
絶滅種の再生はそんな明るい話題の
13:45
as the kind of good news you might be able to build on.
一環として有意義です
13:48
Here's a couple related examples.
いくつか例をあげましょう
13:51
Captive breeding will be a major part of bringing back these species.
飼育下繁殖は絶滅種再生に有効な手段になります
13:54
The California condor was down to 22 birds in 1987.
カリフォルニア・コンドルは1987年には22羽に減りました
13:58
Everybody thought is was finished.
絶滅は時間の問題と思われました
14:01
Thanks to captive breeding at the San Diego Zoo,
しかしサンディエゴ動物園の飼育下繁殖のおかげで
14:03
there's 405 of them now, 226 are out in the wild.
今は405羽に増えてそのうち226羽は野生に戻っています
14:06
That technology will be used on de-extincted animals.
この手法を絶滅種再生にも応用できます
14:10
Another success story is the mountain gorilla in Central Africa.
次の成功例は中央アフリカのマウンテン・ゴリラです
14:14
In 1981, Dian Fossey was sure they were going extinct.
1981年にダイアン・フォッシーは絶滅を覚悟しました
14:17
There were just 254 left.
254頭が生存するのみでした
14:21
Now there are 880. They're increasing in population
今では880頭になり 毎年3%増加しています
14:23
by three percent a year.
今では880頭になり 毎年3%増加しています
14:26
The secret is, they have an eco-tourism program,
秘訣はとてもすばらしいエコ・ツアーの仕組みです
14:28
which is absolutely brilliant.
秘訣はとてもすばらしいエコ・ツアーの仕組みです
14:32
So this photograph was taken last month by Ryan
この写真は妻が先月 iPhone で撮影しました
14:33
with an iPhone.
この写真は妻が先月 iPhone で撮影しました
14:36
That's how comfortable these wild gorillas are with visitors.
これほど野生のゴリラが観光客に慣れているのです
14:39
Another interesting project, though it's going to need some help,
次も興味深いですが 更なる支援が必要です
14:43
is the northern white rhinoceros.
シロサイの例です
14:47
There's no breeding pairs left.
つがいはいません
14:49
But this is the kind of thing that
それでもこの動物の
14:51
a wide variety of DNA for this animal is available in the frozen zoo.
様々なDNA検体が保存されています
14:53
A bit of cloning, you can get them back.
クローンすれば再生可能です
14:57
So where do we go from here?
では次のステップは何でしょうか
15:00
These have been private meetings so far.
これまで行われたのは私的な会合です
15:02
I think it's time for the subject to go public.
私はこの話題を公けにすべきだと思います
15:04
What do people think about it?
世論に問いかけるのです
15:06
You know, do you want extinct species back?
世論は絶滅種再生を望むでしょうか
15:08
Do you want extinct species back?
皆さんは絶滅種再生を望みますか
15:10
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:13
Tinker Bell is going to come fluttering down.
ティンカー・ベルが飛んでくることでしょう
15:18
It is a Tinker Bell moment,
まさにその瞬間です
15:20
because what are people excited about with this?
とても期待している人も
15:22
What are they concerned about?
心配な人もいるでしょう
15:24
We're also going to push ahead with the passenger pigeon.
私たちはリョウコウバト再生を継続するつもりです
15:26
So Ben Novak, even as we speak, is joining the group
ベン・ノバックはカリフォルニア大サンタクルーズ校の
15:29
that Beth Shapiro has at UC Santa Cruz.
ベス・シャピロのグループと共同研究をはじめました
15:32
They're going to work on the genomes
リョウコウバトとオビオバトのゲノム解析をするのです
15:36
of the passenger pigeon and the band-tailed pigeon.
リョウコウバトとオビオバトのゲノム解析をするのです
15:37
As that data matures, they'll send it to George Church,
完了したらジョージ・チャーチに送り
15:39
who will work his magic, get passenger pigeon DNA out of that.
魔法のようにリョウコウバトのDNAを抽出します
15:43
We'll get help from Bob Lanza and Mike McGrew
そこでベン・ランザとマイク・マグリューが引継ぎ
15:47
to get that into germ plasm that can go into chickens
DNAを胚プラズマに挿入し鶏に移植します
15:50
that can produce passenger pigeon squabs
鶏からリョウコウバトのひな鳥が生まれ
15:53
that can be raised by band-tailed pigeon parents,
オビオバトが育てるのです
15:56
and then from then on, it's passenger pigeons all the way,
あとはリョウコウバトに
15:58
maybe for the next six million years.
全てを託せば おそらく向こう6百万年は安泰です
16:00
You can do the same thing, as the costs come down,
コストが下がれば同様なことを
16:03
for the Carolina parakeet, for the great auk,
カロライナ・インコ
オーロックス
16:06
for the heath hen, for the ivory-billed woodpecker,
ニューイングランド・ソウゲンライチョウ
ハシジロキツツキ
16:09
for the Eskimo curlew, for the Caribbean monk seal,
エスキモーコシャクシギ
カリブモンクアザラシ
16:12
for the woolly mammoth.
マンモスに応用できます
16:14
Because the fact is, humans have made a huge hole
事実上 人間は過去1万年に渡り
16:17
in nature in the last 10,000 years.
自然界に巨大な穴を開けてきたのです
16:19
We have the ability now,
今の私たちにはそのダメージを
16:22
and maybe the moral obligation, to repair some of the damage.
少しでも修復する能力とおそらく義務があります
16:24
Most of that we'll do by expanding and protecting wildlands,
できることは自然を回復し保護し
16:29
by expanding and protecting
そして絶滅危惧種の
16:34
the populations of endangered species.
個体数を回復し保護することです
16:35
But some species
既に死滅した種の幾つかは
16:40
that we killed off totally
その復活を待ち望む
16:42
we could consider bringing back
世界に呼び戻すことが
16:47
to a world that misses them.
可能なのです
16:51
Thank you.
ありがとうございます
16:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:56
Chris Anderson: Thank you.
ありがとうございます
17:07
I've got a question.
質問があります
17:09
So, this is an emotional topic. Some people stand.
これは感情的なトピックです 立ち上る人もいるでしょう
17:11
I suspect there are some people out there sitting,
一方座ったままで次のような
17:16
kind of asking tormented questions, almost, about,
辛い質問をする人もいるでしょう
17:19
well, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait a minute,
ちょっと待ってくれ
17:22
there's something wrong with mankind
このように人間が自然界に
17:23
interfering in nature in this way.
介入するのは問題ではないか
17:27
There's going to be unintended consequences.
予期せぬ事態を引き起こし パンドラの箱か何かを
17:30
You're going to uncork some sort of Pandora's box
開けることにならないのか
17:33
of who-knows-what. Do they have a point?
これについてどう思いますか
17:36
Stewart Brand: Well, the earlier point is
先に述べた点は我々こそが
17:40
we interfered in a big way by making these animals go extinct,
大いに介入して動物を絶滅に追い込み
17:42
and many of them were keystone species,
しかもその多くは重要種であり
17:45
and we changed the whole ecosystem they were in
絶滅させた結果 生態系全体を
17:48
by letting them go.
変えてしまったことです
17:50
Now, there's the shifting baseline problem, which is,
基準レベルの変動が問題です すなわち絶滅種が
17:52
so when these things come back,
基準レベルの変動が問題です すなわち絶滅種が
17:55
they might replace some birds that are there
復活したら現在生息していて
17:56
that people really know and love.
人々が愛する鳥を駆逐しないか
17:59
I think that's, you know, part of how it'll work.
私はそれも自然の摂理だと思います
18:01
This is a long, slow process --
長くゆっくりした過程なのです
18:04
One of the things I like about it, it's multi-generation.
多世代におよぶのは好ましいことだと思います
18:07
We will get woolly mammoths back.
マンモスだって再生できるでしょう
18:09
CA: Well it feels like both the conversation
お話もその可能性も非常にスリルがあると感じました
18:11
and the potential here are pretty thrilling.
お話もその可能性も非常にスリルがあると感じました
18:13
Thank you so much for presenting. SB: Thank you.
お話いただきありがとうございました
18:15
CA: Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとう (拍手)
18:17
Translated by Akira Kan
Reviewed by Mitsuko Atsusaka

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Stewart Brand - Environmentalist, futurist
Since the counterculture '60s, Stewart Brand has been creating our internet-worked world. Now, with biotech accelerating four times faster than digital technology, Stewart Brand has a bold new plan ...

Why you should listen

With biotech accelerating four times faster than digital technology, the revival of extinct species is becoming possible. Stewart Brand plans to not only bring species back but restore them to the wild.

Brand is already a legend in the tech industry for things he’s created: the Whole Earth Catalog, The WELL, the Global Business Network, the Long Now Foundation, and the notion that “information wants to be free.” Now Brand, a lifelong environmentalist, wants to re-create -- or “de-extinct” -- a few animals that’ve disappeared from the planet.

Granted, resurrecting the woolly mammoth using ancient DNA may sound like mad science. But Brand’s Revive and Restore project has an entirely rational goal: to learn what causes extinctions so we can protect currently endangered species, preserve genetic and biological diversity, repair depleted ecosystems, and essentially “undo harm that humans have caused in the past.”

His newest book is Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto.

More profile about the speaker
Stewart Brand | Speaker | TED.com