sponsored links
TED@Intel

Eric Dishman: Health care should be a team sport

エリック・デイシュマン: チームで運営するヘルス・ケア

March 27, 2013

エリック・デイシュマンは大学生の頃、医師たちから余命2・3年であるという宣告を受けました。今や大昔の話です。新しい診断と後に受けた腎臓移植によって、デイシュマンは自身の経験と専門性を武器に最先端の医療技術スペシャリストに転身しました。治療チームの中心に患者を位置付けるヘルス・ケアを再構築するという大胆なアイディアを紹介します。(TED@Intel にて収録)

Eric Dishman - Social scientist
Eric Dishman does health care research for Intel -- studying how new technology can solve big problems in the system for the sick, the aging and, well, all of us. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I want to share some personal friends and stories with you
私の友人たちを紹介しながら 自分の話をしようと思います
00:13
that I've actually never talked about in public before
これまで公にしたことのない話ですが
00:17
to help illustrate the idea
世界中のヘルス・ケアシステムを改革する
00:19
and the need and the hope
必要性と可能性と
00:21
for us to reinvent our health care system around the world.
アイディアが伝えられると思うからです
00:23
Twenty-four years ago, I had -- a sophomore in college,
24年前 私は大学2年生でした―
00:26
I had a series of fainting spells. No alcohol was involved.
失神の発作を経験しました
アルコールは関係ありませんよ
00:30
And I ended up in student health,
大学の保健センターで―
00:32
and they ran some labwork and came back right away,
臨床検査を受け すぐに 結果が出て
00:35
and said, "Kidney problems."
「腎臓の病気」と告げられました
00:37
And before I knew it, I was involved and thrown into
その後6ヶ月間に渡る
00:40
this six months of tests and trials and tribulations
検査や試練 苦難の経験の始まりでした
00:43
with six doctors across two hospitals
2つの病院の 6人の大先生が
00:46
in this clash of medical titans
私の体の問題について
00:49
to figure out which one of them was right
誰の見立てが正しいか
00:52
about what was wrong with me.
激論を重ねたのです
00:54
And I'm sitting in a waiting room some time later for an ultrasound,
超音波検査のため 待合室に座っていたときのこと
00:56
and all six of these doctors actually show up in the room at once,
6人の医師が揃って入って来たので
00:59
and I'm like, "Uh oh, this is bad news."
「あぁ 悪いニュースに違いない」と思いました
01:02
And their diagnosis was this:
彼らの診断はこうでした
01:07
They said, "You have two rare kidney diseases
「君は2種類の珍しい腎臓病に―
01:08
that are going to actually destroy your kidneys eventually,
かかっている
いずれ腎臓は駄目になるだろう
01:10
you have cancer-like cells in your immune system
体の免疫システムの中にガン細胞に似た―
01:13
that we need to start treatment right away,
細胞があり すぐに治療が必要だ
01:15
and you'll never be eligible for a kidney transplant,
腎臓移植は不可能だし
01:17
and you're not likely to live more than two or three years."
余命は2・3年だろう」
01:20
Now, with the gravity of this doomsday diagnosis,
この最後の審判 と言うべき診断で
01:23
it just sucked me in immediately,
すっかり心くじけた私は
01:26
as if I began preparing myself as a patient
医師たちに告げられた時期に死を迎える
01:28
to die according to the schedule that they had just given to me,
準備を始めなくては と考えました
01:31
until I met a patient named Verna in a waiting room,
そんな時 待合室でヴァーナという患者に出会いました
01:35
who became a dear friend, and she grabbed me one day
親しくなった彼女はある日 私を
01:38
and took me off to the medical library
強引に医療図書館まで連れて行き
01:40
and did a bunch of research on these diagnoses and these diseases,
同様の病気や診断についてかなりのリサーチをしました
01:42
and said, "Eric, these people who get this
彼女はこう言ったんです 「エリック
01:45
are normally in their '70s and '80s.
普通は70か80代でかかる病気ね
01:47
They don't know anything about you. Wake up.
医者は あなたのことを分かってないの
目を覚まして
01:49
Take control of your health and get on with your life."
自分の健康を管理してしっかり生きなさい」
01:52
And I did.
その通りにしました
01:56
Now, these people making these proclamations to me
ただし 私に死の宣告をした医師たちは
01:57
were not bad people.
悪い人たちではありません
01:59
In fact, these professionals were miracle workers,
実際 すご腕の医師たちです
02:01
but they're working in a flawed, expensive system that's set up the wrong way.
しかし根本的な問題のため
欠陥があり費用もかさむシステムで働いています
02:03
It's dependent on hospitals and clinics for our every care need.
日々必要とするケアを病院や診療所に頼り
02:07
It's dependent on specialists who just look at parts of us.
身体の一部だけを診る
専門家に頼るシステムです
02:11
It's dependent on guesswork of diagnoses and drug cocktails,
推測に基づいた 診断や薬の配合に頼っています
02:14
and so something either works or you die.
だから処置が効くことも
死んでしまうこともあるのです
02:18
And it's dependent on passive patients
また何も質問することなく
診断を受け入れるような
02:21
who just take it and don't ask any questions.
受け身の患者に依存したシステムです
02:25
Now the problem with this model
このモデルの問題は
02:29
is that it's unsustainable globally.
地球規模で持続可能ではないこと
02:30
It's unaffordable globally.
地球規模では負担できないのです
02:33
We need to invent what I call a personal health system.
パーソナル・ヘルス・システムと呼ぶものを
開発する必要があります
02:35
So what does this personal health system look like,
パーソナル・ヘルス・システムとはどの様なものでしょうか―
02:38
and what new technologies and roles is it going to entail?
どんな新技術・役割を伴うのでしょうか?
02:41
Now, I'm going to start by actually sharing with you
まず 私の新しい友達を紹介しましょう
02:46
a new friend of mine, Libby,
リビーです
02:48
somebody I've become quite attached to over the last six months.
この6ヶ月で かなり馴染んできました
02:50
This is Libby, or actually, this is an ultrasound image of Libby.
これがリビーです 実際はリビーの超音波映像です
02:52
This is the kidney transplant I was never supposed to have.
医師から不可能と言われた腎臓移植を受けたのです
02:56
Now, this is an image that we shot a couple of weeks ago for today,
今日 皆さんに ご覧いただくため数週間前に撮影しました
02:59
and you'll notice, on the edge of this image,
お気付きでしょうか映像の端に―
03:03
there's some dark spots there, which was really concerning to me.
黒い影があります
とても心配でした
03:05
So we're going to actually do a live exam
これから実際に リビーがどんな様子か
03:08
to sort of see how Libby's doing.
生中継します
03:10
This is not a wardrobe malfunction. I have to take my belt off here.
「事故」には気をつけますが
ベルトだけは外します
03:12
Don't you in the front row worry or anything.
前列の方は 心配無用ですよ
03:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:17
I'm going to use a device from a company called Mobisante.
モビサンテという会社が作った装置を使います
03:18
This is a portable ultrasound.
携帯型の超音波検査器です
03:22
It can plug into a smartphone. It can plug into a tablet.
スマート・フォンや タブレットに接続できます
03:23
Mobisante is up in Redmond, Washington,
モビサンテはワシントン州・レドモンドを拠点としていて―
03:26
and they kindly trained me to actually do this on myself.
実際 この装置の使い方もトレーニングしてくれました
03:28
They're not approved to do this. Patients are not approved to do this.
患者が使用することは
まだ許可されていません
03:31
This is a concept demo, so I want to make that clear.
今回はデモである点を
お断りしておきます
03:34
All right, I gotta gel up.
それでは ジェルを塗りましょう
03:36
Now the people in the front row are very nervous. (Laughter)
前列の皆さんは とてもナーバスになっているでしょうね
(笑)
03:38
And I want to actually introduce you to Dr. Batiuk,
医師のバトゥーク先生をご紹介します
03:42
who's another friend of mine.
私の友人の一人です
03:46
He's up in Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, Oregon.
オレゴン州・ポートランドの
レガシー・グッド・サマリタン病院の医師です
03:47
So let me just make sure. Hey, Dr. Batiuk. Can you hear me okay?
バトゥーク先生 聞こえますか?
03:51
And actually, can you see Libby?
リビーは見えていますか?
03:55
Thomas Batuik: Hi there, Eric.
トーマス・バトゥーク: こんにちは エリック
03:57
You look busy. How are you?
忙しそうですね
元気ですか?
03:58
Eric Dishman: I'm good. I'm just taking my clothes off
ED: 元気です 今ちょうど数百人の前で
03:59
in front of a few hundred people. It's wonderful.
洋服をめくっています
最高の気分です
04:02
So I just wanted to see, is this the image you need to get?
映像を見ていただけますか これで良いでしょうか?
04:05
And I know you want to look and see if those spots are still there.
影がまだあるか 見ていただきたいんです
04:09
TB: Okay. Well let's scan around a little bit here,
TB: 分かりました スキャンを―
04:13
give me a lay of the land.
見て行きましょうか
04:16
ED: All right.TB: Okay. Turn it a little bit inside,
ED: 分かりました
TB: ちょっと内側に―
04:17
a little bit toward the middle for me.
少し中心に動かしてしてください
04:21
Okay, that's good. How about up a little bit?
良いですね もう少し上に動かしてもらえますか?
04:23
Okay, freeze that image. That's a good one for me.
OKです 画像を静止してください
これで大丈夫
04:28
ED: All right. Now last week, when I did this,
ED: 先週 チェックした際―
04:31
you had me measure that spot to the right.
右側の影を測りましたよね
04:34
Should I do that again?
また やりましょうか?
04:36
TB: Yeah, let's do that.
TB: はい やりましょう
04:38
ED: All right. This is kind of hard to do
ED: 分かりました
これがちょっと難しいんです
04:39
with one hand on your belly and one hand on measuring,
片手は お腹を押さえていて もう片方で測定するので
04:42
but I've got it, I think,
でも できそうです
04:45
and I'll save that image and send it to you.
画像を保存して 先生にお送りします
04:46
So tell me a little bit about what this dark spot means.
この影について 少し教えていただけますか
04:48
It's not something I was very happy about.
ちょっと心配なんです
04:51
TB: Many people after a kidney transplant
TB: 腎臓移植をした患者の多くは
04:53
will develop a little fluid collection around the kidney.
腎臓の周りに 少し水がたまることがあります
04:55
Most of the time it doesn't create any kind of mischief,
大抵の場合は害はありませんが
04:58
but it does warrant looking at,
でも念のため確認した方が良いんです
05:01
so I'm happy we've got an opportunity to look at it today,
今日この映像を 見れて良かったです
05:04
make sure that it's not growing, it's not creating any problems.
影が大きくなっておらず
問題がないことを確認できました
05:07
Based on the other images we have,
他の画像と比べると
05:10
I'm really happy how it looks today.
良好のようですね
05:12
ED: All right. Well, I guess we'll double check it when I come in.
ED: 分かりました 今度お会いする時に
再確認できますね
05:14
I've got my six month biopsy in a couple of weeks,
数週間の内に 6ヶ月毎の生体検査を受けますが―
05:17
and I'm going to let you do that in the clinic,
これは先生の診察室でお願いしましょう
05:19
because I don't think I can do that one on myself.
自分ではできませんから
05:21
TB: Good choice.ED: All right, thanks, Dr. Batiuk.
TB: 良い選択です
ED: バトゥーク先生 ありがとう
05:23
All right. So what you're sort of seeing here
今 皆さんに ご覧いただいたのが
05:26
is an example of disruptive technologies,
モバイルでソーシャルな分析技術という
05:28
of mobile, social and analytic technologies.
社会を劇的に変える技術の一例です
05:30
These are the foundations of what's going to make personal health possible.
パーソナル・ヘルスの可能性を広げる 基盤となります
05:34
Now there's really three pillars
今日 皆さんにお話したいのは
パーソナル・ヘルスの
05:36
of this personal health I want to talk to you about now,
3つの柱です
05:39
and it's care anywhere, care networking and care customization.
「どこでもケア」 「ネットワークでケア」
「カスタマイズ・ケア」です
05:41
And you just saw a little bit of the first two
最初の2つの一部は ご覧いただきましたね
05:45
with my interaction with Dr. Batiuk.
バトゥーク先生とのやりとりです
05:46
So let's start with care anywhere.
では どこでもケアという点から始めましょう
05:48
Humans invented the idea of hospitals and clinics
病院や診療所は1780年代に始まりました
05:51
in the 1780s. It is time to update our thinking.
もう一度考え直してもよい時期です
05:54
We have got to untether clinicians and patients
治療のため 特別な建物のところに
05:57
from the notion of traveling to a special
足を運ぶ という概念から
06:01
bricks-and-mortar place for all of our care,
臨床医と患者を解き放たれなければ なりません
06:04
because these places are often the wrong tool,
なぜなら治療の目的に対して
病院は
06:06
and the most expensive tool, for the job.
しばしば適切ではなく
高くつくからです
06:08
And these are sometimes unsafe places to send our sickest patients,
そして 重症の患者を送るには
安全でない場合もあります
06:11
especially in an era of superbugs
抗生物質の効かない耐性菌や
06:14
and hospital-acquired infections.
院内感染が問題になる時代になったのです
06:17
And many countries are going to go brickless from the start
多くの国は最初から建物なしで考えています
06:19
because they're never going to be able to afford
先進国がさかんに建てた大型医療施設は
06:22
the mega-medicalplexes that a lot of the rest of the world has built.
高くてまかなえないからです
06:24
Now I personally learned that hospitals
私は個人的に 子供時代に
06:28
can be a very dangerous place at a young age.
病院は とても危険な場所になりうると学びました
06:31
This was me in third grade.
私が小学校3年生の時の写真です
06:33
I broke my elbow very seriously, had to have surgery,
肘に重傷を負って 手術しました
06:35
worried that they were going to actually lose the arm.
医師たちは 腕を切断する可能性を懸念しました
06:38
Recovering from the surgery in the hospital, I get bedsores.
術後の入院中 床ずれになり
06:40
Those bedsores become infected,
それが細菌感染して
06:43
and they give me an antibiotic which I end up being allergic to,
抗生物質を投与されましたがアレルギー反応を起こしました
06:45
and now my whole body breaks out,
そのため全身の皮膚がただれ
06:48
and now all of those become infected.
感染が全身に広がりました
06:50
The longer I stayed in the hospital, the sicker I became,
病院に長くいるほど病気が悪化して―
06:53
and the more expensive it became,
医療費が掛かりました
06:55
and this happens to millions of people around the world every year.
毎年 世界中で何百万人に同じことが起こっています
06:57
The future of personal health that I'm talking about
私がお話しているパーソナル・ヘルス・ケアは
07:00
says care must occur at home as the default model,
ケアが病院やクリニックでなく
家で行なわれることを
07:02
not in a hospital or clinic.
標準としています
07:07
You have to earn your way into those places
人々は 病気が悪化して
07:08
by being sick enough to use that tool for the job.
病院の機器が必要になるまで入院しません
07:10
Now the smartphones that we're already carrying
普段持ち歩いているスマートフォンは
07:13
can clearly have diagnostic devices like ultrasounds plugged into them,
プラグインを使えば超音波装置になります
07:16
and a whole array of others, today,
可能性は広がっていきます
07:19
and as sensing is built into these,
センサーが搭載されているので
07:21
we'll be able to do vital signs monitor
これまで 出来なかったような―
07:23
and behavioral monitoring like we've never had before.
バイタルサインや行動をモニタできるようになります
07:25
Many of us will have implantables that will actually look
たくさんの人が装置を埋め込んで
07:28
real-time at what's going on with our blood chemistry
血液検査でたんぱく質の量まで
07:30
and in our proteins right now.
リアルタイムで 見られるようになるでしょう
07:33
Now the software is also getting smarter, right?
今や ソフトもスマートになっていますよね?
07:35
Think about a coach, an agent online,
オンラインエージェントのコーチを想像してみて下さい
07:38
that's going to help me do safe self-care.
安全なセルフケアを手助けしてくれます
07:41
That same interaction that we just did with the ultrasound
先ほどの超音波のときのようなやり取りを
07:43
will likely have real-time image processing,
リアルタイムの画像処理でできるでしょう
07:46
and the device will say, "Up, down, left, right,
機械が指示します
「上 下 右 左―
07:48
ah, Eric, that's the perfect spot to send that image
エリック そこの映像を
07:50
off to your doctor."
先生に送りましょう」
07:53
Now, if we've got all these networked devices
もし このような どこでもケア出来る
07:54
that are helping us to do care anywhere,
ネットワークにつないだ装置があれば
07:57
it stands to reason that we also need a team
当然 様々なやり取りをする
07:59
to be able to interact with all of that stuff,
チームが必要になります
08:01
and that leads to the second pillar I want to talk about,
これが 2つ目の柱に繋がります
08:03
care networking.
ケアのネットワークです
08:05
We have got to go beyond this paradigm
私たちは バラバラの専門医が部分ごとのケアをする
08:07
of isolated specialists doing parts care
パラダイムを抜け出す必要があります
08:10
to multidisciplinary teams doing person care.
多くの専門分野にわたるチームが
個人治療を 施すべきです
08:14
Uncoordinated care today is expensive at best,
現代の非協調的なケアは高額で―
08:18
and it is deadly at worst.
最悪の場合 命取りになります
08:21
Eighty percent of medical errors are actually caused
実に 8割の医療ミスは
08:24
by communication and coordination problems
医療チーム間の 伝達ミスや
08:26
amongst medical team members.
調整の問題から生じています
08:28
I had my own heart scare years ago in graduate school,
私自身も恐怖の経験があります昔 大学院時代―
08:30
when we're under treatment for the kidney,
腎臓の治療を受けている際―
08:32
and suddenly, they're like, "Oh, we think you have a heart problem."
突然 「君は心臓も悪いようだ」と言われました
08:35
And I have these palpitations that are showing up.
たしかに動悸を感じていました
08:37
They put me through five weeks of tests --
検査が5週間も続き―
08:39
very expensive, very scary -- before the nurse finally notices
とても高額で とても恐ろしく―
結局 看護師が
08:42
the piece of the paper, my meds list
私がいつも携帯していた
08:45
that I've been carrying to every single appointment,
小さな投薬リストに気付いて
08:47
and says, "Oh my gosh."
「いけない」と言ったのです
08:49
Three different specialists had prescribed
3人の異なる専門医が
同じ薬を
08:51
three different versions of the same drug to me.
べつべつに3種類も
処方していたのです
08:53
I did not have a heart problem. I had an overdose problem.
心臓は大丈夫でしたが
薬剤の過量摂取でした
08:55
I had a care coordination problem.
ケア管理の問題があったのです
08:59
And this happens to millions of people every year.
このような問題が 毎年何百万の人々に起こっています
09:02
I want to use technology that we're all working on and making happen
私は 誰でも使える技術を駆使してヘルス・ケアを
09:05
to make health care a coordinated team sport.
統合されたチームで運営したいと考えます
09:08
Now this is the most frightening thing to me.
恐ろしいことに
09:12
Out of all the care I've had in hospitals and clinics around the world,
これまで世界中の病院やクリニックで治療を受けてきた中で―
09:14
the first time I've ever had a true team-based care experience
私がチームベースのケアを受けたのは
09:19
was at Legacy Good Sam these last six months
ここ6ヶ月間 診てもらった
レガシー・グッド・サマリタンが
09:22
for me to go get this.
初めてでした
09:25
And this is a picture of my graduation team from Legacy.
これはレガシーからの「卒業」を支援してくれたチーム
09:26
There's a couple of the folks here. You'll recognize Dr. Batiuk.
先ほど 登場していただいたバトゥーク先生もいますね
09:29
We just talked to him. Here's Jenny, one of the nurses,
ジェニーは看護師で―
09:31
Allison, who helped manage the transplant list,
アリソンは 移植リストを管理してくれました―
09:34
and a dozen other people who aren't pictured,
ここに写っていない方々も沢山います
09:36
a pharmacist, a psychologist, a nutritionist,
薬剤師 心理学者 栄養士
09:38
even a financial counselor, Lisa,
リサは会計カウンセラーで―
09:41
who helped us deal with all the insurance hassles.
保険のごたごたを 取りまとめてくれました
09:43
I wept the day I graduated.
晴れて卒業した時は 涙が出ました
09:46
I should have been happy, because I was so well
元気になって
かかりつけ医に―
09:49
that I could go back to my normal doctors,
戻るのは
うれしいはずでしたが
09:50
but I wept because I was so actually connected to this team.
実際は このチームに絆を感じて
泣いてしまいました
09:52
And here's the most important part.
ここからが 一番重要な点です
09:55
The other people in this picture are me and my wife, Ashley.
写真には 私と妻のアシュレーも写っています
09:57
Legacy trained us on how to do care for me at home
レガシーは 自宅での手当を教えてくれました
10:00
so that they could offload the hospitals and clinics.
病院やクリニックの負荷が減ります
10:04
That's the only way that the model works.
これが モデルが上手く行く唯一の方法です
10:07
My team is actually working in China
私のチームでは 中国を拠点に
10:09
on one of these self-care models
セルフ・ケアモデルのプロジェクト
10:11
for a project we called Age-Friendly Cities.
「高齢者フレンドリー都市」を進めています
10:13
We're trying to help build a social network
高齢者のケアの追跡や トレーニングを
10:15
that can help track and train the care of seniors
支援するソーシャル・ネットワークを構築しています
10:17
caring for themselves
高齢者のセルフ・ケアや
10:19
as well as the care provided by their family members
家族やボランティアコミュニティのケア・ワーカーが
10:21
or volunteer community health workers,
実施するケアです
10:23
as well as have an exchange network online,
ネットワークを介した
サービスの交換も行っています
10:26
where, for example, I can donate three hours of care a day to your mom,
例えば 私は誰かのお母さんに1日3時間のケアをするから
10:28
if somebody else can help me with transportation to meals,
誰か私が食事場所まで
連れて行くのを手伝ってくれないか?
10:31
and we exchange all of that online.
オンライン上で こんな やり取りを行ないます
10:34
The most important point I want to make to you about this
皆さんにお伝えしておきたい最も重要なことは
10:37
is the sacred and somewhat over-romanticized
神聖化されて 美化されすぎている
10:39
doctor-patient one-on-one
医師と患者の 一対一の関係は
10:42
is a relic of the past.
過去の遺産ということです
10:45
The future of health care is smart teams,
未来のヘルス・ケアはスマートなチームで構成され
10:47
and you'd better be on that team for yourself.
患者自身もチームに参加します
10:50
Now, the last thing that I want to talk to you about
では 最後に皆さんにお話したい点は
10:53
is care customization,
カスタマイズするケアです
10:56
because if you've got care anywhere and you've got care networking,
もし「どこでもケア」や「ネットワークでケア」があっても
10:57
those are going to go a long way towards improving our health care system,
ヘルス・ケア・システムの改善は
長い道のりとなるでしょう
11:00
but there's still too much guesswork.
推測に頼るところが多く残っているからです
11:03
Randomized clinical trials were actually invented in 1948
1948年に無作為の臨床試験が開発されました
11:06
to help invent the drugs that cured tuberculosis,
結核のための 治療薬を開発するためです
11:10
and those are important things, don't get me wrong.
この臨床試験は重要な役割を果たしました
11:13
These population studies that we've done have created
多くの奇跡的な薬剤が開発され
11:15
tons of miracle drugs that have saved millions of lives,
何百万人もの命を救いました
11:17
but the problem is that health care
ただ問題もあって ヘルス・ケアでは
11:20
is treating us as averages, not unique individuals,
私たちを平均値で考え
一人ひとりの個人では考えないのです
11:22
because at the end of the day,
結局のところ―
11:26
the patient is not the same thing as the population
患者は 臨床試験で研究された人々と
11:28
who are studied. That's what's leading to the guesswork.
同じではないので
ここから推測に頼り始めるのです
11:31
The technologies that are coming,
これから登場すると
11:34
high-performance computing, analytics,
話題の 高性能コンピューター
11:36
big data that everyone's talking about,
アナリティックスやビックデータによって
11:38
will allow us to build predictive models for each of us
私たちは 個々の患者として
11:40
as individual patients.
予測モデルを得られるようになります
11:43
And the magic here is, experiment on my avatar
あらかじめ治療をソフト上の
アバターでテストできるので
11:45
in software, not my body in suffering.
私が苦しむ必要がありません
11:50
Now, I've had two examples I want to quickly share with you
私が経験したカスタマイズ・ケアの
11:54
of this kind of care customization on my own journey.
2つの例を ご紹介しましょう
11:57
The first was quite simple. I finally realized some years ago
1つ目はとても単純です
何年か前に やっと気付いたんですが
11:59
that all my medical teams were optimizing my treatment for longevity.
私の医療チームは余命を長くすることを
重視した治療をしていました
12:03
It's like a badge of honor to see how long they can get the patient to live.
どれだけ延命させたかが
評価されるのです
12:07
I was optimizing my life for quality of life,
私は 生活の質を重視して生きていきたいのです
12:09
and quality of life for me means time in snow.
生活の質とは
私にとっては雪山を楽しむことです
12:12
So on my chart, I forced them to put, "Patient goal:
医師たちに こんな風に書かせました「患者のゴール:
12:17
low doses of drugs over longer periods of time,
できるだけ長い期間低用量の薬を使用すること
12:20
side effects friendly to skiing."
副作用で スキーを妨げないように」
12:23
And I think that's why I achieved longevity.
これが 私が長生き出来た秘訣だと思います
12:27
I think that time-in-snow therapy was as important
「雪山セラピー」は
12:29
as the pharmaceuticals that I had.
医療品と同様に重要でした
12:31
Now the second example of customization -- and by the way,
2つ目の例の前に―
ゴールがはっきりしないと
12:34
you can't customize care if you don't know your own goals,
ケアをカスタマイズできません
12:36
so health care can't know those until you know your own health care goals.
自分でヘルス・ケアのゴールを見出すことが肝心です
12:38
But the second example I want to give you is,
2つ目の例は―
12:41
I happened to be an early guinea pig,
早い段階で 人間モルモットになって
12:43
and I got very lucky to have my whole genome sequenced.
幸運にも 自分の全ゲノム解析を受けました
12:45
Now it took about two weeks of processing
ただし インテルの高性能サーバーでも
12:48
on Intel's highest-end servers to make this happen,
解析には約2週間掛かります
12:51
and another six months of human and computing labor
更に専門家とコンピューターを駆使して
データをまとめるのに
12:53
to make sense of all of that data.
6ヶ月かかりました
12:56
And at the end of all of that, they said, "Yes,
最終的に分かったのは
「確かに
12:58
those diagnoses of that clash of medical titans
何年も前に 大先生たちが議論して下した
13:01
all of those years ago were wrong,
診断は 間違っていて
13:04
and we have a better path forward."
私たちには より良い未来が待っています」と
13:06
The future that Intel's working on now is to figure out
インテルが開発している未来とは
13:08
how to make that computing for personalized medicine
個別の医療に 使用するコンピュータの
13:11
go from months and weeks to even hours,
分析にかかる時間を数ヶ月や数週間から
数時間に短縮し
13:13
and make this kind of tool available,
こんなツールを実用化することです
13:17
not just in the mainframes of tier-one research hospitals around the world,
世界中の 一流 研究病院のメインフレームだけでなく―
13:18
but in the mainstream -- every patient, every clinic
全ての患者 全てのクリニックで
13:22
with access to whole genome sequencing.
全ゲノム解析を可能にすることです
13:25
And I tell you, this kind of care customization
このような 人々の目標や
13:27
for everything from your goals to your genetics
遺伝学まで包括した カスタマイズ・ケアは
13:30
will be the most game-changing transformation
私たちが生きている間のヘルス・ケアに
13:32
that we witness in health care during our lifetime.
最も大きな変容を もたらすでしょう
13:34
So these three pillars of personal health,
パーソナル・ヘルスの3つの柱―
13:38
care anywhere, care networking, care customization,
「どこでもケア」「ネットワークでケア」
「カスタマイズ・ケア」
13:41
are happening in pieces now,
これは少しずつ 始まっていますが
13:44
but this vision will completely fail if we don't step up
介護者や患者である私たちが ステップ・アップして
13:45
as caregivers and as patients to take on new roles.
新しい役割を担わないと
完全な失敗に終わるでしょう
13:49
It's what my friend Verna said:
友人のヴァーナはこう言いました
13:53
Wake up and take control of your health.
目を覚まして自分の健康を管理しなさい
13:54
Because at the end of the day these technologies
結局は テクノロジーとは
13:56
are simply about people caring for other people
人々が 他人や自分をケアするときの
13:58
and ourselves in some powerful new ways.
新しくてパワフルな手段にすぎないのです
14:02
And it's in that spirit that I want to introduce you
そこで 最後にもう一人
14:05
to one last friend, very quickly.
友人を簡単にご紹介します
14:07
Tracey Gamley stepped up to give me the impossible kidney
トレイシー・ギャムレーは
移植不可能と言われた 私に
14:09
that I was never supposed to have.
腎臓を提供してくれました
14:13
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:18
So Tracey, just tell us a little bit quickly about what the donor experience was like with you.
トレイシー 簡単にドナーとしての
経験をお話しいただけますか
14:34
Tracey Gamley: For me, it was really easy.
トレイシー・ギャムレー: とても簡単なことでした
14:39
I only had one night in the hospital.
入院はたったの一晩だけでした
14:41
The surgery was done laparoscopically,
手術は腹腔鏡下で行われて―
14:43
so I have just five very small scars on my abdomen,
腹部に5つの小さな傷が残っただけです
14:44
and I had four weeks away from work
4週間 仕事を休みましたが
14:47
and went back to doing everything I'd done before
その後は 元通りの生活に戻りました
14:49
without any changes.
何の変化もありません
14:51
ED: Well, I probably will never get a chance to say this to you
ED: こんな大勢の観客の前で 貴女にお話しする機会は
14:53
in such a large audience ever again.
もう二度と来ないと思います
14:56
So "thank you" feel likes a really trite word,
「ありがとう」という言葉は陳腐に感じますが―
14:58
but thank you from the bottom of my heart for saving my life.
私の命を救ってくれて 本当にありがとう
15:01
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:04
This TED stage and all of the TED stages
このTEDステージと全てのTEDステージは
15:09
are often about celebrating innovation
発明や新しいテクノロジーを
15:12
and celebrating new technologies,
称える場です
15:15
and I've done that here today,
今回 この目標を達成できました
15:16
and I've seen amazing things coming from TED speakers,
TEDスピーカの話には本当に驚かされます
15:18
I mean, my gosh, artificial kidneys, even printable kidneys, that are coming.
今後 人工腎臓やプリンタで作る腎臓が登場するでしょう
15:20
But until such time that these amazing technologies
そんな素晴らしいテクノロジーが
15:24
are available to all of us, and even when they are,
一般に普及するまで
あるいはその日が来たとしても―
15:28
it's up to us to care for, and even save, one another.
お互いケアすること
命を救うことが重要です
15:31
I hope you will go out and make personal health happen
パーソナル・ヘルスを自分のため
皆のために
15:35
for yourselves and for everyone. Thanks so much.
実現してもらいたいと願っています
ありがとうございました
15:37
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:41
Translator:Mari Arimitsu
Reviewer:Natsuhiko Mizutani

sponsored links

Eric Dishman - Social scientist
Eric Dishman does health care research for Intel -- studying how new technology can solve big problems in the system for the sick, the aging and, well, all of us.

Why you should listen

Eric Dishman is an Intel Fellow and general manager of Intel's Health Strategy & Solutions Group. He founded the product research and innovation team responsible for driving Intel’s worldwide healthcare research, new product innovation, strategic planning, and health policy and standards activities.

Dishman is recognized globally for driving healthcare reform through home and community-based technologies and services, with a focus on enabling independent living for seniors. His work has been featured in The New York Times, Washington Post and Businessweek, and The Wall Street Journal named him one of “12 People Who Are Changing Your Retirement.” He has delivered keynotes on independent living for events such as the annual Consumer Electronics Show, the IAHSA International Conference and the National Governors Association. He has published numerous articles on independent living technologies and co-authored government reports on health information technologies and health reform.

He has co-founded organizations devoted to advancing independent living, including the Technology Research for Independent Living Centre, the Center for Aging Services Technologies, the Everyday Technologies for Alzheimer’s Care program, and the Oregon Center for Aging & Technology.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.