sponsored links
TED2013

Erik Brynjolfsson: The key to growth? Race with the machines

エリック・ブリニョルフソン: 成長のための鍵は何?機械との競争

February 26, 2013

機械がますます多くの仕事を奪う中で、失業したりいつまでも賃金が増えないという人が増えています。もはや成長が止まったということなのでしょうか?エリック・ブリニョルフソンはそうではない、これは根本的な経済再編のための成長の痛みなのであると言います。コンピューターをチームメートにできると、なぜ大きな革新を迎えられるのか。惹きつけられる事例を用いて語ります。 ロバート・ゴードンによる反対意見と合わせてご覧ください。

Erik Brynjolfsson - Innovation researcher
Erik Brynjolfsson examines the effects of information technologies on business strategy, productivity and employment. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Growth is not dead.
成長は死んでいません
00:12
(Applause)
(拍手)
00:14
Let's start the story 120 years ago,
120年前のことから 話を始めましょう
00:16
when American factories began to electrify their operations,
当時アメリカの工場では動力が電気に変わり
00:20
igniting the Second Industrial Revolution.
第二次産業革命の火が付いたところでした
00:23
The amazing thing is
驚くべきことに
00:27
that productivity did not increase in those factories
その後30年もの間 工場の生産性は
00:28
for 30 years. Thirty years.
向上しませんでした
30年間です
00:30
That's long enough for a generation of managers to retire.
その間に幹部達はすっかり入れ替わります
00:34
You see, the first wave of managers
つまり 当初の幹部は
00:37
simply replaced their steam engines with electric motors,
単に蒸気エンジンを電気モーターに変えただけで
00:39
but they didn't redesign the factories to take advantage
電気による柔軟性を活用できるように
00:43
of electricity's flexibility.
工場を再編成したわけではないのです
00:46
It fell to the next generation to invent new work processes,
新しい仕事の仕組みを発明したのは
次の世代でした
00:48
and then productivity soared,
その結果 生産性が急上昇すると
00:52
often doubling or even tripling in those factories.
2倍や3倍の改善も見られました
00:55
Electricity is an example of a general purpose technology,
電気は汎用技術の一例です
00:59
like the steam engine before it.
その前の蒸気エンジンも同様です
01:03
General purpose technologies drive most economic growth,
汎用技術は経済成長の大半を促進します
01:05
because they unleash cascades of complementary innovations,
これを補完するイノーベーションが
次々に始まるからです
01:09
like lightbulbs and, yes, factory redesign.
電球しかり 工場の再編成しかり
01:12
Is there a general purpose technology of our era?
では今の時代に 汎用技術はあるでしょうか
01:16
Sure. It's the computer.
もちろん コンピューターです
01:20
But technology alone is not enough.
でも 技術だけでは不十分です
01:22
Technology is not destiny.
技術に 未来の全てを委ねることはできません
01:25
We shape our destiny,
人が未来を形づくるのです
01:28
and just as the earlier generations of managers
工場の再編成が必要だった―
01:29
needed to redesign their factories,
旧世代の幹部たちと同様に
01:32
we're going to need to reinvent our organizations
組織や さらには経済システム全体を
01:34
and even our whole economic system.
見直す必要が生じるでしょう
01:36
We're not doing as well at that job as we should be.
この見直しは まだ不十分です
01:39
As we'll see in a moment,
今から示すように
01:42
productivity is actually doing all right,
生産性に関しては 順調な推移ですが
01:44
but it has become decoupled from jobs,
そのことと雇用とは分離されてしまい
01:46
and the income of the typical worker is stagnating.
典型的な労働者の収入は伸び悩んでいます
01:50
These troubles are sometimes misdiagnosed
この問題は「イノベーションが終わった」と
01:55
as the end of innovation,
分析されることがありますが
これは誤りです
01:57
but they are actually the growing pains
時代の変化に伴う成長痛です
02:01
of what Andrew McAfee and I call the new machine age.
この時代をアンドリュー・マカフィーと私は「新しい機械の時代」と名づけました
02:03
Let's look at some data.
データを見ていきましょう
02:08
So here's GDP per person in America.
アメリカで1人当たりのGDPを示します
02:10
There's some bumps along the way, but the big story
多少の凹凸はありますが 全体として
02:13
is you could practically fit a ruler to it.
定規に沿うような真っすぐなグラフです
02:16
This is a log scale, so what looks like steady growth
グラフの目盛は対数です
つまり一定の成長ということは
02:19
is actually an acceleration in real terms.
実際の数値では成長が加速しています
02:22
And here's productivity.
こちらは生産性を示したものです
02:25
You can see a little bit of a slowdown there in the mid-'70s,
70年代半ばに少し停滞が見られます
02:27
but it matches up pretty well with the Second Industrial Revolution,
第二次産業革命の時にも同様の停滞がありました
02:30
when factories were learning how to electrify their operations.
工場をどう電化するべきかを模索した時期に相当します
02:34
After a lag, productivity accelerated again.
停滞の後 生産性は再び加速しました
02:36
So maybe "history doesn't repeat itself,
「歴史はくり返さないが 韻を踏む」
02:40
but sometimes it rhymes."
という言葉の通りかもしれません
02:43
Today, productivity is at an all-time high,
今では 生産性は史上最高に達し
02:46
and despite the Great Recession,
「大不況」にも関わらず
02:49
it grew faster in the 2000s than it did in the 1990s,
2000年代の生産性の伸びは90年代を上回ります
02:51
the roaring 1990s, and that was faster than the '70s or '80s.
好景気だった90年代は
70年代や80年代よりも生産性が伸びていました
02:55
It's growing faster than it did during the Second Industrial Revolution.
第二次産業革命の時期よりも急速に成長しました
02:59
And that's just the United States.
このデータはアメリカだけの話
03:03
The global news is even better.
世界に目を向ければさらに良くなります
03:04
Worldwide incomes have grown at a faster rate
過去十年の間に 世界の所得は
03:08
in the past decade than ever in history.
史上かつてない伸び率で成長を遂げました
03:10
If anything, all these numbers actually understate our progress,
ただ これらの数字は進歩をむしろ過小評価しています
03:13
because the new machine age
新しい機械の時代には
03:18
is more about knowledge creation
物質的な生産よりも
03:20
than just physical production.
知識を作り出すことが重視されるからです
03:21
It's mind not matter, brain not brawn,
物質よりも精神 腕力よりも知力
03:24
ideas not things.
物よりもアイデア
03:26
That creates a problem for standard metrics,
困ったことに伝統的な経済統計では扱えません
03:29
because we're getting more and more stuff for free,
なぜならどんどん無料のものが増えているからです
03:31
like Wikipedia, Google, Skype,
ウィキペディア グーグル スカイプ
03:35
and if they post it on the web, even this TED Talk.
そしてウェブに公開されれば このTEDトークも無料
03:37
Now getting stuff for free is a good thing, right?
無料で手に入るというのは良いことですよね
03:40
Sure, of course it is.
ええ もちろんです
03:44
But that's not how economists measure GDP.
でもそういうのは 経済学者はGDPに含めません
03:45
Zero price means zero weight in the GDP statistics.
価格がゼロのものは GDP統計における重みもゼロです
03:49
According to the numbers, the music industry
統計によれば
03:55
is half the size that it was 10 years ago,
音楽業界は10年前の半分の規模になっていますが
03:57
but I'm listening to more and better music than ever.
私は これまでになく多くの良い音楽を聴いています
04:00
You know, I bet you are too.
みなさんもそうでしょう?
04:04
In total, my research estimates
私の研究による推定では
04:06
that the GDP numbers miss over 300 billion dollars per year
GDP の総計金額は 毎年3000億ドル相当の
04:09
in free goods and services on the Internet.
ネット上で無料の物やサービスを見逃しています
04:13
Now let's look to the future.
さて未来に目を向けましょう
04:17
There are some super smart people
極めて頭の切れる何人かの人が
04:18
who are arguing that we've reached the end of growth,
成長は終わったのだと論じています
04:21
but to understand the future of growth,
しかし 将来の成長について理解するためには
04:26
we need to make predictions
成長を引っ張る原動力について
04:29
about the underlying drivers of growth.
予測しなければなりません
04:32
I'm optimistic, because the new machine age
私は楽観的です
なぜなら新しい機械の時代の特徴が
04:35
is digital, exponential and combinatorial.
デジタル 指数関数的 組合せ だからです
04:39
When goods are digital, they can be replicated
デジタル化された物は複製できます
04:44
with perfect quality at nearly zero cost,
品質は完璧で コストはほぼゼロで
04:46
and they can be delivered almost instantaneously.
たちどころに届けられます
04:51
Welcome to the economics of abundance.
過剰の経済へ ようこそというわけです
04:55
But there's a subtler benefit to the digitization of the world.
デジタル化された世界には目立たないメリットもあります
04:58
Measurement is the lifeblood of science and progress.
科学と進歩において計測は不可欠です
05:01
In the age of big data,
ビッグデータの時代になって
05:06
we can measure the world in ways we never could before.
これまでにない方法で世界を計測できるようになりました
05:08
Secondly, the new machine age is exponential.
第二に 機械の時代の特徴は指数関数的です
05:12
Computers get better faster than anything else ever.
コンピューターは他に類をみないほど急速に進歩します
05:16
A child's Playstation today is more powerful
今の子どものプレイステーションは
05:22
than a military supercomputer from 1996.
1996年の軍用スパコンより強力です
05:26
But our brains are wired for a linear world.
でも人は直線的な成長を考えてしまいがちで
05:30
As a result, exponential trends take us by surprise.
その結果 指数関数的な発展には驚かされてばかり
05:33
I used to teach my students that there are some things,
かつて 授業でもこう教えていました
05:37
you know, computers just aren't good at,
コンピューターにだって苦手なことがある
05:40
like driving a car through traffic.
道路で車を運転することなどだ
05:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:44
That's right, here's Andy and me grinning like madmen
そのとおり この写真でアンディと私が
バカみたいに笑っているのは
05:46
because we just rode down Route 101
ルート101のドライブ直後だからです
05:50
in, yes, a driverless car.
そう 自動運転だったのです
05:52
Thirdly, the new machine age is combinatorial.
第三に新しい機械の時代は組合せが特徴
05:56
The stagnationist view is that ideas get used up,
停滞派の人は 低いところに実った果実のように
アイデアは
05:58
like low-hanging fruit,
もう尽きてしまったと見ています
06:02
but the reality is that each innovation
しかし実際はすべての革新が
06:04
creates building blocks for even more innovations.
更なる革新への構成要素となります
06:07
Here's an example. In just a matter of a few weeks,
こんな例があります 私の学生の一人が
06:11
an undergraduate student of mine
ほんの数週間で
06:14
built an app that ultimately reached 1.3 million users.
アプリを開発して たちまち130万人の利用者を獲得しました
06:16
He was able to do that so easily
簡単にできたのはアプリを
06:20
because he built it on top of Facebook,
フェイスブックを使って作ったから
06:22
and Facebook was built on top of the web,
フェイスブックはウェブを使い
06:24
and that was built on top of the Internet,
ウェブはインターネットを使い―
06:26
and so on and so forth.
と どんどん続いてきたわけです
06:27
Now individually, digital, exponential and combinatorial
デジタル 指数関数的 組合せ このいずれかひとつだけでも
06:30
would each be game-changers.
ゲームチェンジャーです
06:34
Put them together, and we're seeing a wave
3つが合わさって 驚愕するような
06:37
of astonishing breakthroughs,
革新の大波が現れています
06:39
like robots that do factory work or run as fast as a cheetah
工場で働くロボットや チータより速く走るロボット
06:40
or leap tall buildings in a single bound.
高いビルを一跳びで越えるロボットも登場します
06:43
You know, robots are even revolutionizing
そう ロボットによる革新は
06:46
cat transportation.
猫の移動にまで及びます
06:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:50
But perhaps the most important invention,
さらにもっとも大事な発明は
06:53
the most important invention is machine learning.
機械学習です
06:55
Consider one project: IBM's Watson.
IBMのワトソンを見てみましょう
07:00
These little dots here,
クイズ番組の『ジェパディ!』の
07:04
those are all the champions on the quiz show "Jeopardy."
優勝者の成績を示すグラフです
07:05
At first, Watson wasn't very good,
初めのうち ワトソンはぜんぜん駄目でした
07:10
but it improved at a rate faster than any human could,
しかし どんな人よりも素早く上達して
07:13
and shortly after Dave Ferrucci showed this chart
デイブ・フェルッチが このグラフを
07:18
to my class at MIT,
MITの私のクラスで見せた直後に
07:21
Watson beat the world "Jeopardy" champion.
ワトソンが『ジェパディ!』の世界チャンピオンを破りました
07:23
At age seven, Watson is still kind of in its childhood.
歳は7歳 ワトソンはまだ子どもみたいなものですが
07:26
Recently, its teachers let it surf the Internet unsupervised.
最近では一人でのネットサーフィンも許されています
07:30
The next day, it started answering questions with profanities.
次の日からは回答にひどい言葉が混じり始めました
07:35
Damn. (Laughter)
くそっ (笑)
07:41
But you know, Watson is growing up fast.
でも ワトソンの成長は速くて
07:44
It's being tested for jobs in call centers, and it's getting them.
コールセンターでは試用を経て 採用され始めています
07:46
It's applying for legal, banking and medical jobs,
法律や銀行や医療でも試されており
07:50
and getting some of them.
一部で使われ始めています
07:54
Isn't it ironic that at the very moment
知的な機械を作っている―
07:56
we are building intelligent machines,
まさにそのときに
07:58
perhaps the most important invention in human history,
人類の歴史で最も重要な発明が
登場しているときに
08:00
some people are arguing that innovation is stagnating?
革新が停滞していると論じる人がいるのは
皮肉なことではありませんか
08:03
Like the first two industrial revolutions,
最初の二つの産業革命と同じように
08:07
the full implications of the new machine age
新しい機械の時代の影響が全て
08:10
are going to take at least a century to fully play out,
明らかになるには 少なくとも百年はかかるでしょう
08:13
but they are staggering.
しかし最終結果は圧倒的なものです
08:16
So does that mean we have nothing to worry about?
では何も心配することはないのでしょうか?
08:19
No. Technology is not destiny.
あります 技術発展に 未来の全てを委ねるわけには行きません
08:22
Productivity is at an all time high,
生産性は史上最高ですが
08:26
but fewer people now have jobs.
仕事に就ける人の数は減っています
08:28
We have created more wealth in the past decade than ever,
ここ十年で生み出された富はかつてないものですが
08:31
but for a majority of Americans, their income has fallen.
大半のアメリカ人の収入は減りました
08:34
This is the great decoupling
これが生産性と雇用との
08:38
of productivity from employment,
大きな分離であり
08:41
of wealth from work.
富と仕事との分離です
08:44
You know, it's not surprising that millions of people
この大きな分離によって何百万人もの人が
08:47
have become disillusioned by the great decoupling,
幻滅させられていますが
08:49
but like too many others,
他の多くの人と同じように
08:52
they misunderstand its basic causes.
その基本的な原因を誤解しています
08:54
Technology is racing ahead,
技術が先行してしまっていて
08:57
but it's leaving more and more people behind.
取り残される人が増えているのです
08:59
Today, we can take a routine job,
今では 繰り返しの作業なら
09:03
codify it in a set of machine-readable instructions,
機械にわかる指示としてプログラムすれば
09:06
and then replicate it a million times.
百万回でも繰り返させられます
09:09
You know, I recently overheard a conversation
最近 耳にしたこんな会話が
09:12
that epitomizes these new economics.
こういう新しい経済をよく表しています
09:15
This guy says, "Nah, I don't use H&R Block anymore.
「最近では HRB の税務サービスは頼まないことにしたよ
09:17
TurboTax does everything that my tax preparer did,
ターボ・タックスだけで申告書はできてしまうし
09:21
but it's faster, cheaper and more accurate."
この方が早くて 安くて正確だ」
09:23
How can a skilled worker
経験を積んだ事務員が
09:28
compete with a $39 piece of software?
39ドルのソフトウェアに勝てるものでしょうか
09:30
She can't.
無理です
09:33
Today, millions of Americans do have faster,
今では 何百万人ものアメリカ人が
09:35
cheaper, more accurate tax preparation,
早く安く正確に申告書を作成しています
09:37
and the founders of Intuit
インテュイット社の創始者は
09:40
have done very well for themselves.
十分報われていますが
09:41
But 17 percent of tax preparers no longer have jobs.
申告書作成の事務員は17パーセントが職を失いました
09:44
That is a microcosm of what's happening,
今起きていることの縮図です
09:48
not just in software and services, but in media and music,
ソフトウェアやサービスだけでなく
メディアや音楽でも
09:50
in finance and manufacturing, in retailing and trade --
金融や製造業や 小売りや貿易でも
09:55
in short, in every industry.
つまりあらゆる産業に起きていることです
09:58
People are racing against the machine,
人は機械と対立して競争しています
10:02
and many of them are losing that race.
たくさんの人がその競争に負けています
10:05
What can we do to create shared prosperity?
繁栄を広く分かち合うにはどうすればよいでしょうか
10:08
The answer is not to try to slow down technology.
技術を減速させるというのは答えではありません
10:12
Instead of racing against the machine,
機械と競争する代わりに
10:15
we need to learn to race with the machine.
機械と共に競争しなければなりません
10:18
That is our grand challenge.
これが我々の大きな課題です
10:22
The new machine age
新しい機械の時代は
10:25
can be dated to a day 15 years ago
15年前に始まりました
10:27
when Garry Kasparov, the world chess champion,
チェスの世界チャンピオンだったガルリ・カスパロフが
10:30
played Deep Blue, a supercomputer.
スーパーコンピューターのディープ・ブルーと
対戦し
10:33
The machine won that day,
機械が勝った その日からです
10:37
and today, a chess program running on a cell phone
今では 携帯電話で動作するチェスのプログラムでも
10:39
can beat a human grandmaster.
チェスの名人に勝てます
10:42
It got so bad that, when he was asked
こんな厳しい状況の中で
コンピューターと対戦するときの―
10:44
what strategy he would use against a computer,
戦略を聞かれたオランダの名人
10:47
Jan Donner, the Dutch grandmaster, replied,
ヤン・ドネルはこう答えました
10:50
"I'd bring a hammer."
「金づちを持って行くよ」
10:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:56
But today a computer is no longer the world chess champion.
しかし 今ではコンピューターも
世界のチェス王者ではありません
10:59
Neither is a human,
人でもありません
11:04
because Kasparov organized a freestyle tournament
人とコンピュータとが共に戦うことができる
11:07
where teams of humans and computers
フリースタイルのトーナメントを
11:10
could work together,
カスパロフが開催したのです
11:12
and the winning team had no grandmaster,
優勝チームにはチェスの名人もいないし
11:14
and it had no supercomputer.
スーパーコンピュータもありませんでした
11:17
What they had was better teamwork,
優勝チームにあったのは優れたチームワークで
11:20
and they showed that a team of humans and computers,
人とコンピューターが組んだときに
11:24
working together, could beat any computer
どんなコンピュータにも
11:29
or any human working alone.
単独のどんな選手にも勝つことを示しました
11:32
Racing with the machine
機械と共に競争することは
11:36
beats racing against the machine.
機械と競争することに勝ります
11:37
Technology is not destiny.
技術に 未来の全てを委ねることはできません
11:40
We shape our destiny.
人が未来を形づくるのです
11:42
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
11:44
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:45
Translator:Natsuhiko Mizutani
Reviewer:Akinori Oyama

sponsored links

Erik Brynjolfsson - Innovation researcher
Erik Brynjolfsson examines the effects of information technologies on business strategy, productivity and employment.

Why you should listen

The director of the MIT Center for Digital Business and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, Erik Brynjolfsson asks how IT affects organizations, markets and the economy. His recent work studies data-driven decision-making, management practices that drive productivity, the pricing implications of Internet commerce and the role of intangible assets.
 
Brynjolfsson was among the first researchers to measure the productivity contributions of information and community technology (ICT) and the complementary role of organizational capital and other intangibles. His research also provided the first quantification of the value of online product variety, often known as the “Long Tail,” and developed pricing and bundling models for information goods.

His books include Wired for Innovation: How IT Is Reshaping the Economy and Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution Is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy (with Andrew McAfee); and the recent article "Big Data: The Management Revolution" (with Andrew McAfee).

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.