13:50
TEDxCaltech

Colin Camerer: Neuroscience, game theory, monkeys

コリン・キャメラー: 神経科学、ゲーム理論とサル

Filmed:

ある2人が交渉をしているとき―それが競争か協力であるかを問わず―彼らの頭の中では、いったい何が起こっているのでしょうか? 行動経済学者 コリン・キャメラーは、我々がどれだけ他人の考えを予測できないかを示した研究を紹介します。さらに、チンパンジーが人間よりも優れているとの予想外の調査結果も提示します。 (TEDxCalTechにて収録)

- Behavioral economist
Colin Camerer is a leading behavioral economist who studies the psychological and neural bases of choice and strategic decision-making. Full bio

I'm going to talk about the strategizing brain.
今日は 戦略を練る脳についてお話します
00:12
We're going to use an unusual combination of tools
ここでは ゲーム理論と神経科学という
00:14
from game theory and neuroscience
変わった組み合わせを用いて
00:17
to understand how people interact socially when value is on the line.
利害が絡むとき人々が
社会的にどう相互作用するかを理解します
00:19
So game theory is a branch of, originally, applied mathematics,
ゲーム理論は 元々応用数学の一分野で
00:22
used mostly in economics and political science, a little bit in biology,
ほとんどが経済学と政治科学で
ごく一部 生物学で 使われます
00:26
that gives us a mathematical taxonomy of social life
ゲーム理論は
社会行動の数学的分類を可能にし
00:28
and it predicts what people are likely to do
行動が他人に影響を与え合うとき
00:32
and believe others will do
人がどのように行動をし
00:34
in cases where everyone's actions affect everyone else.
他人がどう行動すると考えるかを
予想するものです
00:35
That's a lot of things: competition, cooperation, bargaining,
色々な状況が当てはまります
競争 協力 交渉―
00:38
games like hide-and-seek, and poker.
かくれんぼや ポーカーといったゲームもそうです
00:42
Here's a simple game to get us started.
まずは この単純なゲームから始めましょう
00:45
Everyone chooses a number from zero to 100,
各人 0から100の中から数字を一つ選びます
00:48
we're going to compute the average of those numbers,
それらの数字を計算して平均値を出し
00:50
and whoever's closest to two-thirds of the average wins a fixed prize.
その平均値の2/3に
最も近かった人が賞をもらえます
00:52
So you want to be a little bit below the average number,
つまり平均よりやや低めを狙いたいわけです
00:56
but not too far below, and everyone else wants to be
小さすぎではダメで
他の人も 同じように
00:59
a little bit below the average number as well.
平均より少し小さめの数字にします
01:01
Think about what you might pick.
あなたなら どの数字にしますか
01:03
As you're thinking, this is a toy model of something like
これは上昇している市場における株の売却の
01:05
selling in the stock market during a rising market. Right?
簡易モデルみたいなものですよね
01:09
You don't want to sell too early, because you miss out on profits,
利益もほしいので
あまり早く売りたくはない
01:11
but you don't want to wait too late
だけど 待ちすぎると
01:14
to when everyone else sells, triggering a crash.
みんなが売ってしまって 値崩れしてしまう
01:16
You want to be a little bit ahead of the competition, but not too far ahead.
相手の一歩先を行きたいけれど
先を行き過ぎてもいけない
01:18
Okay, here's two theories about how people might think about this,
このときの人々の思考について
2つの理論があります
01:21
and then we'll see some data.
あとで データも見ましょう
01:25
Some of these will sound familiar because you probably are
みなさんが思い当たる考え方もあるでしょう
01:26
thinking that way. I'm using my brain theory to see.
あなた自身がそう考えているからです
私の脳の理論でそれが見えます
01:28
A lot of people say, "I really don't know what people are going to pick,
多くの人はこう考えるでしょう
「他人がどの数を選ぶか 見当もつかない
01:32
so I think the average will be 50."
だから平均は50になるだろう」
01:35
They're not being really strategic at all.
これは ちっとも戦略的ではありません
01:37
"And I'll pick two-thirds of 50. That's 33." That's a start.
「そこで 50の2/3の数を選ぶね つまり 33だ」
これが第一歩です
01:39
Other people who are a little more sophisticated,
もう少し知恵のはたらく人なら
01:42
using more working memory,
作業記憶を使ってこう言います
01:44
say, "I think people will pick 33 because they're going to pick a response to 50,
「みんな 50を平均と考えて 33を選ぶはず
01:46
and so I'll pick 22, which is two-thirds of 33."
だから 私は 33の2/3である22にする」
01:49
They're doing one extra step of thinking, two steps.
彼らは もう1段階 考えを進めて
2段階を踏みました
01:52
That's better. And of course, in principle,
よりよいですね
もちろん 原理上―
01:55
you could do three, four or more,
3段階 4段階 それ以上もできます
01:57
but it starts to get very difficult.
でも そうなると難しくなってきます
01:59
Just like in language and other domains, we know that it's hard for people to parse
言語やその他の分野で
再帰的な構造を持つ複雑な文章を
02:01
very complex sentences with a kind of recursive structure.
文法的に説明するのが
難しいのと同じことです
02:04
This is called a cognitive hierarchy theory, by the way.
これは 認知階層理論と呼ばれていて
02:07
It's something that I've worked on and a few other people,
私と数名が取り組んできたもので
02:09
and it indicates a kind of hierarchy along with
ある仮定のもと
どの段階まで人が思考するか
02:12
some assumptions about how many people stop at different steps
多くの興味深い条件や被験者を
変えることで
02:14
and how the steps of thinking are affected
その思考段階がどう影響されるかにつき
02:16
by lots of interesting variables and variant people, as we'll see in a minute.
ある種の階層を提示します
あとでお見せします
02:18
A very different theory, a much more popular one, and an older one,
これとは全然違って
もっと人気があって 古い理論があります
02:22
due largely to John Nash of "A Beautiful Mind" fame,
「ビューティフル・マインド」の
ジョン・ナッシュで有名になったもので
02:25
is what's called equilibrium analysis.
均衡分析と言われているものです
02:29
So if you've ever taken a game theory course at any level,
ゲーム理論の授業を受けたことがある人なら
02:31
you will have learned a little bit about this.
誰でもこの理論について習う筈です
02:33
An equilibrium is a mathematical state in which everybody
均衡とは 全員がお互いが何をするか
02:35
has figured out exactly what everyone else will do.
完全に把握している
数学的な状態のことを指します
02:38
It is a very useful concept, but behaviorally,
とても便利な概念ですが
02:40
it may not exactly explain what people do
こうした経済ゲームを初めてやる場合や
02:42
the first time they play these types of economic games
現実の世界において
人々がどんな行動をとるか
02:44
or in situations in the outside world.
これで 正確に説明できるとは限りません
02:47
In this case, the equilibrium makes a very bold prediction,
先ほどのゲームの例では この理論は
02:49
which is everyone wants to be below everyone else,
誰もが他人より低い数を選ぶため
02:52
therefore they'll play zero.
皆ゼロを選択するという大胆な予測をします
02:55
Let's see what happens. This experiment's been done many, many times.
実際はどうか見てみましょう
この実験は何度も行われています
02:57
Some of the earliest ones were done in the '90s
最も古い実験のいくつかは 90年代に
03:00
by me and Rosemarie Nagel and others.
私と ローズマリー・ネーゲルらが行いました
03:02
This is a beautiful data set of 9,000 people who wrote in
3つの新聞・雑誌が開催した
コンテストに参加した
03:04
to three newspapers and magazines that had a contest.
9,000 人からなる美しいデータセットです
03:07
The contest said, send in your numbers
参加者は好きな数字を投稿し
03:10
and whoever is close to two-thirds of the average will win a big prize.
平均値の 2/3 にもっとも近い人が
賞を獲得します
03:12
And as you can see, there's so much data here, you can see the spikes very visibly.
データを見て分かる通り
いくつかのはっきりとした山があります
03:15
There's a spike at 33. Those are people doing one step.
33で ひとつの山がありますね
1段階だけ思考を進めた人たちです
03:18
There is another spike visible at 22.
そして 次の山は 22で見えます
03:22
And notice, by the way, that most people pick numbers right around there.
ほとんどの人は
この前後の数を選んでいます
03:24
They don't necessarily pick exactly 33 and 22.
33や22 ちょうどを選択するとは
限らないのです
03:27
There's something a little bit noisy around it.
このあたりは バラバラですが
03:29
But you can see those spikes, and they're there.
山があるのも事実です
03:31
There's another group of people who seem to have
均衡分析を充実に守った
グループもいて
03:33
a firm grip on equilibrium analysis,
均衡分析を忠実に守った
グループもいて
03:34
because they're picking zero or one.
彼らは0 か 1 を選んでいます
03:36
But they lose, right?
でも 彼らは負けましたね?
03:39
Because picking a number that low is actually a bad choice
全員が同様に均衡分析をするとは
限らないのに
03:41
if other people aren't doing equilibrium analysis as well.
それだけ小さい数字を選ぶのは
悪い選択なのです
03:44
So they're smart, but poor.
だから 彼らは賢いけれど 貧しいのです
03:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:49
Where are these things happening in the brain?
これらは
脳のどこで起きているんでしょう?
03:51
One study by Coricelli and Nagel gives a really sharp, interesting answer.
コリセッリとネーゲルの研究が
とても鋭く 面白い答えをくれます
03:53
So they had people play this game
彼らは 被験者をfMRIで測定しながら
03:57
while they were being scanned in an fMRI,
2つの異なる条件下において
03:58
and two conditions: in some trials,
このゲームをプレーしてもらったのです
04:01
they're told you're playing another person
ある条件では 同時に別の人間と
対戦していて
04:03
who's playing right now and we're going to match up
ある条件では 同時に別の人間と
対戦していて
04:04
your behavior at the end and pay you if you win.
勝てば賞金を払うと 説明されます
04:06
In the other trials, they're told, you're playing a computer.
別の条件では ランダムの数字を選ぶ
04:08
They're just choosing randomly.
コンピュータを相手と告げられます
04:10
So what you see here is a subtraction
ここで見ているのは
04:12
of areas in which there's more brain activity
コンピュータ相手のときよりも
04:14
when you're playing people compared to playing the computer.
人間相手で脳の活動が増えている場所です
04:17
And you see activity in some regions we've seen today,
活動がある場所は ご覧の通り―
04:20
medial prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial, however, up here,
内側前頭前皮質 背内側部
それと 上のここ
04:22
ventromedial prefrontal cortex,
前頭前野腹内側部
04:25
anterior cingulate, an area that's involved
前帯状領域です
ここは
04:27
in lots of types of conflict resolution, like if you're playing "Simon Says,"
「船長さんの命令」のようなゲームにおける
問題解決プロセスと関係します
04:28
and also the right and left temporoparietal junction.
それから 左右の側頭頭頂接合部もあります
04:32
And these are all areas which are fairly reliably known
これらは全て 「心の理論」回路や
04:36
to be part of what's called a "theory of mind" circuit,
「心理化回路」の一部として
04:38
or "mentalizing circuit."
よく知られています
04:40
That is, it's a circuit that's used to imagine what other people might do.
つまり それは 他人の行動を推測するのに
使われる回路です
04:42
So these were some of the first studies to see this
これらは
この回路とゲーム理論を結びつけた
04:46
tied in to game theory.
最初の研究でした
04:48
What happens with these one- and two-step types?
思考が1段階か2段階かで
何が違うのでしょう?
04:50
So we classify people by what they picked,
どの戦略を選んだかで被験者を分類し
04:52
and then we look at the difference between
相手が 人かコンピュータかで
04:54
playing humans versus playing computers,
脳のどこが活動しているか
04:56
which brain areas are differentially active.
違いを見てみます
04:58
On the top you see the one-step players.
上側は 1段階のプレーヤーです
05:00
There's almost no difference.
ほぼ違いはありません
05:01
The reason is, they're treating other people like a computer, and the brain is too.
彼ら自身も 脳も
他人をコンピュータと同様に扱うからです
05:03
The bottom players, you see all the activity in dorsomedial PFC.
下側は 背内側部前頭前皮質で
活動があります
05:06
So we know that those two-step players are doing something differently.
2段階思考の人は
違う形で動いているのです
05:10
Now if you were to step back and say, "What can we do with this information?"
さて 一歩離れて
「この情報で何ができるのか?」と言うと
05:12
you might be able to look at brain activity and say,
脳の活動から こう言えるかもしれません
05:15
"This person's going to be a good poker player,"
「この人はポーカーがうまそう」
05:17
or, "This person's socially naive,"
「この人は 世間知らずだ」 と
05:19
and we might also be able to study things
この回路の場所が分かれば
05:20
like development of adolescent brains
思春期の脳の発達などについても
05:22
once we have an idea of where this circuitry exists.
研究をすることができるかもしれません
05:23
Okay. Get ready.
よろしい
では 行きますよ
05:27
I'm saving you some brain activity,
あなたの脳が活動する手間を省いてあげます
05:29
because you don't need to use your hair detector cells.
髪の有無を検知する細胞を使う必要はないでしょう
05:31
You should use those cells to think carefully about this game.
この細胞を使って
このゲームについてよく考えてください
05:34
This is a bargaining game.
これは 交渉ゲームです
05:37
Two players who are being scanned using EEG electrodes
2人の被験者は
脳波図電極を使って測定されながら
05:39
are going to bargain over one to six dollars.
1~6ドルを分配する交渉をします
05:42
If they can do it in 10 seconds, they're going to actually earn that money.
10秒で決められれば
その額のお金をもらえます
05:45
If 10 seconds goes by and they haven't made a deal, they get nothing.
10秒たって 交渉が成立しなければ
お互い何ももらえません
05:47
That's kind of a mistake together.
これは どっちにとっても間違いですね
05:50
The twist is that one player, on the left,
違うのは 一方のプレーヤー
ここでは左側の方だけが
05:52
is informed about how much on each trial there is.
各実験で分配する金額を
知っています
05:55
They play lots of trials with different amounts each time.
彼らは違う金額で何度もプレイします
05:57
In this case, they know there's four dollars.
例えば 分配金が4 ドルのとき
06:00
The uninformed player doesn't know,
情報を持たないプレーヤーは
知りませんが
06:02
but they know that the informed player knows.
他方のプレーヤーが
知っていることは知っています
06:04
So the uninformed player's challenge is to say,
情報を持たないプレーヤーは
こう考えます
06:06
"Is this guy really being fair
「相手は本当に公平なのか
06:08
or are they giving me a very low offer
それとも 1 ドルか2ドルしかないと
06:09
in order to get me to think that there's only one or two dollars available to split?"
思わせて
低い分け前をオファーしているのか?」
06:11
in which case they might reject it and not come to a deal.
後者の場合はオファーを拒否して交渉不成立に
なるかもしれません
06:14
So there's some tension here between trying to get the most money
ですから できるだけ多くのお金を得ることと
06:17
but trying to goad the other player into giving you more.
相手からお金を引き出すこととの間で
緊張があります
06:20
And the way they bargain is to point on a number line
交渉のやり方は
0から6までの数直線上で
06:23
that goes from zero to six dollars,
数字を指差すというもので
06:25
and they're bargaining over how much the uninformed player gets,
情報を持たないプレーヤーが
何ドル得るか交渉し
06:27
and the informed player's going to get the rest.
情報を持つプレーヤーが
残りを取ります
06:30
So this is like a management-labor negotiation
これは労使間交渉に似ています
06:32
in which the workers don't know how much profits
株式非公開の会社の場合
従業員は
06:34
the privately held company has, right,
会社の利益を知りませんが
06:37
and they want to maybe hold out for more money,
できるだけ多くの報酬を引き出すよう
交渉します
06:40
but the company might want to create the impression
一方 会社は従業員に対して
06:42
that there's very little to split: "I'm giving you the most that I can."
利益は少なく
「精一杯分配している」印象を与えたいのです
06:44
First some behavior. So a bunch of the subject pairs, they play face to face.
まず ある行動を見ましょう
ある被験者ペアーには 対面でプレーさせます
06:47
We have some other data where they play across computers.
他のグループはコンピュータを介して
プレーさせます
06:51
That's an interesting difference, as you might imagine.
ご想像の通り 面白い違いがあります
06:53
But a bunch of the face-to-face pairs
対面のペアーのいくつかは
06:55
agree to divide the money evenly every single time.
毎回 均等にお金を分けることに合意しました
06:57
Boring. It's just not interesting neurally.
つまらないですね
神経学的に面白くないです
07:00
It's good for them. They make a lot of money.
まあ 彼らにとってはよいことです
たくさんお金を得られますから
07:03
But we're interested in, can we say something about
ただ 我々の関心は 言うなれば
07:06
when disagreements occur versus don't occur?
不一致があるときと そうでないときの差にあります
07:09
So this is the other group of subjects who often disagree.
彼らは 言い争って合意できず
結局 少ないお金しか
07:11
So they have a chance of -- they bicker and disagree
得られないことがありました
07:13
and end up with less money.
結局 少ないお金しか得られないことがありました
07:16
They might be eligible to be on "Real Housewives," the TV show.
彼らは リアリティ番組「妻たちの真実」に
出演できるかもしれません
07:18
You see on the left,
左を見てください
07:21
when the amount to divide is one, two or three dollars,
分ける金額が1~3ドルのとき
07:23
they disagree about half the time,
半分くらいは 合意できていません
07:26
and when the amount is four, five, six, they agree quite often.
4~6ドルでは
かなり頻繁に合意できています
07:28
This turns out to be something that's predicted
これは あるとても複雑なゲーム理論が
07:30
by a very complicated type of game theory
予想した結果に合致します
07:32
you should come to graduate school at CalTech and learn about.
カリフォルニア工科大学大学院で
勉強しないといけなくらい
07:34
It's a little too complicated to explain right now,
ここで説明するには 少し複雑すぎますが―
07:37
but the theory tells you that this shape kind of should occur.
この理論が言わんとするのは
この形になるということです
07:39
Your intuition might tell you that too.
直感的にも そう思われるでしょう
07:42
Now I'm going to show you the results from the EEG recording.
さて 脳波検査記録の結果をお見せします
07:45
Very complicated. The right brain schematic
とても複雑です
右側の脳の回路は―
07:47
is the uninformed person, and the left is the informed.
情報を持たない人のもので
左は情報を持つ人のです
07:49
Remember that we scanned both brains at the same time,
私たちは 同時に両方の脳を計測をしたので
07:52
so we can ask about time-synced activity
類似したあるいは異なる脳領域での活動を
07:55
in similar or different areas simultaneously,
時間を同期して見ることができます
07:57
just like if you wanted to study a conversation
ちょうど 会話について研究するのに
08:00
and you were scanning two people talking to each other
互いに話をしている2名を計測して
08:03
and you'd expect common activity in language regions
実際に 聞いたり 意思疎通を図っているときに
08:05
when they're actually kind of listening and communicating.
言語野における共通の動きを期待するようなものです
08:07
So the arrows connect regions that are active at the same time,
ですから 矢印は同時に活動がある場所を
結んでいますが―
08:09
and the direction of the arrows flows
矢印の向きは
08:13
from the region that's active first in time,
最初にアクティブになった場所から出ていて
08:15
and the arrowhead goes to the region that's active later.
そのあとにアクティブになった場所に向かっています
08:18
So in this case, if you look carefully,
ですから このケースでは よく見ると
08:21
most of the arrows flow from right to left.
ほとんどの矢印が右から左に向かっています
08:24
That is, it looks as if the uninformed brain activity
つまり 情報を持たない脳の活動が
08:25
is happening first,
先に起こって
08:29
and then it's followed by activity in the informed brain.
それから 情報を持っている方の脳が
活動しているのです
08:31
And by the way, these were trials where their deals were made.
ところで これらは交渉が成立したときのものです
08:34
This is from the first two seconds.
これは 最初の2秒の状況です
08:38
We haven't finished analyzing this data,
このデータはまだ分析を終えていなくて
08:40
so we're still peeking in, but the hope is
まだ ちらっと見ただけですが
最終的には―
08:42
that we can say something in the first couple of seconds
最初の2秒の動きを見て
交渉が成立するか
08:44
about whether they'll make a deal or not,
言えればと思っています
08:46
which could be very useful in thinking about avoiding litigation
それができれば 訴訟や
醜い離婚などを避けるのに―
08:48
and ugly divorces and things like that.
とても有益ですから
08:50
Those are all cases in which a lot of value is lost
これらは 全て 遅れや攻撃行為によって
08:52
by delay and strikes.
多くの価値が失われたときのものです
08:55
Here's the case where the disagreements occur.
これは 不一致がおこったときのものです
08:58
You can see it looks different than the one before.
前のと違うことがわかりますね
09:00
There's a lot more arrows.
より たくさんの矢印があります
09:02
That means that the brains are synced up
これは 脳が 同時活動の観点で
09:04
more closely in terms of simultaneous activity,
より密接にシンクロしていることを意味します
09:06
and the arrows flow clearly from left to right.
矢印も 明らかに左から右に流れています
09:08
That is, the informed brain seems to be deciding,
つまり 情報を持っている脳が
09:10
"We're probably not going to make a deal here."
「おそらく 交渉は成立しないだろう」と決めて
09:12
And then later there's activity in the uninformed brain.
そのあとで 情報を持たない脳で
活動が起きています
09:15
Next I'm going to introduce you to some relatives.
次に 私たちの親戚を紹介しましょう
09:18
They're hairy, smelly, fast and strong.
毛深くて 臭くて 速くてて強いものです
09:20
You might be thinking back to your last Thanksgiving.
感謝祭の日を思い出しているかもしれませんし
09:23
Maybe if you had a chimpanzee with you.
チンパンジーが一緒だったかもしれません
09:26
Charles Darwin and I and you broke off from the family tree
チャールズ・ダーウィンと私とあなたは
約500万年前に
09:29
from chimpanzees about five million years ago.
チンパンジーの系譜から離れました
09:32
They're still our closest genetic kin.
でも まだ遺伝子上は
最も近いものです
09:34
We share 98.8 percent of the genes.
98.8%の遺伝子は同じです
09:36
We share more genes with them than zebras do with horses.
シマウマと馬との間よりも
私たちは 遺伝子を共有していて
09:38
And we're also their closest cousin.
チンパンジーの
最も近い従兄弟です
09:41
They have more genetic relation to us than to gorillas.
チンパンジーは ゴリラよりも
私たちと遺伝子的関係が強いです
09:43
So how humans and chimpanzees behave differently
ですから 人間とチンパンジーの行動の差を見れば
09:46
might tell us a lot about brain evolution.
脳の進化について
多くのことが分かるかもしれないのです
09:48
So this is an amazing memory test
これは 素晴らしい記憶テストで
09:51
from Nagoya, Japan, Primate Research Institute,
日本の名古屋にある 霊長類研究所で行われたものです
09:53
where they've done a lot of this research.
ここでは この種の研究が多く行われています
09:56
This goes back quite a ways. They're interested in working memory.
これは かなり遡ります
彼らは 作業記憶に関心があります
09:58
The chimp is going to see, watch carefully,
よく見ていてください
チンパンジーは
10:00
they're going to see 200 milliseconds' exposure
200 ミリ秒間だけ写し出される
1~5の数字を見ています
10:02
— that's fast, that's eight movie frames —
200 ミリ秒間だけ写し出される
1~5の数字を見ています
10:04
of numbers one, two, three, four, five.
映画のコマ8つ分だけの長さです
10:06
Then they disappear and they're replaced by squares,
数字は消えて 四角に変わります
10:08
and they have to press the squares
チンパンジーたちは―
10:10
that correspond to the numbers from low to high
数の小さい順に
数字に対応した四角を押せば
10:12
to get an apple reward.
リンゴのご褒美をもらえます
10:14
Let's see how they can do it.
彼らがどうするか見てみましょう
10:15
This is a young chimp. The young ones
こちらは 若いチンパンジーです
10:28
are better than the old ones, just like humans.
人間同様 年老いているより
若い方が上手です
10:29
And they're highly experienced, so they've done this
彼らは 経験をかなり積んでいて
10:32
thousands and thousands of time.
何千回も これを行っています
10:34
Obviously there's a big training effect, as you can imagine.
ご想像の通り はっきりと
訓練の効果が見られます
10:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:39
You can see they're very blasé and kind of effortless.
とても 無関心に
簡単そうにしていますね
10:41
Not only can they do it very well, they do it in a sort of lazy way.
彼らはうまいだけではなくて
言わば だらけた感じでやってのけます
10:43
Right? Who thinks you could beat the chimps?
そうでしょう?
チンパンジーに勝てると思う人いますか?
10:47
Wrong. (Laughter)
無理ですよ(笑)
10:50
We can try. We'll try. Maybe we'll try.
試すことはできますね
まあ 頑張りましょう
10:52
Okay, so the next part of this study
さて この研究の次の部分は
10:54
I'm going to go quickly through
これから簡単に説明しますが
10:57
is based on an idea of Tetsuro Matsuzawa.
松沢哲郎氏のアイデアに基づいています
10:58
He had a bold idea that -- what he called the cognitive trade-off hypothesis.
彼は大胆な発想で
「知性のトレードオフ仮説」を立てました
11:01
We know chimps are faster and stronger.
チンパンジーは 素早く力強いですが
11:04
They're also very obsessed with status.
地位に関しても
強い執着心があります
11:05
His thought was, maybe they've preserved brain activities
松沢氏が考えたのは
チンパンジーは脳の活動を温存し
11:07
and they practice them in development
それを彼らにとって最重要である
11:10
that are really, really important to them
地位を 交渉して勝ち取るために
11:12
to negotiate status and to win,
使っているのではないかということです
11:14
which is something like strategic thinking during competition.
それは 競争における
戦略的思考のようなものです
11:16
So we're going to check that out
ここで チンパンジーに
11:19
by having the chimps actually play a game
2つのタッチスクリーンを触るゲームをさせて
11:21
by touching two touch screens.
確認してみましょう
11:23
The chimps are actually interacting with each other through the computers.
彼らは コンピュータを介して
作用し合っていて
11:26
They're going to press left or right.
スクリーンの左か右側を押します
11:28
One chimp is called a matcher.
一方のチンパンジーは「一致狙い」で
11:30
They win if they press left, left,
両方が左 または 右を押せば 勝ちです
11:32
like a seeker finding someone in hide-and-seek, or right, right.
かくれんぼで 鬼が誰かを探す感じです
11:34
The mismatcher wants to mismatch.
もう一方は「不一致狙い」で
11:37
They want to press the opposite screen of the chimp.
相手と反対側のスクリーンを
押すと勝ちです
11:38
And the rewards are apple cube rewards.
ご褒美は 角切りのりんご
11:41
So here's how game theorists look at these data.
ゲーム理論者は
このデータをこう見ます
11:44
This is a graph of the percentage of times
このグラフでは X軸に
11:47
the matcher picked right on the x-axis,
「一致狙い」のチンパンジーが右を選んだ割合を
11:48
and the percentage of times they predicted right
Y軸には「不一致狙い」の相手が
11:51
by the mismatcher on the y-axis.
右を選ぶことを正しく予測した割合を
表しています
11:52
So a point here is the behavior by a pair of players,
ゲームの要は プレーヤーの片方は一致を
11:55
one trying to match, one trying to mismatch.
もう片方は不一致を狙っているということです
11:58
The NE square in the middle -- actually NE, CH and QRE --
NE・CH・QREで記されている
中央の四角は
12:01
those are three different theories of Nash equilibrium, and others,
ナッシュ均衡およびその他の理論が
12:04
tells you what the theory predicts,
予測する地点を示しています
12:06
which is that they should match 50-50,
50-50となるべきということです
12:09
because if you play left too much, for example,
例えば 相手が左ばかりを押していれば
12:11
I can exploit that if I'm the mismatcher by then playing right.
「不一致狙い」は 右を押すことで
勝てるからです
12:13
And as you can see, the chimps, each chimp is one triangle,
各チンパンジーを三角で表していますが
12:16
are circled around, hovering around that prediction.
ご覧の通りみな予測された周辺にいますね
12:19
Now we move the payoffs.
次に 報酬を変えてみます
12:22
We're actually going to make the left, left payoff for the matcher a little bit higher.
「一致狙い」が左を押したときの
報酬を多くして
12:24
Now they get three apple cubes.
角切りリンゴを3個にします
12:28
Game theoretically, that should actually make the mismatcher's behavior shift,
ゲーム理論上 「不一致狙い」の行動は
変化するはずです
12:29
because what happens is, the mismatcher will think,
「不一致狙い」はこう考えるからです
12:32
oh, this guy's going to go for the big reward,
「相手は報酬が多い方にかけるだろう
12:34
and so I'm going to go to the right, make sure he doesn't get it.
自分は右にして
報酬が与えられないようにしよう」
12:35
And as you can see, their behavior moves up
ご覧のとおり 行動は ナッシュ均衡により
12:38
in the direction of this change in the Nash equilibrium.
この変化の方向に上昇します
12:40
Finally, we changed the payoffs one more time.
最後に もう1回 報酬を変えます
12:44
Now it's four apple cubes,
角切りリンゴ4個にします
12:46
and their behavior again moves towards the Nash equilibrium.
彼らの行動は
再び ナッシュ均衡に近づきます
12:47
It's sprinkled around, but if you average the chimps out,
点在はしていますが 平均すれば
12:49
they're really, really close, within .01.
.01以内で かなり近づいています
12:51
They're actually closer than any species we've observed.
私たちが観察した どんな種よりも近いです
12:53
What about humans? You think you're smarter than a chimpanzee?
人間はどうでしょう?
チンパンジーよりも賢いでしょうか?
12:57
Here's two human groups in green and blue.
ここに 緑と青で示した
二つの人間の集団があります
13:00
They're closer to 50-50. They're not responding to payoffs as closely,
50-50に近くなっています
報酬へはさほど反応しておらず
13:03
and also if you study their learning in the game,
ゲームでの学習を考えれば
13:07
they aren't as sensitive to previous rewards.
前の報酬ほど 敏感ではありません
13:09
The chimps are playing better than the humans,
ゲーム理論に忠実という意味では
13:11
better in the sense of adhering to game theory.
チンパンジーは人間よりもプレイが上手です
13:12
And these are two different groups of humans
これは 日本とアフリカ出身の―
13:14
from Japan and Africa. They replicate quite nicely.
人間の二つのグループのデータですが
結果はどちらも類似していて
13:16
None of them are close to where the chimps are.
いずれも チンパンジーには程遠いのです
13:19
So here are some things we learned today.
今日学んだことを振り返ってみましょう
13:22
People seem to do a limited amount of strategic thinking
人間は 限られた範囲でしか―
13:24
using theory of mind.
心の理論を使って戦略的思考をしていません
13:26
We have some preliminary evidence from bargaining
交渉の実験の暫定的な結果ではありますが
13:28
that early warning signs in the brain might be used to predict
脳が発する早期警告を使えば
13:30
whether there will be a bad disagreement that costs money,
損に繋がる悪い不同意が予想でき
13:32
and chimps are better competitors than humans,
そして ゲーム理論によって判断すると
13:34
as judged by game theory.
チンパンジーは 人間よりも
ゲームに長けているのです
13:36
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
13:39
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:41
Translated by Yuko Yoshida
Reviewed by Shuichi Sakai

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Colin Camerer - Behavioral economist
Colin Camerer is a leading behavioral economist who studies the psychological and neural bases of choice and strategic decision-making.

Why you should listen

Colin Camerer focuses on brain behavior during decision making, strategizing and market trading. He is the Robert Kirby Professor of Behavioral Finance and Economics at the California Institute of Technology. A child prodigy in his youth, Camerer received a B.A. in quantitative studies from Johns Hopkins when he was just 17 and a PhD in decision theory from the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business when he was 22. Camerer's research departs from previous theory in that it does not assume the mind to be a rational and perfect system, but rather focuses on the limitations of everyday people when they play actual games, and seeks to predict how they will behave in situations that involve strategy. His studies focus on neurological findings from economic experiments in the lab (on humans -- and monkeys!) Camerer is the author of Behavioral Game Theory.

More profile about the speaker
Colin Camerer | Speaker | TED.com