14:02
TED2013

Rose George: Let's talk crap. Seriously.

ローズ・ジョージ: うんちについて真剣に話しましょう

Filmed:

2013年現在、世界では約25億人が未だ衛生的なトイレを利用できない環境にいます。トイレが無い時、あなたならどこで用を足しますか?世界には路上などで用を足す屋外排泄により、飲み水や食料が排泄物に含まれる病原菌に汚染され、死や病気の危険にさらされている人たちが大勢います。ジャーナリストのローズ・ジョージが、かつては下品で口に出すこともできなかった問題に、単刀直入に切り込み、ユーモアを交えながら力強く語り始めます。準備は良いですか?

- Curious journalist
Rose George looks deeply into topics that are unseen but fundamental, whether that's sewers or latrines or massive container ships or pirate hostages or menstrual hygiene. Full bio

00:12
Let's talk dirty.
品のない話をします
数年前に 妙な話ですが
00:16
A few years ago, oddly enough,
私は用を足したくなり
00:19
I needed the bathroom,
公衆トイレを見つけて
00:22
and I found one, a public bathroom,
駆け込むと
00:25
and I went into the stall,
今までしてきたように
用を足しました
00:27
and I prepared to do what I'd done most of my life:
トイレを使って水を流し
さっぱりしたのです
00:31
use the toilet, flush the toilet, forget about the toilet.
するとその日どういう訳か
00:35
And for some reason that day, instead,
ある疑問が浮かびました
00:37
I asked myself a question,
排泄物はどこへ行くのか?
00:39
and it was, where does this stuff go?
そしてその疑問と共に
00:43
And with that question, I found myself plunged
私は公衆衛生の世界に
どっぷりはまりました
00:47
into the world of sanitation --
―まだあります―
(笑)
00:51
there's more coming -- (Laughter) —
公衆衛生とトイレ
そしてうんちにはまり
00:53
sanitation, toilets and poop,
まだ抜けられないでいます
00:57
and I have yet to emerge.
というのも
そのように不快な場所を
01:00
And that's because it's such an enraging,
魅力的に感じられたからです
01:03
yet engaging place to be.
そのトイレを思うと
01:06
To go back to that toilet,
特に立派だったわけではなく
01:09
it wasn't a particularly fancy toilet,
世界トイレ機関(WTO)のトイレほど
01:12
it wasn't as nice as this one
01:13
from the World Toilet Organization.
快適でもありませんでした
(世界貿易機関)
ではない方のWTOです(笑)
01:16
That's the other WTO. (Laughter)
しかしそのトイレには鍵があり
プライバシーが保護され
01:21
But it had a lockable door, it had privacy, it had water,
水と石鹸があったので
手が洗えました
01:24
it had soap so I could wash my hands,
女性なら手を洗うので
私も洗いました
01:27
and I did because I'm a woman, and we do that.
(笑)(拍手)
01:30
(Laughter) (Applause)
しかしその疑問がよぎった日
01:35
But that day, when I asked that question,
私は一つ利口になりました
今までずっと―
01:38
I learned something, and that was that I'd grown up thinking
トイレを当然の権利だと
思っていましたが
01:40
that a toilet like that was my right,
実は特権なのです
01:43
when in fact it's a privilege.
世界では約25億人が
適切なトイレを使えていません
01:46
2.5 billion people worldwide have no adequate toilet.
(排泄用の)バケツや箱すらありません
01:51
They don't have a bucket or a box.
世界で約4割の人々には
適切なトイレが無いのです
01:55
Forty percent of the world with no adequate toilet.
人々はこの少年が空港の
高速道路の脇でしているように
01:59
And they have to do what this little boy is doing
02:02
by the side of the Mumbai Airport expressway,
屋外排泄または野糞
と呼ばれる行為を余儀なくされます
02:05
which is called open defecation,
02:07
or poo-pooing in the open.
彼は毎日このように排泄し
02:11
And he does that every day,
恐らく写真の男性は毎日
02:13
and every day, probably, that guy in the picture
この上を歩いています
02:15
walks on by,
男性に少年は見えていますが
見えていないものもあります
02:17
because he sees that little boy, but he doesn't see him.
しかし見るべきです
問題は―
02:21
But he should, because the problem
散らかっている便が
02:23
with all that poop lying around
病原菌を運ぶことにあります
02:25
is that poop carries passengers.
約50の感染症は
人の便を介して感染します
02:28
Fifty communicable diseases like to travel in human shit.
便に含まれる卵やのう胞
02:32
All those things, the eggs, the cysts,
細菌やウィルスが感染源となり
02:35
the bacteria, the viruses, all those can travel
1グラムの便で
感染の危険があります
02:38
in one gram of human feces.
どんなふうに?
恐らくこの少年は手を洗いません
02:41
How? Well, that little boy will not have washed his hands.
更に彼は裸足です
家に帰ると―
02:45
He's barefoot. He'll run back into his house,
彼は飲み水や食べ物
そして生活環境を汚染します
02:47
and he will contaminate his drinking water and his food
02:51
and his environment
指や足に付着した
02:52
with whatever diseases he may be carrying
便の小片によって 何らかの病原菌を
持ち込んでしまうのです
02:55
by fecal particles that are on his fingers and feet.
ここにいるほぼ全員は幸運にも
03:00
In what I call the flushed-and-plumbed world
上下水道が整備された社会で暮らし
03:03
that most of us in this room are lucky to live in,
昨今では下痢というと
03:05
the most common symptoms associated with those diseases,
ちょっとした冗談扱いされがちです
03:08
diarrhea, is now a bit of a joke.
下痢直行便とか ちびった話とか...
03:11
It's the runs, the Hershey squirts, the squits.
イギリスでは
03:15
Where I come from, we call it Delhi belly,
デリー・ベリーとも言います
植民地時代の遺産ですね
03:17
as a legacy of empire.
人気のストックフォトから
03:19
But if you search for a stock photo of diarrhea
「下痢」の写真を探すと
03:23
in a leading photo image agency,
こんな写真が見つかりました
03:26
this is the picture that you come up with.
(笑)
03:28
(Laughter)
なぜビキニなのかは不明です
03:30
Still not sure about the bikini.
そしてこれは別の下痢の写真です
03:35
And here's another image of diarrhea.
彼女はマリー・セイリー
生後9か月です
03:37
This is Marie Saylee, nine months old.
写真に彼女の姿がないのは
03:41
You can't see her, because she's buried
リベリアの片田舎の茂みに
埋葬されているからです
03:42
under that green grass in a little village in Liberia,
彼女は下痢を患って
3日で亡くなりました
03:46
because she died in three days from diarrhea --
私たちは下痢を
時に冗談として発します
03:49
the Hershey squirts, the runs, a joke.
しかしこの父親には娘の死です
03:53
And that's her dad.
彼女のみならず
03:55
But she wasn't alone that day,
約4000人の子供が
その日 下痢で命を落としました
03:57
because 4,000 other children died of diarrhea,
このようなことが
毎日起きています
04:01
and they do every day.
下痢は世界の子供の死因
第2位です
04:03
Diarrhea is the second biggest killer of children worldwide,
皆さんが気に掛けてきた
病というと
04:08
and you've probably been asked to care about things
HIV/エイズや結核
麻疹だと思いますが
04:11
like HIV/AIDS or T.B. or measles,
それらの病を合計した人数より
多くの子供が下痢で亡くなっています
04:14
but diarrhea kills more children
04:16
than all those three things put together.
これは非常に有害な
大量殺りく兵器です
04:19
It's a very potent weapon of mass destruction.
世界が負担する費用は巨額で
04:24
And the cost to the world is immense:
粗末な下水設備による損失は
毎年2600億ドルにのぼります
04:27
260 billion dollars lost every year
04:29
on the losses to poor sanitation.
これはハイチの
コレラ患者専用のベッドです
04:32
These are cholera beds in Haiti.
皆さんはコレラを知っていても
下痢のことは知らないでしょう
04:34
You'll have heard of cholera, but we don't hear about diarrhea.
下痢に関する病に与えられるのは
わずかな配慮と資金だけです
04:37
It gets a fraction of the attention and funding
04:40
given to any of those other diseases.
しかし私たちは
解決策を知っています
04:43
But we know how to fix this.
19世紀中ばに
04:46
We know, because in the mid-19th century,
ヴィクトリア朝の
素晴らしい技術者が
04:49
wonderful Victorian engineers
下水設備と排水処理そして
04:52
installed systems of sewers and wastewater treatment
水洗トイレのシステムを導入し
病気が劇的に減少したからです
04:54
and the flush toilet, and disease dropped dramatically.
これは子どもの死亡率に
04:59
Child mortality dropped by the most
未曾有の減少をもたらしました
05:01
it had ever dropped in history.
ブリティッシュ・メディカル・ジャーナルの
読者により
05:03
The flush toilet was voted the best medical advance
水洗トイレは過去200年において
最高の医学の進歩と認められました
05:06
of the last 200 years by the readers of the British Medical Journal,
ピルや麻酔 手術を差し置き
05:09
and they were choosing over the Pill, anesthesia,
トイレが選ばれたのです
05:12
and surgery.
素晴らしい廃棄物処理装置です
05:14
It's a wonderful waste disposal device.
私が大変良いと思うのは
トイレが臭わずに―
05:16
But I think that it's so good — it doesn't smell,
家の中にあって
ドアに鍵がかかることです
05:20
we can put it in our house, we can lock it behind a door —
そして話題にしないように
口にも鍵をかけてきました
05:23
and I think we've locked it out of conversation too.
適当な言葉がないのです
05:26
We don't have a neutral word for it.
うんちと言うと不適切で
05:27
Poop's not particularly adequate.
クソと言えば人を苛立たせ
排泄は医学的すぎます
05:29
Shit offends people. Feces is too medical.
そうなると
私がその物体を見た時に
05:33
Because I can't explain otherwise,
何が起きているのか
説明できません
05:36
when I look at the figures, what's going on.
私たちは下痢と公衆衛生の
解決策を知っていますが
05:39
We know how to solve diarrhea and sanitation,
もし皆さんが先進国と途上国の
05:42
but if you look at the budgets of countries,
国家予算を見ると
05:44
developing and developed,
計算ミスだと思うでしょう
05:46
you'll think there's something wrong with the math,
それはこのような
不条理によるものです
05:49
because you'll expect absurdities like
パキスタンでは
毎年15万人の子供たちが
05:52
Pakistan spending 47 times more on its military
下痢で亡くなっているのに
05:55
than it does on water and sanitation,
水や衛生設備の47倍の費用を
軍事費に充てているのです
05:57
even though 150,000 children die of diarrhea
06:00
in Pakistan every year.
しかし水や衛生設備の予算が
極端に少ないことを皆さんが知って
06:02
But then you look at that already minuscule
しかし水や衛生設備の予算が
極端に少ないことを皆さんが知って
06:04
water and sanitation budget,
75から90パーセントの予算が
浄水の供給に充てられれば
06:06
and 75 to 90 percent of it will go on clean water supply,
素晴らしいです
人には水が必要です
06:09
which is great; we all need water.
誰もが水を必要とします
06:11
No one's going to refuse clean water.
公衆トイレや水洗トイレなど
06:13
But the humble latrine, or flush toilet,
きれいな水の使用を倍増するだけで
病気は減らせます
06:16
reduces disease by twice as much
06:19
as just putting in clean water.
例えばさっきの少年が
06:21
Think about it. That little boy
家に帰ってきれいな水があればと
考えてみてください
06:22
who's running back into his house,
06:24
he may have a nice, clean fresh water supply,
しかし現実は自分の汚れた手で
飲み水を汚染してしまいます
06:26
but he's got dirty hands that he's going to contaminate his water supply with.
私が思うに
実際の糞便におけるムダとは
06:31
And I think that the real waste of human waste
素晴らしい発展をもたらす資源を
06:34
is that we are wasting it as a resource
人がムダにしていることです
06:37
and as an incredible trigger for development,
というのも トイレやうんちは
人に役立つからです
06:41
because these are a few things that toilets
06:43
and poop itself can do for us.
トイレがあれば
女の子が復学できます
06:46
So a toilet can put a girl back in school.
インドの25パーセントの女の子は
06:49
Twenty-five percent of girls in India drop out of school
不十分な衛生設備を理由に
学校を中退しています
06:52
because they have no adequate sanitation.
何年もの間女の子たちは
授業中ずっと我慢しています
06:55
They've been used to sitting through lessons
06:57
for years and years holding it in.
一日が終わっても
それが毎日続き
07:00
We've all done that, but they do it every day,
思春期に入り月経が始まると
07:03
and when they hit puberty and they start menstruating,
我慢は限界に達します
07:05
it just gets too much.
良く分かります
誰が非難できるでしょう?
07:08
And I understand that. Who can blame them?
もしあなたが教育者に
07:11
So if you met an educationalist and said,
「簡単なこと一つで出席率を
25パーセント向上できる」
07:13
"I can improve education attendance rates by 25 percent
07:16
with just one simple thing,"
と言えばたくさんの教育者が
友人になるでしょう
07:18
you'd make a lot of friends in education.
できることは他にもあります
07:21
That's not the only thing it can do for you.
うんちで夕飯を調理できます
07:24
Poop can cook your dinner.
うんちは栄養素を含みます
07:27
It's got nutrients in it.
人は栄養を摂取し排泄します
07:28
We ingest nutrients. We excrete nutrients as well.
体に溜めておくことはできません
07:31
We don't keep them all.
ルワンダでは現在
07:33
In Rwanda, they are now getting
刑務所の調理用燃料の
75パーセントに
07:35
75 percent of their cooking fuel in their prison system
囚人たちの排せつ物が
使用されています
07:38
from the contents of prisoners' bowels.
ブタレの刑務所には
多くの囚人が収容されています
07:41
So these are a bunch of inmates in a prison in Butare.
囚人の多くが大量虐殺犯です
07:45
They're genocidal inmates, most of them,
彼らは自分のトイレを
かき混ぜています
07:47
and they're stirring the contents of their own latrines,
なぜなら密閉されたタンクの中に
07:51
because if you put poop in a sealed environment, in a tank,
大量に排泄物が溜まると
07:54
pretty much like a stomach,
胃と同じようにガスを放ち
07:56
then, pretty much like a stomach, it gives off gas,
燃料として調理に使えます
07:59
and you can cook with it.
囚人たちが
排泄物をかき混ぜることに
08:01
And you might think it's just good karma
因果応報を感じると思いますが
08:03
to see these guys stirring shit,
実は経済にも良い効果があり
08:06
but it's also good economic sense,
毎年数百万ドルが
節約されているのです
08:08
because they're saving a million dollars a year.
このことが森林破壊を減らし
08:10
They're cutting down on deforestation,
彼らが見出した燃料の供給法は
無尽蔵で
08:12
and they've found a fuel supply that is inexhaustible,
無限そして無料で生産されます
08:15
infinite and free at the point of production.
うんちが人を救うのは
貧困社会だけではあません
08:20
It's not just in the poor world that poop can save lives.
この女性が注射器で
08:23
Here's a woman who's about to get a dose
投与されている茶色い物体は
08:25
of the brown stuff in those syringes,
皆さんが想像しているものです
08:27
which is what you think it is,
提供されたものなので
そのものではありません
08:29
except not quite, because it's actually donated.
スツール・ドナーという
新たな肩書も生まれました
08:32
There is now a new career path called stool donor.
精子ドナーのようなものです
08:35
It's like the new sperm donor.
彼女が感染しているスーパー耐性菌は
クロストリジウム・ディフィシルといって
08:36
Because she has been suffering from a superbug called C. diff,
ほとんどの抗生物質に
耐性を示します
08:39
and it's resistant to antibiotics in many cases.
彼女は何年も苦しんできました
08:43
She's been suffering for years.
健康な人の便が
投与されましたが
08:44
She gets a dose of healthy human feces,
これは治癒率94パーセントの治療法です
08:48
and the cure rate for this procedure is 94 percent.
驚異的ですが この治療を
実践する人はほとんどいません
08:52
It's astonishing, but hardly anyone is still doing it.
さすがに受け入れ難いのでしょう
08:56
Maybe it's the ick factor.
でも大丈夫です
08:58
That's okay, because there's a team of research scientists
カナダの研究チームが
RePOOPulateという
09:01
in Canada who have now created a stool sample,
人工糞便を開発しました
09:04
a fake stool sample which is called RePOOPulate.
皆さんこう思うでしょう
「解決策は単純
09:07
So you'd be thinking by now, okay, the solution's simple,
みんなにトイレを与えればいい」
09:09
we give everyone a toilet.
実に興味深いことですが
09:11
And this is where it gets really interesting,
人は単純ではないので
単純に解決できません
09:13
because it's not that simple, because we are not simple.
公衆衛生の研究が実に興味深く
刺激的で 魅力的なのは
09:16
So the really interesting, exciting work --
09:20
this is the engaging bit -- in sanitation is that
人間の心を
理解する必要があるからです
09:23
we need to understand human psychology.
私たちはハードウェアを
与えるだけでなく
09:26
We need to understand software
ソフトウェアを
理解する必要があります
09:28
as well as just giving someone hardware.
多くの途上国に政府が加わり
09:30
They've found in many developing countries that
無料トイレを設置してきて
09:32
governments have gone in and given out free latrines
数年後に戻るとそこには―
09:35
and gone back a few years later and found that they've
新しいヤギ小屋や寺院
客間が建てられていて
09:37
got lots of new goat sheds or temples or spare rooms
所有者たちは
そそくさとそこを通り抜けて
09:41
with their owners happily walking past them
用を足しに空き地へ
出向いていたのです
09:44
and going over to the open defecating ground.
故に重要なのは
人の心を巧みに操ることです
09:47
So the idea is to manipulate human emotion.
これは数十年間用いられています
石鹸会社は―
09:50
It's been done for decades. The soap companies did it
20世紀初頭にこれを役立てました
09:53
in the early 20th century.
健康を売りにした石鹸は
売れませんでした
09:55
They tried selling soap as healthy. No one bought it.
セクシーを売りにすると
石鹸は良く売れたのです
09:58
They tried selling it as sexy. Everyone bought it.
現在インドでは
10:02
In India now there's a campaign
「花嫁はトイレのない家に嫁ぐな」
10:03
which persuades young brides
という運動が行われています
10:06
not to marry into families that don't have a toilet.
これを「No Loo(トイレ), No I Do」
といいます
10:09
It's called "No Loo, No I Do."
(笑)
10:11
(Laughter)
これを単なるプロパガンダと
思っている方に
10:14
And in case you think that poster's just propaganda,
彼女はプリヤンカ 23歳です
10:16
here's Priyanka, 23 years old.
インドで昨年の10月に会いました
10:18
I met her last October in India,
彼女は保守的な環境に育ちました
10:20
and she grew up in a conservative environment.
インドの貧しい
田舎町で育った彼女は
10:23
She grew up in a rural village in a poor area of India,
14歳で婚約し およそ21歳で
10:26
and she was engaged at 14, and then at 21 or so,
夫の家に嫁ぎました
10:30
she moved into her in-law's house.
嫁ぎ先で彼女はゾッとしました
10:32
And she was horrified to get there and find
トイレが無いのです
10:34
that they didn't have a toilet.
彼女にトイレは当たり前でした
10:35
She'd grown up with a latrine.
トイレなんて人並みのことです
10:37
It was no big deal, but it was a latrine.
嫁いだ日の夜
10:39
And the first night she was there, she was told
彼女は朝の4時に
10:41
that at 4 o'clock in the morning --
姑に起こされ屋外に出ると
10:42
her mother-in-law got her up, told her to go outside
暗がりで用を足すように
言われたのです
10:45
and go and do it in the dark in the open.
彼女は徘徊する
酔っ払いに怯えました
10:48
And she was scared. She was scared of drunks hanging around.
そしてヘビに怯え
性的暴行に怯えました
10:50
She was scared of snakes. She was scared of rape.
三日後に彼女は
思いも寄らぬことをしました
10:53
After three days, she did an unthinkable thing.
家を出たのです
10:55
She left.
インドの田舎をご存知なら
10:57
And if you know anything about rural India,
言葉にならない程
勇敢な行為だと分かるでしょう
10:58
you'll know that's an unspeakably courageous thing to do.
それだけでなく
11:02
But not just that.
彼女はトイレを手に入れて
11:03
She got her toilet, and now she goes around
インドの田舎の女性たちに
自分を真似るよう促しています
11:05
all the other villages in India
11:07
persuading other women to do the same thing.
これを社会的伝染といい
実に強力で刺激的な事象です
11:09
It's what I call social contagion, and it's really powerful
11:12
and really exciting.
他にも
プリヤンカの暮らす村の近くの
11:14
Another version of this, another village in India
11:16
near where Priyanka lives
11:18
is this village, called Lakara, and about a year ago,
ラカラというインドの村は
約1年前には
トイレが全くありませんでした
11:22
it had no toilets whatsoever.
子供たちは下痢やコレラで
命を落としていました
11:24
Kids were dying of diarrhea and cholera.
そこに訪れた一団が
行動変化のトリックを使いました
11:26
Some visitors came, using various behavioral change tricks
皿にのった食品と便を外に置いて
11:30
like putting out a plate of food and a plate of shit
その双方を行き交うハエを
観察できるようにしたのです
11:33
and watching the flies go one to the other.
これまでともかく
自分たちのしていることに
11:35
Somehow, people who'd been thinking
全く平気だった人たちが
11:38
that what they were doing was not disgusting at all
急に「待てよ」と思ったのです
11:39
suddenly thought, "Oops."
これは 隣人の
便を口にしてるということではないか
11:41
Not only that, but they were ingesting their neighbors' shit.
それこそが
彼らの習慣を変えたのです
11:44
That's what really made them change their behavior.
故にこの少年の母親は
11:47
So this woman, this boy's mother
数時間内にトイレを設置しました
11:49
installed this latrine in a few hours.
生涯バナナ農園の陰を
使用してきた女性が
11:52
Her entire life, she'd been using the banana field behind,
数時間内に
トイレを設置したのです
11:54
but she installed the latrine in a few hours.
費用は一切かからず
この少年の命を救ってくれます
11:56
It cost nothing. It's going to save that boy's life.
公衆衛生の状況に
落胆していた時が
11:59
So when I get despondent about the state of sanitation,
実は大変刺激的な時でした
12:03
even though these are pretty exciting times
というのも
ビル&メリンダ・ゲイツ財団の
12:05
because we've got the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
トイレ改革事業に携わり
12:07
reinventing the toilet, which is great,
マット・デイモンのトイレ・ストライキに
携われたからです
12:09
we've got Matt Damon going on bathroom strike,
これは人として良くても
結腸には悪影響です
12:12
which is great for humanity, very bad for his colon.
気がかりなこともあります
12:16
But there are things to worry about.
これは最も達成度の低い
ミレニアム開発目標です
12:17
It's the most off-track Millennium Development Goal.
修復には50年はかかるでしょう
12:20
It's about 50 or so years off track.
この状況では
12:23
We're not going to meet targets,
衛生設備を提供していても
目標は達成できません
12:24
providing people with sanitation at this rate.
公衆衛生のことを思い
胸が痛くなった時
12:27
So when I get sad about sanitation,
日本が頭に浮かびました
70年前の日本では
12:31
I think of Japan, because Japan 70 years ago
汲み取り式便所が使用され
12:34
was a nation of people who used pit latrines
棒でふき取っていましたが
12:37
and wiped with sticks,
今の日本では
ウォシュレットが普及しています
12:39
and now it's a nation of what are called Woshurettos,
12:42
washlet toilets.
これには温水洗浄機能があり
12:43
They have in-built bidet nozzles for a lovely,
手を使わずに洗浄できます
12:46
hands-free cleaning experience,
他にも様々な機能があります
12:49
and they have various other features
暖房便座機能や
12:51
like a heated seat and an automatic lid-raising device
夫婦円満の小道具と言われる
フタ自動開閉機能など
12:54
which is known as the "marriage-saver."
(笑)
12:56
(Laughter)
しかし日本が行った
最も重要なことは
12:58
But most importantly, what they have done in Japan,
―私はこれに大変感銘しました―
13:00
which I find so inspirational,
トイレを密室から
表に出したことです
13:01
is they've brought the toilet out from behind the locked door.
話題にできるようになったのです
13:04
They've made it conversational.
人は最新のトイレを買いに
出掛けるようになりました
13:05
People go out and upgrade their toilet.
トイレについて話すようになり
清潔な場所になりました
13:09
They talk about it. They've sanitized it.
皆がそうできるよう願います
難しいことはありません
13:13
I hope that we can do that. It's not a difficult thing to do.
私たちがすべきことは
13:18
All we really need to do
この問題と向き合い
13:20
is look at this issue
緊急で恥ずべき問題として
捉えることです
13:22
as the urgent, shameful issue that it is.
不運な貧困社会に限った
問題とは思いません
13:26
And don't think that it's just in the poor world that things are wrong.
下水設備は老朽化しています
13:29
Our sewers are crumbling.
ここでも事態は
悪化しているのです
13:31
Things are going wrong here too.
全ての解決策は実に簡単です
13:33
The solution to all of this is pretty easy.
この後の空き時間に
13:36
I'm going to make your lives easy this afternoon
皆さんに一つお願いがあります
13:38
and just ask you to do one thing,
白日の下 主張してください
13:40
and that's to go out, protest,
今まで言葉にできなかった
13:43
speak about the unspeakable,
うんちについて
13:46
and talk shit.
ありがとうございます
13:47
Thank you.
(拍手)
13:49
(Applause)
Translated by Yuko Masubuchi
Reviewed by Claire Ghyselen

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Rose George - Curious journalist
Rose George looks deeply into topics that are unseen but fundamental, whether that's sewers or latrines or massive container ships or pirate hostages or menstrual hygiene.

Why you should listen

Rose George thinks, researches, writes and talks about the hidden, the undiscussed. Among the everyone-does-it-no-one-talks-about-it issues she's explored in books and articles: sanitation (and poop in general). Diarrhea is a weapon of mass destruction, says the UK-based journalist and author, and a lack of access to toilets is at the root of our biggest public health crisis. In 2012, two out of five of the world’s population had nowhere sanitary to go.

The key to turning around this problem, says George: Let’s drop the pretense of “water-related diseases” and call out the cause of myriad afflictions around the world as what they are -- “poop-related diseases” that are preventable with a basic toilet. George explores the problem in her book The Big Necessity: The Unmentionable World of Human Waste and Why It Matters and in a fabulous special issue of Colors magazine called "Shit: A Survival Guide." Read a sample chapter of The Big Necessity >>

Her latest book, on an equally hidden world that touches almost everything we do, is Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car, Food on Your Plate. Read a review >> 

 In the UK and elsewhere, you'll find the book titled Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry the Brings You 90% of Everything.

More profile about the speaker
Rose George | Speaker | TED.com