sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2012

Catarina Mota: Play with smart materials

カタリナ・モタ: スマート素材で遊んでみよう

July 12, 2012

電気を通すインク、スイッチ一つで不透明になる窓、音楽を奏でるゼリー。こんな製品が本当にあります。カタリナ・モタは、これで遊んでみようと語りかけます。彼女は意外でクールな新しい素材を紹介し、その素材が何に使えるかは、実験やいじってみること、そして楽しむことで見つけることができると提案します。

Catarina Mota - Maker
A TEDGlobal Fellow, Catarina Mota plays with "smart materials" -- like shape-memory alloys and piezoelectric structures that react to voltage -- and encourages others to do so too. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I have a friend in Portugal
ポルトガルに友人がいます
00:15
whose grandfather built a vehicle out of a bicycle
友人の おじいさんは
自転車と洗濯機を使って
00:18
and a washing machine so he could transport his family.
家族のために 自動車を作りました
00:20
He did it because he couldn't afford a car,
車を買う余裕が
なかったからですが
00:23
but also because he knew how to build one.
実は 車の作り方も
知っていました
00:26
There was a time when we understood how things worked
皆が 物の仕組みを
理解していて
00:29
and how they were made, so we could build and repair them,
物を作り 修繕できる
時代がありました
00:32
or at the very least
そうでなかったとしても
00:36
make informed decisions about what to buy.
何を購入するか 十分な情報に
基づいて 意思決定しました
00:37
Many of these do-it-yourself practices
こういった日曜大工(DIY)のような慣習は
00:40
were lost in the second half of the 20th century.
20世紀後半には
大方失われてしまいました
00:43
But now, the maker community and the open-source model
しかし今日 DIYのコミュニティや
オープンソース・モデルが
00:46
are bringing this kind of knowledge about how things work
物の機能や それが何から
できているかと言った知識を
00:50
and what they're made of back into our lives,
身近なものに してくれます
00:53
and I believe we need to take them to the next level,
私は これを次のステップに
進める必要性を感じています
00:56
to the components things are made of.
製品を作り上げる
部品に注目しています
00:59
For the most part, we still know
私たちは
01:02
what traditional materials like paper and textiles are made of
紙や生地といった伝統的な
材料が何からできていて
01:04
and how they are produced.
どうやって作られるか
だいたい理解しています
01:08
But now we have these amazing, futuristic composites --
しかし 今は素晴らしい
未来的な複合材料があります―
01:10
plastics that change shape,
変形自在のプラスチック
01:14
paints that conduct electricity,
電気を通す塗料
01:16
pigments that change color, fabrics that light up.
色が変わる絵具 光る布地などです
01:18
Let me show you some examples.
いくつかの例を お見せしましょう
01:23
So conductive ink allows us to paint circuits
導電性インクは これまでの
プリント基板や
01:29
instead of using the traditional
ワイヤを使わずに
01:33
printed circuit boards or wires.
電気回路を塗って
作ることが出来ます
01:35
In the case of this little example I'm holding,
例として こちらをご覧ください
01:37
we used it to create a touch sensor that reacts to my skin
皮膚に反応する
タッチセンサーに使いました
01:40
by turning on this little light.
小さなライトを点けることができます
01:44
Conductive ink has been used by artists,
導電性インクは これまで
芸術家が使用してきました
01:46
but recent developments indicate that we will soon be able
しかし 近年開発が進んでおり
01:49
to use it in laser printers and pens.
近々レーザープリンターや
ペンに利用されるでしょう
01:53
And this is a sheet of acrylic infused
こちらのアクリル板には
01:57
with colorless light-diffusing particles.
光を拡散する 無色の粒子が注入されています
02:00
What this means is that, while regular acrylic
通常のアクリル板は
02:02
only diffuses light around the edges,
縁の辺りでのみ
光を拡散させるのに対して
02:05
this one illuminates across the entire surface
こちらは周囲のライトを点ければ
02:07
when I turn on the lights around it.
表面全体に光が
拡散されます
02:11
Two of the known applications for this material
この素材に考えられている利用法は
02:13
include interior design and multi-touch systems.
インテリアデザインや
マルチタッチシステムなどです
02:16
And thermochromic pigments
また サーモクロミック色素は
02:21
change color at a given temperature.
温度によって色が変化します
02:23
So I'm going to place this on a hot plate
ホットプレートに乗せてみましょう
02:26
that is set to a temperature only slightly higher than ambient
外気より 少しだけ
高い温度に設定しています
02:28
and you can see what happens.
どうなるかは ご覧のとおりです
02:32
So one of the principle applications for this material
この素材の利用先を一つあげれば
02:38
is, amongst other things, in baby bottles,
いろいろありますが
哺乳瓶に利用できます
02:40
so it indicates when the contents are cool enough to drink.
中のミルクが 適温かどうか分かります
02:44
So these are just a few of what are commonly known
これらは スマート素材として
02:49
as smart materials.
知られている物の ごく一部です
02:52
In a few years, they will be in many of the objects
これから数年の内に
私たちが日常的に使用する
02:54
and technologies we use on a daily basis.
多くの物や技術に利用されるでしょう
02:57
We may not yet have the flying cars science fiction promised us,
SFに出てくるような
空を飛ぶ車は まだありませんが
03:00
but we can have walls that change color
温度によって
03:04
depending on temperature,
色が変わる壁や
03:07
keyboards that roll up,
ロールアップできる キーボード
03:08
and windows that become opaque at the flick of a switch.
スイッチ一つで 不透明になる窓は可能です
03:10
So I'm a social scientist by training,
私は社会科学を学んできました
03:15
so why am I here today talking about smart materials?
なぜスマート素材の話をしているのかと
お思いでしょうね
03:17
Well first of all, because I am a maker.
まず 私がDIYをするからです
03:21
I'm curious about how things work
物の仕組みや その作り方に
03:24
and how they are made,
興味があります
03:26
but also because I believe we should have a deeper understanding
また 私たちの世界を
築いている 物について
03:28
of the components that make up our world,
十分に理解する必要があると考えています
03:31
and right now, we don't know enough about
今のところ 未来を築いていく
ハイテク材料について
03:34
these high-tech composites our future will be made of.
私たちは十分に知りません
03:36
Smart materials are hard to obtain in small quantities.
スマート素材を
少量だけ入手するのは困難です
03:40
There's barely any information available on how to use them,
使用方法についての情報も
ほとんどありません
03:44
and very little is said about how they are produced.
どうやって作られるかも分かりません
03:48
So for now, they exist mostly in this realm
ですから 今のところスマート素材は
03:52
of trade secrets and patents
大学や企業だけがアクセスできる
03:54
only universities and corporations have access to.
企業秘密や専売特許の域を出ません
03:57
So a little over three years ago, Kirsty Boyle and I
約3年前 私とカースティ・ボイルは
04:01
started a project we called Open Materials.
「オープンマテリアルズ」という
プロジェクトを立ち上げました
04:04
It's a website where we,
ウェブサイトなんですが―
04:07
and anyone else who wants to join us,
誰でも自由に参加できて
04:09
share experiments, publish information,
実験を共有したり 情報を公開したり
04:11
encourage others to contribute whenever they can,
他の人に 貢献を呼びかけたり
04:14
and aggregate resources such as research papers
私たちのような
DIY愛好家による
04:18
and tutorials by other makers like ourselves.
研究論文や手引書などの
資料を集めています
04:22
We would like it to become a large,
このウェブサイトを
04:25
collectively generated database
スマート素材についてのDIY情報を
04:28
of do-it-yourself information on smart materials.
共同で発信できる
データベースにしたいと思っています
04:30
But why should we care
なぜスマート素材の仕組みや材料を
04:34
how smart materials work and what they are made of?
知っておくべきなのでしょうか?
04:37
First of all, because we can't shape what we don't understand,
まず 自分が理解していない材料で
物を作ることはできません
04:40
and what we don't understand and use
そして 理解しないままに使っている物が
04:45
ends up shaping us.
結局は 私たちを形作っていくのです
04:47
The objects we use, the clothes we wear,
つまり 私たちが使う物
着る服 住む家などが
04:49
the houses we live in, all have a profound impact
行動や健康 生活の質に
04:52
on our behavior, health and quality of life.
大きな影響を与えています
04:55
So if we are to live in a world made of smart materials,
ですから スマート素材で作られた
世界に住むのであれば
04:59
we should know and understand them.
それを知り 理解する必要が
あると思うのです
05:02
Secondly, and just as important,
次に 同じく重要なことですが―
05:06
innovation has always been fueled by tinkerers.
技術革新を進めてきたのは
素人です
05:08
So many times, amateurs, not experts,
多くの場合
物作りの専門家ではなく 愛好家が
05:11
have been the inventors and improvers
発明家や 改良者として
貢献してきました
05:15
of things ranging from mountain bikes
その例として マウンテンバイク
05:17
to semiconductors, personal computers,
半導体 パソコン
05:19
airplanes.
飛行機などがあります
05:23
The biggest challenge is that material science is complex
材料科学は複雑で
05:26
and requires expensive equipment.
器具が高価なのが課題ですが
05:30
But that's not always the case.
必ずしも そうとは限りません
05:32
Two scientists at University of Illinois understood this
イリノイ大学の2人の科学者が
05:34
when they published a paper on a simpler method
導電性インクを簡単に作る方法について
05:38
for making conductive ink.
論文を出版した際の出来事です
05:41
Jordan Bunker, who had had
化学の知識が全く無かった
05:43
no experience with chemistry until then,
ジョーダン・バンカーが
05:45
read this paper and reproduced the experiment
この論文を読み
05:48
at his maker space using only off-the-shelf substances
趣味の作業場にあった
材料と道具を利用して
05:51
and tools.
この実験を再現しました
05:55
He used a toaster oven,
オーブントースターも使いましたし
05:57
and he even made his own vortex mixer,
ボルテックスミキサーは手作りしました
05:58
based on a tutorial by another scientist/maker.
他の科学者や DIY愛好家の
手引きを参考にしてです
06:01
Jordan then published his results online,
ジョーダンは この成果を
オンラインで発表しました
06:05
including all the things he had tried and didn't work,
試してみて失敗した例も
発表しました
06:08
so others could study and reproduce it.
おかげで他の人が
学習して 再現できました
06:11
So Jordan's main form of innovation
ジョーダンが成し遂げた革新は
06:15
was to take an experiment created in a well-equipped lab
設備の整った大学のラボで
06:17
at the university
行われた実験を
06:21
and recreate it in a garage in Chicago
シカゴのガレージで再現したことです
06:23
using only cheap materials and tools he made himself.
それも 安価な材料と
自作の道具を利用してです
06:26
And now that he published this work,
彼が自分の作業を公開したことで
06:30
others can pick up where he left
他の人が仕事を引き継げます
06:32
and devise even simpler processes and improvements.
より簡単な方法や 改善点が
見つかるかもしれません
06:34
Another example I'd like to mention
もう一つ ご紹介したい例があります
06:39
is Hannah Perner-Wilson's Kit-of-No-Parts.
ハンナ・パーナー・ウィルソンの
「キット・オブ・ノー・パーツ」です
06:41
Her project's goal is to highlight
このプロジェクトの目的は
06:45
the expressive qualities of materials
作り手の創造性と技術に
焦点を当てながら
06:47
while focusing on the creativity and skills of the builder.
材料の表情豊かな
性質に注目します
06:50
Electronics kits are very powerful
市販の電子機器キットは
とてもパワフルで
06:55
in that they teach us how things work,
物の仕組みについて
教えてくれます
06:57
but the constraints inherent in their design
ただし その学習法は
07:00
influence the way we learn.
画一化されています
07:03
So Hannah's approach, on the other hand,
一方で ハンナは
07:05
is to formulate a series of techniques
部品そのものについての理解を促し
07:08
for creating unusual objects
設計図通りに作る必要のない
07:11
that free us from pre-designed constraints
変わった物を作るテクニックを
07:13
by teaching us about the materials themselves.
まとめようとしています
07:16
So amongst Hannah's many impressive experiments,
ハンナの数々の 
素晴らしい実験の内―
07:20
this is one of my favorites.
これが 私のお気に入りです
07:22
["Paper speakers"]
「紙のスピーカー」
07:24
What we're seeing here is just a piece of paper
ご覧いただいているのは
銅テープを貼った紙切れで
07:28
with some copper tape on it connected to an mp3 player
MP3プレーヤーに 接続されています
07:31
and a magnet.
そこに 磁石を近づけています
07:36
(Music: "Happy Together")
(音楽:Happy Together)
07:37
So based on the research by Marcelo Coelho from MIT,
MIT(マサチューセッツ工科大学)の
マルセロ・コエーリョの研究を参考に
07:48
Hannah created a series of paper speakers
ハンナは 銅テープや
07:52
out of a wide range of materials
導電性の布やインクなど
様々な素材から
07:54
from simple copper tape to conductive fabric and ink.
紙のスピーカーを作成しました
07:57
Just like Jordan and so many other makers,
先ほどのジョーダンや
多くのDIY愛好家と同様
08:01
Hannah published her recipes
ハンナは このレシピを発表しました
08:04
and allows anyone to copy and reproduce them.
誰でも真似し
再現することができるのです
08:05
But paper electronics is one of the most promising branches
紙を使用した電子装置は
08:11
of material science
材料科学の中でも 最も有望です
08:14
in that it allows us to create cheaper and flexible electronics.
安価で柔軟な
電子装置を作れるからです
08:16
So Hannah's artisanal work,
ですから このハンナの職人技は―
08:20
and the fact that she shared her findings,
彼女が その成果を共有したことで
08:22
opens the doors to a series of new possibilities
魅力的で かつ革新的な
08:25
that are both aesthetically appealing and innovative.
新しい可能性への
扉が開かれたのです
08:28
So the interesting thing about makers
DIY愛好家の面白い点は
08:34
is that we create out of passion and curiosity,
情熱と好奇心から 物を作ることです
08:37
and we are not afraid to fail.
そして 失敗を恐れません
08:40
We often tackle problems from unconventional angles,
今までにない角度から
問題に取り組み
08:42
and, in the process, end up discovering alternatives
その過程で 代用品や
08:46
or even better ways to do things.
より良い方法を 発見します
08:49
So the more people experiment with materials,
ですから より多くの人が物を使って
実験することで
08:51
the more researchers are willing to share their research,
より多くの研究者が
彼らの成果を共有し
08:55
and manufacturers their knowledge,
製造業者も
知識を共有するでしょう
08:58
the better chances we have to create technologies
すべての人々に 本当に必要な
09:01
that truly serve us all.
技術を生み出す
機会が得られるのです
09:04
So I feel a bit as Ted Nelson must have
今 少しだけ テッド・ネルソンのような
気持ちでいます
09:07
when, in the early 1970s, he wrote,
彼は1970年初期に こう言いました
09:09
"You must understand computers now."
「皆さんは 今コンピューターを
理解しなければなりません」
09:13
Back then, computers were these large mainframes
当時 コンピューターは
科学者にしか関係のない
09:16
only scientists cared about,
大きなメインフレームでした
09:20
and no one dreamed of even having one at home.
一家に一台持つなんて
誰も思っていませんでした
09:22
So it's a little strange that I'm standing here and saying,
ですから 今日ここで 皆さんに
お伝えするのは 妙な気分ですが―
09:25
"You must understand smart materials now."
「皆さんは 今スマート素材を
理解しなければいけません」
09:28
Just keep in mind that acquiring preemptive knowledge
これから出てくる 新しい技術について
09:31
about emerging technologies
知識を持つよう 心に留めてみてください
09:34
is the best way to ensure that we have a say
そうすることで 私たちの手で
09:37
in the making of our future.
私たちの未来を創ることができます
09:39
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
09:41
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:44
Translator:Mari Arimitsu
Reviewer:Sakuya Kawakami

sponsored links

Catarina Mota - Maker
A TEDGlobal Fellow, Catarina Mota plays with "smart materials" -- like shape-memory alloys and piezoelectric structures that react to voltage -- and encourages others to do so too.

Why you should listen

A maker of things and open-source advocate, Catarina Mota is co-founder of openMaterials.org, a collaborative project dedicated to do-it-yourself experimentation with smart materials. This is a new class of materials that change in response to stimuli: conductive ink, shape-memory plastics, etc. Her goal is to encourage the making of things; to that end, she teaches hands-on workshops on high-tech materials and simple circuitry for both young people and adults--with a side benefit of encouraging interest in science, technology and knowledge-sharing. She's working on her PhD researching the social impact of open and collaborative practices for the development of technologies. In other words: Do we make better stuff when we work together? She is also a co-founder of Lisbon's hackerspace altLab.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.