sponsored links
TED2007

Jeff Skoll: My journey into movies that matter

ジェフ・スコールは、社会を変革する映画を作っています

March 3, 2007

映画製作者ジェフ・スコール(「不都合な真実」)が、彼の映画会社Participant Productionsと、彼に良い行いをするようヒントをもたらした人々について語ります

Jeff Skoll - Producer
Jeff Skoll was the first president of eBay; he used his dot-com fortune to found the film house Participant Productions, making movies to inspire social change, including Syriana; Good Night, and Good Luck; Murderball; An Inconvenient Truth ... Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I've actually been waiting by the phone
実のところ私はTEDからの電話を
00:25
for a call from TED for years.
何年も待っていました
00:28
And in fact, in 2000, I was ready to talk about eBay, but no call.
2000年にはeBayのことを話す用意がありました…しかし電話はきません
00:31
In 2003, I was ready to do a talk
2003年にはSkoll基金と
00:37
about the Skoll Foundation and social entrepreneurship. No call.
社会起業について しかし電話は来ません
00:40
In 2004, I started Participant Productions
2004年にはParticipantプロダクションを設立しました
00:47
and we had a really good first year, and no call.
最初の年は実によい滑り出しでした しかし電話はきません
00:49
And finally, I get a call last year,
そして去年、ついに電話が来ましたが
00:52
and then I have to go up after J.J. Abrams.
その時は出番がJJエイブラムスの後でした
00:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:58
You've got a cruel sense of humor, TED.
TEDは血も涙もないブラックユーモアのセンスがあります
01:01
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:02
When I first moved to Hollywood from Silicon Valley,
初めてシリコンバレーからハリウッドに移り住んだ時
01:04
I had some misgivings.
私には不安がありました
01:08
But I found that there were some advantages to being in Hollywood.
しかしハリウッドにいることのメリットもあるとわかりました
01:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:13
And, in fact, some advantages to owning your own media company.
それに、実は自分の映画会社を持つこともメリットも
01:14
And I also found that Hollywood and Silicon Valley
私はまた、ハリウッドとシリコンバレーは思ったより
01:21
have a lot more in common than I would have dreamed.
共通点が多いとわかりました
01:23
Hollywood has its sex symbols, and the Valley has its sex symbols.
ハリウッドにはセックスシンボルがおり、バレーにもいます
01:26
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:29
Hollywood has its rivalries, and the Valley has its rivalries.
ハリウッドにはハリウッドのライバルが、バレーと同じでした
01:31
Hollywood gathers around power tables,
ハリウッドでは人々はパワーテーブルの前に集まり
01:35
and the Valley gathers around power tables.
バレーでも我々はパワーテーブルに集まります
01:37
So it turned out there was a lot more in common
つまり、自分で思っていたよりずっと
01:39
than I would have dreamed.
共通点が多かったのです
01:41
But I'm actually here today to tell a story.
しかし、とにかく私は今ここで話をしています
01:43
And part of it is a personal story. When Chris invited me to speak,
その一部は個人的なものです クリスが私をスピーカーとして招待してくれた時
01:46
he said, people think of you as a bit of an enigma,
彼は、私が他人から見れば—謎の人物で
01:51
and they want to know what drives you a bit.
なにが私を駆り立てているのかを知りたがっていると言いました
01:53
And what really drives me is a vision of the future
私を駆り立てているものーそれは私たち皆が
01:56
that I think we all share.
共有している未来のビジョンです
01:59
It's a world of peace and prosperity and sustainability.
そこは平和と繁栄と持続性のある世界です
02:00
And when we heard a lot of the presentations
ここ数日間、エド・ウィルソンや
02:04
over the last couple of days,
ジェームズ・ナクトウェイの写真などの
02:09
Ed Wilson and the pictures of James Nachtwey,
たくさんのプレゼンを聴きましたが
02:10
I think we all realized how far we have to go
私たちが新しいバージョンの「ヒューマニティ2.0」に
02:14
to get to this new version of humanity
到達するには、とても長い道のりを
02:16
that I like to call "Humanity 2.0."
進まなくてはならないと思います
02:17
And it's also something that resides in each of us,
そして、私が今日の世界の二大災厄と
02:20
to close what I think
考えているものを終わらせたいという気持ちは
02:25
are the two big calamities in the world today.
私たち全ての心にあることだと思います
02:26
One is the gap in opportunity --
そのうち一つは機会の格差で―
02:30
this gap that President Clinton last night
昨夜クリントン(大統領)が不平等、不公平
02:33
called uneven, unfair and unsustainable --
そして非持続的と呼んだもので―
02:36
and, out of that, comes poverty and illiteracy and disease
そこから我々を取り囲む全ての悪:貧困、文盲、病魔などが
02:39
and all these evils that we see around us.
発生しているのです
02:42
But perhaps the other, bigger gap is what we call the hope gap.
しかし、おそらくもっと大きな格差は「希望の格差」だと思います
02:45
And someone, at some point, came up with this very bad idea
どこかでだれかが普通の人間はこの世界を
02:50
that an ordinary individual couldn't make a difference in the world.
変えることはできないのだ、という非常に悪い考えを抱いているのです
02:53
And I think that's just a horrible thing.
これは恐ろしいことだと思います
02:57
And so chapter one really begins today, with all of us,
そこで第一章はまさにここで、私たち全てと共に始まるのです
02:59
because within each of us is the power to
なぜなら私たちそれぞれの中には機会格差を
03:03
equal those opportunity gaps and to close the hope gaps.
均等にし、希望格差を埋める力があるからです
03:07
And if the men and women of TED
もしTEDの人たちが
03:10
can't make a difference in the world, I don't know who can.
世界を変えられなかったら、誰が変えられるでしょう
03:12
And for me, a lot of this started when I was younger
私にとって、こういうことはずっと若い頃
03:15
and my family used to go camping in upstate New York.
家族でニューヨークの郊外でキャンプしていた頃に始まります
03:18
And there really wasn't much to do there for the summer,
夏の間そこでは、姉に小突き回されるか読書をする以外には
03:22
except get beaten up by my sister or read books.
やるべきことがほとんどなく
03:24
And so I used to read authors like James Michener
それで私はジェイムズ・ミッチェナー、
03:28
and James Clavell and Ayn Rand.
ジェイムズ・クラベル、アイン・ランドなどを読んでいました
03:31
And their stories made the world seem a very small
そして彼らの物語によって、世界が非常に小さく、
03:33
and interconnected place.
互いに結びついているように感じられました
03:37
And it struck me that if I could write stories
そして、もし私が物語を書いて
03:39
that were about this world as being small and interconnected,
世界が小さく互いに結びついていると書いたら
03:43
that maybe I could get people interested in the issues
ひょっとしたら人々が、我々を取り巻いている問題に
03:45
that affected us all, and maybe engage them to make a difference.
関心を持ち、世界を変えようとするかもしれないと思いました
03:49
I didn't think that was necessarily the best way to make a living,
私はそれが生計を立てるベストな方法ではないと思ったので
03:53
so I decided to go on a path to become financially independent,
まず経済的に自立する道を選び、それから
03:57
so I could write these stories as quickly as I could.
なるべく早くそのような物語を書こうと思いました
04:01
I then had a bit of a wake-up call when I was 14.
そして私が14歳の時に、はっと目が覚めるような出来事がありました
04:05
And my dad came home one day
ある日父親が家に帰って来て
04:08
and announced that he had cancer, and it looked pretty bad.
彼が癌に冒されており、かなり悪そうだと話したのです
04:10
And what he said was, he wasn't so much afraid that he might die,
そして父が言うには、自分は死ぬことはそれほど恐れていないが
04:14
but that he hadn't done the things that he wanted to with his life.
自分が人生でしたかったことができないのが怖い、と言ったのです
04:18
And knock on wood, he's still alive today, many years later.
幸運にも、それから長年経った今でも父は生きています
04:23
But for a young man that made a real impression on me,
しかし若かった私には、それは非常に衝撃的で
04:27
that one never knows how much time one really has.
人は自分があとどれくらい時間があるかわからないのだと思いました
04:30
So I set out in a hurry. I studied engineering.
そこで私は急ぎました 私は工学を学び
04:33
I started a couple of businesses
いくつかビジネスを起こし
04:38
that I thought would be the ticket to financial freedom.
それが経済的自由への切符だと思っていました
04:40
One of those businesses was a computer rental business
ビジネスの一つはコンピュータレンタルの仕事で
04:43
called Micros on the Move,
「マイクロ・オン・ザ・ムーヴ」といって
04:46
which is very well named,
よく出来た名前で
04:47
because people kept stealing the computers.
人々はしょっちゅうコンピュータを盗みました
04:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:50
So I figured I needed to learn a little bit more about business,
そこで私はもっとビジネスについて知らなくてはと思い
04:51
so I went to Stanford Business School and studied there.
スタンフォードビジネススクールに通って学びました
04:55
And while I was there, I made friends with a fellow
私がそこにいる時にピエール・オミダイアと
04:58
named Pierre Omidyar, who is here today. And Pierre, I apologize
友達になり、彼は今日ここにいますが ピエール、
05:01
for this. This is a photo from the old days.
ごめんな―この写真は昔のなんです
05:04
And just after I'd graduated, Pierre came to me
そして私が卒業してすぐピエールが私のところに来てー
05:07
with this idea to help people
人々がオンラインで欲しいものを
05:09
buy and sell things online with each other.
売買するためのシステムのアイデアをもたらしました
05:11
And with the wisdom of my Stanford degree,
スタンフォードの学位からくる知恵を持つ私は
05:13
I said, "Pierre, what a stupid idea."
言いました「ピエール、なんて馬鹿なことを」と
05:15
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:17
And needless to say, I was right.
もちろん私は正しく
05:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:19
But right after that, Pierre -- in '96, Pierre and I left our full-time jobs
それからすぐ、96年にピエールと私はフルタイムジョブから離れ
05:21
to build eBay as a company. And the rest of that story, you know.
eBayを企業化し、そのあとはご存知ですね
05:25
The company went public two years later
会社は2年後に上場し
05:30
and is today one of the best known companies in the world.
今では世界で一番知られている企業の一つになっています
05:32
Hundreds of millions of people use it in hundreds of countries, and so on.
何億人もの人が何百という国でeBayを利用していて、まあそういうことです
05:35
But for me, personally, it was a real change.
しかし私にとっては、それはまさしく「変化」でした
05:39
I went from living in a house with five guys in Palo Alto
私はパロアルトの5人住まいの部屋から始めて
05:43
and living off their leftovers,
残り物の食べ物で生活していましたが
05:47
to all of a sudden having all kinds of resources.
突然全てのリソースが手に入ったのです
05:48
And I wanted to figure out how I could
そして私はどうやってこのリソースの恵みを
05:52
take the blessing of these resources and share it with the world.
世界と分かち合えるかを考えようと思いました
05:54
And around that time, I met John Gardner,
私はその頃、注目すべき人物、ジョン・ガードナーと
05:58
who is a remarkable man.
会いました
06:01
He was the architect of the Great Society programs
彼は1960年代、リンドンジョンソン政権下の
06:03
under Lyndon Johnson in the 1960s.
「偉大な社会」プログラムの開発者で
06:07
And I asked him what he felt was the best thing I could do,
私は彼に尋ねました 「私か、他の誰でもいいが
06:09
or anyone could do, to make a difference
人間性に関する長期的な問題について世界を変えるには
06:12
in the long-term issues facing humanity.
これからどうしたらいいと思いますか?」と
06:14
And John said, "Bet on good people doing good things.
彼は言いました「良い人々が良い行いをするのに賭けなさい」と
06:18
Bet on good people doing good things."
「良い人々が良い行いをするのに賭けなさい」
06:22
And that really resonated with me.
私はそれに本当に共感しました
06:24
I started a foundation
私は基金をつくり
06:26
to bet on these good people doing good things.
良い人々が良い行いをするのに賭けることにしました
06:28
These leading, innovative, nonprofit folks,
先進的で、革新的で、非営利の人たち
06:30
who are using business skills in a very leveraged way
ビジネススキルを非常に有効に使い
06:33
to solve social problems.
社会問題を解決する人々です
06:36
People today we call social entrepreneurs.
今では社会起業家と呼ばれる人たちです
06:38
And to put a face on it, people like Muhammad Yunus,
たとえばグラミン銀行を興し
06:41
who started the Grameen Bank,
世界で一億人以上の人を貧困から救い
06:43
has lifted 100 million people plus out of poverty around the world,
ノーベル平和賞を受賞した
06:45
won the Nobel Peace Prize.
モハメド・ユヌス氏です
06:49
But there's also a lot of people that you don't know.
しかし、あまり知られていないたくさんの人たちもいます
06:50
Folks like Ann Cotton, who started a group called CAMFED in Africa,
たとえばアン・コットン:彼女はアフリカの女性の教育が
06:53
because she felt girls' education was lagging.
切り詰められていると感じ、CAMFEDという組織を起こし
06:57
And she started it about 10 years ago,
すでに10年が経ちますが
07:00
and today, she educates over a quarter million African girls.
これまでに25万人以上のアフリカの女性を教育しています
07:02
And somebody like Dr. Victoria Hale,
あるいはヴィクトリア・ヘール博士
07:07
who started the world's first nonprofit pharmaceutical company,
彼女は世界で始めて、非営利の製薬会社を起こし
07:10
and whose first drug will be fighting visceral leishmaniasis,
最初の製品は「黒熱病」と呼ばれる内臓リーシュマニア症の
07:13
also known as black fever.
治療薬でした
07:19
And by 2010, she hopes to eliminate this disease,
彼女は2010年には、開発途上国では大きな苦悩であった
07:21
which is really a scourge in the developing world.
この病気を根絶できると考えています
07:24
And so this is one way to bet
これが、良い人の良い行いへの
07:27
on good people doing good things.
私の賭けなのです
07:29
And a lot of this comes together in a philosophy of change
これら多くの例が重なって、改革の精神になっており
07:30
that I find really is powerful.
非常に強力なことだと思います
07:34
It's what we call, "Invest, connect and celebrate."
これが「投資し、結びつけ、称賛する」ということです
07:38
And invest: if you see good people doing good things,
投資―良い人々が良い行いをしていたら、
07:40
invest in them. Invest in their organizations,
それに投資して下さい 彼らの組織や
07:43
or in business. Invest in these folks.
ビジネスに、そういう人たちに投資してください
07:45
Connecting them together through conferences --
TEDや、私の基金が毎年オックスフォードで
07:48
like a TED -- brings so many powerful connections,
開催している「社会起業家世界会議」などの場で
07:50
or through the World Forum on Social Entrepreneurship
彼らを結びつけることで
07:53
that my foundation does at Oxford every year.
非常にたくさんの強力なコネクションが生まれます
07:56
And celebrate them: tell their stories,
そして彼らの物語を話し、称賛して下さい
07:59
because not only are there good people doing good work,
なぜなら良い人々は良い行いをするだけでなく
08:02
but their stories can help close these gaps of hope.
彼らの物語が希望格差を減らすことになるからです
08:04
And it was this last part of the mission, the celebrate part,
私の使命の最後の部分の「称賛」は
08:09
that really got me back to thinking when I was a kid
まさに、私が子供の頃、我々全てに影響する問題に、
08:12
and wanted to tell stories to get people involved
物語で人々の関心を集めたいと思っていたことを
08:16
in the issues that affect us all.
思い出させました
08:18
And a light bulb went off,
そしてひらめきました
08:20
which was, first, that I didn't actually have to do the writing myself, I could find writers.
一つ:私は自分で物語を書く必要ななく、作家を探せばいい
08:22
And then the next light bulb was, better than just writing,
二つ目のひらめき:ただ本にするよりも
08:27
what about film and TV, to get out to people in a big way?
映画やテレビにしたほうが人々の関心を惹くのじゃないか?
08:30
And I thought about the films that inspired me,
私は自分が影響を受けた映画について考えました
08:34
films like "Gandhi" and "Schindler's List."
「ガンジー」や「シンドラーのリスト」などです
08:36
And I wondered who was doing these kinds of films today.
そして、現在こういう仕事をしているのは誰だろうと考えました
08:39
And there really wasn't a specific company
そして、公衆の利益に関心を寄せている会社は
08:42
that was focused on the public interest.
実際は存在しなかったのです
08:45
So, in 2003, I started to make my way around Los Angeles
そこで2003年、私はロサンジェルスを歩き回り
08:48
to talk about the idea of a pro-social media company
社会問題に特化したメディア会社というアイデアを話して回りましたが
08:53
and I was met with a lot of encouragement.
たくさんの激励を受けました
08:56
One of the lines of encouragement
そういった激励の中で
08:59
that I heard over and over was,
よく耳にしたのは
09:02
"The streets of Hollywood are littered with the carcasses of people like you,
「ハリウッドの通りは君みたいな人の死骸でいっぱいだ
09:04
who think you're going to come to this town and make movies."
君がここまできて映画を作ると誰が思うんだ?」でした
09:08
And then of course, there was the other adage.
もちろん他の言い伝えもありました
09:11
"The surest way to become a millionaire
「百万長者になるには
09:13
is to start by being a billionaire and go into the movie business."
億万長者になってから映画の世界に入ることだ」
09:15
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:18
Undeterred, in January of 2004, I started Participant Productions
ひるまずに私は2004年にParticipantプロダクションを起こしました
09:20
with the vision to be a global media company
公衆の利益に目を向けた
09:25
focused on the public interest.
世界規模のメディア会社というビジョンでした
09:28
And our mission is to produce entertainment
私達の使命は、社会の変化を創発するような
09:30
that creates and inspires social change.
娯楽映画を作ることでした
09:32
And we don't just want people to see our movies
観客が私たちの映画を見て
09:34
and say, that was fun, and forget about it.
「面白かったね」と言って、あと忘れてほしくなかったのです
09:37
We want them to actually get involved in the issues.
彼らに、そのあと実際に問題にかかわってほしかったのです
09:39
In 2005, we launched our first slate of films,
2005年に私たちは第一弾の映画を開始しました
09:42
"Murder Ball," "North Country," "Syriana"
「マーダーボール」「スタンドアップ」「シリアナ」
09:45
and "Good Night and Good Luck."
それと「グッドナイト&グッドラック」です
09:48
And much to my surprise, they were noticed.
驚いたことに、それらは注目されました
09:49
We ended up with 11 Oscar nominations for these films.
そして11のオスカーにノミネートされ
09:52
And it turned out to be a pretty good year for this guy.
この人物にはとてもよい年になりました
09:56
Perhaps more importantly,
おそらくより重要なのは
09:59
tens of thousands of people joined the advocacy programs
何万人もの人々が、我々が映画をめぐって作った
10:00
and the activism programs
支援プログラムや行動プログラムに
10:04
that we created to go around the movies.
参加したことでしょう
10:06
And we had an online component of that,
私たちはまたそのオンライン版
10:08
our community sect called Participate.net.
Participate.netも作りました
10:11
But with our social sector partners, like the ACLU and PBS and the
しかし、我々の社会部門のパートナーであるACLU,PBS,
10:13
Sierra Club and the NRDC, once people saw the film,
シェラクラブやNRDCのおかげで、人々は映画を観たあと
10:18
there was actually something they could do to make a difference.
世界を変えるために具体的な行動ができたのです
10:21
One of these films in particular, called "North Country," was actually
このような映画のひとつが「スタンドアップ」で
10:25
kind of a box office disaster.
興行的には失敗でした
10:31
But it was a film that starred Charlize Theron
しかし、シャーリーズ・セロン主演のこの映画は
10:33
and it was about women's rights, women's empowerment,
女性の権利、女性の福祉向上、家庭内暴力などを
10:36
domestic violence and so on.
扱っていました
10:39
And we released the film at the same time that
その映画は議会が「女性に対する暴力対策法」の更改を
10:41
the Congress was debating the renewal of the Violence Against Women Act.
審議している最中に公開されました
10:44
And with screenings on the Hill, and discussions,
そして全国婦人協会などの
10:49
and with our social sector partners,
パートナーとの連携による
10:52
like the National Organization of Women,
議会での上映や議論によって
10:54
the film was widely credited
その映画は、法律の更改を成功に
10:57
with influencing the successful renewal of the act.
導く効果があったと評価されました
10:59
And that to me, spoke volumes, because it's --
それは私には大きな意味がありました―なぜなら
11:03
the film started about a true-life story
その映画は実話に基づくからです
11:07
about a woman who was harassed, sued her employer,
虐待され、雇用主を訴え、
11:09
led to a landmark case that led to the Equal Opportunity Act,
機会均等法および女性に対する暴力禁止法の成立へと導いた
11:13
and the Violence Against Women Act and others.
記念碑的判例についてのものだったからです
11:16
And then the movie about this person doing these things,
そしてこの人物がこういうことをして
11:18
then led to this greater renewal.
より大きな更改を得たのです
11:21
And so again,
これもまた
11:25
it goes back to betting on good people doing good things.
良い人の良い行いに賭けることになっているのです
11:26
Speaking of which, our fellow TEDster, Al --
関連して、我らが仲間のTEDster アル・ゴアについて
11:30
I first saw Al do his slide show presentation
アルと私は2005年の地球温暖化に関するスライド
11:33
on global warming in May of 2005.
プレゼンテーションで初めて会いました
11:36
At that point, I thought I knew something about global warming.
その頃私は地球温暖化は
11:40
I thought it was a 30 to 50 year problem.
30年から50年先のことだと思っていました
11:43
And after we saw his slide show,
彼のスライドショーを見た後では
11:45
it became clear that it was much more urgent.
それがもっと差し迫っているとわかりました
11:47
And so right afterwards, I met backstage with Al, and
それで、すぐあとで、私は舞台裏でアルや
11:50
with Lawrence Bender, who was there, and Laurie David,
そこにいたローレンス・ベンダーやローリー・デビッド、
11:54
and Davis Guggenheim,
それにParticipantでドキュメンタリーを撮っていた
11:56
who was running documentaries for Participant at the time.
デイヴィス・グッゲンハイムらと会いました
11:58
And with Al's blessing, we decided on the spot to turn it into a film,
そしてアルの承認を得て、我々はその場でそれを映画にすることにしました
12:02
because we felt that we could get the message out there
その方がアルが世界のあちこちに出かけて
12:06
far more quickly than having Al go around the world,
100人か200人そこらの人たちに話すよりは
12:09
speaking to audiences of 100 or 200 at a time.
もっと簡単にメッセージを拡げられると思ったからです
12:13
And you know, there's another adage in Hollywood,
ご存知のように、ハリウッドにはもう一つの格言があります
12:15
that nobody knows nothing about anything.
「誰も何についても何も知らない」です
12:18
And I really thought this was going to be
そして私は、この映画はすぐにPBSへ回される
12:20
a straight-to-PBS charitable initiative.
慈善のようなものと思っていました
12:22
And so it was a great shock to all of us
ところが、私たちにショックだったのは
12:26
when the film really captured the public interest,
その映画が大衆の関心を捉え
12:29
and today is mandatory viewing in schools in England and Scotland,
イギリスとスコットランドとスカンジナビアでは学校での
12:32
and most of Scandinavia.
必須視聴科目になったのです
12:36
We've sent 50,000 DVDs to high school teachers in the U.S.
我々は5万本のDVDを全米の高校教師に送り
12:38
and it's really changed the debate on global warming.
地球温暖化の議論を変えて行きました
12:44
It was also a pretty good year for this guy.
この人物にとってはとても良い年になり
12:48
We now call Al the George Clooney of global warming.
アルは「地球温暖化のジョージ・クルーニー」と呼ばれています
12:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:53
And for Participant, this is just the start.
Participantにとってはこれが出発点でした
12:55
Everything we do looks at the major issues in the world.
我々のすることは世界の主要な問題を見据えており
12:59
And we have 10 films in production right now,
現在Participantは10本の映画の製作を進めており
13:01
and dozens others in development.
他に企画中のものが数十本あります
13:04
I'll quickly talk about a few coming up.
近日公開のいくつかについて簡単にお話しします
13:07
One is "Charlie Wilson's War," with Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts.
一つは「チャーリー・ウィルソンズ・ウォー」でトム・ハンクスと
13:09
And it's the true story of Congressman Charlie Wilson, and
ジュリア・ロバーツ主演、実在の上院議員チャーリー・ウィルソンが
13:13
how he funded the Taliban to fight the Russians in Afghanistan.
アフガニスタンでロシアと戦うためにいかにタリバンに出資したかを描きます
13:16
And we're also doing a movie called "The Kite Runner,"
「君のためなら千回でも」は、書籍「カイトランナー」に
13:21
based on the book "The Kite Runner," also about Afghanistan.
基づく、同じくアフガニスタンに関する映画です
13:23
And we think once people see these films,
映画を見ると、人々は
13:27
they'll have a much better understanding of that part of the world
中東の全般とアフガニスタンに関してよりよい理解が
13:28
and the Middle East in general.
できるようになるでしょう
13:31
We premiered a film called "The Chicago 10" at Sundance this year.
我々はサンダンス映画祭で「The Chicago 10」のプレミア上映を行いました
13:33
It's based on the protesters at the Democratic Convention in 1968,
それは1968年、民主党大会で反戦デモを行ったアビー・ホフマンと
13:37
Abby Hoffman and crew,
仲間の話です
13:41
and, again, a story about a small group of individuals
これもまた世界を変えた、少人数の
13:43
who did make change in the world.
グループの話です
13:47
And a documentary that we're doing on Jimmy Carter
さらに、ジミー・カーター氏と彼の長年にわたる
13:49
and his Mid-East peace efforts over the years.
中東和平のドキュメンタリーもあります
13:53
And in particular, we've been following him on his recent book tour,
特に、彼の最近の著書出版ツアーをフォローしているのですが
13:55
which, as many of you know, has been very non-controversial --
ご存じのとおりまったく話題にも上らないので
14:00
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:03
-- which is really bad for getting people to come see a movie.
映画のプロモーションにはなっていません
14:04
In closing, I'd like to say that everybody has the opportunity
最後に私は、だれでも自分なりの方法で世界を変える
14:07
to make change in their own way.
チャンスがあると言いたいと思います
14:11
And all the people in this room
この部屋にいる全ての人たちは
14:13
have done so through their business lives,
それぞれのビジネスライフ、慈善活動などの分野で
14:16
or their philanthropic work, or their other interests.
それを実行した人たちです
14:18
And one thing that I've learned
そして私が学んだことは、世界を変えるのは
14:22
is that there's never one right way to make change.
一つの正しい方法だけではない、ということです
14:24
One can do it as a tech person, or as a finance person,
誰でも技術分野、財政分野、
14:26
or a nonprofit person, or as an entertainment person,
非営利分野、エンタメ分野などの
14:29
but every one of us is all of those things and more.
どの分野でもほかのどんなことでもできるのです
14:33
And I believe if we do these things,
そして私たちがそのようなことを実行すれば
14:37
we can close the opportunity gaps, we can close the hope gaps.
機会格差をなくし、希望格差をなくし、
14:40
And I can imagine, if we do this,
そしてそれらが達成されれば
14:44
the headlines in 10 years might read something like these:
10年後の新聞の見出しはこんな感じのものになるでしょう:
14:46
"New AIDS Cases in Africa Fall to Zero,"
「アフリカの新規のAIDS症例数、ゼロに」
14:51
"U.S. Imports its Last Barrel of Oil" --
「米国、最後の石油の輸入を終了」
14:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:57
-- "Israelis and Palestinians Celebrate
「イスラエルとパレスチナ、
14:59
10 Years of Peaceful Coexistence."
平和共存10年を祝う」
15:03
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:05
And I like this one, "Snow Has Returned to Kilimanjaro."
これいいよね「キリマンジャロに冠雪戻る」
15:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
15:10
And finally, an eBay listing for one well-traveled slide show,
最後に、eBayリストにあるよく知られたスライドショー
15:13
now obsolete, museum piece. Please contact Al Gore.
もう古くなって博物館入りなんですが―アル・ゴアに連絡してください
15:19
And I believe that, working together,
そして、我々は協同することで
15:25
we can make all of these things happen.
これら全てを実現可能だと信じています
15:28
And I want to thank you all for having me here today.
今日ここに呼んでくださってありがとう
15:30
It's been a real honor. Thank you.
とても名誉なことです ありがとう
15:32
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:33
Oh, thank you.
おお、ありがとう
15:36
Translator:Masahiro Kyushima
Reviewer:Wataru Narita

sponsored links

Jeff Skoll - Producer
Jeff Skoll was the first president of eBay; he used his dot-com fortune to found the film house Participant Productions, making movies to inspire social change, including Syriana; Good Night, and Good Luck; Murderball; An Inconvenient Truth ...

Why you should listen

Jeff Skoll was eBay's employee number 2 and president number 1. He left with a comfortable fortune and a desire to spend his money helping others.

The Skoll Foundation, established in 1999, invests in, connects and celebrates social entrepreneurs -- offering grants to people who build businesses, schools and services for communities in need. Every year, it presents the Skoll World Forum on Social Entrepreneurship at Oxford, and runs Social Edge, a networking site for social entrepreneurs.

His production company, Participant Productions, is what Skoll calls a "pro-social media company," making features and documentaries that address social and political issues and drive real change. His film North Country, for example, is credited with influencing the signing of the 2005 Violence Against Women Act. Participant's blockbuster doc, An Inconvenient Truth, is required viewing in classrooms around the world, and has unquestionably changed the debate around climate change. Other Participant films include The Kite RunnerThe VisitorFood Inc.The Cove, and the recent Earth Day release, Oceans.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.