15:19
TEDGlobal 2013

Sonia Shah: 3 reasons we still haven’t gotten rid of malaria

ソニア・シャー: いまだにマラリアを撲滅できない3つの理由

Filmed:

1600年代からマラリアの治療法は分かっているにもかかわらず、なぜ、この病気でまだ毎年何十万もの命が失われるのでしょうか? ジャーナリストのソニア・シャーは、それは単に薬の問題ではないと言います。マラリアの歴史をひも解くと、マラリア撲滅を阻む3つの大きな課題が浮かび上がります。

- Science writer
Science historian Sonia Shah explores the surprisingly fascinating story behind an ancient scourge: malaria. Full bio

So over the long course of human history,
長きにわたる
人類の歴史において
00:12
the infectious disease that's killed more humans
最も多くの人が
犠牲になった伝染病は
00:16
than any other is malaria.
マラリアです
00:18
It's carried in the bites of infected mosquitos,
感染した蚊に刺されることで
かかる病気で
00:21
and it's probably our oldest scourge.
おそらく 最も古い惨事でしょう
00:24
We may have had malaria since we evolved from the apes.
マラリアとの関わりは
類人猿から進化して以来かもしれません
00:26
And to this day, malaria takes a huge toll on our species.
今でもなお マラリアには
大きな犠牲を払わされています
00:30
We've got 300 million cases a year
毎年3億人がマラリアにかかり
00:33
and over half a million deaths.
50万人以上が亡くなっています
00:36
Now this really makes no sense.
これは 本当におかしなことです
00:39
We've known how to cure malaria
マラリアの治療法は
1600年代からあるのですから
00:42
since the 1600s.
マラリアの治療法は
1600年代からあるのですから
00:44
That's when Jesuit missionaries in Peru
当時 ペルーで
イエズス会の伝道師が
00:46
discovered the bark of the cinchona tree,
キナの木の皮を発見し
00:48
and inside that bark was quinine,
その皮に「キニーネ」と呼ばれる―
00:51
still an effective cure for malaria to this day.
現在でもマラリア治療に
使われる薬があったのです
00:53
So we've known how to cure malaria for centuries.
つまり 何世紀もの間
マラリアの治療法は知られていたのです
00:56
We've known how to prevent malaria since 1897.
1897年には
マラリア予防法も分かりました
00:59
That's when the British army surgeon Ronald Ross
イギリスの軍医
ロナルド・ロスが
01:02
discovered that it was mosquitos that carried malaria,
マラリアを媒介するのは
蚊だと発見したのです
01:05
not bad air or miasmas, as was previously thought.
かつては ミアズマと言われる
悪い空気が原因と思われていました
01:08
So malaria should be a relatively simple disease to solve,
ですから マラリアは
比較的簡単に解決できるはずなのです
01:12
and yet to this day, hundreds of thousands of people
でも 今でも
何十万もの人が
01:18
are going to die from the bite of a mosquito.
蚊に刺されたことが原因で
亡くなっています
01:22
Why is that?
なぜでしょう?
01:25
This is a question that's
この問いに
01:26
personally intrigued me for a long time.
長い間 私は関心を持ってきました
01:28
I grew up as the daughter of Indian immigrants
インド系移民の娘として
育った私は
01:30
visiting my cousins in India every summer,
毎夏 インドのいとこを
訪ねていました
01:33
and because I had no immunity to the local malarias,
地元のマラリアに
免疫がなかった私は
01:35
I was made to sleep under this hot, sweaty mosquito net every night
毎晩 この暑くて汗まみれになる
蚊帳で寝かされました
01:38
while my cousins, they were allowed to sleep
いとこたちは
テラスで寝ることができ
01:42
out on the terrace and have
いとこたちは
テラスで寝ることができ
01:44
this nice, cool night breeze wafting over them.
気持ちよい夜風にあたれたのに
01:45
And I really hated the mosquitos for that.
それが理由で
私は蚊が大嫌いでした
01:48
But at the same time, I come from a Jain family,
でも 私は
ジャイナ教の家庭出身で
01:52
and Jainism is a religion that espouses
ジャイナ教では
01:55
a very extreme form of nonviolence.
不殺生を厳格に守ります
01:57
So Jains are not supposed to eat meat.
ジャイナ教徒は
お肉を食べてもいけないし
02:00
We're not supposed to walk on grass,
草の上も歩いてはいけません
02:04
because you could, you know,
うっかり踏みつけて
02:06
inadvertently kill some insects when you walk on grass.
虫を殺してしまうかも
しれないからです
02:07
We're certainly not supposed to swat mosquitos.
当然 蚊をたたいてもいけません
02:09
So the fearsome power of this little insect
ですから この小さな虫は
私にとって
02:12
was apparent to me from a very young age,
幼いころから
恐るべき脅威でした
02:15
and it's one reason why I spent five years as a journalist
それもあって 私は5年かけ
ジャーナリストとして
02:17
trying to understand, why has malaria
なぜマラリアが
これほど長い間
02:20
been such a horrible scourge for all of us for so very long?
私たちを苦しめてきたのか
突き止めようとしてきました
02:23
And I think there's three main reasons why.
私は3つの原因があると
考えています
02:28
Those three reasons add up to the fourth reason,
この3つが相まって
4つ目の原因を生み出します
02:30
which is probably the biggest reason of all.
それが おそらく
最大の原因でしょう
02:33
The first reason is certainly scientific.
1つ目の原因は
もちろん 科学的なものです
02:36
This little parasite that causes malaria,
この小さな寄生虫が
マラリアを引き起こします
02:39
it's probably one of the most complex
おそらく 今まで知られている中で
02:41
and wily pathogens known to humankind.
最も複雑 かつ
したたかな病原体です
02:43
It lives half its life inside the cold-blooded mosquito
この病原体は
その半生は冷血動物の蚊の中で
02:45
and half its life inside the warm-blooded human.
そして残りは
温血動物の人間の中で過ごします
02:49
These two environments are totally different,
この二つの環境は
全く異なるもので
02:53
but not only that, they're both utterly hostile.
さらに いずれも
非常に攻撃的です
02:56
So the insect is continually trying to fight off the parasite,
蚊は 絶えず
寄生虫を追い出そうとしますし
02:59
and so is the human body continually trying to fight it off.
人間の身体も
同様に追い出そうとします
03:03
This little creature survives under siege like that,
この小さな生物は
そんな包囲攻撃を生き延び
03:06
but not only does it survive, it has thrived.
さらには 繁栄までしているのです
03:10
It has spread. It has more ways to evade attack than we know.
寄生虫は広まり
巧みに攻撃を逃れる術も身に付けました
03:13
It's a shape-shifter, for one thing.
まず 形態を変えます
03:17
Just as a caterpillar turns into a butterfly,
ちょうど毛虫が蝶になるように
03:19
the malaria parasite transforms itself like that
マラリア寄生虫も姿を変えます
03:23
seven times in its life cycle.
ライフサイクルで 7回もです
03:25
And each of those life stages not only looks totally different from each other,
それぞれの段階で
全く違う姿をしているだけではなく
03:28
they have totally different physiology.
全く異なる生理機能を持っています
03:33
So say you came up with some great drug
つまり 例えば
ライフサイクルの
03:36
that worked against one stage of the parasite's life cycle.
特定の段階にある寄生虫への
特効薬を見つけたとしても
03:38
It might do nothing at all to any of the other stages.
他の段階になったら ちっとも
効果がないかもしれないのです
03:41
It can hide in our bodies, undetected,
寄生虫は 私たちの体内に隠れて
検出もされず
03:44
unbeknownst to us, for days, for weeks,
気付かれずにいられるのです
何日も 何週間も
03:47
for months, for years, in some cases even decades.
何ヶ月も 何年も
場合によっては何十年もです
03:49
So the parasite is a very big scientific challenge to tackle,
この寄生虫は
とても大きな科学上の課題ですが
03:53
but so is the mosquito that carries the parasite.
寄生虫を宿す蚊も 同様です
03:58
Only about 12 species of mosquitos
たった12種類の蚊が
04:01
carry most of the world's malaria,
世界中の ほとんどのマラリアを運んでいて
04:03
and we know quite a bit about the kinds of
そうした蚊が住む
水のある場所について
04:05
watery habitats that they specialize in.
多くのことが分かっています
04:07
So you might think, then, well, why don't we just
皆さんは こう思うかもしれませんね
04:10
avoid the places where the killer mosquitos live? Right?
そんな危ない蚊がいる場所を
避ければいいじゃないかって?
04:13
We could avoid the places where the killer grizzly bears live
危険なハイイログマが
いる場所は避けられますし
04:16
and we avoid the places where the killer crocodiles live.
クロコダイルがいる場所も
避けますよね
04:18
But say you live in the tropics
でも もし熱帯地方に住んでいて
04:21
and you walk outside your hut one day
ある日 小屋の外を歩いて
04:24
and you leave some footprints in the soft dirt
家のまわりの やわらかい泥の上に
足跡を残したとします
04:27
around your home.
家のまわりの やわらかい泥の上に
足跡を残したとします
04:29
Or say your cow does, or say your pig does,
あるいは 飼い牛や豚が
足跡を残します
04:31
and then, say, it rains,
そこへ 雨が降ります
04:35
and that footprint fills up with a little bit of water.
すると 足跡は
水たまりになります
04:37
That's it. You've created the perfect
ほら こうして
家のすぐそばに
04:39
malarial mosquito habitat that's right outside your door.
マラリア蚊に最適な住まいを
作ってしまったのです
04:41
So it's not easy for us to extricate ourselves from these insects.
ですから こうした虫を
避けるのは簡単ではありません
04:45
We kind of create places that they love to live
私たちは 蚊が住みやすい場所を
作ってしまうのです
04:48
just by living our own lives.
ただ 普通に生活するだけでです
04:50
So there's a huge scientific challenge,
ですから 科学的にだけでなく
04:52
but there's a huge economic challenge too.
経済的にも大きな課題となります
04:54
Malaria occurs in some of the poorest
マラリアが発生するのは
04:56
and most remote places on Earth,
世界でも 最も貧しく
辺鄙な場所で
04:58
and there's a reason for that.
それには 理由があります
05:00
If you're poor, you're more likely to get malaria.
貧しければ
よりマラリアにかかりやすいのです
05:02
If you're poor, you're more likely to live
貧しければ
住む可能性が高くなるのは
05:04
in rudimentary housing on marginal land that's poorly drained.
水はけが悪い 僻地に建つ
粗末な家屋です
05:06
These are places where mosquitos breed.
つまり 蚊が繁殖する場所です
05:10
You're less likely to have door screens or window screens.
網戸もないことが多いでしょう
05:13
You're less likely to have electricity
電気もなくて
05:17
and all the indoor activities that electricity makes possible,
電気が必要な屋内での活動も
できないことが多いでしょう
05:19
so you're outside more.
外で過ごすことが増え
05:22
You're getting bitten by mosquitos more.
蚊に刺されやすくなります
05:23
So poverty causes malaria,
貧困がマラリアを引き起こすのです
05:25
but what we also know now is that malaria itself
でも 今分かっているのは
マラリアもまた
05:27
causes poverty.
貧困を生み出すことです
05:30
For one thing, it strikes hardest during harvest season,
一つには 収穫の時期に
大打撃を与えます
05:31
so exactly when farmers need to be out in the fields
まさに農家が畑に出て
05:34
collecting their crops, they're home sick with a fever.
収穫しないといけないとき
熱で家にいることになるのです
05:37
But it also predisposes people to death
でも それはまた
05:41
from all other causes.
他の原因による死も招きます
05:44
So this has happened historically.
歴史的にも起こりました
05:45
We've been able to take malaria out of a society.
私たちは 一部の社会では
マラリアの駆逐に成功しました
05:47
Everything else stays the same,
でも 他が全て同じままだと
05:50
so we still have bad food, bad water, bad sanitation,
悪い食べ物
悪い水 悪い衛生状態によって
05:52
all the things that make people sick.
結局 人々は病気になります
05:54
But just if you take malaria out,
でも もしマラリアをなくせば
05:56
deaths from everything else go down.
他の原因による死も
減るのです
05:58
And the economist Jeff Sachs has actually quantified
経済学者 ジェフリー・サックスは
これが社会にとって
06:02
what this means for a society.
何を意味するのか
実際に数値化しました
06:05
What it means is, if you have malaria in your society,
社会にマラリアがあれば
06:07
your economic growth is depressed
経済成長は 毎年1.3%も
抑制されるというのです
06:10
by 1.3 percent every year,
経済成長は 毎年1.3%も
抑制されるというのです
06:12
year after year after year, just this one disease alone.
毎年毎年
この病気だけでです
06:16
So this poses a huge economic challenge,
ですから これは
大きな経済的課題を提示します
06:20
because say you do come up with your great drug
というのも
もし特効薬やワクチンを
06:22
or your great vaccine -- how do you deliver it
見つけたとして
どうやって届けるのですか?
06:25
in a place where there's no roads,
道もなければ
06:27
there's no infrastructure,
インフラもなく
06:29
there's no electricity for refrigeration to keep things cold,
冷蔵できる電気もない場所です
06:31
there's no clinics, there's no clinicians
病院も お医者さんもいません
06:34
to deliver these things where they're needed?
でも これらが必要なのは
そういう場所なのです
06:37
So there's a huge economic challenge in taming malaria.
マラリアをおとなしくさせるには
大きな経済的課題があります
06:39
But along with the scientific challenge and the economic challenge,
でも 科学的課題
経済的課題に加えて
06:43
there's also a cultural challenge,
文化的課題もあります
06:46
and this is probably the part about malaria
これは おそらく
マラリアに関することで
06:48
that people don't like to talk about.
皆が話したがらないことでしょう
06:51
And it's the paradox that the people
逆説的ではありますが
06:54
who have the most malaria in the world
世界で最もマラリアに悩む人たちが
06:56
tend to care about it the least.
一番 そのことを
気にしない傾向にあります
06:58
This has been the finding of medical anthropologists again and again.
これは医療人類学者によって
何度も確認されてきたことです
07:01
They ask people in malarious parts of the world,
世界でマラリアが多い地域で
こんな質問をします
07:04
"What do you think about malaria?"
「マラリアについてどう思いますか?」
07:07
And they don't say, "It's a killer disease. We're scared of it."
返ってくる答えは
「死に至らしめる病気で恐ろしい」ではなく
07:09
They say, "Malaria is a normal problem of life."
「マラリアは 日々のちょっとしたトラブル」です
07:13
And that was certainly my personal experience.
これは 私自身も経験しました
07:18
When I told my relatives in India
インドの親戚に
マラリアの本を書いていると言ったら
07:20
that I was writing a book about malaria,
インドの親戚に
マラリアの本を書いていると言ったら
07:22
they kind of looked at me like
まるで イボに関する本でも
書いているかのような目で見られました
07:24
I told them I was writing a book about warts or something.
まるで イボに関する本でも
書いているかのような目で見られました
07:26
Like, why would you write about something so boring,
なんで そんな退屈で
ありきたりなものについて
07:28
so ordinary? You know?
書いているの
という感じです
07:31
And it's simple risk perception, really.
これは 単純なリスク認識の問題です
07:33
A child in Malawi, for example,
例えば マラウイの子どもは
07:36
she might have 12 episodes of malaria before the age of two,
2歳になるまで マラリアに
12回もかかるかもしれません
07:38
but if she survives,
それでも 生きながらえれば
07:43
she'll continue to get malaria throughout her life,
人生でずっと
マラリアにかかり続けるでしょう
07:45
but she's much less likely to die of it.
でも それで死ぬ可能性は
ぐんと低くなります
07:48
And so in her lived experience,
彼女にとっては
07:50
malaria is something that comes and goes.
マラリアは 現れては
消えていくものになるのです
07:52
And that's actually true for most of the world's malaria.
世界のマラリアのほとんどで
実際にそうなのです
07:56
Most of the world's malaria comes and goes on its own.
ほとんどのマラリアは
自然と 現れては消えていきます
07:58
It's just, there's so much malaria
マラリアはたくさんあって
08:01
that this tiny fraction of cases that end in death
死に至るのは
ほんの一部のケースです
08:04
add up to this big, huge number.
それでも この大きな数になる
というわけです
08:08
So I think people in malarious parts of the world
マラリアの多い地域に
住む人にとっては
08:11
must think of malaria the way
マラリアはちょうど
08:13
those of us who live in the temperate world
温暖な地域に住む
私たちにとっての
08:15
think of cold and flu. Right?
風邪やインフルエンザと
同じに違いありません
08:16
Cold and flu have a huge burden on our societies
風邪やインフルエンザは
社会や生活の上で
08:18
and on our own lives,
大きな重荷です
08:22
but we don't really even take
でも 私たちは
08:24
the most rudimentary precautions against it because
最も基礎的な予防措置さえ
取っていません
08:25
we consider it normal to get cold and flu
風邪やインフルエンザの
季節になれば
08:27
during cold and flu season.
それにかかるのは
普通と考えるからです
08:30
And so this poses a huge cultural challenge in taming malaria,
これは マラリア抑制の上での
大きな文化的課題です
08:32
because if people think it's normal to have malaria,
マラリアにかかるのが
普通だと思う人たちを
08:37
then how do you get them to run to the doctor
どうやって医者に行かせますか?
08:41
to get diagnosed, to pick up their prescription,
どうやったら 診断を受けて
処方箋をもらい
08:44
to get it filled, to take the drugs,
薬をもらって
それを飲み
08:47
to put on the repellents, to tuck in the bed nets?
虫よけをつけ 蚊帳の中で
眠ってもらうことができますか?
08:49
This is a huge cultural challenge in taming this disease.
この病気を抑制する上での
大きな文化的課題です
08:52
So take all that together.
まとめてみましょう
08:57
We've got a disease. It's scientifically complicated,
ある病気があります
科学的にも複雑で
08:58
it's economically challenging to deal with,
経済的にも
取り組むべき課題です
09:03
and it's one for which the people who stand
また 最も恩恵を被るべき人たちが
09:05
to benefit the most care about it the least.
最も関心を払っていないこと
でもあります
09:07
And that adds up to the biggest problem of all,
これら全てが
最大の問題を生み出します
09:09
which, of course, is the political problem.
もちろん 政治的な問題です
09:11
How do you get a political leader to do anything
どうやって
政治指導者に
09:14
about a problem like this?
こうした問題に取り組ませますか?
09:17
And the answer is, historically, you don't.
歴史的に見ても
答えは「何もしない」です
09:19
Most malarious societies throughout history
ほとんどのマラリア社会は
09:24
have simply lived with the disease.
ずっと この病気と共に
生きてきました
09:26
So the main attacks on malaria have come
マラリアへの戦いは 主に
09:28
from outside of malarious societies,
マラリア社会の外から
挑まれてきました
09:30
from people who aren't constrained
身のすくむような政治に
縛られない人たちによってです
09:33
by these rather paralyzing politics.
身のすくむような政治に
縛られない人たちによってです
09:34
But this, I think, introduces a whole host of other kinds of difficulties.
でも これは 新たな困難の
温床になったと思います
09:37
The first concerted attack against malaria
マラリアへの
最初の一斉攻撃は
09:41
started in the 1950s.
1950年代に始まりました
09:43
It was the brainchild of the U.S. State Department.
アメリカ国務省の発案でした
09:45
And this effort well understood the economic challenge.
この取組みは
経済的課題を良く理解したもので
09:48
They knew they had to focus on cheap, easy-to-use tools,
安価で 使いやすいツールを
使う必要があると考え
09:51
and they focused on DDT.
殺虫剤DDTに注目しました
09:54
They understood the cultural challenge.
文化的課題も理解していました
09:56
In fact, their rather patronizing view was that
事実 彼らが
恩着せがましくも考えたのは
09:58
people at risk of malaria shouldn't be asked to do anything at all.
マラリアの危険にある人には
何もさせるべきでないことです
10:01
Everything should be done to them and for them.
全ては 彼らのために
彼らにしてあげるべきだと
10:04
But they greatly underestimated the scientific challenge.
でも 過小評価していたのは
科学的課題です
10:07
They had so much faith in their tools
DDTに大きな信頼を寄せたばかりに
10:10
that they stopped doing malaria research.
マラリアの研究を
やめてしまったのです
10:13
And so when those tools started to fail,
そのDDTが使えないと分かり
10:16
and public opinion started to turn against those tools,
世論は DDTに反対するようになりました
10:18
they had no scientific expertise to figure out what to do.
でも 彼らはどうすればよいか
科学的知見もなく
10:21
The whole campaign crashed, malaria resurged back,
キャンペーンは崩壊し
マラリアは再発し
10:25
but now it was even worse than before
以前よりも ひどくなりました
10:29
because it was corralled into the hardest-to-reach places
というのも マラリアは
最も辿り着きにくい場所に
10:30
in the most difficult-to-control forms.
最もコントロールが難しい形で
追い込まれたからです
10:33
One WHO official at the time actually called that whole campaign
世界保健機構の ある職員は
当時 このキャンペーンを
10:36
"one of the greatest mistakes ever made in public health."
「公衆衛生分野での史上最大の間違い」
と言いました
10:40
The latest effort to tame malaria started in the late 1990s.
最新の取組みは
1990年代後半に始まり
10:45
It's similarly directed and financed primarily
同じように
マラリア社会の外から
10:47
from outside of malarious societies.
運営・資金提供されたものです
10:51
Now this effort well understands the scientific challenge.
この取組みは
科学的課題を良く理解していて
10:53
They are doing tons of malaria research.
マラリア研究も
活発にされています
10:56
And they understand the economic challenge too.
そして 経済的課題も考慮し
10:58
They're focusing on very cheap, very easy-to-use tools.
とても安価で 使い勝手の良い
ツールを使っています
11:00
But now, I think, the dilemma is the cultural challenge.
でも ジレンマは
文化的課題にあると思います
11:04
The centerpiece of the current effort is the bed net.
現在の取組みの中心は
蚊帳です
11:08
It's treated with insecticides.
殺虫剤処理がされたもので
11:11
This thing has been distributed across the malarious world
マラリアのある全地域で
配布されてきました
11:13
by the millions.
何百万という単位でです
11:15
And when you think about the bed net,
この蚊帳というのは
11:17
it's sort of a surgical intervention.
ある種の外科的措置です
11:19
You know, it doesn't really have any value
マラリアと共にある家庭にとって
11:22
to a family with malaria except that it helps prevent malaria.
蚊帳は あまり価値はなく
マラリアが予防できるだけのものです
11:24
And yet we're asking people to use these nets every night.
それでも 皆に毎晩
蚊帳を使うようお願いしています
11:27
They have to sleep under them every night.
毎晩 蚊帳の中で寝ることが
11:31
That's the only way they are effective.
唯一 有効な方法だからです
11:33
And they have to do that
そうしないといけないんです
11:35
even if the net blocks the breeze,
たとえ それが夜風を遮り
11:36
even if they might have to get up in the middle of the night
たとえ 夜中に起きて
用を足すために
11:39
and relieve themselves,
外に出ないといけなくても
11:42
even if they might have to move all their furnishings
たとえ 蚊帳を張るのに
家具を全て移動させないといけなくてもです
11:44
to put this thing up,
たとえ 蚊帳を張るのに
家具を全て移動させないといけなくてもです
11:46
even if, you know, they might live in a round hut
たとえ 丸い小屋に住んでいて
11:48
in which it's difficult to string up a square net.
四角い蚊帳を張るのが
難しくてもです
11:50
Now that's no big deal if you're fighting a killer disease.
命にかかわる病気と戦うのに
たいしたことではありません
11:54
I mean, these are minor inconveniences.
これらは ちょっとした不便というものです
11:59
But that's not how people with malaria think of malaria.
でも マラリアと共にいる人々は
そうは考えません
12:01
So for them, the calculus must be quite different.
彼らは 全く別の論理で
動いているはずなんです
12:05
Imagine, for example, if a bunch of well-meaning Kenyans
たとえば 想像してください
善意のケニア人が
12:10
came up to those of us in the temperate world and said,
温暖な地域にいる私たちに
こう言います
12:14
"You know, you people have a lot of cold and flu.
「皆さん 風邪やインフルエンザを
よくひきますね
12:16
We've designed this great, easy-to-use, cheap tool,
素晴らしく 簡単に使えて
安価なツールを作りました
12:19
we're going to give it to you for free.
ただでプレゼントします
12:22
It's called a face mask,
マスクというものですが
12:23
and all you need to do is
皆さんは 風邪やインフルエンザの季節に
12:25
wear it every day during cold and flu season
ただ毎日 マスクを
着けているだけでいいんです
12:29
when you go to school and when you go to work."
学校や仕事に行くときにもです」
12:31
Would we do that?
皆さん そうしますか?
12:34
And I wonder if that's how people
これこそ
マラリア世界にいる人たちが
12:36
in the malarious world thought of those nets
初めて蚊帳を受け取ったときの
反応ではないかと思うのです
12:38
when they first received them?
初めて蚊帳を受け取ったときの
反応ではないかと思うのです
12:40
Indeed, we know from studies
実際 調査によれば
12:42
that only 20 percent of the bed nets
初めて配られた蚊帳のうち
12:45
that were first distributed were actually used.
実際に使われていたのは
20%だけでした
12:48
And even that's probably an overestimate,
それも おそらく
過大評価でしょう
12:51
because the same people who distributed the nets
蚊帳を配った人たちが
受け取った人に
12:52
went back and asked the recipients,
聞き取り調査したのですから
12:55
"Oh, did you use that net I gave you?"
「お渡しした蚊帳を使いましたか?」と
12:56
Which is like your Aunt Jane asking you,
ちょうど ジェーンおばさんが
12:59
"Oh, did you use that vase I gave you for Christmas?"
「クリスマスにあげた花瓶はどう?」
と聞くようなものです
13:01
So it's probably an overestimate.
ですから おそらくは過大評価です
13:04
But that's not an insurmountable problem.
でも 乗り越えられない
問題ではありません
13:06
We can do more education,
もっと教育をして
13:10
we can try to convince these people to use the nets.
蚊帳を使うよう説得できます
13:11
And that's what happening now.
今 実際に行われています
13:14
We're throwing a lot more time and money
より多くの時間とお金をかけて
13:15
into workshops and trainings and musicals and plays
ワークショップや研修
ミュージカルや劇
13:17
and school meetings,
学校集会
13:22
all these things to convince people
これら全てを駆使して
13:24
to use the nets we gave you.
配布した蚊帳を使うよう
説得をしています
13:26
And that might work.
効果はあるかもしれません
13:29
But it takes time. It takes money.
でも 時間も
お金もかかります
13:31
It takes resources. It takes infrastructure.
リソースや
インフラも必要です
13:34
It takes all the things that that cheap,
これらは 全て
13:36
easy-to-use bed net was not supposed to be.
安価で使いやすい蚊帳の
あるべき姿ではありません
13:39
So it's difficult to attack malaria from inside malarious societies,
マラリア社会の内側から
マラリアと戦うのは難しいですが
13:42
but it's equally tricky when we try to attack it
マラリア社会の外側から
戦うことは
13:45
from outside of those societies.
同様に困難なことです
13:48
We end up imposing our own priorities
結局は自らの価値観を
マラリア社会に
13:51
on the people of the malarious world.
押し付けることになるからです
13:52
That's exactly what we did in the 1950s,
これが まさに
1950年代に私たちがしたことで
13:54
and that effort backfired.
その取組みは逆効果でした
13:57
I would argue today,
今 私が言いたいのは
13:59
when we are distributing tools that we've designed
自らが作ったツールを配布しても
14:00
and that don't necessarily make sense in people's lives,
それが相手の生活に
役に立つとは限らない場合
14:04
we run the risk of making the same mistake again.
同じ間違いを犯す
リスクがあるということです
14:08
That's not to say that malaria is unconquerable,
マラリアが克服不能というのではなく
14:12
because I think it is,
私は 克服できると思っています
14:14
but what if we attacked this disease
ただ もしこの病気を
14:15
according to the priorities of the people who lived with it?
マラリアと共に生きる人たちの価値観で
戦ったらどうかと言いたいのです
14:17
Take the example of England and the United States.
イギリスやアメリカの例を見てみましょう
14:21
We had malaria in those countries for hundreds of years,
何百年もの間
両国ではマラリアがありましたが
14:23
and we got rid of it completely,
ついには撲滅しました
14:26
not because we attacked malaria. We didn't.
マラリアと戦ったからではありません
戦っていません
14:29
We attacked bad roads and bad houses
戦ったのは
悪い道路や住居
14:32
and bad drainage and lack of electricity and rural poverty.
悪い下水や 電気がないこと
田舎の貧困です
14:36
We attacked the malarious way of life,
マラリアを生む生活様式と
戦ったのです
14:41
and by doing that, we slowly built malaria out.
それにより 徐々に
マラリアを駆逐しました
14:44
Now attacking the malarious way of life,
マラリアを生む生活様式と戦うこと
14:50
this is something -- these are things people care about today.
これは意味のあることです
今日 誰もが関心があります
14:51
And attacking the malarious way of life,
マラリアを生む生活様式と戦うこと
14:55
it's not fast, it's not cheap, it's not easy,
それは 早くて安く
簡単なものではありません
14:57
but I think it's the only lasting way forward.
でも これこそが
唯一 前に進める道だと思うのです
15:02
Thank you so much.
ありがとうございました
15:05
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:06
Translated by Yuko Yoshida
Reviewed by Mari Arimitsu

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Sonia Shah - Science writer
Science historian Sonia Shah explores the surprisingly fascinating story behind an ancient scourge: malaria.

Why you should listen

Aided by economics, culture, its own resilience and that of the insect that carries it (the mosquito), the malaria parasite has determined for thousands of years the health and course not only of human lives, but also of whole civilizations. In her book The Fever, author Sonia Shah outlines the epic and devastating history of malaria and shows how it still infects 500 million people every year, and kills half a million, in a context where economic inequality collides with science and biology.

Shah’s previous book The Body Hunters established her as a heavy hitter in the field of investigative human rights reporting. She is a frequent contributor to publications such as Scientific American, The Nation and Foreign Affairs.

More profile about the speaker
Sonia Shah | Speaker | TED.com