sponsored links
TED2013

Sebastião Salgado: The silent drama of photography

セバスチャン・サルガド: 「写真が見せるサイレントドラマ」

February 26, 2013

経済学の博士号をもつセバスチャン・サルガドは、30代で写真を撮り始めて以来その虜になりました。彼は何年にもおよぶプロジェクトを通して、人間に焦点を当てて地球規模の物語を美しく描写し、その多くに死・破壊・腐敗といったテーマを取り入れています。ここでは、写真を撮る事で死の恐怖に追い込まれた極めて個人的な話や、地上で忘れ去られた人々や景観を撮影した最新作『Sebastião Salgado.Genesis』に収録された美しい写真をご覧いただきます。

Sebastião Salgado - Photojournalist
Sebastião Salgado captures the dignity of the dispossessed through large-scale, long-term projects. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'm not sure that every person here
ここに いらっしゃる皆さんは
00:13
is familiar with my pictures.
私の写真をご存知でしょうか
00:15
I want to start to show just a few pictures to you,
まずは何枚か ご覧ください
00:17
and after I'll speak.
その後 お話しさせていただきます
00:21
I must speak to you a little bit of my history,
私の生い立ちについて 少しお話しします
00:57
because we'll be speaking on this
今日の ここでの講演に
01:01
during my speech here.
関係するからです
01:03
I was born in 1944 in Brazil,
私は1944年に ブラジルで生まれました
01:06
in the times that Brazil was not yet a market economy.
当時 ブラジルは
まだ市場経済ではありませんでした
01:09
I was born on a farm,
私は 農家に生まれました
01:13
a farm that was more than 50 percent rainforest [still].
農園の5割以上が まだ熱帯雨林でした
01:15
A marvelous place.
実に素晴らしい土地です
01:19
I lived with incredible birds, incredible animals,
素晴らしい鳥や動物達に
囲まれて暮らし ―
01:21
I swam in our small rivers with our caimans.
カイマン(ワニ)と一緒に
小さい川を泳いだりしました
01:25
It was about 35 families that lived on this farm,
私達の農園には 35世帯ほどが暮らしていました
01:30
and everything that we produced on this farm, we consumed.
農園でとれた物は
全て自分達で食べ
01:32
Very few things went to the market.
市場に出荷するものは
ほんのわずかでした
01:37
Once a year, the only thing that went to the market
出荷するのは年に一度 ―
01:39
was the cattle that we produced,
私達が育てた肉牛だけでした
01:42
and we made trips of about 45 days
何千頭もの牛達を引き連れ
01:43
to reach the slaughterhouse,
45日もかけて
01:46
bringing thousands of head of cattle,
食肉処理場まで行きました
01:48
and about 20 days traveling back
そして20日かけて
01:51
to reach our farm again.
農場に戻ってくるのです
01:53
When I was 15 years old,
私が15歳のとき
01:55
it was necessary for me to leave this place
そこを離れて
町に出ることになりました
01:58
and go to a town a little bit bigger -- much bigger --
少し・・・いや
ずっと大きな町です
02:01
where I did the second part of secondary school.
後期中等教育を受けるためです
02:05
There I learned different things.
そこでは これまでと違うことを学びました
02:08
Brazil was starting to urbanize, industrialize,
ブラジルでは都市化と産業化が
始まっていました
02:11
and I knew the politics. I became a little bit radical,
政治に興味があったので
少し急進的になりました
02:14
I was a member of leftist parties,
左派政党の党員を経て
02:18
and I became an activist.
その後 活動家になりました
02:21
I [went to] university to become an economist.
経済学者になるために
大学に進学し
02:24
I [did] a master's degree in economics.
経済学の修士号を取得しました
02:27
And the most important thing in my life
また 私の人生において
最も重要なことも
02:30
also happened in this time.
この時期に起こりました
02:33
I met an incredible girl
素晴らしい女性と出会ったのです
02:34
who became my lifelong best friend,
生涯に渡る親友になって
02:37
and my associate in everything that I have done till now,
私がしてきたことには
何でも協力してくれた ―
02:41
my wife, Lélia Wanick Salgado.
妻のレリア・ワニック・サルガドです
02:45
Brazil radicalized very strongly.
ブラジルは政治面で急進的になり
02:48
We fought very hard against the dictatorship,
私達は独裁政治に果敢に戦いました
02:50
in a moment it was necessary to us:
そのうち私達は
02:53
Either go into clandestinity with weapons in hand,
武器を手にゲリラになるか
祖国を去るかを選ぶ必要に迫られました
02:55
or leave Brazil. We were too young,
私達はまだ若かったし
02:58
and our organization thought it was better for us to go out,
所属していた組織は
私達が国を出た方が良いと考えたため
03:01
and we went to France,
フランスへ行って
私は経済学の博士号を取り ―
03:06
where I did a PhD in economics,
フランスへ行って
私は経済学の博士号を取り ―
03:07
Léila became an architect.
レリアは建築家になりました
03:09
I worked after for an investment bank.
私は その後 投資銀行で働きました
03:11
We made a lot of trips, financed development,
世界銀行がアフリカで行った
開発向け資金援助の ―
03:14
economic projects in Africa with the World Bank.
経済プロジェクトに携わり
たくさん旅をしました
03:17
And one day photography made a total invasion in my life.
そんな時 完全に写真の虜になり
03:20
I became a photographer,
私は写真家になりました
03:23
abandoned everything and became a photographer,
全てを投げ出して
03:25
and I started to do the photography
写真を撮り始めました
03:27
that was important for me.
これは私にとって重要なことでした
03:30
Many people tell me that you are a photojournalist,
多くの人が私のことを
報道写真家とか
03:33
that you are an anthropologist photographer,
人類学の写真家とか
03:35
that you are an activist photographer.
活動家でもある写真家と呼びますが
03:38
But I did much more than that.
私はそれ以上のことをやりました
03:41
I put photography as my life.
写真を我が人生と考えています
03:44
I lived totally inside photography
長期的なプロジェクトを通して
03:46
doing long term projects,
私は完全に写真の中に生きています
03:49
and I want to show you just a few pictures
ここで数枚の写真を見ていただきます
03:51
of -- again, you'll see inside the social projects,
私が携わった社会プロジェクトの
様子がわかると思います
03:53
that I went to, I published many books
これらの写真については
03:59
on these photographs,
多くの本を出版しました
04:02
but I'll just show you a few ones now.
でも 今は少しだけ お見せします
04:05
In the '90s, from 1994 to 2000,
1994年から2000年にかけて
04:54
I photographed a story called Migrations.
『大移動(Migrations)』の
物語を写真に撮り
04:58
It became a book. It became a show.
写真集と展覧会になりました
05:01
But during the time that I was photographing this,
でも この写真を撮影しているとき
05:03
I lived through a very hard moment in my life, mostly in Rwanda.
人生で とても辛い時期を
主にルワンダで過ごしていました
05:06
I saw in Rwanda total brutality.
ルワンダでは最悪の
残虐行為を目にしました
05:12
I saw deaths by thousands per day.
毎日 数千人が死ぬのを目の当たりにし
05:16
I lost my faith in our species.
人類への信頼を失いました
05:19
I didn't believe that it was possible for us to live any longer,
人類はもう存続できないと思いました
05:22
and I started to be attacked by my own Staphylococcus.
それから私は自らの
ブドウ球菌に冒され始めました
05:26
I started to have infection everywhere.
いたる所が感染しました
05:32
When I made love with my wife, I had no sperm that came out of me;
妻と愛し合った時には
精液の代わりに―
05:35
I had blood.
血が流れました
05:39
I went to see a friend's doctor in Paris,
パリにいる友人の医者のところに行き
05:42
told him that I was completely sick.
すっかり病気になってしまったと言いました
05:45
He made a long examination, and told me, "Sebastian,
長い検査の後 こう言われました
05:48
you are not sick, your prostate is perfect.
「セバスチャン 君は病気じゃない
前立腺も完ぺきだ ―
05:51
What happened is, you saw so many deaths that you are dying.
でも死を見過ぎたせいで
君自身が死につつあるんだ ―
05:54
You must stop. Stop.
もうやめたまえ ―
05:58
You must stop because on the contrary, you will be dead."
さもないと本当に死んでしまうよ」
06:01
And I made the decision to stop.
それでやめることを決断したのです
06:06
I was really upset with photography,
私は写真にも
世界のあらゆるものにも
06:09
with everything in the world,
本当に腹を立てていました
06:11
and I made the decision to go back to where I was born.
そこで生まれ故郷に帰る決意をしました
06:13
It was a big coincidence.
その頃はちょうど
06:17
It was the moment that my parents became very old.
両親が高齢になった
時期と重なっていました
06:19
I have seven sisters. I'm one of the only men in my family,
私には7人の姉妹がいて
男性は私だけです
06:22
and they made together the decision
だからレリアと私が家族の土地を
06:26
to transfer this land to Léila and myself.
継ぐことになりました
06:28
When we received this land, this land was as dead as I was.
譲り受けた時 土地は
私同様 死につつありました
06:30
When I was a kid, it was more than 50 percent rainforest.
私が子供だった頃は
半分以上が熱帯雨林でしたが
06:36
When we received the land,
土地を受け継いだ時は
06:39
it was less than half a percent rainforest,
熱帯雨林は0.5%にも
満たなかったのです
06:41
as in all my region.
周辺はどこも同じ状況でした
06:45
To build development, Brazilian development,
ブラジルでは開発の結果 ―
06:46
we destroyed a lot of our forest.
多くの森林が破壊されました
06:49
As you did here in the United States,
ここアメリカでも インドでも ―
06:52
or you did in India, everywhere in this planet.
地上のいたる所で破壊が行われました
06:54
To build our development,
発展のために
06:56
we come to a huge contradiction
身の周りの環境を壊すという
06:58
that we destroy around us everything.
大きな矛盾が生まれました
07:00
This farm that had thousands of head of cattle
かつて農園には数千頭の
牛がいましたが
07:04
had just a few hundreds,
わずか数百頭になっていて
07:07
and we didn't know how to deal with these.
どう対処したらいいか
途方に暮れました
07:10
And Léila came up with an incredible idea, a crazy idea.
そんな時 レリアが素晴らしい
クレイジーなアイデアを思いつきました
07:12
She said, why don't you put back the rainforest that was here before?
彼女は言いました
「熱帯雨林を復活させたら?
07:16
You say that you were born in paradise.
あなたの生まれ故郷の
07:21
Let's build the paradise again.
パラダイスを
もう一度作りましょう」
07:22
And I went to see a good friend
そこで森林工学に詳しい
07:25
that was engineering forests
親しい友人に会って
07:28
to prepare a project for us,
プロジェクトの準備を始めました
07:29
and we started. We started to plant, and this
それから植樹を始めました
07:31
first year we lost a lot of trees, second year less,
1年目は大量に枯れましたが
翌年は枯れる本数が減り
07:33
and slowly, slowly this dead land started to be born again.
死に絶えた土地が
ゆっくり再生を始めました
07:38
We started to plant hundreds of thousands of trees,
私達は何十万本もの
木々を植え始めました
07:43
only local species, only native species,
ただし土着の種だけに限定して
07:46
where we built an ecosystem identical to the one that was destroyed,
破壊された生態系を蘇らせました
07:50
and the life started to come back in an incredible way.
すると生命が驚くべき形で
再生し始めました
07:53
It was necessary for us to transform our land
私達は この土地を
国立公園にする必要がありました
07:57
into a national park.
私達は この土地を
国立公園にする必要がありました
08:00
We transformed. We gave this land back to nature.
土地を改良して
自然の状態に戻し
08:02
It became a national park.
国立公園になりました
08:04
We created an institution called Instituto Terra,
Instituto Terra という団体を設立して
08:06
and we built a big environmental project to raise money everywhere.
資金を集めるため大規模な
環境プロジェクトを始めました
08:09
Here in Los Angeles, in the Bay Area in San Francisco,
ここロスやサンフランシスコの
ベイ・エリアでも活動しています
08:14
it became tax deductible in the United States.
米国では税金控除の対象です
08:18
We raised money in Spain, in Italy, a lot in Brazil.
これまで スペインやイタリア
ブラジルでも多くの資金を集めました
08:20
We worked with a lot of companies in Brazil
ブラジルでは資金を投入してくれる ―
08:24
that put money into this project, the government.
多くの企業や行政と活動しています
08:26
And the life started to come, and I had a big wish
人生が輝き始め
08:28
to come back to photography, to photograph again.
もう一度 写真を撮りたいという
大きな夢に立ち返りました
08:32
And this time, my wish was not to photograph anymore
でも 今回撮ろうとしたのは
08:36
just one animal that I had photographed all my life: us.
生涯を通じて撮影してきた
我々人間ではありません
08:39
I wished to photograph the other animals,
他の生き物や風景 ―
08:44
to photograph the landscapes,
他の生き物や風景 ―
08:46
to photograph us, but us from the beginning,
そして人間の中でも
自然と共存していた頃の
08:48
the time we lived in equilibrium with nature.
原初の姿でした
08:51
And I went. I started in the beginning of 2004,
2004年の初頭から始めて
08:54
and I finished at the end of 2011.
2011年に終了しました
08:59
We created an incredible amount of pictures,
膨大な数の写真が生まれ
09:02
and the result -- Lélia did the design of all my books,
レリアが本と展覧会のデザインを
09:04
the design of all my shows. She is the creator of the shows.
全て手がけました
彼女は言わば創造主です
09:08
And what we want with these pictures
こうした写真の狙いは
09:11
is to create a discussion about what we have that is pristine on the planet
地球上に原初の姿のまま残っているものや
09:13
and what we must hold on this planet
人類が生き残り
自然と調和した生活を送るために ―
09:20
if we want to live, to have some equilibrium in our life.
地球上に残すべきものについて
09:22
And I wanted to see us
議論を起こすことでした
09:26
when we used, yes, our instruments in stone.
また人間が石器を使うところを
見たかったのです
09:28
We exist yet. I was last week
そう そんな光景がまだ存在します
09:34
at the Brazilian National Indian Foundation,
先週ブラジル国立先住民保護財団に
行ったのですが
09:36
and only in the Amazon we have about 110 groups
アマゾン川流域だけで
隔絶した生活を送る ―
09:39
of Indians that are not contacted yet.
約110の先住民の集団がいます
09:42
We must protect the forest in this sense.
だから私達は
森を守らねばなりません
09:45
And with these pictures, I hope that we can create
そして 私の写真によって
09:48
information, a system of information.
知識体系を作りたいのです
09:53
We tried to do a new presentation of the planet,
私達は地球を新しい視点から
見せようとしてきました
09:55
and I want to show you now just a few pictures
ここでプロジェクトの写真を
09:59
of this project, please.
何枚かご覧ください
10:01
Well, this — (Applause) —
(拍手)
11:59
Thank you. Thank you very much.
どうもありがとう
12:01
This is what we must fight hard
今ご覧いただいたようなものを守るため
12:08
to hold like it is now.
私達は全力で戦わなければいけません
12:12
But there is another part that we must together rebuild,
でも他にも一丸となって
再生すべきものがあります
12:13
to build our societies, our modern family of societies,
社会や その中に生きる
現代家族を築くことです
12:18
we are at a point where we cannot go back.
私達は もう後戻りできません
12:22
But we create an incredible contradiction.
一方で大きな矛盾を生んでいます
12:24
To build all this, we destroy a lot.
今あるものを築くため 多くを破壊しています
12:26
Our forest in Brazil, that antique forest
ブラジルにある私達の森は
12:29
that was the size of California,
カリフォルニア州ほどの広さの原始林ですが
12:31
is destroyed today 93 percent.
その93%が破壊されています
12:34
Here, on the West Coast, you've destroyed your forest.
ここ西海岸でも森が破壊されていますね?
12:36
Around here, no? The redwood forests are gone.
この辺のアメリカスギは消滅しました
12:39
Gone very fast, disappeared.
あっという間に消えてしまいました
12:43
Coming the other day from Atlanta, here, two days ago,
2日前アトランタを経由して
ここに来たとき
12:45
I was flying over deserts
砂漠の上を飛行しました
12:47
that we made, we provoked with our own hands.
この砂漠は 私達自身が
生み出したものです
12:49
India has no more trees. Spain has no more trees.
インドにはもう木々がありません
スペインも同様です
12:52
And we must rebuild these forests.
私達は森を再生しなければいけません
12:55
That is the essence of our life, these forests.
私達の命の源は森です
12:58
We need to breathe. The only factory
私達は呼吸しなければなりませんが
13:02
capable to transform CO2 into oxygen,
二酸化炭素を酸素に変えられるのは
13:06
are the forests.
森だけなのです
13:10
The only machine capable to capture the carbon
森だけが二酸化炭素を
吸収できるのです
13:11
that we are producing, always,
私達は常に二酸化炭素を出しています
13:16
even if we reduce them, everything that we do, we produce CO2,
いくら排出量を減らしても
私達が活動するたびに
13:19
are the trees.
必ず排出されるのです
13:23
I put the question -- three or four weeks ago,
3~4週間前 思いついたことがあります
13:24
we saw in the newspapers
ノルウェーで数百万匹の魚が
死んだという記事を読んだ時です
13:29
millions of fish that die in Norway.
ノルウェーで数百万匹の魚が
死んだという記事を読んだ時です
13:30
A lack of oxygen in the water.
水中の酸素が不足したことが死因でした
13:33
I put to myself the question, if for a moment,
それでこんなことを考えたのです
13:36
we will not lack oxygen for all animal species,
人間を含む全ての生き物が
酸素不足になることがないから
13:38
ours included -- that would be very complicated for us.
事態が見えにくいのではないか
13:42
For the water system, the trees are essential.
水システムにおいても 木々は重要です
13:46
I'll give you a small example that you'll understand very easily.
分かりやすくなるように
ちょっとした例をあげましょう
13:50
You happy people that have a lot of hair on your head,
皆さんのように髪の毛が
たくさんあるハッピーな方は
13:54
if you take a shower, it takes you
シャワーを浴びた後
ドライヤーを使わなければ
13:58
two or three hours to dry your hair
髪が乾くのに
14:01
if you don't use a dryer machine.
2~3時間かかります
14:04
Me, one minute, it's dry. The same with the trees.
ところが私の場合は1分で乾きます
14:07
The trees are the hair of our planet.
木々は いわば地上の髪の毛です
14:12
When you have rain in a place that has no trees,
木々が無い場所に雨が降れば
14:14
in just a few minutes, the water arrives in the stream,
雨水は数分で河川に流れ込み
14:18
brings soil, destroying our water source,
土壌を流し 水源を破壊し ―
14:21
destroying the rivers,
河川を壊して
14:24
and no humidity to retain.
水分は保たれません
14:26
When you have trees, the root system holds the water.
ところが木々があれば
根が水を留め
14:27
All the branches of the trees, the leaves that come down
落ち葉や枝が
14:32
create a humid area,
湿度の高い場所を作り
14:34
and they take months and months under the water, go to the rivers,
数か月かかって
地下水に下りて川に届きます
14:36
and maintain our source, maintain our rivers.
こんな風に 私達の源である
川が維持されます
14:41
This is the most important thing,
最も大切なことは―
14:44
when we imagine that we need water for every activity in life.
あらゆる活動において
水が必要だと理解することです
14:46
I want to show you now, to finish,
それでは最後に
14:51
just a few pictures that for me
何枚か写真をお見せします
14:53
are very important in that direction.
未来にとって大切なものです
14:56
You remember that I told you,
先ほどお話したように
14:59
when I received the farm from my parents
両親から私のパラダイスだった
15:01
that was my paradise, that was the farm.
農園を譲り受けた時 ―
15:03
Land completely destroyed, the erosion there, the land had dried.
土地は完全に破壊され
浸食がすすみ 乾燥していました
15:06
But you can see in this picture,
でも写真でわかる通り ―
15:11
we were starting to construct an educational center
私達はこの時 教育センターの
建設を始めていました
15:14
that became quite a large environmental center in Brazil.
これはブラジル有数の大きな
環境センターになりました
15:18
But you see a lot of small spots in this picture.
点のように見える部分が
たくさんあるのが見えるでしょう
15:23
In each point of those spots, we had planted a tree.
私達が木を植えた場所です
15:27
There are thousands of trees.
数千もの木々を植えました
15:31
Now I'll show you the pictures made exactly in the same point
全く同じ場所で
今から2か月前に撮った ―
15:32
two months ago.
写真をご覧ください
15:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:39
I told you in the beginning that it was necessary
冒頭でお話ししましたが
15:48
for us to plant about 2.5 million trees
私達は 生態系を再生するために
15:50
of about 200 different species
約200種からなるー
15:55
in order to rebuild the ecosystem.
250万の木々を植えなければなりませんでした
15:57
And I'll show you the last picture.
最後の写真を ご覧いただきます
16:00
We are with two million trees in the ground now.
この土地で 200万の木々を育てました
16:03
We are doing the sequestration
この木々のおかげで
16:06
of about 100,000 tons of carbon with these trees.
約10万トンの二酸化炭素を隔離しています
16:08
My friends, it's very easy to do. We did it, no?
皆さん これは本当に簡単なことです
私達だって できたんです
16:12
By an accident that happened to me,
自分に降りかかった災難をきっかけに
16:17
we went back, we built an ecosystem.
母国に戻って 生態系を再生させました
16:19
We here inside the room,
ここにお越しの皆さんも
16:22
I believe that we have the same concern,
同じ不安を抱えているでしょう
16:25
and the model that we created in Brazil,
私達がブラジルで創ったモデルは
16:29
we can transplant it here.
ここでも使えるものです
16:31
We can apply it everywhere around the world, no?
世界中で応用できますよね?
16:32
And I believe that we can do it together.
皆さんと一緒に
このモデルを広められるはずです
16:35
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございました
16:38
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:40
Translator:Mari Arimitsu
Reviewer:Kazunori Akashi

sponsored links

Sebastião Salgado - Photojournalist
Sebastião Salgado captures the dignity of the dispossessed through large-scale, long-term projects.

Why you should listen

A gold miner in Serra Pelada, Brazil; a Siberian Nenet tribe that lives in -35°C temperatures; a Namibian gemsbok antelope. These are just a few of the subjects from Sebastião Salgado’s immense collection of work devoted to the world’s most dispossessed and unknown.

Brazilian-born Salgado, who shoots only using Kodak film, is known for his incredibly long-term projects, which require extensive travel and extreme lifestyle changes. Workers took seven years to complete and contained images of manual laborers from 26 countries, while Migrations took six years in 43 different countries on all seven continents. Most recently Salgado completed Genesis, an ambitious eight-year project that spanned 30 trips to the world’s most pristine territories, land untouched by technology and modern life. Among Salgado’s many travels for Genesis was a two-month hike through Ethiopia, spanning 500 miles with 18 pack donkeys and their riders. In the words of Brett Abbott, a Getty Museum curator, Salgado’s approach can only be described as “epic.”

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.