sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2013

Pico Iyer: Where is home?

ピコ・アイヤー: 「故郷とは何か」

June 20, 2013

自分の国を離れて暮らす人の数が、世界中で増えています。複数の「故国」を持つ作家のピコ・アイヤーが、故郷の意味、旅する喜び、そして立ち止まることで得られる心の静けさについて語ります。

Pico Iyer - Global author
Pico Iyer has spent more than 30 years tracking movement and stillness -- and the way criss-crossing cultures have changed the world, our imagination and all our relationships. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Where do you come from?
出身はどこですか?という質問は
00:12
It's such a simple question,
とても単純なものです
00:14
but these days, of course, simple questions
でも今の時代 単純な質問に対する
00:16
bring ever more complicated answers.
答えが どんどん複雑に
なっています
00:18
People are always asking me where I come from,
私も出身地をよく聞かれます
00:21
and they're expecting me to say India,
聞いた人は インドという答えを
思い浮かべています
00:24
and they're absolutely right insofar as 100 percent
祖先や血筋という点では
まさにその通り
00:27
of my blood and ancestry does come from India.
私は100% インド人です
00:30
Except, I've never lived one day of my life there.
でも 生まれてから1日たりとも
インドに住んだことはありません
00:34
I can't speak even one word
22,000以上ある
インドの方言のうち
00:38
of its more than 22,000 dialects.
単語ひとつすら
話すことができません
00:40
So I don't think I've really earned the right
なので 自分をインド人だと言う―
00:43
to call myself an Indian.
資格はないと思っています
00:46
And if "Where do you come from?"
出身を尋ねる質問が
00:48
means "Where were you born and raised and educated?"
「どこで生まれ 育ち 教育を受けて
きたのか」という意味であれば
00:49
then I'm entirely of that funny little country
私の出身は イングランドという
00:53
known as England,
小さくて変な国です
00:55
except I left England as soon as I completed
でも 大学を卒業してすぐに
00:57
my undergraduate education,
イングランドを離れましたし
00:59
and all the time I was growing up,
子どもの頃は ずっと
01:01
I was the only kid in all my classes
教科書に出てくるー
01:03
who didn't begin to look like the classic English heroes
古典的なイギリスの英雄と
見かけが全く違うのは
01:05
represented in our textbooks.
クラスで 私だけでした
01:09
And if "Where do you come from?"
出身を尋ねる質問が
01:11
means "Where do you pay your taxes?
「どこで税金を払いー
01:13
Where do you see your doctor and your dentist?"
病院や歯医者にかかるのか」
という意味ならば
01:14
then I'm very much of the United States,
私はアメリカ人
ということになります
01:17
and I have been for 48 years now,
小さな子どもだった頃から
01:19
since I was a really small child.
もう48年間にもなります
01:22
Except, for many of those years,
でも 長年にわたって
01:24
I've had to carry around this funny little pink card
定住外国人であることを示す
01:25
with green lines running through my face
顔のところに 緑の線が入ったー
01:28
identifying me as a permanent alien.
変なピンク色のカードを
携帯しなければなませんでした
01:30
I do actually feel more alien the longer I live there.
長く住むほど 外国人なのだと
強く感じていますが…
01:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:37
And if "Where do you come from?"
では もし出身とは
01:39
means "Which place goes deepest inside you
「心のもっとも奥深くにありー
01:41
and where do you try to spend most of your time?"
多くの時間を過ごしたい場所は
どこか?」という意味ならば
01:43
then I'm Japanese,
私は日本人です
01:47
because I've been living as much as I can
この25年間
01:48
for the last 25 years in Japan.
できるだけ多くの時間を
日本で過ごしてきました
01:50
Except, all of those years I've been there on a tourist visa,
でも 私はいつも
観光ビザで入国していますし
01:53
and I'm fairly sure not many Japanese
多くの日本人は
01:56
would want to consider me one of them.
私のことを同朋だとは
思いたがらないでしょう
01:59
And I say all this just to stress
こんな話をしたのは
自分の経歴がいかに時代遅れで―
02:01
how very old-fashioned and straightforward
単純なものかということを
強調したかったからです
02:05
my background is,
単純なものかということを
強調したかったからです
02:07
because when I go to Hong Kong or Sydney or Vancouver,
香港やシドニー
バンクーバーに行くと
02:08
most of the kids I meet
そこで出会う子どもの多くは
02:12
are much more international and multi-cultured than I am.
私よりもずっと国際的ですし
多くの文化に接しています
02:14
And they have one home associated with their parents,
彼らには 両親とつながった
故郷のほかに
02:18
but another associated with their partners,
自分の配偶者や恋人に
関連する故郷
02:21
a third connected maybe with the place where they happen to be,
その時 たまたま住んでいる場所も
故郷でしょうし
02:24
a fourth connected with the place they dream of being,
住みたいと思っている場所も
故郷です
02:27
and many more besides.
他にもたくさん あるでしょう
02:30
And their whole life will be spent taking pieces
彼らは いろいろな場所の
かけらを手に取り
02:33
of many different places and putting them together
それをステンドグラスのように
組み立てながら
02:36
into a stained glass whole.
人生を送ります
02:39
Home for them is really a work in progress.
彼らにとって 故郷とは
進行中の作品なのです
02:42
It's like a project on which they're constantly adding
常にアップグレードし
02:45
upgrades and improvements and corrections.
改善や修正を加える
プロジェクトのようなものです
02:47
And for more and more of us,
多くの人たちが
02:50
home has really less to do with a piece of soil
故郷は土壌(soil)ではなく
02:52
than, you could say, with a piece of soul.
魂(soul)とつながった場所だと
考えています
02:57
If somebody suddenly asks me, "Where's your home?"
もし突然 誰かに
「故郷はどこですか?」と聞かれたら
02:59
I think about my sweetheart or my closest friends
私は いとしい人や
親しい友人
03:02
or the songs that travel with me wherever I happen to be.
いつも頭の中にある曲のことを考えます
03:05
And I'd always felt this way,
いつも そう思っていました
03:09
but it really came home to me, as it were,
このことを痛切に感じる
出来事がありました
03:11
some years ago when I was climbing up the stairs
数年前 カリフォルニアにある
両親の家で
03:14
in my parents' house in California,
階段を上っているとき
03:16
and I looked through the living room windows
リビングの窓を覗くと
03:19
and I saw that we were encircled by 70-foot flames,
家が 20メートルの高さの炎に
囲まれているのが見えました
03:22
one of those wildfires that regularly tear through
カリフォルニアの丘陵地帯を
はじめ 多くの場所をー
03:27
the hills of California and many other such places.
焼き尽くす 山火事です
03:30
And three hours later, that fire had reduced
3時間後 炎は私の家と
03:33
my home and every last thing in it
中にあったすべてのものを
灰にしました
03:36
except for me to ash.
無事だったのは我が身だけです
03:39
And when I woke up the next morning,
次の朝 友人の家の床で
03:42
I was sleeping on a friend's floor,
目を覚ましたとき
03:45
the only thing I had in the world was a toothbrush
持っていたのは
夜中にスーパーで買った
03:46
I had just bought from an all-night supermarket.
歯ブラシだけでした
03:49
Of course, if anybody asked me then,
もしその時 誰かに
03:52
"Where is your home?"
「家はどこですか?」
と聞かれても
03:53
I literally couldn't point to any physical construction.
物理的な場所を
指し示すことはできませんでした
03:55
My home would have to be whatever I carried around inside me.
私の故郷は 心の中にしか
ありませんでした
03:59
And in so many ways, I think this is a terrific liberation.
多くの点で これは
素晴らしい解放だと思います
04:04
Because when my grandparents were born,
祖父母が生まれた頃は
04:08
they pretty much had their sense of home,
故郷やコミュニティの意識
04:10
their sense of community, even their sense of enmity,
さらには敵対心といった意識までが
生まれながらに
04:12
assigned to them at birth,
与えられました
04:16
and didn't have much chance of stepping outside of that.
そこから抜け出す機会は
ほとんどありませんでした
04:18
And nowadays, at least some of us can choose our sense of home,
しかし現代なら
故郷とは何かを 自ら選び取り
04:21
create our sense of community,
コミュニティの意識を作り出し
04:24
fashion our sense of self, and in so doing
自己意識を形成することも
できるようになりました
04:27
maybe step a little beyond
祖父母の時代にあったような
04:30
some of the black and white divisions
人種差別や 単純な価値判断をー
04:32
of our grandparents' age.
克服できるようになったのです
04:34
No coincidence that the president
地球で最も力のある国家の大統領が
ケニアの血筋を半分受け継ぎ
04:36
of the strongest nation on Earth is half-Kenyan,
地球で最も力のある国家の大統領が
ケニアの血筋を半分受け継ぎ
04:38
partly raised in Indonesia,
一時 インドネシアで育てられ
04:40
has a Chinese-Canadian brother-in-law.
中国系カナダ人の義兄弟がいることも
不思議ではありません
04:42
The number of people living in countries not their own
自分の国を離れて
暮らしている人の数は
04:46
now comes to 220 million,
今や 2億2千万人に達します
04:49
and that's an almost unimaginable number,
想像を超えるような数です
04:54
but it means that if you took the whole population of Canada
カナダとオーストラリアの
全人口を合わせて
04:57
and the whole population of Australia
カナダとオーストラリアの
全人口を合わせて
05:00
and then the whole population of Australia again
そこにもう一度
2つの国の人口を
05:02
and the whole population of Canada again
足し上げて
05:04
and doubled that number,
その数を2倍にしても
05:07
you would still have fewer people than belong
この多大なる 流動する人々の―
05:09
to this great floating tribe.
数には及ばないのです
05:11
And the number of us who live outside
古い国民国家の枠組みを超えて
05:13
the old nation-state categories is increasing so quickly,
生活する人の数は
ものすごい速さで増えています
05:15
by 64 million just in the last 12 years,
この12年で 6,400万人も
増えました
05:19
that soon there will be more of us than there are Americans.
じきに アメリカの人口よりも
多くなるでしょう
05:23
Already, we represent the fifth-largest nation on Earth.
すでに 地球で5番目に
大きな国が作れる人数です
05:26
And in fact, in Canada's largest city, Toronto,
実際 カナダ最大の都市である
05:31
the average resident today is what used to be called
トロントの一般的な住民は
05:34
a foreigner, somebody born in a very different country.
以前は外国人と呼ばれていた
違う国で生まれた人たちです
05:37
And I've always felt that the beauty of being surrounded by the foreign
異国的なるものに
囲まれることの美点は
05:42
is that it slaps you awake.
目を覚まされることです
05:45
You can't take anything for granted.
当然だと思えることは
何もありません
05:47
Travel, for me, is a little bit like being in love,
旅行とは 私にとって
恋のようなものです
05:50
because suddenly all your senses are at the setting marked "on."
突然すべての感覚の
スイッチが入り
05:52
Suddenly you're alert to the secret patterns of the world.
世界の秘める側面を
感じ取るようになるのです
05:57
The real voyage of discovery, as Marcel Proust famously said,
マルセル・プルーストの
有名な言葉にもあるように
06:01
consists not in seeing new sights,
”真の発見の旅とは
新しい景色を探すことではないー”
06:05
but in looking with new eyes.
”新しい目を持つことなのだ”と
06:08
And of course, once you have new eyes,
新しい目を手にしたならば
06:10
even the old sights, even your home
古い景色や 故郷でさえ
06:12
become something different.
別なものに見えるでしょう
06:15
Many of the people living in countries not their own
異国で暮らす人の多くは 避難者です
06:17
are refugees who never wanted to leave home
故郷を離れたいなど
思ったこともなく
06:20
and ache to go back home.
帰郷を切望しています
06:23
But for the fortunate among us,
でも 幸運な者にとっては
06:26
I think the age of movement brings exhilarating new possibilities.
大移動時代はワクワクするような
新たな可能性をもたらしてくれます
06:28
Certainly when I'm traveling,
私が旅行するとき
06:32
especially to the major cities of the world,
特に世界の大都市に旅行すると
06:33
the typical person I meet today
こんな人々に出会います
06:35
will be, let's say, a half-Korean, half-German young woman
たとえば パリに暮らす
韓国とドイツのハーフの
06:37
living in Paris.
若い女性
06:42
And as soon as she meets a half-Thai,
もし タイとカナダのハーフで
06:44
half-Canadian young guy from Edinburgh,
エディンバラ出身の若い男性と
彼女が出会ったならば
06:47
she recognizes him as kin.
すぐに彼を仲間だと思うでしょう
06:50
She realizes that she probably has much more in common with him
100%韓国人だったり
ドイツ人である人よりも
06:52
than with anybody entirely of Korea or entirely of Germany.
共通点が多いと 思うのでしょう
06:57
So they become friends. They fall in love.
2人は友人になり 恋に落ち
07:00
They move to New York City.
ニューヨークに引っ越します
07:03
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:05
Or Edinburgh.
エディンバラでもいいです
07:07
And the little girl who arises out of their union
この2人から産まれた
小さな女の子は
07:09
will of course be not Korean or German
韓国人 ドイツ人
フランス人でもない
07:12
or French or Thai or Scotch or Canadian
タイ人 スコットランド人
カナダ人でもありません
07:14
or even American, but a wonderful
アメリカ人でもありません しかし―
07:17
and constantly evolving mix of all those places.
これらすべての場所の要素を
合わせ持ち 発展させていくのです
07:19
And potentially, everything about the way
もしかすると この女の子が
07:23
that young woman dreams about the world,
世界について夢見たり
07:26
writes about the world, thinks about the world,
世界のことを書いたり
考えたりする方法は
07:29
could be something different,
他の人と違っているかもしれません
07:32
because it comes out of this almost unprecedented
これまでになかったような
文化の混合から
07:34
blend of cultures.
生まれるものなのですから
07:37
Where you come from now is much less important
「どこから来たのか」よりも
「どこへ行くのか」ということの方が
07:39
than where you're going.
はるかに重要な時代になりました
07:42
More and more of us are rooted in the future
より多くの人たちが
過去と同じぐらい
07:43
or the present tense as much as in the past.
現在や未来に軸足を置いて
暮らしています
07:46
And home, we know, is not just the place
故郷というのは
ただ自分が生まれた場所―
07:49
where you happen to be born.
というだけではありません
07:52
It's the place where you become yourself.
故郷とは
本当の自分になれる場所なのです
07:54
And yet,
でも 移動には
07:58
there is one great problem with movement,
ひとつ大きな問題があります
08:01
and that is that it's really hard to get your bearings
動き回っていると
自分の居場所を知るのが
08:03
when you're in midair.
とても難しいのです
08:07
Some years ago, I noticed that I had accumulated
数年前 私は
ユナイテッド航空だけで
08:08
one million miles on United Airlines alone.
100万マイルを貯めたことに
気づきました
08:11
You all know that crazy system,
6日間ひどい思いをすると
08:15
six days in hell, you get the seventh day free.
7日目が無料になるという
あのおかしなシステムです
08:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:21
And I began to think that really,
私はこう考えるようになりました
08:24
movement was only as good as the sense of stillness
移動とは
立ち止まることができてこそ
08:27
that you could bring to it to put it into perspective.
役に立ち その意味が
わかるものなのだと
08:30
And eight months after my house burned down,
両親の家が焼けた8か月後
08:34
I ran into a friend who taught at a local high school,
地元の高校で教えている友人と
ばったり出会いました
08:37
and he said, "I've got the perfect place for you."
「君にぴったりの場所を見つけたよ」
と言われ 「本当に?」と答えました
08:39
"Really?" I said. I'm always a bit skeptical
そういう言葉は すぐには
信じないようにしているのです
08:43
when people say things like that.
そういう言葉は すぐには
信じないようにしているのです
08:45
"No, honestly," he went on,
「本当さ」と彼は続けました
08:46
"it's only three hours away by car,
「車でほんの3時間ほどだしー
08:48
and it's not very expensive,
値段も高くないんだ」
08:50
and it's probably not like anywhere you've stayed before."
「泊ったことのないような
場所だと思うよ」
08:51
"Hmm." I was beginning to get slightly intrigued. "What is it?"
私は少し興味を惹かれ始めました
「どこなんだい?」
08:55
"Well —" Here my friend hemmed and hawed —
「え~と」 友人は咳払いをして
口ごもり―
08:59
"Well, actually it's a Catholic hermitage."
「実は カトリックの修道院なんだ」
09:02
This was the wrong answer.
良い答えではありませんでした
09:05
I had spent 15 years in Anglican schools,
英国教会系の学校に
15年間通っていたので
09:07
so I had had enough hymnals and crosses to last me a lifetime.
讃美歌や十字架は
一生分 経験しましたし
09:10
Several lifetimes, actually.
もうたくさんなのです
09:14
But my friend assured me that he wasn't Catholic,
でも 友人や 彼の教え子も
09:17
nor were most of his students,
カトリック教徒ではないけど
09:19
but he took his classes there every spring.
毎年 春に生徒たちを
そこに連れて行くのだと言いました
09:21
And as he had it, even the most restless, distractible,
彼によると もっとも
落着きがなく 注意力散漫で
09:23
testosterone-addled 15-year-old Californian boy
男性ホルモンに惑わされている
カリフォルニアの15歳の男子でも
09:28
only had to spend three days in silence
たった3日間 静寂の中で過ごすと
09:32
and something in him cooled down and cleared out.
心が静まり
すっきりするのだそうです
09:35
He found himself.
自分自身を知ることができるのです
09:40
And I thought, "Anything that works for a 15-year-old boy
「15歳の男子に効くのならー
09:42
ought to work for me."
自分にも効果があるはずだ」
と思いました
09:45
So I got in my car, and I drove three hours north
それで 車に乗って3時間
海岸沿いに
09:46
along the coast,
北へ向かいました
09:50
and the roads grew emptier and narrower,
行き交う車はだんだんと減り
道が狭くなっていきました
09:51
and then I turned onto an even narrower path,
やがてより狭い小道に入り
09:54
barely paved, that snaked for two miles
舗装もされていない曲がり道を
3キロほど進み
09:57
up to the top of a mountain.
山の上までのぼりました
10:00
And when I got out of my car,
車から降りると
10:03
the air was pulsing.
空気が力に満ちていました
10:06
The whole place was absolutely silent,
場所全体が 完全な静寂でした
10:08
but the silence wasn't an absence of noise.
その静寂は騒音がない
ということではなく
10:10
It was really a presence of a kind of energy or quickening.
ある種のエネルギーや
脈動があったのです
10:13
And at my feet was the great, still blue plate
足下には 太平洋が
静かな青い板のように
10:17
of the Pacific Ocean.
はるかに広がっていました
10:21
All around me were 800 acres of wild dry brush.
周囲は800エーカーに及ぶ
乾燥した低木地帯です
10:23
And I went down to the room in which I was to be sleeping.
自分が泊まる部屋に入りました
10:27
Small but eminently comfortable,
小さいけれど とても快適で
10:30
it had a bed and a rocking chair
ベッドと揺り椅子
10:32
and a long desk and even longer picture windows
長机と もっと長い大きな窓があり
10:34
looking out on a small, private, walled garden,
窓からは 壁に囲まれた
小さな庭が見え
10:37
and then 1,200 feet of golden pampas grass
そこから 黄金色に輝く
シロガネヨシが
10:42
running down to the sea.
350メートルほど斜面に連なり
海へと続いていました
10:45
And I sat down, and I began to write,
私は腰を下ろして
文章を書き始めました
10:48
and write, and write,
仕事場から離れるために―
10:51
even though I'd gone there really to get away from my desk.
ここを訪れたのに
書き始めると止まりませんでした
10:53
And by the time I got up, four hours had passed.
机から立ち上がった時には
4時間が過ぎていて
10:56
Night had fallen,
もう夜でした
11:01
and I went out under this great overturned saltshaker of stars,
空には 塩を振りかけたように
星が広がり
11:03
and I could see the tail lights of cars
車のテールランプが
11:07
disappearing around the headlands 12 miles to the south.
20キロほど南にある岬の突端に
消えていくのが見えました
11:10
And it really seemed like my concerns of the previous day
前日まで 自分を悩ませていたものが
11:14
vanishing.
消えていきました
11:18
And the next day, when I woke up
その翌日
11:20
in the absence of telephones and TVs and laptops,
電話もテレビも
パソコンもない部屋で目を覚ますと
11:21
the days seemed to stretch for a thousand hours.
1日が1,000時間もあるかのように
長く感じられました
11:25
It was really all the freedom I know when I'm traveling,
こうしたことは 旅行中に得られる
自由だと思っていましたが
11:29
but it also profoundly felt like coming home.
故郷に帰ってきたような気分に
させてくれるものでした
11:33
And I'm not a religious person,
私は信心深くはありませんから
礼拝には行きませんでした
11:37
so I didn't go to the services.
私は信心深くはありませんから
礼拝には行きませんでした
11:39
I didn't consult the monks for guidance.
修道士に助言をあおぐことも
しませんでした
11:40
I just took walks along the monastery road
ただ修道院の周りの道を歩き
11:43
and sent postcards to loved ones.
親しい人に絵葉書を送ったり
11:46
I looked at the clouds,
雲を眺めたりしていました
11:48
and I did what is hardest of all for me to do usually,
そして 普段なら一番難しいことに
取り組みました
11:50
which is nothing at all.
何もしない ということです
11:54
And I started to go back to this place,
私は 繰り返し
その場所を訪れるようになり
11:57
and I noticed that I was doing my most important work there
ただそこで静かに
じっと座っているだけで
11:59
invisibly just by sitting still,
知らないうちに
一番大切な仕事をしていたのです
12:03
and certainly coming to my most critical decisions
メールの処理や
人との約束に忙殺される中では
12:06
the way I never could when I was racing
決してできないであろうー
12:09
from the last email to the next appointment.
重要な決断を行なっていたのです
12:12
And I began to think that something in me
自分の中の何かが
12:14
had really been crying out for stillness,
静けさを渇望していたのです
12:17
but of course I couldn't hear it
でもあまりに忙しかったので
その声を聞くことができませんでした
12:19
because I was running around so much.
でもあまりに忙しかったので
その声を聞くことができませんでした
12:20
I was like some crazy guy who puts on a blindfold
自分から目隠しをして
「何も見えない」と文句を言う
12:22
and then complains that he can't see a thing.
おかしな人間のようでした
12:25
And I thought back to that wonderful phrase
子どものころに
セネカの本で読んだー
12:28
I had learned as a boy from Seneca,
有名な言葉を思い出しました
12:31
in which he says, "That man is poor
「わずかしか持たない者ではなくー
12:33
not who has little but who hankers after more."
多くを望む者が貧しいのである」
12:37
And, of course, I'm not suggesting
もちろん 皆さんに
修道院に行くべきだと
12:42
that anybody here go into a monastery.
言うつもりはありません
12:44
That's not the point.
大事な点は
そこではないからです
12:46
But I do think it's only by stopping movement
でも 立ち止まってこそー
12:48
that you can see where to go.
行く方向が分かるのだと
思います
12:51
And it's only by stepping out of your life and the world
そして 人生や世界の動きから
一歩 脇にそれてこそ
12:54
that you can see what you most deeply care about
何が一番大切なのかが分かりー
12:57
and find a home.
故郷を見つけることが
できるのです
13:01
And I've noticed so many people now
今では多くの人が
13:03
take conscious measures to sit quietly for 30 minutes
意識して毎朝30分間 静かに座り
13:05
every morning just collecting themselves
電子機器などを持たずに
13:08
in one corner of the room without their devices,
部屋の片隅で考えをまとめたり
13:11
or go running every evening,
毎晩ランニングをしたり
13:13
or leave their cell phones behind
携帯を持たずに
13:15
when they go to have a long conversation with a friend.
友人との会話を楽しみに
出かけたりしています
13:17
Movement is a fantastic privilege,
移動というのは
素晴らしい特権です
13:21
and it allows us to do so much that our grandparents
祖父母の時代には
考えもつかなかったようなことが
13:24
could never have dreamed of doing.
たくさんできるようになりました
13:28
But movement, ultimately,
でも移動が意味を持つのは
13:30
only has a meaning if you have a home to go back to.
帰り着く故郷があってこそです
13:32
And home, in the end, is of course
つまるところ 故郷というのは
13:36
not just the place where you sleep.
ただ休むための場所ではなく
13:39
It's the place where you stand.
よりどころとして
立ち止まる場所なのです
13:42
Thank you.
ありがとう
13:45
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:46
Translator:Wataru Narita
Reviewer:Ayumi McMullen

sponsored links

Pico Iyer - Global author
Pico Iyer has spent more than 30 years tracking movement and stillness -- and the way criss-crossing cultures have changed the world, our imagination and all our relationships.

Why you should listen

In twelve books, covering everything from Revolutionary Cuba to the XIVth Dalai Lama, Islamic mysticism to our lives in airports, Pico Iyer has worked to chronicle the accelerating changes in our outer world, which sometimes make steadiness and rootedness in our inner world more urgent than ever. In his TED Book, The Art of Stillness, he draws upon travels from North Korea to Iran to remind us how to remain focused and sane in an age of frenzied distraction. As he writes in the book, "Almost everybody I know has this sense of overdosing on information and getting dizzy living at post-human speeds ... All of us instinctively feel that something inside us is crying out for more spaciousness and stillness to offset the exhilarations of this movement and the fun and diversion of the modern world."

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.