sponsored links
TED@New York

Tania Luna: How a penny made me feel like a millionaire

タニア・ルナ: 1セント硬貨がもたらした幸福

July 12, 2012

幼い頃、タニア・ルナはチェルノブイリ原発事故の影響から故郷のウクライナを離れ、アメリカに移住しました。ある日、当時家族で滞在していたニューヨークのホームレスシェルターの床で、タニアは1セント硬貨を見つけます。その時ほど、自分が豊かになったと感じたことはない ― タニアは、自身の子供の頃のほろ苦い、でも小さな幸せの記憶を回想し、それを心に留めておくことの意味を伝えます。

Tania Luna - Surprisologist
Tania Luna co-founded Surprise Industries, a company devoted to designing surprise experiences. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'm five years old, and I am very proud.
5才の私には
とても自慢したいことがありました
00:12
My father has just built the best outhouse
父が 私達が住むウクライナの小さな村で
00:16
in our little village in Ukraine.
一番すてきな 屋外トイレを建てたんです
00:20
Inside, it's a smelly, gaping hole in the ground,
中は 地面に大きな臭い穴が開いてるだけ
00:22
but outside, it's pearly white formica
でも外側は パールホワイトの化粧板が
00:26
and it literally gleams in the sun.
文字通り 陽の光を浴びて 輝いているんです
00:30
This makes me feel so proud, so important,
それが とても誇らしくて とても偉くなった気がして
00:33
that I appoint myself the leader of my little group of friends
私は自ら 仲良しグループのリーダーになって
00:37
and I devise missions for us.
使命を課しました
00:40
So we prowl from house to house
そして近所の家々をウロついて
00:43
looking for flies captured in spider webs
蜘蛛の巣に捕まったハエを見つけては
00:45
and we set them free.
逃がしていました
00:48
Four years earlier, when I was one,
その四年前 私がまだ1才だった時
00:51
after the Chernobyl accident,
チェルノブイリの事故の後
00:53
the rain came down black,
黒い雨が降ったと思ったら
00:55
and my sister's hair fell out in clumps,
姉の髪の毛がごっそり抜けて
00:57
and I spent nine months in the hospital.
私は九ヶ月入院しました
00:59
There were no visitors allowed,
病院は面会謝絶だったので
01:02
so my mother bribed a hospital worker.
母はそこで働く関係者を買収して
01:03
She acquired a nurse's uniform,
看護師の制服を手に入れました
01:07
and she snuck in every night to sit by my side.
そして毎晩 病室にもぐりこんでは
私のそばについていてくれました
01:10
Five years later, an unexpected silver lining.
それから五年後
突然 雲の切れ間から光が射して
01:14
Thanks to Chernobyl, we get asylum in the U.S.
チェルノブイリのおかげで
アメリカに避難することになったんです
01:17
I am six years old, and I don't cry when we leave home
6才になった私は 故郷を離れて
アメリカに向かう時も 泣きませんでした
01:22
and we come to America,
6才になった私は 故郷を離れて
アメリカに向かう時も 泣きませんでした
01:26
because I expect it to be a place filled with rare
だって そこには珍しい物や素敵な物
01:27
and wonderful things like bananas and chocolate
バナナやチョコレートが満ちあふれているんですもの
01:31
and Bazooka bubble gum,
そしてバズーカバブルガム
01:35
Bazooka bubble gum with the little cartoon wrappers inside,
漫画が描かれた小さな紙に包まれた
バズーカバブルガム
01:37
Bazooka that we'd get once a year in Ukraine
バズーカバブルガム ウクライナで貰えるのは一年に一度
01:41
and we'd have to chew one piece for an entire week.
そして一個のガムを一週間噛んだものです
01:44
So the first day we get to New York,
ニューヨークに到着した最初の日
01:48
my grandmother and I find a penny
祖母と私は 1セント硬貨を見つけました
01:50
in the floor of the homeless shelter that my family's staying in.
家族で滞在していた ホームレスのシェルターの
床に落ちてたんです
01:52
Only, we don't know that it's a homeless shelter.
ただし そこがホームレスシェルターだとは知らなくて ―
01:56
We think that it's a hotel, a hotel with lots of rats.
てっきり やたらとネズミが多いホテルだと思ってたの
01:58
So we find this penny kind of fossilized in the floor,
その床で 化石のような1セント硬貨を見つけて
02:01
and we think that a very wealthy man must have left it there
どこかのお金持ちが
置いて行ったに違いないと思いました
02:05
because regular people don't just lose money.
だって普通の人がお金を失くすなんて
有り得ないから
02:08
And I hold this penny in the palm of my hand,
その硬貨を掌に握りしめると
02:11
and it's sticky and rusty,
ベタベタして 錆びついていたけど
02:13
but it feels like I'm holding a fortune.
まるで 大金を握っているような気分になって
02:16
I decide that I'm going to get my very own piece
”よし このお金でバズーカバブルガムを買おう”
02:19
of Bazooka bubble gum.
そう決心しました
02:21
And in that moment, I feel like a millionaire.
まるで 大金持ちになった気がしました
02:23
About a year later, I get to feel that way again
その約一年後 また同じような気持ちになりました
02:27
when we find a bag full of stuffed animals in the trash,
ゴミ捨て場でぬいぐるみが
いっぱい詰まった袋を見つけて
02:29
and suddenly I have more toys
突然それまでで一番たくさんの
02:32
than I've ever had in my whole life.
おもちゃを手に入れたんです
02:34
And again, I get that feeling when we get a knock
そして再びこんなことがありました
当時住んでいた ―
02:37
on the door of our apartment in Brooklyn,
ブルックリンのアパートのドアを叩く音がして
02:39
and my sister and I find a deliveryman
開けてみたら ピザの箱を持った
02:41
with a box of pizza that we didn't order.
配達の人が立っていたの
ピザなんて注文していないのに
02:43
So we take the pizza, our very first pizza,
姉と私はピザを受け取ると
生まれて初めのピザを
02:46
and we devour slice after slice
玄関先で配達の人が見つめる中
02:49
as the deliveryman stands there and stares at us from the doorway.
一枚また一枚とむさぼるように
平らげました
02:52
And he tells us to pay, but we don't speak English.
彼は代金を払えって言ったけど
私達は英語が分からない
02:55
My mother comes out, and he asks her for money,
そこに母が出てきたの
02:58
but she doesn't have enough.
だけど 持ち合わせがない
03:01
She walks 50 blocks to and from work every day
母はバス代を節約するために
家から職場まで50ブロックの距離を
03:02
just to avoid spending money on bus fare.
毎日歩いて往復していました
03:06
Then our neighbor pops her head in,
その時 別の部屋の住人が出てきたと思ったら
03:08
and she turns red with rage when she realizes
見る間にその顔が 怒りで赤くなっていったの
03:10
that those immigrants from downstairs
下の階の移民の家族が
03:13
have somehow gotten their hands on her pizza.
どういう訳か 自分のピザに手を付けたわけだから
03:15
Everyone's upset.
その場は大混乱
03:19
But the pizza is delicious.
でもあのピザの味は 格別だった
03:21
It doesn't hit me until years later just how little we had.
それから暫くの間 自分達がいかに貧しいか
気付きませんでした
03:24
On our 10 year anniversary of being in the U.S.,
アメリカに移住して十年経った頃
03:30
we decided to celebrate by reserving a room
最初に泊まったあのホテルを予約して
03:33
at the hotel that we first stayed in when we got to the U.S.
お祝いすることにしたんですが
03:35
The man at the front desk laughs, and he says,
フロント係が笑って言ったんです
03:38
"You can't reserve a room here. This is a homeless shelter."
”ここは予約できないよ ホームレスのシェルターだから”
03:40
And we were shocked.
家族みんな ショックを受けました
03:43
My husband Brian was also homeless as a kid.
私の夫のブライアンも 子供の頃はホームレスでした
03:45
His family lost everything, and at age 11,
彼が11才の時 一家が全てを失って
03:49
he had to live in motels with his dad,
父親とモーテルで暮らすようになりました
03:52
motels that would round up all of their food
そこでは持ってる食料を全て没収されて
03:55
and keep it hostage until they were able to pay the bill.
部屋代を払うまで返してもらえなかったそうです
03:58
And one time, when he finally got his box
ある時 彼がやっとの思いで
04:02
of Frosted Flakes back, it was crawling with roaches.
コーンフレークの箱を取り戻すと
中にはゴキブリがウジャウジャ
04:04
But he did have one thing.
そんな中 彼が大切にしてるものがあったの
04:07
He had this shoebox that he carried with him everywhere
片時も離さなかった その靴箱の中には
04:09
containing nine comic books,
九冊のマンガと
04:12
two G.I. Joes painted to look like Spider-Man
スパイダーマン仕様のG.I.ジョーが二体
04:14
and five Gobots. And this was his treasure.
それとロボットが五個 それが彼の宝物だった
04:18
This was his own assembly of heroes
彼が集めたヒーロー達
04:21
that kept him from drugs and gangs
そのおかげでドラッグや非行に走らず
04:24
and from giving up on his dreams.
夢を持ち続けることができたんです
04:26
I'm going to tell you about one more
もう一人 かつて
04:29
formerly homeless member of our family.
ホームレスだった家族の話をしましょう
04:30
This is Scarlett.
スカーレットです
04:32
Once upon a time, Scarlet was used as bait in dog fights.
その昔 スカーレットは闘犬の “咬ませ犬” でした
04:34
She was tied up and thrown into the ring
鎖に繋がれ 闘犬のリンクに投げ込まれ
04:37
for other dogs to attack so they'd get more aggressive before the fight.
咬まれることで 闘犬達の
闘争心を煽っていたんです
04:40
And now, these days, she eats organic food
今 彼女はオーガニック食品を食べて
04:44
and she sleeps on an orthopedic bed with her name on it,
名前入りの整形外科用ベッドで寝ています
04:48
but when we pour water for her in her bowl,
でもいまだに ボウルに水を入れてあげるだけで
04:50
she still looks up and she wags her tail in gratitude.
こちらを見上げて 嬉しそうに尻尾を振るんです
04:55
Sometimes Brian and I walk through the park with Scarlett,
時々 ブライアンと
スカーレットを連れて公園を散歩します
04:59
and she rolls through the grass,
彼女が芝の上を転がり
05:02
and we just look at her
そんなあの子の様子を ただ眺める
05:05
and then we look at each other
そして思わず お互いを見詰め合う
05:07
and we feel gratitude.
それだけで 感謝の気持ちでいっぱいになります
05:09
We forget about all of our new middle-class frustrations
そんな時は 今や中流階級となって感じる不満や
05:13
and disappointments,
失望感もすっかり忘れて
05:16
and we feel like millionaires.
気分はまるで 億万長者です
05:18
Thank you.
ありがとう
05:21
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:22
Translator:hiroyo okajima
Reviewer:Masumi Kiyota

sponsored links

Tania Luna - Surprisologist
Tania Luna co-founded Surprise Industries, a company devoted to designing surprise experiences.

Why you should listen

Tania Luna has an unusual title: she calls herself a “surprisologist.” The co-founder and CEO of Surprise Industries, Luna thinks deeply about how to delight, and how to help individuals and teams thrive in uncertain circumstances and develop the bonds needed to get through them.

When Luna was invited to take part in TED’s Worldwide Talent Search in 2012, she expected to give a talk about surprise and the importance of not being attached to outcomes. However, she was inspired to tell a more personal story -- one many of her closest friends didn’t know -- about her Ukrainian family getting asylum in the United States when she was 6-yeard-old and arriving in New York with virtually nothing. She sees her work as connected to her upbringing -- in which a piece of Bazooka bubble gum, a thrown-out toy or a mis-delivered pizza was magical -- because it gave her an appreciation for the joy of little surprises. 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.