11:24
TED@BCG Singapore

Rose George: Inside the secret shipping industry

ローズ・ジョージ: あなたの知らない海運業界の内へ

Filmed:

私たちが所有し消費している、ほとんど総ての物は、コンテナ船に積まれ、一般にはほとんど知られていない海路と港の巨大ネットワークを旅して届きます。ジャーナリストのローズ・ジョージが、消費文明を支える海上輸送の世界の旅へとご案内します。

- Curious journalist
Rose George looks deeply into topics that are unseen but fundamental, whether that's sewers or latrines or massive container ships or pirate hostages or menstrual hygiene. Full bio

A couple of years ago,
2、3年ほど前に
00:12
Harvard Business School chose
ハーバード・ビジネス・スクールが
00:14
the best business model of that year.
年間ベストビジネスモデルを
選出しました
00:16
It chose Somali piracy.
その結果は
ソマリアの海賊行為です
00:18
Pretty much around the same time,
その同じ頃に
00:23
I discovered that there were 544 seafarers
私は544人もの船員が
00:25
being held hostage on ships,
船上で人質になっており
00:31
often anchored just off the Somali coast
そのほとんどは
見通しのよいソマリア沖で
00:34
in plain sight.
船と共に拘束されていることを知りました
00:36
And I learned these two facts, and I thought,
この2つの事実から
00:39
what's going on in shipping?
どうして こんな事が海上輸送に起こるのか?
00:41
And I thought, would that happen
in any other industry?
他の業界ではどうだろうか?
とも考えました
00:44
Would we see 544 airline pilots
544人ものパイロットが
00:46
held captive in their jumbo jets
滑走路上のジャンボジェットで
00:50
on a runway for months, or a year?
数か月や一年も
人質に取られるものでしょうか?
00:51
Would we see 544 Greyhound bus drivers?
グレイハウンドの
長距離バスの運転手は どうでしょう?
00:55
It wouldn't happen.
起こりそうもないですよね
00:59
So I started to get intrigued.
興味をかき立てられ
01:00
And I discovered another fact,
また 新たな真実を知りました
01:03
which to me was more astonishing
実は 自分がこんな事に
01:06
almost for the fact that I hadn't known it before
42、43歳になるまで
気付かなかったことのほうが
01:08
at the age of 42, 43.
驚きかもしれませんが
01:11
That is how fundamentally
we still depend on shipping.
いかに私たちが 今なお本質的に
海上輸送に頼っているかということです
01:13
Because perhaps the general public
おそらく たいていの人が
01:19
thinks of shipping as an old-fashioned industry,
海上輸送を古くさい産業だと 思っているでしょう
01:21
something brought by sailboat
帆船で物を運ぶとか
01:24
with Moby Dicks and Jack Sparrows.
そう モービーディックや
ジャック・スパロウ達の世界です
01:27
But shipping isn't that.
でも 実はそうではありません
01:30
Shipping is as crucial to us as it has ever been.
海上輸送は今までになく
不可欠なものになっています
01:32
Shipping brings us 90 percent of world trade.
世界貿易の90%を
運んでいるのです
01:37
Shipping has quadrupled in size since 1970.
海上輸送は1970年以来
4倍の規模になりました
01:42
We are more dependent on it now than ever.
現在はかつてないほど頼りにしている時代なのです
01:46
And yet, for such an enormous industry --
しかし こんな巨大産業を担う
01:49
there are a 100,000 working vessels on the sea —
10万隻の船舶が
海上で稼働しているのに
01:53
it's become pretty much invisible.
ほとんど誰も気が付きません
01:56
Now that sounds absurd in Singapore to say that,
でもシンガポールでそう言ったら
おかしいでしょうね
02:00
because here shipping is so present
ここでは海上輸送がごく身近で
02:04
that you stuck a ship on top of a hotel.
ホテルの屋上に船をのっけるくらいですからね
02:06
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:10
But elsewhere in the world,
でも 世界のどこでも構いませんが
02:11
if you ask the general public what they know
一般の人に海上輸送やその規模について
02:13
about shipping and how much
trade is carried by sea,
知っている事を尋ねても
02:16
you will get essentially a blank face.
きょとんとされると思います
02:19
You will ask someone on the street
道行く人に マイクロソフトを
知っているかと尋ねたら
02:23
if they've heard of Microsoft.
道行く人に マイクロソフトを
知っているかと尋ねたら
02:25
I should think they'll say yes,
きっとイエスと答えるでしょう
02:27
because they'll know that they make software
ソフトウェアを作っていて
02:29
that goes on computers,
パソコンに搭載されて
02:31
and occasionally works.
動作するのを知っていますからね
02:33
But if you ask them if they've heard of Maersk,
しかし マースクについて
尋ねたとしても
02:36
I doubt you'd get the same response,
同じ回答が 得られるかは疑問です
02:40
even though Maersk,
マースクは
02:42
which is just one shipping company amongst many,
数ある船会社の中の1社ですが
02:44
has revenues pretty much on a par with Microsoft.
マイクロソフトと肩を並べる
年間収益を上げています
02:47
[$60.2 billion]
[602億ドル]
02:50
Now why is this?
なのに知られていない
なぜでしょう?
02:52
A few years ago,
数年前に
02:54
the first sea lord of the British admiralty --
英国海軍本部の
ファーストシーロード(第一海軍卿)が--
02:56
he is called the first sea lord,
海軍の最高ポストはシーロードですが
02:59
although the chief of the army is not called a land lord —
陸軍のトップは
ランドロード(大家)とは呼びません --
03:01
he said that we, and he meant
この方が 私たち つまり
03:05
in the industrialized nations in the West,
西側の工業国は
03:08
that we suffer from sea blindness.
海への盲目状態だと指摘しました
03:10
We are blind to the sea
海を産業や仕事の場として
見ていません
03:14
as a place of industry or of work.
海を産業や仕事の場として
見ていません
03:16
It's just something we fly over,
海は飛行機で飛びこえていく
03:19
a patch of blue on an airline map.
地図上の青い区域で
03:21
Nothing to see, move along.
見るべき物は何もなく
飛び越えて行くだけです
03:24
So I wanted to open my own eyes
そこで 私は
自身の海に対する盲目状態から
03:27
to my own sea blindness,
私自身の眼を開きたかった
03:31
so I ran away to sea.
そして海へ出向きました
03:34
A couple of years ago, I took a passage
2年程前 マースク・ケンダル号で
渡航しました
03:38
on the Maersk Kendal,
2年程前 マースク・ケンダル号で
渡航しました
03:40
a mid-sized container ship
それは中規模のコンテナ船で
03:42
carrying nearly 7,000 boxes,
約7000箱のコンテナを運べます
03:44
and I departed from Felixstowe,
英国南岸にある
03:47
on the south coast of England,
フィーリックストウを出港し
03:49
and I ended up right here in Singapore
ここ シンガポールに到着する
03:51
five weeks later,
5週間の航行でした
03:53
considerably less jet-lagged than I am right now.
今の私が経験しているような
時差ボケはほとんどありませんでした
03:54
And it was a revelation.
目からうろこの経験でした
03:59
We traveled through five seas,
5つの海、2つの大洋、9つの港を
航海し
04:02
two oceans, nine ports,
5つの海、2つの大洋、9つの港を
航海し
04:04
and I learned a lot about shipping.
海上輸送について
多くの事を学んだのです
04:07
And one of the first things that surprised me
ケンダル号乗船時に
最初に驚いたのは
04:10
when I got on board Kendal
ケンダル号乗船時に
最初に驚いたのは
04:12
was, where are all the people?
みんなはどこにいるの? という事でした
04:14
I have friends in the Navy who tell me
海軍の友人の話では
04:17
they sail with 1,000 sailors at a time,
1度に1000人の水兵を連れて
出航すると聞いていました
04:18
but on Kendal there were only 21 crew.
ケンダル号の乗組員はたった21人でした
04:21
Now that's because shipping is very efficient.
これは海上輸送の効率化が
大変進んでいるからです
04:25
Containerization has made it very efficient.
コンテナ化でとても効率が良くなり
04:28
Ships have automation now.
こんにち 船舶は自動化されています
04:31
They can operate with small crews.
少人数の乗組員で運行できます
04:33
But it also means that, in the words
しかし それが意味する事は
04:36
of a port chaplain I once met,
港のある牧師の言葉を借りれば
04:37
the average seafarer you're going to find
コンテナ船の乗組員のほとんどが
04:40
on a container ship is either tired or exhausted,
疲れたり疲弊している
ということです
04:42
because the pace of modern shipping
なぜなら 現代の海上輸送のペースは
04:46
is quite punishing for what the shipping calls
海上輸送で言う
「人的要素」を酷使しているからです
04:49
its human element,
海上輸送で言う
「人的要素」を酷使しているからです
04:51
a strange phrase which they don't seem to realize
妙な言い方で 少し残酷な響きが
あるとは気づいていないようです
04:53
sounds a little bit inhuman.
妙な言い方で 少し残酷な響きが
あるとは気づいていないようです
04:56
So most seafarers now working on container ships
コンテナ船の乗組員の多くが
04:58
often have less than two hours in port at a time.
寄港できるのはたいてい2時間足らずで
05:01
They don't have time to relax.
リラックスする間もありません
05:05
They're at sea for months at a time,
ひとたび出港すれば
05:07
and even when they're on board,
海上で何か月間も
05:09
they don't have access to what
5歳の子供ですら当たり前の
05:10
a five-year-old would take for granted, the Internet.
インターネット使用も
ままなりません
05:12
And another thing that surprised me
when I got on board Kendal
ケンダル号に乗船したとき
私がもう一つ驚いたことは
05:16
was who I was sitting next to --
食卓で隣に座る人のことです
05:19
Not the queen; I can't imagine why
they put me underneath her portrait --
女王陛下のことではありません
なぜか女王の肖像の下が私の席でしたが --
05:22
But around that dining table in the officer's saloon,
仕官食堂のテーブルを囲むのは
05:27
I was sitting next to a Burmese guy,
私の隣がビルマ人男性で
05:30
I was opposite a Romanian, a Moldavian, an Indian.
向かい側がルーマニア人
モルドバ人 インド人
05:32
On the next table was a Chinese guy,
隣のテーブルは
中国人男性でした
05:35
and in the crew room, it was entirely Filipinos.
船員食堂は 全員フィリピン人でした
05:37
So that was a normal working ship.
これは一般的な作業船です
05:40
Now how is that possible?
なぜ こんなことが起こるのでしょう?
05:43
Because the biggest dramatic change
原因は 海運業界をここ60年
05:45
in shipping over the last 60 years,
一般の人が関心を払っていない間に
05:47
when most of the general public stopped noticing it,
何よりも劇的に変えたもの
05:49
was something called an open registry,
自由置籍もしくは
05:51
or a flag of convenience.
便宜置籍という方法の普及です
05:54
Ships can now fly the flag of any nation
現在 登録さえすれば
船主の国籍に関わりなく
05:57
that provides a flag registry.
船籍としてどこの国旗を
掲げても構いません
05:59
You can get a flag from the landlocked nation
海に接していない国の
旗を掲げることもできます
06:02
of Bolivia, or Mongolia,
ボリビアや モンゴル
06:05
or North Korea, though that's not very popular.
北朝鮮
あまり見かけないですけどね
06:07
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:10
So we have these very multinational,
こうして 非常に多国籍で
06:11
global, mobile crews on ships.
グローバルで多様な乗組員が
乗船しています
06:13
And that was a surprise to me.
私には驚きでした
06:18
And when we got to pirate waters,
海賊水域に差し掛かった時
06:21
down the Bab-el-Mandeb strait
and into the Indian Ocean,
バブ・エル・マンデブ海峡を下って
インド洋に入ったところで
06:24
the ship changed.
船内は一変しました
06:27
And that was also shocking, because suddenly,
ショックでした
突然 船長がー
06:29
I realized, as the captain said to me,
私に言ったことを
思い出したからです
06:32
that I had been crazy to choose to go
「君は無謀だ
コンテナ船で海賊水域に行くなんて」
06:34
through pirate waters on a container ship.
「君は無謀だ
コンテナ船で海賊水域に行くなんて」
06:36
We were no longer allowed on deck.
もはや デッキに出ることはかなわず
06:39
There were double pirate watches.
見張りが2倍になりました
06:41
And at that time, there were those
544 seafarers being held hostage,
当時は544人もの船員が
人質となっていて
06:44
and some of them were held hostage for years
海上輸送の宿命と便宜置籍が理由で
何年も人質になっている人がいます
06:48
because of the nature of shipping
and the flag of convenience.
海上輸送の宿命と便宜置籍が理由で
何年も人質になっている人がいます
06:50
Not all of them, but some of them were,
もちろん全員ではありませんが
06:53
because for the minority
of unscrupulous ship owners,
一部の不遜な船主は
06:55
it can be easy to hide behind
便宜置籍による匿名性の陰に
07:00
the anonymity offered by some flags of convenience.
簡単に隠れる事が出来ます
07:02
What else does our sea blindness mask?
海への盲目状態は
他にもないでしょうか?
07:07
Well, if you go out to sea on a ship
皆さんが船かクルーズ船で海に出たら
煙突を見て下さい
07:11
or on a cruise ship, and look up to the funnel,
皆さんが船かクルーズ船で海に出たら
煙突を見て下さい
07:13
you'll see very black smoke.
真っ黒い煙が出ているのが分かります
07:15
And that's because shipping
その理由は 海上輸送は
07:18
has very tight margins,
and they want cheap fuel,
非常に薄利で
燃料を安くしようとするからです
07:21
so they use something called bunker fuel,
バンカーオイルというのを使っています
07:23
which was described to me
by someone in the tanker industry
タンカー業界の人から
聞いたのですが
07:26
as the dregs of the refinery,
これは製油の残留物で
07:28
or just one step up from asphalt.
ほとんどアスファルトに
近いものだそうです
07:30
And shipping is the greenest method of transport.
海上輸送は
環境に良い輸送方法です
07:34
In terms of carbon emissions per ton per mile,
トンあたりマイルあたりの
炭素排出量でみれば
07:37
it emits about a thousandth of aviation
航空機の1000分の1で
07:39
and about a tenth of trucking.
トラックの10分の1です
07:42
But it's not benign, because there's so much of it.
しかし環境に優しくはありません
大量だからです
07:44
So shipping emissions are
about three to four percent,
海上輸送の排出量は約3〜4%で
07:48
almost the same as aviation's.
これは航空機とほぼ同じです
07:50
And if you put shipping emissions
しかし 海上輸送の排出量を
07:52
on a list of the countries' carbon emissions,
国別炭素排出量に
当てはめると
07:54
it would come in about sixth,
世界6位に匹敵し
07:57
somewhere near Germany.
ドイツとほぼ同じになります
07:59
It was calculated in 2009 that the 15 largest ships
2009年の試算に結果によると
上位15隻の巨大船舶で
08:01
pollute in terms of particles and soot
粒子やすす及び
有害ガスの観点からみると
08:05
and noxious gases
粒子やすす及び
有害ガスの観点からみると
08:07
as much as all the cars in the world.
世界中の自動車すべてと
同程度の汚染になるそうです
08:09
And the good news is that
幸いなことに
08:11
people are now talking about sustainable shipping.
持続可能な海上輸送に
衆目が集まっています
08:13
There are interesting initiatives going on.
興味深い新規構想が進んでいますが
08:15
But why has it taken so long?
なぜ こんなに時間が
かかっているのでしょうか
08:17
When are we going to start talking and thinking
航空マイル同様に 海上輸送について
いつから討議するのでしょう?
08:20
about shipping miles as well as air miles?
航空マイル同様に 海上輸送について
いつから討議するのでしょう?
08:22
I also traveled to Cape Cod to look
私はケープコッドにも向かいました
08:26
at the plight of the North Atlantic right whale,
北大西洋のセミクジラの窮状を見るためです
08:29
because this to me was one
of the most surprising things
なぜなら これは海上生活中に
一番驚いた事の一つであり
08:33
about my time at sea,
なぜなら これは海上生活中に
一番驚いた事の一つであり
08:35
and what it made me think about.
考えさせられた事だからです
08:37
We know about man's impact on the ocean
漁獲と乱獲の点で人が海に及ぼす
影響については知っています
08:39
in terms of fishing and overfishing,
漁獲と乱獲の点で人が海に及ぼす
影響については知っています
08:42
but we don't really know much about
しかし 水面下で何が起こっているか
実際のところは知りません
08:44
what's happening underneath the water.
しかし 水面下で何が起こっているか
実際のところは知りません
08:46
And in fact, shipping has a role to play here,
実はここでも海上輸送が
問題になります
08:48
because shipping noise has contributed
海上輸送の騒音が
08:51
to damaging the acoustic
habitats of ocean creatures.
海洋生物の聴覚的生息域に
害を及ぼすのです
08:55
Light doesn't penetrate beneath
the surface of the water,
光は水面下まで届きませんので
08:58
so ocean creatures like whales and dolphins
クジラやイルカといった海洋生物
09:01
and even 800 species of fish
その他800種の魚たちは
09:03
communicate by sound.
音波で交信します
09:06
And a North Atlantic right whale
北大西洋のセミクジラの発する音は
09:09
can transmit across hundreds of miles.
数百キロ 離れた場所にまで届きます
09:10
A humpback can transmit a sound
ザトウクジラは
09:13
across a whole ocean.
大西洋全体に音声を発信できます
09:15
But a supertanker can also be heard
しかし 巨大タンカーが
海全体を行き来するのも耳に入り
09:17
coming across a whole ocean,
しかし 巨大タンカーが
海全体を行き来するのも耳に入り
09:19
and because the noise that
propellers make underwater
プロペラが海中でたてる音が
09:21
is sometimes at the same frequency that whales use,
クジラが使う周波数と重なることがあり
09:24
then it can damage their acoustic habitat,
聴覚的生息域に害を及ぼす可能性があるのですが
09:27
and they need this for breeding,
クジラは繁殖や餌場の発見
09:30
for finding feeding grounds,
クジラは繁殖や餌場の発見
09:32
for finding mates.
つがいの相手を見つけるのにも
音を頼りにしています
09:34
And the acoustic habitat of the
North Atlantic right whale
北大西洋セミクジラの生息地の
聴覚的生息域の減少は
09:36
has been reduced by up to 90 percent.
90%にも達しています
09:39
But there are no laws governing
acoustic pollution yet.
しかし 未だに騒音公害を規制する
法律はありません
09:42
And when I arrived in Singapore,
そして シンガポールに着いたとき
09:47
and I apologize for this, but I
didn't want to get off my ship.
申し訳ないのですが
船を降りたくありませんでした
09:50
I'd really loved being on board Kendal.
ケンダル号を離れたくないと本気で思っていました
09:55
I'd been well treated by the crew,
乗組員には良くして頂きましたし
09:58
I'd had a garrulous and entertaining captain,
話好きの楽しい船長もいました
10:00
and I would happily have signed up
for another five weeks,
もうあと5週間であれば
喜んでサインしたと思います
10:04
something that the captain also said
これも船長いわく
10:08
I was crazy to think about.
私の無謀なところだそうですが
10:09
But I wasn't there for nine months at a time
しかしいちどきに9ヶ月間いた訳ではなく
10:12
like the Filipino seafarers,
フィリピンの船員とは違うのです
10:14
who, when I asked them to describe their job to me,
彼らにとってこの仕事は
10:16
called it "dollar for homesickness."
「ホームシックの対価」なのだそうです
10:18
They had good salaries,
報酬は良いのですが
10:21
but theirs is still an isolating and difficult life
得られる物は危険で困難に満ちた
10:22
in a dangerous and often difficult element.
未だに孤独で厳しい人生です
10:25
But when I get to this part, I'm in two minds,
最後になりますが
私の心は葛藤しています
10:29
because I want to salute those seafarers
なぜなら 敬意を表したい船員の皆さんは
10:31
who bring us 90 percent of everything
私達に90%もの物資を
運んでくれているのに
10:34
and get very little thanks or recognition for it.
十分に感謝されているとは
とても思えないからです
10:36
I want to salute the 100,000 ships
海上の10万隻の船にも
10:40
that are at sea
敬意を表したいと思います
10:42
that are doing that work, coming in and out
入出港という仕事を続け
10:44
every day, bringing us what we need.
毎日 必要なものを届けてくれます
10:46
But I also want to see shipping,
しかし 同時に私は海上輸送に注目し
10:49
and us, the general public,
who know so little about it,
余りに何も知らない 私たち一般の人に
10:52
to have a bit more scrutiny,
もっと関心を払ってもらい
10:56
to be a bit more transparent,
またもう少し透明性を高め
10:58
to have 90 percent transparency.
90%の透明性を維持してほしいと思います
11:00
Because I think we could all benefit
とても簡単で皆に有意義だと思うからです
11:03
from doing something very simple,
とても簡単で皆に有意義だと思うからです
11:06
which is learning to see the sea.
それは 海に目を向けることを
学ぶことです
11:08
Thank you.
ありがとうございます
11:11
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:14
Translated by Misaki Sato
Reviewed by Yoshifumi Yamada

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Rose George - Curious journalist
Rose George looks deeply into topics that are unseen but fundamental, whether that's sewers or latrines or massive container ships or pirate hostages or menstrual hygiene.

Why you should listen

Rose George thinks, researches, writes and talks about the hidden, the undiscussed. Among the everyone-does-it-no-one-talks-about-it issues she's explored in books and articles: sanitation (and poop in general). Diarrhea is a weapon of mass destruction, says the UK-based journalist and author, and a lack of access to toilets is at the root of our biggest public health crisis. In 2012, two out of five of the world’s population had nowhere sanitary to go.

The key to turning around this problem, says George: Let’s drop the pretense of “water-related diseases” and call out the cause of myriad afflictions around the world as what they are -- “poop-related diseases” that are preventable with a basic toilet. George explores the problem in her book The Big Necessity: The Unmentionable World of Human Waste and Why It Matters and in a fabulous special issue of Colors magazine called "Shit: A Survival Guide." Read a sample chapter of The Big Necessity >>

Her latest book, on an equally hidden world that touches almost everything we do, is Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car, Food on Your Plate. Read a review >> 

 In the UK and elsewhere, you'll find the book titled Deep Sea and Foreign Going: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry the Brings You 90% of Everything.

More profile about the speaker
Rose George | Speaker | TED.com