sponsored links
TEDCity2.0

Chris Downey: Design with the blind in mind

クリス・ダウニー: 目の不自由な人を思ってデザインすると

October 11, 2013

目の不自由な人たちのために都市をデザインすると、どんな街になるだろう?クリス・ダウニーは2008年に突然失明してしまった建築家。彼が愛するサンフランシスコの街を、盲目になる前となった後で比較し、盲目の彼の生活を豊かにする思いやりあるデザインが、実際には、盲目であるなしにかかわらず、全ての人たちの生活をどのように良くするものであるかを語ります。

Chris Downey - Architect
Chris Downey is an architect who lost his sight and gained a new way of seeing the world. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So, stepping down out of the bus,
ある日 バスから降りて
00:14
I headed back to the corner
点字レッスンへ向かうために
00:17
to head west en route to a braille training session.
交差点を目指して西へ歩いていました
00:19
It was the winter of 2009,
2009年の冬のことです
00:23
and I had been blind for about a year.
私が失明して1年が経った頃のことでした
00:25
Things were going pretty well.
生活はわりとうまくいっていました
00:27
Safely reaching the other side,
何事もなく通りの反対側へたどり着き
00:29
I turned to the left,
左に曲がり
00:31
pushed the auto-button for
the audible pedestrian signal,
音響式の歩行者用信号のボタンを押して
00:33
and waited my turn.
信号が変わるのを待っていました
00:35
As it went off, I took off
信号が青に変わって 歩きを進め
00:37
and safely got to the other side.
無事に横断歩道を渡りきりました
00:39
Stepping onto the sidewalk,
歩道に上がると
00:41
I then heard the sound of a steel chair
私の目の前で スチール製の椅子が
00:43
slide across the concrete sidewalk in front of me.
スライドしている音が聞こえてきました
00:46
I know there's a cafe on the corner,
私はこの角にはカフェがあり
00:50
and they have chairs out in front,
その前には椅子があるのを知っていたので
00:52
so I just adjusted to the left
左にそれて
00:53
to get closer to the street.
車道に近いほうに寄りました
00:55
As I did, so slid the chair.
すると 同時にその椅子も動いたのです
00:57
I just figured I'd made a mistake,
私は ただ勘違いしたのだろうと思い
01:00
and went back to the right,
右側へ戻りましたが
01:02
and so slid the chair in perfect synchronicity.
椅子も全く同じように動くのです
01:04
Now I was getting a little anxious.
ここまで来ると 私も少しおかしいと思い始めました
01:08
I went back to the left,
また左へ動いてみる
01:10
and so slid the chair,
椅子も左へ動き
01:12
blocking my path of travel.
私の行く手を塞ぎます
01:13
Now, I was officially freaking out.
私はとうとうパニックになり
01:16
So I yelled,
叫びました
01:19
"Who the hell's out there? What's going on?"
「誰だ、何をしている!」
01:20
Just then, over my shout,
すると 私の叫び声の向こうに
01:23
I heard something else, a familiar rattle.
何だか聞いたことのある音が聞こえてきました
01:26
It sounded familiar,
聞き覚えのある音です
01:28
and I quickly considered another possibility,
私はすぐに別の可能性に思いを巡らせ
01:30
and I reached out with my left hand,
左手を伸ばすと
01:32
as my fingers brushed against something fuzzy,
指が毛のようなものに触れ
01:34
and I came across an ear,
耳を見つけました
01:37
the ear of a dog, perhaps a golden retriever.
犬の耳です
恐らくゴールデンレトリバーだったと思います
01:40
Its leash had been tied to the chair
飼い主がコーヒーを買いにいっている間
01:44
as her master went in for coffee,
その犬のリードは椅子につながれていたのです
01:46
and she was just persistent in her efforts
ただ私に挨拶をしようと努力を続けていたのです
01:48
to greet me, perhaps get a scratch behind the ear.
耳の後ろを撫でてもらいたかのかもしれません
01:50
Who knows, maybe she was volunteering for service.
ひょっとしたら
盲導犬のサービスをしたかったのかもしれません
01:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:56
But that little story is really about
しかし このちょっとしたエピソードは
01:58
the fears and misconceptions that come along
目が不自由な人が
02:01
with the idea of moving through the city
街を歩くということに対して抱く
02:04
without sight,
恐怖や誤解なのですが
02:07
seemingly oblivious to the environment
周りの環境は人々に気付かずに
02:08
and the people around you.
歩いていると思われがちです
02:11
So let me step back and set the stage a little bit.
さて 少し時間をさかのぼってお話をしましょう
02:14
On St. Patrick's Day of 2008,
2008年の聖パトリックの祝日のことです
02:18
I reported to the hospital for surgery
脳腫瘍を取り除く手術をしました
02:20
to remove a brain tumor.
脳腫瘍を取り除く手術をしました
02:23
The surgery was successful.
手術は成功したのですが
02:25
Two days later, my sight started to fail.
2日後に私の視力は減退し始めました
02:27
On the third day, it was gone.
そして 3日目には視力を完全に失いました
02:30
Immediately, I was struck by an incredible sense
私はたちまちものすごい恐怖に襲われ
02:34
of fear, of confusion, of vulnerability,
混乱状態に陥り 自分のもろさを感じました
02:36
like anybody would.
誰もがそうなると思います
02:40
But as I had time to stop and think,
しかし 私には立ち止まって
02:42
I actually started to realize
こんな風に考えることができたのです
02:45
I had a lot to be grateful for.
「自分には感謝すべきことがたくさんある」
02:46
In particular, I thought about my dad,
特に父親のことを思いました
02:49
who had passed away from complications
父は脳外科手術の後に起こった
02:52
from brain surgery.
合併症が原因で亡くなりました
02:55
He was 36. I was seven at the time.
その時父は36歳 私は7歳でした
02:57
So although I had every reason
これから私に
03:02
to be fearful of what was ahead,
どんな恐怖があろうとも
03:04
and had no clue quite what was going to happen,
何が起こるか全く予想できないとしても
03:07
I was alive.
私は生きているのです
03:09
My son still had his dad.
私の息子には まだ父親がいるのです
03:11
And besides, it's not like I was the first person
それに私が初めて視力を失った人間
03:14
ever to lose their sight.
という訳ではないのです
03:16
I knew there had to be all sorts of systems
様々なシステムや技術 そして訓練によって
03:17
and techniques and training to have
目が見えなくても 充実した有意義な
03:19
to live a full and meaningful, active life
そして活気ある生活を送れることも
03:22
without sight.
分かっていました
03:24
So by the time I was discharged from the hospital
ですから 数日後に退院する前に
03:26
a few days later, I left with a mission,
目標を立てておきました
03:28
a mission to get out and get the best training
とにかく外へ出て できるだけ早く最良の訓練を受け
03:31
as quickly as I could and get on to rebuilding my life.
人生を立て直すという目標です
03:33
Within six months, I had returned to work.
6ヶ月しないうちに 私は仕事に復帰しました
03:38
My training had started.
私の訓練が始まりました
03:42
I even started riding a tandem bike
昔からのサイクリング仲間と
03:44
with my old cycling buddies,
二人用自転車にも乗り始めたり
03:45
and was commuting to work on my own,
一人で街を歩き バスに乗って
03:47
walking through town and taking the bus.
通勤もしていました
03:50
It was a lot of hard work.
大変な努力が必要でした
03:52
But what I didn't anticipate
しかし 急激な変化の中において
03:55
through that rapid transition
私が予測していなかったことは
03:57
was the incredible experience of the juxtaposition
同じ環境 同じ人たちの中で
04:00
of my sighted experience
up against my unsighted experience
目が見える自分と 目が見えない自分を
04:04
of the same places and the same people
短い間に同時に体験した
04:08
within such a short period of time.
ものすごい経験でした
04:11
From that came a lot of insights,
その経験は 内面だけでなく
04:14
or outsights, as I called them,
外見をも見抜く洞察力をもたらしました
04:16
things that I learned since losing my sight.
視力を失ったからこそ学んだことです
04:17
These outsights ranged from the trival
それらの洞察力は 些細なことから深いものまで
04:21
to the profound,
平凡なことから ユーモアのあるものまで
04:24
from the mundane to the humorous.
幅広いものでした
04:25
As an architect, that stark juxtaposition
建築家として私は 短い間に
04:28
of my sighted and unsighted experience
同じ場所 同じ街で
04:31
of the same places and the same cities
目が見える自分と目の見えない自分の
04:34
within such a short period of time
凄まじい経験をしたことで
04:36
has given me all sorts of wonderful outsights
街についての様々なすばらしい洞察力を
04:38
of the city itself.
持つことができました
04:40
Paramount amongst those
その中でも素晴らしかったのは
04:43
was the realization that, actually,
街は盲目の人たちにとって
04:45
cities are fantastic places for the blind.
とても素晴らしい場所であると気付いたことでした
04:47
And then I was also surprised
街は盲目の人たちに冷たく無関心なのではなく
04:51
by the city's propensity for kindness and care
親切で関心の高い傾向にあることに
04:53
as opposed to indifference or worse.
驚かされました
04:57
And then I started to realize that
そして 目の不自由な人々が
05:00
it seemed like the blind seemed to have
街というものに良い影響を与えているように
05:02
a positive influence on the city itself.
思えたのです
05:04
That was a little curious to me.
それが私にはとても興味深かったのです
05:08
Let me step back and take a look
少し戻って どうして街が目の不自由な人々に
05:11
at why the city is so good for the blind.
やさしいのか考えてみたいと思います
05:14
Inherent with the training for recovery from sight loss
視力を失った人たちが
生活を立て直していくための訓練の本質は
05:19
is learning to rely on all your non-visual senses,
目が見える時には気にも留めていなかった
05:23
things that you would otherwise maybe ignore.
非視覚的な感覚の全てに頼ることを学ぶことです
05:27
It's like a whole new world of sensory information
全く新しい感覚の世界が
05:30
opens up to you.
開かれていくようなものです
05:33
I was really struck by the symphony
街は微妙な音の奏でる
シンフォニーで溢れているんです
05:34
of subtle sounds all around me in the city
街は微妙な音の奏でる
シンフォニーで溢れているんです
05:35
that you can hear and work with
それに耳を傾ければ
05:38
to understand where you are,
自分がどこにいるのか
05:40
how you need to move, and where you need to go.
どう動けばいいか
どこへ向かえばいいか 把握できるのです
05:42
Similarly, just through the grip of the cane,
同じように 握った杖からも
05:44
you can feel contrasting textures in the floor below,
足下の地面の質感の違いも感じることができるのです
05:47
and over time you build a pattern of where you are
そして時間が経つにつれて
自分がどこにいるのか どこへ向かっているのかという
05:51
and where you're headed.
そのパターンを積み上げていくのです
05:54
Similarly, just the sun warming one side of your face
同様に顔の片側に感じる太陽の温かさや
05:55
or the wind at your neck
首にあたる風などから
05:58
gives you clues about your alignment
自分の向く方向のヒントを得たり
06:01
and your progression through a block
どの辺を歩いているかや
06:03
and your movement through time and space.
時空間的な
自分の動きを知る事ができます
06:05
But also, the sense of smell.
さらに 嗅覚も役立ちます
06:08
Some districts and cities have their own smell,
自分の周りのものや場所に匂いがあるように
06:11
as do places and things around you,
その区域や街にも 特有の匂いがあります
06:13
and if you're lucky, you can even follow your nose
もし運がよければ ずっと探していた新しいパン屋さんを
06:16
to that new bakery that you've been looking for.
嗅覚に任せて探し当てることができるかもしれません
06:18
All this really surprised me,
私は大きな衝撃を受けました
06:22
because I started to realize that
なぜなら
06:23
my unsighted experienced
盲目になってからの経験は
06:26
was so far more multi-sensory
目が見えていた時よりも
06:29
than my sighted experience ever was.
断然多くの感覚を使うものだったからです
06:31
What struck me also was how much the city
街が自分の周りでどれだけ変化しているか
06:34
was changing around me.
ということにも驚かされました
06:37
When you're sighted,
目が見えていると
06:39
everybody kind of sticks to themselves,
誰もが自分自身のことだけに集中するだけです
06:40
you mind your own business.
誰もが自分自身のことだけに集中するだけです
06:43
Lose your sight, though,
しかし 視力を失うと
06:44
and it's a whole other story.
これが全く異なるのです
06:46
And I don't know who's watching who,
誰が誰を見ているのかは分かりませんが
06:48
but I have a suspicion that
a lot of people are watching me.
たくさんの人が自分を見ているだろうと疑います
06:50
And I'm not paranoid, but everywhere I go,
妄想に駆られている訳ではありませんが
06:53
I'm getting all sorts of advice:
どこへ言っても様々なアドバイスを受けるのです
06:56
Go here, move there, watch out for this.
「ここですよ、そっちへ動いて、これに気をつけて」
06:59
A lot of the information is good.
たくさんのそんな情報はありがたいです
07:01
Some of it's helpful. A lot of it's kind of reversed.
とても助けになるものもあります
多くの場合 逆なのですが
07:03
You've got to figure out what they actually meant.
どんな意味なのか考えないといけません
07:06
Some of it's kind of wrong and not helpful.
一部 間違った助けにならない情報もあります
07:09
But it's all good in the grand scheme of things.
でも 物事全体からすると すべてありがたいことです
07:13
But one time I was in Oakland
しかし オークランドにいた時にこんなことがありました
07:16
walking along Broadway, and came to a corner.
ブロードウェイ沿いを歩いて 交差点まできて
07:17
I was waiting for an audible pedestrian signal,
音響式の歩行者信号を待っていました
07:20
and as it went off, I was just about
to step out into the street,
信号が変わり 歩き出そうとしたところで
07:23
when all of a sudden, my right hand
突然 何者かに右手を掴まれ
07:25
was just gripped by this guy,
腕を引っ張られると
07:27
and he yanked my arm
and pulled me out into the crosswalk
横断歩道に引きずり出されたのです
07:29
and was dragging me out across the street,
そのまま 引きずられるように横断歩道を渡ると
07:32
speaking to me in Mandarin.
中国語で話しかけられました
07:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:35
It's like, there was no escape
from this man's death grip,
そのがっちり握られた手からは逃れられない
そんな状況でした
07:37
but he got me safely there.
でも 彼は私を安全に横断させてくれたのです
07:41
What could I do?
文句は言えません
07:43
But believe me, there are more polite ways
でも助けてくれるのであれば
07:45
to offer assistance.
もう少し丁寧な接し方があったと思います
07:47
We don't know you're there,
そばに居ても気付きませんから
07:49
so it's kind of nice to say "Hello" first.
まず「こんにちは」と声をかけて
07:51
"Would you like some help?"
「お手伝いしましょうか?」
と言ってくれるとありがたいのです
07:53
But while in Oakland, I've really been struck by
それにしても オークランドにいる間
07:55
how much the city of Oakland changed
盲目になった私にとって オークランドという街が
07:58
as I lost my sight.
これほど変わってしまうのかと驚きました
08:00
I liked it sighted. It was fine.
目が見えている時は 好きな街でした
何の問題もありませんでした
08:03
It's a perfectly great city.
とっても素敵な街です
08:05
But once I lost my sight
しかし 目が不自由になったとたん
08:08
and was walking along Broadway,
ブロードウェイ沿いを歩いているだけで
08:09
I was blessed every block of the way.
ひとブロック毎に こんな声をかけられます
08:11
"Bless you, man."
「幸運を祈ってるよ」
08:14
"Go for it, brother."
「頑張れよ 相棒」
08:16
"God bless you."
「神のご加護がありますように」
08:18
I didn't get that sighted.
目が見えていた時は
こんなことはありませんでした (笑)
08:20
(Laughter)
目が見えていた時は
こんなことはありませんでした (笑)
08:22
And even without sight,
I don't get that in San Francisco.
盲目になってからも
サンフランシスコではこんなことはありません
08:23
And I know it bothers some of my blind friends,
目の不自由な友達にはこういったことを嫌がる人がいます
08:29
it's not just me.
私だけではありません
08:32
Often it's thought that
大抵 哀れみからくる感情が
08:34
that's an emotion that comes up out of pity.
そうさせるのだろうと思います
08:36
I tend to think that it comes
out of our shared humanity,
これは 人類共通の慈悲心や
08:39
out of our togetherness, and I think it's pretty cool.
人類の連帯感からくるものだと思います
とても素敵なことだと思います
08:42
In fact, if I'm feeling down,
実際 もし気分が滅入っている時に
08:45
I just go to Broadway in downtown Oakland,
オークランドのダウンタウンのブロードウェイへ行き
08:47
I go for a walk, and I feel better like that,
歩いていたら きっとすぐに
08:49
in no time at all.
気分が良くなるでしょう
08:52
But also that it illustrates how
しかし同時に
08:55
disability and blindness
身体的な障害や目が見えないということが
08:57
sort of cuts across ethnic, social,
民族的 社会的 人種的 経済的な垣根を
08:59
racial, economic lines.
超えたものであることを表しています
09:02
Disability is an equal-opportunity provider.
障害は平等な機会を提供するものなのです
09:04
Everybody's welcome.
誰でも歓迎します
09:08
In fact, I've heard it said in the disability community
実際に 障害者のコミュニティで
こんなことが言われているのを耳にしました
09:11
that there are really only two types of people:
人間には2つのタイプしかいない
09:13
There are those with disabilities,
障害を持っている人たち
09:16
and there are those that haven't
quite found theirs yet.
そして まだ自身の障害を見つけていない人たちです
09:18
It's a different way of thinking about it,
新しい考え方ですが
09:22
but I think it's kind of beautiful,
私はなんだか美しい考え方だと思います
09:24
because it is certainly far more inclusive
なぜなら「自分と同じか そうでないか」または
09:27
than the us-versus-them
「健常者か障がい者か」と考えるより
09:29
or the abled-versus-the-disabled,
ずっと包括的なものであり
09:31
and it's a lot more honest and respectful
人生の儚さを より正しく
09:33
of the fragility of life.
好ましく 表しているものだからです
09:36
So my final takeaway for you is
さて 最後にお聞きいただきたいことは
09:40
that not only is the city good for the blind,
目の不自由な人々に優しい街ということだけではなく
09:41
but the city needs us.
街が私たちを必要としているということです
09:45
And I'm so sure of that that
私はそう強く自負しているのです
09:49
I want to propose to you today
今日ここで皆さんに提案したいと思います
09:51
that the blind be taken as
the prototypical city dwellers
新たな素晴らしい都市を考える時
09:52
when imagining new and wonderful cities,
目の不自由な人をモデルの市民として考えてください
09:56
and not the people that are thought about
街を形作ってしまってから
09:59
after the mold has already been cast.
そこに住む人たちのことを考えても
10:01
It's too late then.
遅いのです
10:03
So if you design a city with the blind in mind,
目の不自由な人たちのことを考えて 都市をデザインすると
10:06
you'll have a rich, walkable network of sidewalks
豊富な歩きやすい歩道のネットワークが必要です
10:09
with a dense array of options and choices
様々な選択肢を備え
10:14
all available at the street level.
そして車道と同じ高さである必要があります
10:16
If you design a city with the blind in mind,
目の不自由な人たちのことを考えて 都市をデザインすると
10:19
sidewalks will be predictable and will be generous.
歩道は予測がしやすく 誰にでも便利な道になるはずです
10:22
The space between buildings will be well-balanced
建物間のスペースは 人や車の間に
10:25
between people and cars.
バランス良く保たれるでしょう
10:27
In fact, cars, who needs them?
実際 誰が車を必要とするでしょう?
10:31
If you're blind, you don't drive. (Laughter)
目が見えなければ運転はしませんよね
(笑)
10:35
They don't like it when you drive. (Laughter)
みんな嫌がるでしょうから
(笑)
10:38
If you design a city with the blind in mind,
目の不自由な人たちのことを考えて 都市をデザインしたら
10:41
you design a city with a robust,
その都市全体とその周辺地域をつなぐ
10:44
accessible, well-connected mass transit system
利用しやすく耐久性の高い
10:47
that connects all parts of the city
公共の交通システムを
10:50
and the region all around.
設計するでしょう
10:52
If you design a city with the blind in mind,
目の不自由な人たちのことを考えて 都市をデザインしたら
10:55
there'll be jobs, lots of jobs.
多くの雇用機会もあるでしょう
10:57
Blind people want to work too.
目の不自由な人々も 働きたいのです
11:00
They want to earn a living.
働いて生計を立てたいのです
11:01
So, in designing a city for the blind,
ですから 皆さんも気付いていることを願いますが
11:04
I hope you start to realize
目の不自由な人たちのために
街をデザインするということは
11:06
that it actually would be a more inclusive,
より包括的で公平であり
11:08
a more equitable, a more just city for all.
単純に皆のための街になるということです
11:11
And based on my prior sighted experience,
目が見えていた頃の経験からしても
11:15
it sounds like a pretty cool city,
とても素晴らしい都市のように思えます
11:17
whether you're blind, whether you have a disability,
あなたが盲目であっても 障害を持っていたとしても
11:19
or you haven't quite found yours yet.
または まだ自分の障害に気付いていないとしても
11:22
So thank you.
ありがとうございました
11:25
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:28
Translator:Ayako Inoue
Reviewer:Yukako Uchida

sponsored links

Chris Downey - Architect
Chris Downey is an architect who lost his sight and gained a new way of seeing the world.

Why you should listen

Chris Downey is an architect, planner, and consultant. Working with design teams and clients, he draws on his unique perspective as a seasoned architect without sight, helping to realize environments that offer not only greater physical accessibility, but also a dimension of delight in architecture experienced through other senses.

Downey enjoyed 20 years of distinguished practice on award-winning custom residences and cultural institutions before losing his sight. One of the few practicing blind architects in the world, Downey has been featured in many media stories and speaks regularly about issues relative to visual impairments and architectural design.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.