09:21
TED2013

Two young scientists break down plastics with bacteria

二人の若き科学者、バクテリアでプラスチックを分解

Filmed:

プラスチックは、ひとたび作られると、(ほぼ)なくなることはありません。高校3年のとき、ミランダ・ワンとジニー・ヤオは新しいバクテリアを探す旅に出ます。プラスチックを生分解する、正確には、有害な可塑剤であるフタル酸エステル類を分解するバクテリアです。二人が見つけた答えは、ビックリするくらい身近なところにありました。

- Science fair winners
Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao have identified a new bacteria that breaks down nasty compounds called phthalates, common to flexible plastics and linked to health problems. And they’re still teenagers. Full bio

Miranda Wang: We're here to talk about accidents.
今日は アクシデントについてお話しします
00:12
How do you feel about accidents?
アクシデントについて どう思いますか?
00:15
When we think about accidents,
アクシデントと聞いて
00:17
we usually consider them to be harmful,
思い浮かべるのは
たいてい 有害とか
00:19
unfortunate or even dangerous, and they certainly can be.
不運とか 危険なことです
確かに そういう場合もあります
00:21
But are they always that bad?
でも 悪いことばかりでしょうか?
00:25
The discovery that had led to penicillin, for example,
例えば ペニシリンにつながる発見は
00:28
is one of the most fortunate accidents of all time.
今までで最高のアクシデントによるものです
00:30
Without biologist Alexander Fleming's moldy accident,
生物学者 アレクサンダー・フレミングが
ずさんな実験をして
00:34
caused by a neglected workstation,
カビを生やしてしまうアクシデントがなければ
00:37
we wouldn't be able to fight off so many bacterial infections.
これだけ多くの細菌感染症に
私たちは対抗できていないでしょう
00:39
Jeanny Yao: Miranda and I are here today
今日 ミランダと私はここで
00:44
because we'd like to share how our accidents
私たちのアクシデントが
どう発見に結びついたか
00:46
have led to discoveries.
お話ししたいと思います
00:48
In 2011, we visited the Vancouver Waste Transfer Station
2011年 私たちは
バンクーバーのゴミ処理場に行き
00:50
and saw an enormous pit of plastic waste.
大量のプラスチック廃棄物を
目の当たりにしました
00:54
We realized that when plastics get to the dump,
そこで気づいたのは
ゴミの集積所では
00:57
it's difficult to sort them because they have similar densities,
プラスチックの分別は難しいということです
みんな同じような密度で
01:00
and when they're mixed with organic matter
有機ゴミや建築廃材と混ざろうものなら
01:03
and construction debris, it's truly impossible
プラスチックだけ取り出して
01:05
to pick them out and environmentally eliminate them.
環境に優しい形で処理するのは
本当に不可能になります
01:07
MW: However, plastics are useful
プラスチックは便利です
01:10
because they're durable, flexible,
耐久性や柔軟性があり
01:13
and can be easily molded into so many useful shapes.
様々な形に成型して
使うことができます
01:15
The downside of this convenience
でも この便利さの裏返しとして
01:18
is that there's a high cost to this.
高い犠牲を払わないといけません
01:20
Plastics cause serious problems, such as
プラスチックは深刻な問題を引き起こします
01:23
the destruction of ecosystems,
例えば 生態系の破壊
01:25
the pollution of natural resources,
天然資源の汚染
01:27
and the reduction of available land space.
そして 処理にも場所を取ります
01:29
This picture you see here is the Great Pacific Gyre.
この写真は 太平洋ゴミベルトです
01:31
When you think about plastic pollution
プラスチックによる汚染や
01:34
and the marine environment,
海洋環境を考えるとき
01:36
we think about the Great Pacific Gyre,
このゴミベルトを思い浮かべます
01:38
which is supposed to be a floating island of plastic waste.
プラスチックのゴミからなる
浮島のようなものです
01:39
But that's no longer an accurate depiction
でも それは
もはや海洋環境における―
01:43
of plastic pollution in the marine environment.
プラスチック汚染の実態を
正しく表わさなくなっています
01:45
Right now, the ocean is actually a soup of plastic debris,
今 海全体が
プラスチック廃棄物のスープの状態で
01:48
and there's nowhere you can go in the ocean
海のどこを探しても
01:52
where you wouldn't be able to find plastic particles.
プラスチックの破片がないところ
なんてありません
01:54
JY: In a plastic-dependent society,
プラスチック依存社会において
01:57
cutting down production is a good goal, but it's not enough.
プラスチックの減産は良い目標ですが
十分ではありません
02:00
And what about the waste that's already been produced?
だって すでに作られたプラスチック廃棄物は
そのままでしょう?
02:03
Plastics take hundreds to thousands of years to biodegrade.
プラスチックの生分解には
何百年 何千年とかかります
02:06
So we thought, you know what?
そこで 私たちは考えました
02:10
Instead of waiting for that garbage to sit there and pile up,
ただ ゴミがたまって積みあがるのを
見ているのではなくて
02:11
let's find a way to break them down
分解する方法を見つけよう
02:15
with bacteria.
バクテリアでです
02:17
Sounds cool, right?
クールでしょ?
02:19
Audience: Yeah. JY: Thank you.
(会場から「イエス」)
ありがとう
02:21
But we had a problem.
でも 問題がありました
02:22
You see, plastics have very complex structures
プラスチックは とても複雑な構造をしていて
02:24
and are difficult to biodegrade.
生分解は難しいんです
02:27
Anyhow, we were curious and hopeful
でも 好奇心と希望にあふれていた私たちは
02:30
and still wanted to give it a go.
それでも やってみたいと思いました
02:32
MW: With this idea in mind, Jeanny and I read through
このアイデアをもとに ジニーと私は
02:33
some hundreds of scientific articles on the Internet,
ネット上にある
何百という科学論文を読み
02:36
and we drafted a research proposal
研究計画書をまとめました
02:38
in the beginning of our grade 12 year.
高校3年の初めのことです
02:40
We aimed to find bacteria from our local Fraser River
考えたのは 地元のフレーザー川で
フタル酸エステル類と言われる―
02:43
that can degrade a harmful plasticizer called phthalates.
有害な可塑剤を分解できる
バクテリアを見つけることです
02:46
Phthalates are additives used in everyday plastic products
フタル酸エステル類は
一般的なプラスチック製品に
02:50
to increase their flexibility, durability and transparency.
柔軟性 耐性 透明性を向上させる
添加剤として使われています
02:52
Although they're part of the plastic,
それは プラスチックの一部ですが
02:57
they're not covalently bonded to the plastic backbone.
プラスチックの構造自体とは
共有結合していないので
02:59
As a result, they easily escape into our environment.
簡単に 外の環境に
流れ出てしまうのです
03:01
Not only do phthalates pollute our environment,
フタル酸エステル類は
環境を汚染するだけでなく
03:04
but they also pollute our bodies.
私たちの体まで汚染してしまいます
03:07
To make the matter worse, phthalates are found in products
さらに悪いことに
フタル酸エステル類は
03:09
to which we have a high exposure, such as babies' toys,
私たちがよく使う物に使われています
例えば 赤ちゃんのおもちゃ
03:12
beverage containers, cosmetics, and even food wraps.
飲料容器 化粧品
食品用ラップフィルムにもです
03:16
Phthalates are horrible because
フタル酸エステル類が怖いのは
03:20
they're so easily taken into our bodies.
簡単に体に取り込まれてしまうからです
03:22
They can be absorbed by skin contact, ingested, and inhaled.
肌と触れたり 口にしたり
吸い込むだけで 体に吸収されてしまいます
03:24
JY: Every year, at least 470 million pounds of phthalates
毎年 21万トン以上のフタル酸エステル類が
03:29
contaminate our air, water and soil.
私たちの空気 水 土を汚染しています
03:32
The Environmental Protection Agency
環境保護庁は
03:36
even classified this group as a top-priority pollutant
フタル酸エステル類を
最優先取組み汚染物質としています
03:37
because it's been shown to cause cancer and birth defects
ガンや出生異常を引き起こすとされるからです
03:40
by acting as a hormone disruptor.
ホルモンかく乱物質として作用するのです
03:44
We read that each year, the Vancouver municipal government
毎年 バンクーバー市は
03:46
monitors phthalate concentration levels in rivers
河川でのフタル酸エステル類の
汚染レベルを監視し
03:49
to assess their safety.
安全性を評価しています
03:51
So we figured, if there are places along our Fraser River
それで思いました
フレーザー川沿いで
03:53
that are contaminated with phthalates,
フタル酸エステル類に汚染されている場所で
03:56
and if there are bacteria that are able to live in these areas,
生きているバクテリアがあるとすれば
03:58
then perhaps, perhaps these bacteria could have evolved
たぶん ひょっとしたら
そのバクテリアは フタル酸エステル類を
04:01
to break down phthalates.
分解できるよう進化しているのではないか
04:05
MW: So we presented this good idea
私たちは この素敵なアイデアを
04:07
to Dr. Lindsay Eltis at the University of British Columbia,
ブリティッシュコロンビア大の
リンズィー・エルティス博士に提案しました
04:10
and surprisingly, he actually took us into his lab
すると驚くことに
博士の研究室で受け入れてくれ
04:13
and asked his graduate students Adam and James to help us.
院生のアダムとジェームズを
サポートにあててくれました
04:16
Little did we know at that time
当時は夢にも思っていませんでした
04:20
that a trip to the dump and some research on the Internet
ゴミ集積場に行って
インターネットで調査をして
04:22
and plucking up the courage to act upon inspiration
思い切って ヒラメキをもとに行動したら
04:25
would take us on a life-changing journey
人生を変えるような―
04:28
of accidents and discoveries.
アクシデントと発見の旅が始まるなんて
04:30
JY: The first step in our project
プロジェクトの最初のステップとして
04:33
was to collect soil samples from three different sites
フレーザー川沿いの3つの場所から
04:35
along the Fraser River.
土のサンプル採取をしました
04:37
Out of thousands of bacteria, we wanted to find ones
何千もいるバクテリアの中から
フタル酸エステル類を―
04:39
that could break down phthalates,
分解できるものを見つけるため
04:42
so we enriched our cultures with phthalates
フタル酸エステル類が
唯一の炭素源となるよう
04:43
as the only carbon source.
集積培養を行いました
04:45
This implied that, if anything grew in our cultures,
つまり この培養物に何かが増殖すれば
04:47
then they must be able to live off of phthalates.
それはフタル酸エステル類を
食べて生きていることになる
04:49
Everything went well from there,
万事うまく行き
04:52
and we became amazing scientists. (Laughter)
私たちは素晴らしい科学者になりましたとさ
(笑)
04:54
MW: Um ... uh, Jeanny. JY: I'm just joking.
あー ジニー
冗談よ
04:57
MW: Okay. Well, it was partially my fault.
そう あれは私の失敗でもありました
05:00
You see, I accidentally cracked the flask
フラスコをうっかり割ってしまったんです
05:02
that had contained our third enrichment culture,
3つ目の集積培養物が入っていました
05:05
and as a result, we had to wipe down the incubator room
それで 培養室を隅々まで拭くはめに
05:07
with bleach and ethanol twice.
漂白とエタノールで2回も
05:10
And this is only one of the examples of the many accidents
しかも これは私たちの実験で起こった―
05:12
that happened during our experimentation.
数々のアクシデントの一つに過ぎません
05:15
But this mistake turned out to be rather serendipitous.
でも このミスが予期せぬ発見を導きます
05:17
We noticed that the unharmed cultures
無事に残った培養物は
05:20
came from places of opposite contamination levels,
汚染レベルが正反対の所からのものだったので
05:23
so this mistake actually led us to think that
このミスのお蔭で こう思い至ったんです
05:26
perhaps we can compare
汚染レベルが全く違う場所から
05:28
the different degradative potentials of bacteria
バクテリアを取って
05:30
from sites of opposite contamination levels.
分解能力を比べればいいんじゃないか
05:33
JY: Now that we grew the bacteria,
バクテリアは育てたので
05:37
we wanted to isolate strains by streaking onto mediate plates,
これを培地上に画線培養をして
菌株を単離することにしました
05:39
because we thought that would be
これなら安全で
05:42
less accident-prone, but we were wrong again.
アクシデントも起こりにくいと思ったから
でも また間違っていました
05:44
We poked holes in our agar while streaking
培地に画線を引いているとき
寒天に穴をあけて
05:47
and contaminated some samples and funghi.
いくつかのサンプルと菌を汚染してしまいました
05:51
As a result, we had to streak and restreak several times.
それで 何度も培地に
画線を引き直すはめになりました
05:53
Then we monitored phthalate utilization
フタル酸エステル類の利用と
05:56
and bacterial growth,
バクテリアの増殖を観察し
05:59
and found that they shared an inverse correlation,
両者には逆相関関係があると気づきました
06:01
so as bacterial populations increased,
バクテリアが増えれば
06:03
phthalate concentrations decreased.
フタル酸エステル類の濃度は減少する
06:06
This means that our bacteria were actually living off of phthalates.
つまり このバクテリアが
フタル酸エステル類を食べているのです
06:08
MW: So now that we found bacteria that could break down phthalates,
フタル酸エステル類を分解するバクテリアを発見して
06:12
we wondered what these bacteria were.
このバクテリアが何か気になりました
06:15
So Jeanny and I took three of our most efficient strains
ジニーと私は 最も効率的な3つの菌株で
06:17
and then performed gene amplification sequencing on them
遺伝子を増幅して配列を解析し
06:20
and matched our data with an online comprehensive database.
そして そのデータを
オンラインの総合データベースで照合
06:23
We were happy to see that,
嬉しいことに
06:26
although our three strains had been previously identified bacteria,
3つの菌株は すでに発見されていたものの
06:27
two of them were not previously associated
うち2つは これまでフタル酸エステル類分解とは
06:31
with phthalate degradation, so this was actually a novel discovery.
関係づけられていなかったので
新しい発見をしたことになりました
06:34
JY: To better understand how this biodegradation works,
この生分解がどう作用するのか
良く理解するため
06:38
we wanted to verify the catabolic pathways of our three strains.
この3つの菌の異化経路を
検証する必要がありました
06:42
To do this, we extracted enzymes from our bacteria
そのために バクテリアから酵素を抽出し
06:46
and reacted with an intermediate of phthalic acid.
フタル酸の中間体と反応させました
06:49
MW: We monitored this experiment with spectrophotometry
光度分析法で この実験を観察し
06:52
and obtained this beautiful graph.
得られたのが この美しいグラフです
06:55
This graph shows that our bacteria really do have
このグラフによれば
私たちのバクテリアには
06:58
a genetic pathway to biodegrade phthalates.
遺伝的に フタル酸エステル類を
生分解する経路があり
07:00
Our bacteria can transform phthalates, which is a harmful toxin,
有害な毒であるフタル酸エステル類を
07:03
into end products such as carbon dioxide, water
分解して 二酸化炭素や水
アルコールなどの―
07:06
and alcohol.
最終生成物にできます
07:09
I know some of you in the crowd are thinking,
こう思っている方もいるでしょう
07:10
well, carbon dioxide is horrible, it's a greenhouse gas.
二酸化炭素なんて最悪だ
温暖化ガスじゃないかって
07:11
But if our bacteria did not evolve to break down phthalates,
でも このバクテリアが
フタル酸エステル類を生分解しなくても
07:15
they would have used some other kind of carbon source,
他の炭素源を使って
07:18
and aerobic respiration would have led it
好気呼吸をするので
07:21
to have end products such as carbon dioxide anyway.
どっちみち 二酸化炭素などの
最終生成物を生み出します
07:23
We were also interested to see that,
面白いことには
07:26
although we've obtained greater diversity
生分解力を持つバクテリアの種類は
07:28
of bacteria biodegraders from the bird habitat site,
鳥類生息地でより多く見つかりましたが
07:31
we obtained the most efficient degraders from the landfill site.
埋立地のバクテリアの生分解力が
最も効率的でした
07:33
So this fully shows that nature evolves
だから 自然淘汰によって
07:37
through natural selection.
自然は進化するんです
07:39
JY: So Miranda and I shared this research
ミランダと私は この研究を
07:42
at the Sanofi BioGENEius Challenge competition and were recognized
サノフィ・バイオジニアス・チャレンジ・カナダに出し
07:44
with the greatest commercialization potential.
商業化可能性が最も高いと評価されました
07:47
Although we're not the first ones to find bacteria
フタル酸エステル類を分解するバクテリアを
初めて発見したわけではありません
07:50
that can break down phthalates,
フタル酸エステル類を分解するバクテリアを
初めて発見したわけではありません
07:53
we were the first ones to look into our local river
でも 地元の川に行って
地元の問題を解決する方法を
07:54
and find a possible solution to a local problem.
探したのは 私たちが初めてです
07:56
We have not only shown that bacteria
私たちが示したのは
08:00
can be the solution to plastic pollution, but also that
バクテリアが プラスチック汚染の
解決策になりうることだけでなく
08:03
being open to uncertain outcomes and taking risks
不確実なことを受け入れ
リスクを取ることによって
08:06
create opportunities for unexpected discoveries.
予期せぬ発見の機会を生み出せるということです
08:09
Throughout this journey, we have also discovered our passion for science,
この旅を通して 私たちは
科学への熱い思いを確認し
08:13
and are currently continuing research
今も 大学で
08:16
on other fossil fuel chemicals in university.
他の化石燃料の化学物質について
研究を続けています
08:18
We hope that in the near future,
近い将来
08:21
we'll be able to create model organisms
モデル生物を作りたいと思っています
08:23
that can break down not only phthalates
フタル酸エステル類だけでなく
08:25
but a wide variety of different contaminants.
たくさんの汚染物質を
分解できる生物です
08:27
We can apply this to wastewater treatment plants
これを汚水処理場で利用して
08:31
to clean up our rivers
私たちの川をきれいにしたり
08:34
and other natural resources.
他の天然資源をきれいにしたり したいです
08:35
And perhaps one day we'll be able to tackle
きっと いつか 私たちは
08:37
the problem of solid plastic waste.
プラスチック廃棄物そのものの
問題を解決できるでしょう
08:40
MW: I think our journey has truly transformed
この旅によって
私たちの微生物への見方は
08:44
our view of microorganisms,
本当に変わりました
08:46
and Jeanny and I have shown that
ジニーと私が示したのは
08:48
even mistakes can lead to discoveries.
ミスでさえ 発見を生み出しうること
08:50
Einstein once said,
アインシュタインによれば
08:52
"You can't solve problems by using the same kind
「問題を生み出した時と同じやり方で
08:53
of thinking you used when you created them."
考えている限り 問題は解けない」のです
08:56
If we're making plastic synthetically, then we think
合成によってプラスチックを作っているとしたら
08:59
the solution would be to break them down biochemically.
解決策は 生化学的にそれを分解することでしょう
09:02
Thank you. JY: Thank you.
ありがとうございました
09:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:08
Translated by Yuko Yoshida
Reviewed by Akiko Hicks

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao - Science fair winners
Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao have identified a new bacteria that breaks down nasty compounds called phthalates, common to flexible plastics and linked to health problems. And they’re still teenagers.

Why you should listen

After a visit to a plastic-filled waste transfer station last year, students Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao learned that much of the plastic in trash may not degrade for 5,000 years. Synthesized into plastics are phthalates, compounds that make shower curtain liners, food wraps and other products bendable but may also adversely impact human reproductive development and health.  As plastics slowly break down, these phthalates would leach into the surrounding environment.

So, the two young scientists tackled the problem and ultimately discovered strains of bacteria that have the potential to naturally degrade phthalates. Their work earned a regional first place in British Columbia for the 2012 Sanofi BioGENEius Challenge Canada, as well as a special award for the most commercial potential at the contest’s finals.

More profile about the speaker
Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao | Speaker | TED.com