11:56
TEDSalon NY2013

Andrew Fitzgerald: Adventures in Twitter fiction

アンドリュー・フィッツジェラルド: ツイッター・フィクションという新たな試み

Filmed:

1930年代、ラジオ放送が全く新たな物語形式を生み出しました。現在、ツイッターのような短文投稿のプラットフォームが、また新たな物語形式を生み出しています。アンドリュー・フィッツジェラルドは、フィクションや物語の新しい形式が発展してきている、(まさに)短くも非常に興味深い軌跡を解説します。

- Editor
Andrew Fitzgerald is shaping new ways for Twitter and journalists to work together. Full bio

So in my free time outside of Twitter
ツイッターでの仕事が休みの時
00:12
I experiment a little bit
ネット上で物語を書いて
00:15
with telling stories online, experimenting
新しいデジタルツールで何ができるか
00:16
with what we can do with new digital tools.
試しています
00:19
And in my job at Twitter,
実は仕事でも
00:21
I actually spent a little bit of time
物語作家に
00:23
working with authors and storytellers as well,
ツイッター上での
00:24
helping to expand out the bounds
新しい物語形式を
00:27
of what people are experimenting with.
提案したりしています
00:29
And I want to talk through some examples today
今日は いくつか実例を
ご紹介したいと思います
00:31
of things that people have done
ネットの特性である
00:34
that I think are really fascinating
柔軟なIDや匿名性を利用し
00:35
using flexible identity and anonymity on the web
実話と作り話の区別を
00:37
and blurring the lines between fact and fiction.
曖昧にするという
大変面白いものです
00:41
But I want to start and go back to the 1930s.
でも まずは1930年代の話から始めさせてください
00:45
Long before a little thing called Twitter,
ツイッターができる何年も前
00:47
radio brought us broadcasts
ラジオが番組を流し
00:49
and connected millions of people
何百万という人々と
00:52
to single points of broadcast.
ラジオ局という一箇所を結びつけていました
00:55
And from those single points emanated stories.
それらのラジオ局は
様々な物語を生み出しました
00:57
Some of them were familiar stories.
ありふれた物語もあれば
01:01
Some of them were new stories.
新しい物語もありました
01:03
And for a while they were familiar formats,
しばらくの間は既存の物語形式でしたが
01:05
but then radio began to evolve its own
ラジオという媒体に応じた独自の形式に
01:08
unique formats specific to that medium.
次第に変化していきました
01:10
Think about episodes that happened live on radio.
ラジオで生放送された物語がいい例です
01:13
Combining the live play
ラジオ局から生で
01:17
and the serialization of written fiction,
シリーズ化された物語を放送するという
01:19
you get this new format.
新しい物語形式が生まれました
01:21
And the reason why I bring up radio is that I think
なぜラジオの話をしているかというと
01:24
radio is a great example of how a new medium
どうやって新しい媒体が
新しい物語形式を生み出し
01:26
defines new formats which then define new stories.
更にそれが新しい物語を生み出すかの
素晴らしい例だと思ったからです
01:30
And of course, today, we have an entirely new
現在 私たちには
01:33
medium to play with,
インターネットという
01:36
which is this online world.
全く新しい媒体があります
01:38
This is the map of verified users on Twitter
これはツイッターユーザーと彼らの関係が
01:39
and the connections between them.
わかるマップです
01:43
There are thousands upon thousands of them.
ユーザーは何千万人といます
01:45
Every single one of these points
ネットにアクセスさえできれば
01:47
is its own broadcaster.
誰でも情報を発信することができます
01:49
We've gone to this world of many to many,
一箇所から多くの人へではなく
多くの箇所から多くの人へ配信という次元です
01:51
where access to the tools is the only barrier to broadcasting.
人々がこの新しい媒体で
話を伝える術を身につけたことで
01:55
And I think that we should start to see
様々な新しい物語形式が
01:59
wildly new formats emerge
生まれてきたことに
02:02
as people learn how to tell stories in this new medium.
私たちは気づき始めるでしょう
02:04
I actually believe that we are in a wide open frontier
目の前に壮大な荒野が広がっていると思ってください
02:07
for creative experimentation, if you will,
ここには色々な建物を築くことができます
02:11
that we've explored and begun to settle
私たちはインターネットという未開の荒野の
02:13
this wild land of the Internet
仕組みがわかり 慣れてきて
02:16
and are now just getting ready
やっと建物を築ける
02:18
to start to build structures on it,
段階にきています
02:21
and those structures are the new formats
そして それらの建物は
02:23
of storytelling that the Internet will allow us to create.
インターネットのおかげで生まれた
新しい物語形式なのです
02:25
I believe this starts with an evolution
この新しい形式は
02:29
of existing methods.
既存の形式を利用して生まれます
02:32
The short story, for example,
例えば 短編小説です
02:33
people are saying that the short story
短編小説は
02:35
is experiencing a renaissance of sorts
電子書籍やデジタル市場のおかげで
02:37
thanks to e-readers, digital marketplaces.
再び注目を浴び始めました
02:39
One writer, Hugh Howey, experimented
ヒュー・ハウイーという著者が
02:43
with short stories on Amazon
『ウール』という超短編小説を
02:46
by releasing one very short story called "Wool."
アマゾンで発売しました
02:48
And he actually says that he didn't intend
実はシリーズ化するつもりはなかった
02:52
for "Wool" to become a series,
と彼は言います
02:55
but that the audience loved the first story so much
しかし読者の間で大好評だったため
02:56
they demanded more, and so he gave them more.
続編を書くことにしました
02:59
He gave them "Wool 2," which was a little bit longer than the first one,
前作よりも少しだけ長い『ウール2』
03:01
"Wool 3," which was even longer,
中編小説となった『ウール3』
03:05
culminating in "Wool 5,"
そして『ウール5』を発売する頃には
03:07
which was a 60,000-word novel.
6万語の長編小説となっていました
03:08
I think Howey was able to do all of this because
ハウイー氏は読者の感想を
すぐに見られる電子書籍システムのおかげで
03:11
he had the quick feedback system of e-books.
ここまでのことが出来たのだと思います
03:15
He was able to write and publish
彼は 比較的短期間で
03:18
in relatively short order.
小説を発売することができました
03:20
There was no mediator between him and the audience.
彼と読者との間に誰もいなかったので
03:22
It was just him directly connected with his audience
読者の感想は直接彼に伝わりました
03:25
and building on the feedback and enthusiasm
読者の意見と要望に応えて
ハウイー氏は
03:27
that they were giving him.
小説を書き続けることができました
03:30
So this whole project was an experiment.
この取り組みは新しい試みでした
03:31
It started with the one short story,
この試みは
03:33
and I think the experimentation actually became
ある短編小説から始まり
03:35
a part of Howey's format.
ハウイー氏の物語形式となったのです
03:38
And that's something that this medium enabled,
それは この新しい媒体が可能にしたのです
03:40
was experimentation being a part of the format itself.
試み自体が新しい形式となったのです
03:43
This is a short story by the author Jennifer Egan
これはジェニファー・イーガン氏による
短編小説で
03:47
called "Black Box."
『ブラックボックス』です
03:50
It was originally written
『ブラックボックス』は元々
03:52
specifically with Twitter in mind.
ツイッター用に書かれた物語でした
03:53
Egan convinced The New Yorker
イーガン氏は
ニューヨーカー誌を説得して
03:55
to start a New Yorker fiction account
ツイッターに小説用アカウントを
開設してもらい
03:57
from which they could tweet
『ブラックボックス』を
04:00
all of these lines that she created.
ツイッター上で書くようにしました
04:02
Now Twitter, of course, has a 140-character limit.
もちろん ツイートの文字数は
140字に限られています
04:03
Egan mocked that up just writing manually
ご覧のように
04:07
in this storyboard sketchbook,
イーガン氏はスケッチブックに
04:10
used the physical space constraints
実際のツイート画面の大きさのコマを作り
04:13
of those storyboard squares
そこに各ツイートを
04:16
to write each individual tweet,
手書きして行きました
04:17
and those tweets ended up becoming
最終的には600以上のツイートになり
04:19
over 600 of them that were serialized by The New Yorker.
ニューヨーカー誌によって
連載されました
04:22
Every night, at 8 p.m., you could tune in
毎晩8時にニューヨーカーのフィクションアカウントから
04:26
to a short story from The New Yorker's fiction account.
短編小説を読むことができるのです
04:29
I think that's pretty exciting:
それはかなり画期的な事だと思います
04:33
tune-in literary fiction.
物語を読むのにテレビをつけるような感覚です
04:34
The experience of Egan's story, of course,
もちろん ツイッター上なので
04:37
like anything on Twitter, there were multiple ways to experience it.
イーガン氏の物語を楽しむ方法は多様でした
04:40
You could scroll back through it,
まとめて読むこともできますが
04:43
but interestingly, if you were watching it live,
面白いのは リアルタイムで読んでいる場合
04:45
there was this suspense that built
どうなるか早く知りたい気持ちが高まるということです
04:48
because the actual tweets,
ツイートは定期的に配信されますが
04:50
you had no control over when you would read them.
いつ次のツイートを読むかを
04:53
They were coming at a pretty regular clip,
自分では決められないということです
04:55
but as the story was building,
通常 物語を読み進める際
04:57
normally, as a reader, you control how fast you move through a text,
読む速度を決めるのは読者ですが
05:00
but in this case, The New Yorker did,
この場合 ニューヨーカーでした
05:03
and they were sending you bit by bit by bit,
ニューヨーカーは読み手に少しずつツイートを送るので
05:05
and you had this suspense of waiting for the next line.
次のツイートを待つ読者のドキドキ感は高まりました
05:08
Another great example of fiction
その他のツイッターでの
05:12
and the short story on Twitter,
フィクションと短編小説の良い例を紹介します
05:15
Elliott Holt is an author who wrote a story called "Evidence."
『エビデンス』という小説の作者 エリオット・ホルトは
05:17
It began with this tweet: "On November 28
ツイートをこのように始めました
05:20
at 10:13 p.m.,
「11月28日 午後10時13分
05:23
a woman identified as Miranda Brown,
マンハッタンホテルの屋根から
05:25
44, of Brooklyn, fell to her death
女性が転落死しました
ブルックリン在住の
05:27
from the roof of a Manhattan hotel."
ミランダ・ブラウン(44歳)と確認されました」
05:30
It begins in Elliott's voice,
ナレーターとして
ホルト氏が話し始めますが
05:32
but then Elliott's voice recedes,
ナレーションが徐々に減っていきます
05:34
and we hear the voices of Elsa, Margot and Simon,
ホルト氏がツイッター上で作り上げた
05:36
characters that Elliott created on Twitter
エルサ、マーゴ、サイモンという人物が
05:39
specifically to tell this story,
続けて語ります
05:42
a story from multiple perspectives
様々な視点から語られる話は
05:44
leading up to this moment at 10:13 p.m.
この女性が亡くなった午後10時13分へと
05:47
when this woman falls to her death.
繋がっていくのです
05:50
These three characters brought an authentic vision
この3人の登場人物の視点が
実話であるかのような
05:52
from multiple perspectives.
錯覚を引き起こしたのです
05:55
One reviewer called Elliott's story
ある読者はホルト氏の物語を
05:57
"Twitter fiction done right," because she did.
「ツイッターフィクションならでは」と評しました
まさにその通り
05:59
She captured that voice
語り口調
06:02
and she had multiple characters and it happened in real time.
複数の登場人物 実際の時間との同時進行
06:04
Interestingly, though, it wasn't just
面白いことは ツイッターが
06:07
Twitter as a distribution mechanism.
配信の役割だけでなく
06:10
It was also Twitter as a production mechanism.
制作の役割も担ったのです
06:12
Elliott told me later
後にホルト氏は言いました
06:14
she wrote the whole thing with her thumbs.
「親指だけで全てを書いた
06:15
She laid on the couch and just went back and forth
ソファーに横たわり
06:19
between different characters
一行一行違う人物になりきり
06:23
tweeting out each line, line by line.
ツイートした」と
06:25
I think that this kind of spontaneous creation
このように登場人物の発言を
06:28
of what was coming out of the characters' voices
場当たり的に書き上げることが
06:30
really lent an authenticity to the characters themselves,
登場人物が実在するかのように感じさせ
06:33
but also to this format that she had created
ツイッター上のひとつの物語を複数の視点から
06:36
of multiple perspectives in a single story on Twitter.
という彼女独自の物語形式に信憑性を与えたのです
06:39
As you begin to play with flexible identity online,
ネット上で変更可能なIDを使って
06:43
it gets even more interesting
現実世界の話題を取り入れることで
06:46
as you start to interact with the real world.
更に面白くなります
06:47
Things like Invisible Obama
共和党の演説を揶揄した
「見えないオバマ」
06:49
or the famous "binders full of women"
共和党ロムニー氏の
「女性が詰まったバインダー」発言
06:51
that came up during the 2012 election cycle,
のような2012年の米大統領選挙の例や
06:53
or even the fan fiction universe of "West Wing" Twitter
『ザ・ホワイトハウス』という実在番組のファン・フィクション
06:56
in which you have all of these accounts
「ザ・ホワイトハウス・ツイッター」
07:00
for every single one of the characters in "The West Wing,"
『ザ・ホワイトハウス』で実在する全ての登場人物
07:02
including the bird that taps at Josh Lyman's window
それは たった一話のワンシーンにしか登場しなかった
07:05
in one single episode. (Laughter)
小鳥までもがアカウントを持ち登場します
07:09
All of these are rapid iterations on a theme.
これら3つは同じ現象なのです
07:13
They are creative people experimenting
これらの作者は この新しい媒体で
07:16
with the bounds of what is possible in this medium.
何ができるか挑戦している
想像力豊かな人たちなのです
07:19
You look at something like "West Wing" Twitter,
ツイッター上の「ホワイトハウス」には
07:22
in which you have these fictional characters
ドラマの架空人物が
07:23
that engage with the real world.
現実世界と交わります
07:26
They comment on politics,
登場人物は政界を批評し
07:28
they cry out against the evils of Congress.
国会の闇を糾弾します
07:30
Keep in mind, they're all Democrats.
彼らは民主党派なのですが
07:34
And they engage with the real world.
物語の登場人物は現実世界の話題を語り合っています
07:36
They respond to it.
要するに現実世界の政治批判をしているのです
07:39
So once you take flexible identity,
変更可能なID 匿名
07:41
anonymity, engagement with the real world,
現実世界の話題を使い
07:43
and you move beyond simple homage or parody
現実の良い面だけを見せる作品や
07:46
and you put these tools to work in telling a story,
パロディを超えた物語を作ると
07:49
that's when things get really interesting.
本当に面白いものができます
07:53
So during the Chicago mayoral election
シカゴ市長選挙中
ツイッター上で
07:55
there was a parody account.
あるパロディがありました
07:57
It was Mayor Emanuel.
ラーム・エマニュエル市長に関するものです
07:59
It gave you everything you wanted from Rahm Emanuel,
そのパロディはエマニュエル市長の様々な姿
08:00
particularly in the expletive department.
特に市長の汚い言葉を使う姿を見せてくれます
08:04
This foul-mouthed account
このツイッターアカウントは
08:07
followed the daily activities of the race,
日々の選挙活動を追いかけ
08:09
providing commentary as it went.
汚い言葉でつぶやいていました
08:13
It followed all of the natural tropes
好評なツイッターパロディによくある構成でしたが
08:15
of a good, solid Twitter parody account,
途中から少しずつ
08:17
but then started to get weird.
おかしくなりました
08:20
And as it progressed, it moved from this commentary
始めは選挙に沿った話でしたが
08:23
to a multi-week, real-time science fiction epic
リアルタイムでのSF長編小説の主人公として
08:27
in which your protagonist, Rahm Emanuel,
エマニュエル市長は
08:32
engages in multi-dimensional travel on election day,
選挙の日 別次元に行くのです・・・
08:35
which is -- it didn't actually happen.
しかしそれは実際には起こっていませんでした
08:39
I double checked the newspapers.
私は新聞を確認しました
08:42
And then, very interestingly, it came to an end.
そして なんとパロディは結末に至ったのです
08:45
This is something that doesn't usually happen
これはツイッター上のパロディでは
08:49
with a Twitter parody account.
普段起こらないことです
08:51
It ended, a true narrative conclusion.
まさに物語の結末のようでした
08:52
And so the author, Dan Sinker, who was a journalist,
記者でありこの小説の作者であるダン・シンカーは
08:56
who was completely anonymous this whole time,
それまで ずっと匿名にしていましたが
08:59
I think Dan -- it made a lot of sense for him
結局 それは物語形式になっていたので
09:02
to turn this into a book,
シンカー氏は書籍化するのが
09:05
because it was a narrative format in the end,
最も自然と考えたのでしょう
09:07
and I think that turning it into a book
ツイッター上のパロディから書籍化に至ることは
09:10
is representative of this idea that he had created something new
今までにないような物語形式を生み出すという
09:13
that needed to be translated into previous formats.
新しい形式の代表的なものです
09:16
One of my favorite examples
現在 ツイッター上で特に気に入っているものは
09:20
of something that's happening on Twitter right now,
「クライマーショー」という
09:22
actually, is the very absurdist Crimer Show.
ばかげた番組です
09:24
Crimer Show tells the story
「クライマーショー」は天才的な犯罪者と
09:29
of a supercriminal and a hapless detective
あわれな探偵の対談で
09:31
that face off in this exceptionally strange lingo,
テレビで見られるような構成を使って
09:34
with all of the tropes of a television show.
2人は対面すると とても奇妙な喋り方をします
09:38
Crimer Show's creator has said that
制作者は言いました
09:40
it is a parody of a popular type of show in the U.K.,
「クライマーショー」はイギリスの人気番組のパロディだと
09:42
but, man, is it weird.
でも本当に変な話ですよ
09:47
And there are all these times where Crimer,
天才的な犯罪者のクライマーは
09:50
the supercriminal, does all of these TV things.
よくテレビで見られるようなしぐさをします
09:52
He's always taking off his sunglasses
かっこつけてサングラスを外したり
09:54
or turning to the camera,
カメラ目線をしたりします
09:56
but these things just happen in text.
でもそれは映像ではなく文章で表現されています
09:59
I think borrowing all of these tropes from television
わざと「エピソード」を「エパソッド」と言い変え
10:02
and additionally presenting each Crimer Show
1話ごとに分けられた話は
10:05
as an episode, spelled E-P-P-A-S-O-D, "eppasod,"
テレビを真似して
10:08
presenting them as episodes
構成されたものであり
10:14
really, it creates something new.
とても新しい形式だと思います
10:16
There is a new "eppasod" of Crimer Show
ツイッター上ではほとんど毎日
10:19
on Twitter pretty much every day,
新しい「エパソッド」が投稿され
10:22
and they're archived that way.
「エパソッド」ごとにまとめられています
10:24
And I think this is an interesting experiment in format.
「クライマーショー」はおもしろい形式を試していると言えます
10:26
Something totally new has been created here
テレビ番組を面白おかしく真似することで
10:29
out of parodying something on television.
全く新しい形式が生み出されました
10:31
I think in nonfiction real-time storytelling,
実話に基づいてリアルタイムで楽しめる例も
10:35
there are a lot of really excellent examples as well.
ツイッター上に多くあると考えられます
10:37
RealTimeWWII is an account
「リアルタイム第2次世界大戦」
10:40
that documents what was happening on this day 60 years ago
というツイッターのアカウントは
60年前のこの日に起きたことを
10:42
in exceptional detail, as if
事細かにリアルタイムで伝えるもので
10:46
you were reading the news reports from that day.
当時の新聞を読んでいるかのように感じます
10:49
And the author Teju Cole has done
また作者のテジュー・コールは
10:51
a lot of experimentation with putting a literary twist
文学的なおもしろみを出すために当時の話題を使って
10:53
on events of the news.
様々な方法を試してきました
10:56
In this particular case, he's talking about drone strikes.
ここで彼は無人爆撃について語っています
10:58
I think that in both of these examples,
この2つの例では
11:02
you're beginning to see ways in which
ツイッターのユーザーが
11:05
people are telling stories with nonfiction content
様々な新しい方法を使って
11:07
that can be built into new types
実話に基づいた物語を語る形式が
11:10
of fictional storytelling.
出始めたことが分かります
11:12
So with real-time storytelling,
リアルタイムで語られる物語は
11:15
blurring the lines between fact and fiction,
実話と作り話
すなわち―
11:18
the real world and the digital world,
現実世界とデジタルの世界の
境界を曖昧にし
11:20
flexible identity, anonymity,
変更可能なID 匿名とともに
11:22
these are all tools that we have accessible to us,
これらは 私たちの手の届くところにあるツールで
11:26
and I think that they're just the building blocks.
積み木のようなものです
11:29
They are the bits that we use
この積み木は建物や骨組みを作るための
11:31
to create the structures, the frames,
資材であり
11:34
that then become our settlements on this
やがてインターネットという荒野に街ができあがり
11:37
wide open frontier for creative experimentation.
この街は創造的な物語を試す最適な場所なのです
11:40
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
11:43
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:44
Translated by John McLean
Reviewed by Yuko Yoshida

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Andrew Fitzgerald - Editor
Andrew Fitzgerald is shaping new ways for Twitter and journalists to work together.

Why you should listen

Andrew Fitzgerald is a writer, editor and Tweeter. As a member of the News and Journalism Partnerships team at Twitter, Fitzgerald explores creative uses of digital storytelling on the platform and elsewhere on the web. In 2012 he helped launch the first Twitter Fiction Festival, a five-day "event" that took place completely on Twitter in an effort to bring together stories that made creative use of the platform.

In his spare time Fitzgerald blogs and writes his own fiction, including the 2010 novel The Collective. He lives in New York, where he likes to experiment.

More profile about the speaker
Andrew Fitzgerald | Speaker | TED.com