sponsored links
TED2013

Joshua Prager: In search of the man who broke my neck

ジョシュア・プレーガー: 僕の首を折った男を探しに

March 1, 2013

ジョシュア・プレーガーは19歳の時、バスの悲惨な事故で半身不随になりました。それから20年後、人生をめちゃくちゃにした運転手を探しにイスラエルに戻りました。再会した時の不思議な話をしながら、プレーガーは自然や社会環境、自己欺瞞、運命について深く追求します。

Joshua Prager - Journalist
Joshua Prager’s journalism unravels historical secrets -- and his own. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
One year ago, I rented a car in Jerusalem
1年前 エルサレムでレンタカーを借りた
00:18
to go find a man I'd never met
一度も会ったことのない
でも僕の人生を変えた
00:21
but who had changed my life.
ある人に会うために
00:23
I didn't have a phone number to call to say I was coming.
連絡を取りようにも
電話番号を知らなかったし
00:25
I didn't have an exact address,
正確な住所も知らなかった
00:28
but I knew his name, Abed,
分かっていたのは
アベッドという名前と
00:30
I knew that he lived in a town of 15,000, Kfar Kara,
人口15,000人のクファカラという町に
住んでいるということ
00:33
and I knew that, 21 years before, just outside this holy city,
21年前に この聖なる街すぐ外で
00:38
he broke my neck.
僕の首の骨を折ったということだった
00:42
And so, on an overcast morning in January, I headed north
1月のあるどんよりした朝
北へ向かった
00:45
off in a silver Chevy to find a man and some peace.
シルバーのシボレーで アベッドを探しに
そして心の平静を求めて
00:49
The road dropped and I exited Jerusalem.
下り道にさしかかり
エルサレムの街を出た
00:54
I then rounded the very bend where his blue truck,
そして あの曲がり角を曲がった
00:57
heavy with four tons of floor tiles,
アベットの運転する
4トンもの床タイルを載せたトラックが
00:59
had borne down with great speed onto the back left corner
ものすごいスピードで
僕が乗っていたミニバスの
01:01
of the minibus where I sat.
左後方に突っ込んできた場所だ
01:04
I was then 19 years old.
そのとき僕は19歳だった
01:07
I'd grown five inches and done some 20,000 pushups
当時の僕は 8ヶ月で13cmも背が伸びて
01:10
in eight months, and the night before the crash,
腕立ては8ヶ月で2万回
事故が起きる前の晩には
01:13
I delighted in my new body,
鍛え上げた身体で 明け方まで
01:16
playing basketball with friends
友達とバスケを楽しんだ
01:19
into the wee hours of a May morning.
爽やかな5月の朝だった
01:21
I palmed the ball in my large right hand,
僕は大きな右手で
ボールをつかめたし
01:23
and when that hand reached the rim, I felt invincible.
その手がリングに届くときなど
向かうところ敵無しだと思えた
01:25
I was off in the bus to get the pizza I'd won on the court.
僕はバスケで勝ち取ったピザを買おうと
バスに乗っていた
01:30
I didn't see Abed coming.
アベッドのトラックが突っ込んでくるとは思いもせずに
01:34
From my seat, I was looking up at a stone town
バスの席から 真昼の太陽に照らされた
01:36
on a hilltop, bright in the noontime sun,
丘の上の石造りの街を見上げていた
01:39
when from behind there was a great bang,
そのとき後ろで ものすごい音がした
01:42
as loud and violent as a bomb.
爆弾にやられたかのような
激しく大きな音だった
01:44
My head snapped back over my red seat.
僕の頭はバスの赤い座席の後ろにがくんと反って
01:47
My eardrum blew. My shoes flew off.
鼓膜は破れ 靴も吹き飛んだ
01:49
I flew too, my head bobbing on broken bones,
僕は身体ごと吹き飛ばされ
首は折れ頭はグラグラして
01:53
and when I landed, I was a quadriplegic.
地面に叩きつけられたときは
両手両足が不自由になっていた
01:56
Over the coming months, I learned to breathe on my own,
事故から数ヶ月後
自力で呼吸できるようになった
02:00
then to sit and to stand and to walk,
座って 立って 歩けるようにもなった
02:02
but my body was now divided vertically.
でも 僕の身体は真っ二つに分かれたままだった
02:05
I was a hemiplegic, and back home in New York,
半身麻痺の身体でニューヨークに戻り
02:08
I used a wheelchair for four years, all through college.
大学時代を通して4年間
車椅子生活をした
02:11
College ended and I returned to Jerusalem for a year.
大学卒業後 1年間エルサレムに戻った
02:16
There I rose from my chair for good,
そのころには車椅子なしで生活できるようになり
02:19
I leaned on my cane, and I looked back,
杖で歩けるようになったので
事故について調べ始め
02:22
finding all from my fellow passengers in the bus
事故の写真から バスに乗り合わせた
02:25
to photographs of the crash,
全ての乗客を探し当てた
02:28
and when I saw this photograph,
そして 僕が事故の写真に見たものは
02:31
I didn't see a bloody and unmoving body.
血まみれの動かぬ身体ではなかった
02:36
I saw the healthy bulk of a left deltoid,
僕はその写真に写る
健康的で立派な左肩の筋肉を見て
02:39
and I mourned that it was lost,
それが失われてしまったことを嘆いた
02:43
mourned all I had not yet done,
今となってはもう不可能となった
02:45
but was now impossible.
やりたかったことを思って悲嘆にくれた
02:47
It was then I read the testimony that Abed gave
事故を起こしたアベッドの証言は
02:55
the morning after the crash,
事故の翌朝に書かれたもので
02:58
of driving down the right lane of a highway toward Jerusalem.
エルサレムに向かう高速の右車線を
走行中の様子だった
03:00
Reading his words, I welled with anger.
読んでいるうちに怒りがこみ上げてきた
03:04
It was the first time I'd felt anger toward this man,
アベッドに対して怒りを覚えたのは
そのときが初めてだった
03:07
and it came from magical thinking.
もし事故が起こっていなかったら と-
03:10
On this xeroxed piece of paper,
証言がコピーされた紙の上では
03:13
the crash had not yet happened.
事故はまだ起こっていなかった
03:15
Abed could still turn his wheel left
アベッドが左にハンドルを切れば
03:19
so that I would see him whoosh by out my window
トラックはバスの横をすり抜け
03:21
and I would remain whole.
僕は身体の自由を失わずに済む
03:24
"Be careful, Abed, look out. Slow down."
「アベッド 気を付けろ スピードを落とせ」
03:27
But Abed did not slow,
しかしアベッドはスピードを落とすことなく
03:30
and on that xeroxed piece of paper, my neck again broke,
証言の紙切れの上で
僕は再び首を折って
03:33
and again, I was left without anger.
怒りは収まった
03:37
I decided to find Abed,
僕はアベッドを見つけようと決心した
03:41
and when I finally did,
ついに見つけて電話をし
03:43
he responded to my Hebrew hello which such nonchalance,
ヘブライ語で挨拶すると
彼は平然と挨拶を返した
03:45
it seemed he'd been awaiting my phone call.
僕の電話を待っていたかのように
03:48
And maybe he had.
実際 待っていたのかも知れない
03:50
I didn't mention to Abed his prior driving record --
アベッドの過去の運転歴には
触れなかったけど
03:53
27 violations by the age of 25,
25歳までに27もの違反をしていた
03:56
the last, his not shifting his truck into a low gear on that May day —
最後の違反は あの5月の日に
坂道でローギアに入れなかったこと
04:00
and I didn't mention my prior record --
僕は 自分のこれまでのことも話さなかった
04:04
the quadriplegia and the catheters,
肢体不自由になって カテーテルを通したこと
不安感や喪失感 -
04:07
the insecurity and the loss —
肢体不自由になって カテーテルを通したこと
不安感や喪失感 -
04:08
and when Abed went on about how hurt he was in the crash,
アベッドがあの事故でひどいケガをしたと
話し出したとき
04:11
I didn't say that I knew from the police report
警察の報告書で
彼が重傷ではなかったことを
04:13
that he'd escaped serious injury.
知ってはいたが
そのことは言わなかった
04:16
I said I wanted to meet.
僕は 会いたい と言った
04:19
Abed said that I should call back in a few weeks,
2、3週間後 もう一度電話してくれと言われ
04:22
and when I did, and a recording told me
そのとおりにすると
04:25
that his number was disconnected,
電話番号はもう使われていなかった
04:27
I let Abed and the crash go.
僕はアベッドに会うことをあきらめ
事故のことを忘れた
04:30
Many years passed.
それから何年も経った
04:35
I walked with my cane and my ankle brace and a backpack
僕は杖をつき 足首に装具をつけて
バックパックを背負い
04:37
on trips in six continents.
6つの大陸を旅して歩いた
04:41
I pitched overhand in a weekly softball game
毎週ソフトボールをするようになり
オーバーハンドで投げた
04:44
that I started in Central Park,
セントラルパークでね
04:47
and home in New York, I became a journalist and an author,
故郷のNYではジャーナリスト 兼 作家として
04:50
typing hundreds of thousands of words with one finger.
一本指で 無数の言葉をタイプした
04:52
A friend pointed out to me that all of my big stories
僕が書くものには全て 自分自身の体験が
04:57
mirrored my own, each centering on a life
色濃く反映されていていると
友人から指摘された
04:59
that had changed in an instant,
何かをきっかけに
一瞬にして変わってしまった人生
05:02
owing, if not to a crash, then to an inheritance,
事故の他にも 遺産相続
05:04
a swing of the bat, a click of the shutter, an arrest.
バットのスイング
カメラのシャッター音 逮捕事件
05:07
Each of us had a before and an after.
僕の作品はどれも 人生を変える出来事の
ビフォー・アフターを扱うものばかりだった
05:10
I'd been working through my lot after all.
僕は何かと大変な目にあってきた
05:14
Still, Abed was far from my mind, when last year,
それでも あの事故について書くために
昨年イスラエルに戻ったとき
05:17
I returned to Israel to write of the crash,
アベッドのことはほとんど考えなかった
05:21
and the book I then wrote, "Half-Life,"
でも『ハーフライフ』を書き終わろうかという頃
05:24
was nearly complete when I recognized
未だにアベッドに会いたいと
05:26
that I still wanted to meet Abed,
思っている自分に気が付いた
05:29
and finally I understood why:
そしてついに アベッドに会いたい理由が分かった
05:32
to hear this man say two words: "I'm sorry."
アベッドに一言「ごめんなさい」と
言って欲しかったんだ
05:35
People apologize for less.
悪いことをしたら謝るのが筋だ
05:40
And so I got a cop to confirm that Abed still lived
アベッドが今でも 前と同じ町のどこかに
05:43
somewhere in his same town,
住んでいることを警察に確認した
05:46
and I was now driving to it with a potted yellow rose in the back seat,
車に黄色いバラの鉢植えを載せて
その町へ向かった
05:48
when suddenly flowers seemed a ridiculous offering.
でも急に 花を贈るという考えが
ばかばかしく思えてきた
05:51
But what to get the man who broke your fucking neck?
でも 僕の首を折った馬鹿に 何を贈ればいい?
05:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:58
I pulled into the town of Abu Ghosh,
僕はアブゴシュの街に入り
06:03
and bought a brick of Turkish delight:
トルコの菓子を一つ買った
06:05
pistachios glued in rosewater. Better.
ピスタチオとバラ水のゼリー
花よりはマシだ
06:07
Back on Highway 1, I envisioned what awaited.
高速道路に入り
アベッドとの再会を想像した
06:11
Abed would hug me. Abed would spit at me.
アベッドは僕を抱きしめるだろうか
アベッドは僕につばを吐きかけるだろうか
06:14
Abed would say, "I'm sorry."
アベッドは僕に詫びるだろうか
06:19
I then began to wonder, as I had many times before,
また 過去何度もしてきたように
考え始めた
06:23
how my life would have been different
身体が不自由にならなければ
人生はどんなに違っただろう
06:26
had this man not injured me,
身体が不自由にならなければ
人生はどんなに違っただろう
06:27
had my genes been fed a different helping of experience.
僕の遺伝子は 僕に違った人生を
歩ませてくれただろうか
06:28
Who was I?
僕は何者だったんだろうか
06:32
Was I who I had been before the crash,
僕は あの事故の前の僕と同じ人間なんだろうか
06:34
before this road divided my life like the spine of an open book?
事故で僕の人生は 開いた本の右と左くらい
違ったものになったけれども
06:37
Was I what had been done to me?
自分の身に起きたことで定義づけられるのか
06:41
Were all of us the results of things done to us, done for us,
僕たちは皆 その身に起きたことの
結果として存在するのか
06:44
the infidelity of a parent or spouse,
親やパートナーの裏切り
06:48
money inherited?
受け継いだ財産
それで存在が決まるのか
06:50
Were we instead our bodies, their inborn endowments and deficits?
それとも 持って生まれた
強みや弱みによるのだろうか
06:53
It seemed that we could be nothing more than genes and experience,
遺伝と経験以外のものではないように
思われたけれど
06:57
but how to tease out the one from the other?
どうやって遺伝と経験を区別できるのだろうか
07:00
As Yeats put that same universal question,
この普遍的な問いはイエーツの問いにも通じる
07:03
"O body swayed to music, o brightening glance,
「あぁ、音楽にゆれる身体
あぁ、輝くまなざし
07:06
how can we know the dancer from the dance?"
どうしてダンスとダンサーの区別などできようか」
07:09
I'd been driving for an hour
運転して1時間ほどして
07:16
when I looked in my rearview mirror and saw my own brightening glance.
バックミラーを見たとき
自分の輝くまなざしに気付いた
07:18
The light my eyes had carried for as long as they had been blue.
生まれたときから青い目であるように
僕がずっと目の中に宿してきた光
07:21
The predispositions and impulses that had propelled me
僕が僕であることの気質であり欲求
07:25
as a toddler to try and slip over a boat into a Chicago lake,
幼い頃は舟に乗ってシカゴの湖に漕ぎ出そうとし
07:28
that had propelled me as a teen
10代の頃には ハリケーンの後
07:31
to jump into wild Cape Cod Bay after a hurricane.
荒れ狂うケープコッド湾に
飛び込もうとしたものだ
07:33
But I also saw in my reflection
でも同時に 鏡に映ったものは
07:37
that, had Abed not injured me,
もし事故で障害を負わなければ
07:40
I would now, in all likelihood, be a doctor
今頃きっと医者になって
07:42
and a husband and a father.
結婚して父親になっていたであろう
自分の姿だった
07:45
I would be less mindful of time and of death,
時間や死について
考えることもなかっただろうし
07:48
and, oh, I would not be disabled,
何より障害者ではなかったはずだ
07:51
would not suffer the thousand slings and arrows of my fortune.
この身に降りかかる山ほどの不幸に
苦しむこともなかっただろう
07:52
The frequent furl of five fingers, the chips in my teeth
5本の指が思うように動かないために
07:56
come from biting at all the many things
手で開けられないものを歯で開けようとして
07:59
a solitary hand cannot open.
歯はあちこち欠けてしまった
08:01
The dancer and the dance were hopelessly entwined.
僕の中では ダンスとダンサーは
絶望的に絡み合っていた
08:04
It was approaching 11 when I exited right
間もなく11時という頃 アフラに向けて
08:09
toward Afula, and passed a large quarry
高速を右に抜け 採石場を通り過ぎ
08:11
and was soon in Kfar Kara.
間もなくカファカラに着いた
08:13
I felt a pang of nerves.
急に すごく不安になった
08:16
But Chopin was on the radio, seven beautiful mazurkas,
ラジオからはショパンの
美しい7つのマズルカが流れていて
08:18
and I pulled into a lot by a gas station
ガソリンスタンドの横に車を止め
08:22
to listen and to calm.
気持ちを静めようとショパンを聴いた
08:24
I'd been told that in an Arab town,
昔 言われたことがある
アラブの街では
08:28
one need only mention the name of a local
地元の人の名前を一人挙げれば
08:30
and it will be recognized.
誰のことだかわかってもらえると
08:32
And I was mentioning Abed and myself,
そこで 街の人達に
08:34
noting deliberately that I was here in peace,
和解するために来たことを強調しながら
08:36
to the people in this town,
アベッドと僕の話をした
08:39
when I met Mohamed outside a post office at noon.
正午ごろ郵便局の外で
モハメッドという男に会い
08:41
He listened to me.
彼は僕の話を聞いてくれた
08:44
You know, it was most often when speaking to people
障害を抱えるに至った身の上話をすると
08:47
that I wondered where I ended and my disability began,
大抵の場合 それを聞いた人は
08:49
for many people told me what they told no one else.
誰にも話したことがない
自分自身の話をしてた
08:53
Many cried.
多くの人が涙を流した
08:56
And one day, after a woman I met on the street did the same
ある日 通りで出会った女性も また
同じ反応をした
08:59
and I later asked her why,
涙の理由を尋ねると 彼女は
09:01
she told me that, best she could tell, her tears
僕が心を強く持って
09:03
had had something to do with my being happy and strong,
前向きに生きていることに
感動したからであり 同時に
09:05
but vulnerable too.
僕のもろさを感じたから と言った
09:08
I listened to her words. I suppose they were true.
彼女の言葉に聞き入った
それは本心だったと思う
09:11
I was me,
僕は変わらず僕だったが 彼女にとっては
09:13
but I was now me despite a limp,
障害を乗り越えた強い人間だった
09:16
and that, I suppose, was what now made me, me.
そしてまた 彼女の認識が
今の僕を僕たらしめるのだ
09:18
Anyway, Mohamed told me
モハメッドは おそらく彼が今まで
09:22
what perhaps he would not have told another stranger.
他人には話したことがないと思われる話を
してくれた
09:24
He led me to a house of cream stucco, then drove off.
それから漆喰の家まで僕を案内し
立ち去った
09:26
And as I sat contemplating what to say,
僕が腰を下ろし 何と切り出そうかと考えていると
09:31
a woman approached in a black shawl and black robe.
黒いローブとショールをまとった女性が
近付いてきた
09:33
I stepped from my car and said "Shalom,"
僕は車から降りて
ヘブライ語で挨拶をし
09:37
and identified myself,
名前を名乗った
09:39
and she told me that her husband Abed
夫のアベッドは
09:41
would be home from work in four hours.
4時間くらいで仕事から帰ってくると言った
09:43
Her Hebrew was not good, and she later confessed
彼女のヘブライ語は片言で
- 後から知ったんだが
09:45
that she thought that I had come to install the Internet.
最初 僕をインターネット接続業者だと
思ってたらしい
09:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:51
I drove off and returned at 4:30,
僕は一旦その場を離れ 4時30分に戻った
09:55
thankful to the minaret up the road
ミナレットを目印にして
09:58
that helped me find my way back.
その場所に戻ることが出来た
09:59
And as I approached the front door,
僕が玄関に近付くと
10:02
Abed saw me, my jeans and flannel and cane,
アベッドは僕と 僕のジーンズ
フランネルの服 杖を見た
10:04
and I saw Abed, an average-looking man of average size.
僕もアベッドを見た
見た感じ ごく普通の男だった
10:07
He wore black and white: slippers over socks,
彼の服装は白黒で
靴下の上にスリッパを履き
10:12
pilling sweatpants, a piebald sweater,
ゆったりしたスウェットパンツに
10:15
a striped ski cap pulled down to his forehead.
まだら模様のセーター
縞のスキー帽を目深にかぶっていた
10:17
He'd been expecting me. Mohamed had phoned.
彼は僕が来ることを知っていた
10:20
And so at once, we shook hands, and smiled,
モハメッドが電話したんだ
僕たちはすぐに握手をして互いに微笑み
10:23
and I gave him my gift,
僕はアベッドに土産を渡した
10:27
and he told me I was a guest in his home,
「ようこそ我が家へ」 と
10:29
and we sat beside one another on a fabric couch.
アベッドが言い
僕たちは布製のソファに並んで座った
10:31
It was then that Abed resumed at once
座るなりアベッドは
10:34
the tale of woe he had begun over the phone
16年前に電話で話した
10:37
16 years before.
つらい身の上話の続きをし始めた
10:39
He'd just had surgery on his eyes, he said.
「つい最近 目の手術をした」 と
アベッドは言った
10:42
He had problems with his side and his legs too,
そしてまた 「腰と足も悪く
10:45
and, oh, he'd lost his teeth in the crash.
あの事故で歯も無くなった
10:47
Did I wish to see him remove them?
入れ歯をとってみせようか?」 とも言った
10:50
Abed then rose and turned on the TV
僕が退屈しないよう テレビをつけてから
10:53
so that I wouldn't be alone when he left the room,
アベッドは部屋を出ていき
10:55
and returned with polaroids of the crash
事故の写真と古い運転免許証を持って
10:58
and his old driver's license.
部屋に戻ってきた
11:00
"I was handsome," he said.
「ハンサムだろう」と彼は言った
11:03
We looked down at his laminated mug.
運転免許証のアベッドの写真を見た
11:07
Abed had been less handsome than substantial,
ハンサムというより たくましく
11:09
with thick black hair and a full face and a wide neck.
丸顔で首は太く
髪は黒々としていた
11:12
It was this youth who on May 16, 1990,
この若者のせいで
1990年5月16日
11:15
had broken two necks including mine,
僕ともう一人の首が折れ
11:18
and bruised one brain and taken one life.
一人が脳挫傷を起こし
一人が命を失ったんだ
11:21
Twenty-one years later, he was now thinner than his wife,
事故から20年
アベッドは妻よりやせて
11:24
his skin slack on his face,
顔の皮はたるんでいた
11:27
and looking at Abed looking at his young self,
アベッドが自分の若い頃の写真を見る姿に
11:29
I remembered looking at that photograph of my young self
事故の後 僕も若い頃の写真を
見ていたときの
11:32
after the crash, and recognized his longing.
気持ちを思い出した
事故が起こる前のことを懐かしく思う気持ちを
11:34
"The crash changed both of our lives," I said.
「あの事故で あなたの人生も僕の人生も
変わってしまった」と僕は言った
11:38
Abed then showed me a picture of his mashed truck,
アベッドは潰れたトラックの写真を見せ
11:42
and said that the crash was the fault of a bus driver
あの事故は左車線にいたバスの運転手が
11:45
in the left lane who did not let him pass.
道を譲らなかったために起こったんだと言った
11:48
I did not want to recap the crash with Abed.
僕はアベッドと事故の話を繰り返したくはなかった
11:51
I'd hoped for something simpler:
ただ 土産のトルコ菓子を渡して
11:54
to exchange a Turkish dessert for two words and be on my way.
詫びの一言を聞いて
その場を去りたかった
11:55
And so I didn't point out that in his own testimony
だから僕は 事故の翌日の証言で
12:00
the morning after the crash,
アベッドがバスの運転手について
12:03
Abed did not even mention the bus driver.
何も言わなかったことを
あえて指摘しなかったし
12:05
No, I was quiet. I was quiet because I had not come for truth.
僕はあまり話さなかった
真実を知るために来たわけではなかったから
12:07
I had come for remorse.
アベッドが悔やんでいることを
確かめるために来たんだ
12:11
And so I now went looking for remorse
悔やんでいるのかどうか確かめようと
12:14
and threw truth under the bus.
話をバスからそらした
12:16
"I understand," I said, "that the crash was not your fault,
「事故があなたのせいでないことは分かりました
12:18
but does it make you sad that others suffered?"
でも 事故の被害者を思うと
つらくありませんか」と聞いた
12:21
Abed spoke three quick words.
アベッドは短く答えた
12:26
"Yes, I suffered."
「ああ つらかったよ」
12:28
Abed then told me why he'd suffered.
それから なぜつらかったのかを話し始めた
12:32
He'd lived an unholy life before the crash,
事故が起こるまで 不信心だったから
12:35
and so God had ordained the crash,
神が罰として事故を与えた
12:38
but now, he said, he was religious, and God was pleased.
今は心を改め信心深くなったので
神も喜んでいる と言う
12:40
It was then that God intervened:
事故は神の仕業だった ということだ
12:44
news on the TV of a car wreck that hours before
テレビでは自動車事故の
ニュースをやっていた
12:47
had killed three people up north.
北の方で起こったその事故では
3人が亡くなっていた
12:50
We looked up at the wreckage.
僕達は映像で 大破した車を見た
12:53
"Strange," I said.
僕は「奇妙だ」と言った
12:55
"Strange," he agreed.
アベッドも「奇妙だ」と言った
12:58
I had the thought that there, on Route 804,
僕は その事故現場である804号線には
13:01
there were perpetrators and victims,
自動車事故の被害者と加害者という
13:03
dyads bound by a crash.
二者の関係があると思っていた
13:06
Some, as had Abed, would forget the date.
アベッドのようにその日のことを忘れる者もいる
13:07
Some, as had I, would remember.
僕のように忘れられない者もいる
13:10
The report finished and Abed spoke.
その事故のレポートが終わり
アベッドが口を開いた
13:13
"It is a pity," he said, "that the police
「この国の警察がたちの悪い運転をする奴らを
13:16
in this country are not tough enough on bad drivers."
十分に取り締まれないのは残念なことだ」
13:19
I was baffled.
僕は困惑した
13:23
Abed had said something remarkable.
アベッドは今 驚くべきことを言ったぞ
13:26
Did it point up the degree to which he'd absolved himself of the crash?
アベッドは自分はあの事故に関して
無罪放免だと言ったのか?
13:29
Was it evidence of guilt, an assertion
それとも罪の意識があって
13:33
that he should have been put away longer?
もっと長く服役すべきだったと言っているのか?
13:35
He'd served six months in prison, lost his truck license for a decade.
彼は事故後6ヶ月服役し
10年間トラックの運転免許を持てなかった
13:37
I forgot my discretion.
僕は黙っていようという考えを変えて
13:41
"Um, Abed," I said,
アベッドに聞いてみた
13:43
"I thought you had a few driving issues before the crash."
「事故の前にいくつか問題のある運転を
していましたよね」
13:46
"Well," he said, "I once went 60 in a 40."
彼は「あぁ 時速40のところ
60出したことが一度あったよ」
13:50
And so 27 violations --
ほかにも色々あっただろう
27もの違反が
13:54
driving through a red light, driving at excessive speed,
信号無視 スピード違反 反対車線走行
13:58
driving on the wrong side of a barrier,
それからローギアに入れるべきところ
14:00
and finally, riding his brakes down that hill --
ブレーキを踏みながら あの坂道を下った
14:02
reduced to one.
それを1つしか違反していないと言うのか
14:04
And it was then I understood that no matter how stark the reality,
そこで僕は思い知った
人間というものは事実がどうあれ
14:07
the human being fits it into a narrative that is palatable.
自分に都合の良いように
解釈するものなのだ と
14:10
The goat becomes the hero. The perpetrator becomes the victim.
ヤギが英雄になる
加害者が被害者になる
14:13
It was then I understood that Abed would never apologize.
そのとき僕は
アベッドが決して謝らないことを悟った
14:17
Abed and I sat with our coffee.
アベッドと僕は座ってコーヒーを飲んだ
14:24
We'd spent 90 minutes together,
そうして1時間半ほど過ごし
14:27
and he was now known to me.
僕は彼のことが分かってた
14:30
He was not a particularly bad man
彼は取り立てて悪い人間でもなければ
14:32
or a particularly good man.
取り立てて良い人間でもなかった
14:35
He was a limited man
心の狭い人間だったが
14:37
who'd found it within himself to be kind to me.
彼は彼なりに僕に親切にしていた
14:39
With a nod to Jewish custom,
ユダヤの習慣である会釈をし
14:42
he told me that I should live to be 120 years old.
彼は僕が 120歳まで生きますように と言った
14:44
But it was hard for me to relate to one who had
しかし僕は
14:48
so completely washed his hands of his own calamitous doing,
この無頓着な人間を理解できなかった
14:50
to one whose life was so unexamined that he said
あの悲惨な事故を起こした張本人なのに
すっかり立ち直り
14:53
he thought two people had died in the crash.
あの事故で亡くなったのは
二人だと思っていたと言うような人間
14:57
There was much I wished to say to Abed.
アベッドに言いたいことは沢山あった
15:04
I wished to tell him that, were he to acknowledge my disability,
僕はアベッドに言いたかった
15:08
it would be okay,
僕の障害に気付くのはいいが
15:12
for people are wrong to marvel
僕のような障害者が
15:14
at those like me who smile as we limp.
笑顔でいられることに
人々が驚嘆するのは間違っていると
15:16
People don't know that they have lived through worse,
障害者がもっとつらい思いをしてきたことを
人は知らない
15:19
that problems of the heart hit with a force greater than a runaway truck,
心に負った傷は
トラックにひき逃げされるより重く
15:23
that problems of the mind are greater still,
首の骨を100回折るよりも
15:26
more injurious, than a hundred broken necks.
もっとつらいものだ
15:29
I wished to tell him that what makes most of us who we are
僕はアベッドに言いたかった
15:33
most of all
人はその心や身体
15:36
is not our minds and not our bodies
身に起こること
または起きないことではなく
15:37
and not what happens to us,
それにどうに反応するかで
15:40
but how we respond to what happens to us.
どんな人間であるかが決まる
15:42
"This," wrote the psychiatrist Viktor Frankl,
心理学者ヴィクトール・フランクルは言った
15:44
"is the last of the human freedoms:
「人はいかなる状況でも
15:47
to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances."
その状況に対する態度を
決める自由だけは失わない」
15:49
I wished to tell him that not only paralyzers
僕はアベッドに言いたかった
15:54
and paralyzees must evolve, reconcile to reality,
現実を受け入れ
前に進まなくてはらないのは
15:57
but we all must --
障害を与えた者と
与えられた者だけじゃない
16:00
the aging and the anxious and the divorced and the balding
年老いた者も 心配性な者も 離婚した者も
16:02
and the bankrupt and everyone.
髪が薄くなった者も 破産した者も
誰でもそうなんだ
16:07
I wished to tell him that one does not have to say
僕はまた アベッドにこうも言いたかった
16:11
that a bad thing is good,
あの事故は神のなせる業で
だからあの事故は
16:14
that a crash is from God and so a crash is good,
あれでよかった
首が折れたのはよかったのだ
16:16
a broken neck is good.
不幸は幸いだ なんて言わないで欲しい
16:18
One can say that a bad thing sucks,
不幸は最低だけど それでもなお自然界には
16:20
but that this natural world still has many glories.
多くの素晴らしいことがあると言っていい
16:23
I wished to tell him that, in the end, our mandate is clear:
僕はアベッドに言いたかった
結局 僕らのなすべきことは明白なんだ と
16:27
We have to rise above bad fortune.
人は不運な目にあっても
立ち上がらなくてはならない
16:32
We have to be in the good and enjoy the good,
人は良きものに囲まれ
それを享受すべきだ
16:36
study and work and adventure and friendship -- oh, friendship --
それは学問 職業 冒険 友情といったもの
16:39
and community and love.
そう 友情
そして社会や愛情といったものだ
16:45
But most of all, I wished to tell him
とりわけ僕は アベッドに
ハーマン・メルヴィルが
16:48
what Herman Melville wrote,
書いた言葉を伝えたかった
16:51
that "truly to enjoy bodily warmth,
「真に肉体的な温もりを楽しむには
16:53
some small part of you must be cold,
ある部分は冷たくなくてはならない
16:56
for there is no quality in this world
なぜならこの世界のあらゆるものは
16:59
that is not what it is merely by contrast."
単に対比することにより認識されるものだから」
17:02
Yes, contrast.
そう 何事も対比
17:05
If you are mindful of what you do not have,
もし 自分にないものを認識していれば
17:07
you may be truly mindful of what you do have,
逆に自分が持てるものを 真に認識できるだろう
17:10
and if the gods are kind, you may truly enjoy what you have.
もし神に思いやりがあれば
人は自分の持てるものを真に喜べるだろう
17:13
That is the one singular gift you may receive
そのことは人に与えられる唯一の恵みだ
17:17
if you suffer in any existential way.
もし人が何らかの実在的なものに
苦しんでいるとしたら
17:19
You know death, and so may wake each morning
人は死を意識し そして毎朝 用意された人生を
17:22
pulsing with ready life.
生きるために目を覚ます
17:25
Some part of you is cold,
人には冷たい部分があるがゆえに
17:27
and so another part may truly enjoy what it is to be warm,
温かい部分を真に楽しむことができたり
17:28
or even to be cold.
より冷たい部分を冷たいと感じることができる
17:32
When one morning, years after the crash,
事故から何年も経ったある朝
17:35
I stepped onto stone and the underside of my left foot
僕は石を踏んだ左足の裏に
17:37
felt the flash of cold, nerves at last awake,
一瞬 冷たさを感じた
神経がついに目覚めた瞬間だ
17:40
it was exhilarating, a gust of snow.
その雪の感覚に 心が高揚した
17:43
But I didn't say these things to Abed.
でも僕は これらのことを
アベッドには伝えなかった
17:48
I told him only that he had killed one man, not two.
僕が ただ伝えたのは あの事故で亡くなったのは
二人ではなく一人だということと
17:52
I told him the name of that man.
そして その人の名前だ
17:56
And then I said, "Goodbye."
そして僕はアベッドに「さようなら」と言った
18:01
Thank you.
皆さん ありがとう
18:05
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:07
Thanks a lot.
皆さん どうもありがとう
18:13
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:16
Translator:Fumiko Kamada
Reviewer:Yuriko Hida

sponsored links

Joshua Prager - Journalist
Joshua Prager’s journalism unravels historical secrets -- and his own.

Why you should listen

Joshua Prager writes for publications including Vanity Fair, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal, where he was a senior writer for eight years. George Will has described his work as "exemplary journalistic sleuthing."

His new book, 100 Years, is a list of literary quotations on every age from birth to one hundred. Designed by Milton Glaser, the legendary graphic designer who created the I ♥ NY logo, the book moves year by year through the words of our most beloved authors, revealing the great sequence of life.

His first book, The Echoing Green, was a Washington Post Best Book of the Year. The New York Times Book Review called it “a revelation and a page turner, a group character study unequaled in baseball writing since Roger Kahn’s Boys of Summer some three decades ago.”

His second book, Half-Life, describes his recovery from a bus crash that broke his neck. Dr. Jerome Groopman, staff writer at the New Yorker magazine, called it “an extraordinary memoir, told with nuance and brimming with wisdom.

Joshua was a Nieman fellow at Harvard in 2011 and a Fulbright Distinguished Chair at Hebrew University in 2012. He was born in Eagle Butte, South Dakota, grew up in New Jersey, and lives in New York. He is writing a book about Roe v. Wade.

 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.