16:16
TED2007

Jan Chipchase: The anthropology of mobile phones

ヤン・チップチェイス: 携帯電話の人類学

Filmed:

ノキアの研究者であるヤン・チップチェイス氏が、ウガンダの村からポケットの中身に至るまで豊富な事例をもとに、私たちとテクノロジーとの関係について考察した興味深いプレゼンテーションです。研究の過程で、彼はいくつもの予想もしなかったような発見をしました。

- User anthropologist
As Executive Creative Director of global insights for frog design, Jan Chipchase travels around the world and inside our pockets in search of behavioral patterns that will inform the design of products we don't even know we want. Yet. Full bio

I live and work from Tokyo, Japan.
私は 日本の東京で暮らし働いています
00:26
And I specialize in human behavioral research,
専門は人間の行動に関する研究です
00:29
and applying what we learn to think about the future in different ways,
さまざまな方法で研究成果を未来に当てはめ
00:33
and to design for that future.
さらにその未来を設計するのが仕事です
00:39
And you know, to be honest, I've been doing this for seven years,
7年に渡ってこの仕事を続けていますが
00:41
and I haven't got a clue what the future is going to be like.
未来の姿についての手がかりは掴めていません
00:45
But I've got a pretty good idea
しかし 未来の人の行動に関しては
00:47
how people will behave when they get there.
かなりいいアイデアを持っています
00:49
This is my office. It's out there.
これは私のオフィスです
そこかしこにあります
00:53
It's not in the lab,
研究室には閉じこもりません
00:56
and it's increasingly in places like India, China, Brazil, Africa.
インド 中国 ブラジル アフリカという具合に
どんどん増えています
00:58
We live on a planet -- 6.3 billion people.
我々の地球には63億の人が暮らしています
01:07
About three billion people, by the end of this year,
今年の末には30億の人が
01:10
will have cellular connectivity.
携帯電話でつながるでしょう
01:12
And it'll take about another two years to connect the next billion after that.
さらに2年後にはそこに10億人が加わります
01:15
And I mention this because,
こんな話をしているのは
01:20
if we want to design for that future,
未来にむけたデザインを考えるときに
01:22
we need to figure out what those people are about.
これらの人々が何をするのかを
知る必要があるからです
01:24
And that's, kind of, where I see what my job is
言うなれば これが私と
01:26
and what our team's job is.
私のチームの仕事です
01:28
Our research often starts with a very simple question.
私たちの研究は
非常に簡単な質問から始まります
01:31
So I'll give you an example. What do you carry?
例えばこんな質問です
「あなたは何を持ち歩きますか?」
01:34
If you think of everything in your life that you own,
自分のすべての持ち物を思い浮かべてみて
01:38
when you walk out that door,
あのドアから出ていくとしたら
01:43
what do you consider to take with you?
あなたなら何を持っていくでしょう?
01:45
When you're looking around, what do you consider?
あたりを見回してみたらどうでしょう?
01:47
Of that stuff, what do you carry?
その中で実際に持っていくのは?
01:50
And of that stuff, what do you actually use?
そして更に その中で実際に使う物は?
01:53
So this is interesting to us,
興味深いのは
01:56
because the conscious and subconscious decision process
意識的にあるいは無意識的に
01:58
implies that the stuff that you do take with you and end up using
持ち物と使う物とを選択する行為が
02:02
has some kind of spiritual, emotional or functional value.
精神的 感情的 機能的な
価値を持つということです
02:05
And to put it really bluntly, you know,
遠慮なく言えば
02:08
people are willing to pay for stuff that has value, right?
人は価値あるものにお金を使う そうですね?
02:11
So I've probably done about five years' research
私は およそ5年かけて
02:15
looking at what people carry.
人が何を持ち歩くのかを研究してきました
02:18
I go in people's bags. I look in people's pockets, purses.
人々のバッグやポケット 財布の中
02:20
I go in their homes. And we do this worldwide,
世界中を訪問して人々の家の中を調べました
02:24
and we follow them around town with video cameras.
カメラを手に街ゆく人を追いかけもしました
02:28
It's kind of like stalking with permission.
許可済みですが一種のストーキングです
02:31
And we do all this -- and to go back to the original question,
私達はこれらを 最初の質問の為に行いました
02:33
what do people carry?
「人は何を持ち歩くか?」
02:37
And it turns out that people carry a lot of stuff.
人々は物をたくさん持ち歩くことが分かります
02:40
OK, that's fair enough.
結構なことですね
02:42
But if you ask people what the three most important things that they carry are --
彼らに自分が持ち歩くものの中で
特に重要な3つを挙げてもらうと
02:44
across cultures and across gender and across contexts --
文化や性別 さまざまな環境にかかわらず
02:49
most people will say keys, money
多くの人はこう言うでしょう
鍵 お金
02:53
and, if they own one, a mobile phone.
そして もしあるなら携帯電話です
02:56
And I'm not saying this is a good thing, but this is a thing, right?
これが良いことだとは言いませんが
面白くありませんか
02:59
I mean, I couldn't take your phones off you if I wanted to.
みなさんから携帯電話を
取り上げるのは難しいのです
03:02
You'd probably kick me out, or something.
そんなことをしたら
叩き出されるのが落ちでしょう
03:04
OK, it might seem like an obvious thing
携帯電話メーカーで働く人間として
03:09
for someone who works for a mobile phone company to ask.
当然の答だと思われるかもしれませんが
03:12
But really, the question is, why? Right?
その理由は何かというのが問題です
03:14
So why are these things so important in our lives?
つまり なぜ私たちの生活で
携帯電話が重要なのか?
03:16
And it turns out, from our research, that it boils down to survival --
私たちの研究の結果 これはサバイバルと
関係していることがわかりました
03:19
survival for us and survival for our loved ones.
自分と愛するものの為のサバイバルです
03:23
So, keys provide an access to shelter and warmth --
鍵は安全な場所や暖かさ―
03:27
transport as well, in the U.S. increasingly.
そして移動手段を提供してくれます
03:32
Money is useful for buying food, sustenance,
お金は 食料をはじめとする生活に必要な―
03:35
among all its other uses.
あらゆるものに対して使うことができます
03:39
And a mobile phone, it turns out, is a great recovery tool.
そして携帯電話は強力な
リカバリー・ツールであることが分かりました
03:40
If you prefer this kind of Maslow's hierarchy of needs,
マズローの欲求5段階説に当てはめると
03:46
those three objects are very good at supporting
これら3つのものは
下層の欲求を満たすための
03:49
the lowest rungs in Maslow's hierarchy of needs.
重要な要素であることがわかります
03:52
Yes, they do a whole bunch of other stuff,
もちろん それが全てではありません
03:55
but they're very good at this.
ですが この点でとても役立っています
03:57
And in particular, it's the mobile phone's ability
特に携帯電話が持つ能力は
03:59
to allow people to transcend space and time.
人々に空間と時間を
飛び越えさせることができます
04:03
And what I mean by that is, you know,
つまり
04:06
you can transcend space by simply making a voice call, right?
電話をすることで距離を越えられる
04:08
And you can transcend time by sending a message at your convenience,
また 好きなときにメールを送ったり
04:13
and someone else can pick it up at their convenience.
受け取ったりすることで時間を越えられる
04:16
And this is fairly universally appreciated, it turns out,
これが一般的に
高く評価されていることが―
04:19
which is why we have three billion plus people who have been connected.
携帯電話が30億人以上もの人々に
使われている理由です
04:23
And they value that connectivity.
人々は「繋がっていること」に価値を認めています
04:26
But actually, you can do this kind of stuff with PCs.
しかしこれと同じことはパソコンでも―
04:28
And you can do them with phone kiosks.
公衆電話でも可能です
04:30
And the mobile phone, in addition, is both personal --
携帯電話は さらにある程度の個人的な―
04:33
and so it also gives you a degree of privacy -- and it's convenient.
プライバシーと利便性のニーズにも
応えてくれるのです
04:37
You don't need to ask permission from anyone,
誰かの許可をもらう必要はなく
04:40
you can just go ahead and do it, right?
シンプルに使えば良いだけですね
04:42
However, for these things to help us survive,
しかし これらをサバイバルの道具として考えると
04:46
it depends on them being carried.
携帯可能かどうかが重要になってきます
04:50
But -- and it's a pretty big but -- we forget.
しかし 置き忘れは非常に大きな問題です
04:52
We're human, that's what we do. It's one of our features.
私たちは人間であって
忘れることも人間の特徴の一つです
04:56
I think, quite a nice feature.
私は素晴らしい特徴だと思っています
04:59
So we forget, but we're also adaptable,
私たちは忘れものをしますが それを受け入れ
05:01
and we adapt to situations around us pretty well.
その状況に上手に適応します
05:06
And so we have these strategies to remember,
私たちは思い出すことができます
05:09
and one of them was mentioned yesterday.
そのうちの一つは 昨日言われました
05:11
And it's, quite simply, the point of reflection.
単純に言えば 思い出すポイントです
05:13
And that's that moment when you're walking out of a space,
部屋を出るとすぐに気が付いて
05:16
and you turn around, and quite often you tap your pockets.
あたりを見回してポケットを探します
05:19
Even women who keep stuff in their bags tap their pockets.
バッグを持っている女性もですね
05:22
And you turn around, and you look back into the space,
あたりを見回して
部屋の中をもう一度探します
05:24
and some people talk aloud.
無くしたと声に出す人もいます
05:27
And pretty much everyone does it at some point.
みんなどこかで経験しています
05:29
OK, the next thing is -- most of you, if you have a stable home life,
ほとんどの方はそうだと思いますが
同じ家でずっと暮らしているなら
05:31
and what I mean is that you don't travel all the time, and always in hotels,
つまり いつも旅していたり
ホテル住まいでなければ
05:36
but most people have what we call a center of gravity.
ほとんどの人にはいわば重力の中心があります
05:39
And a center of gravity is where you keep these objects.
いろんな物が 重力の中心に
集まってきます
05:42
And these things don't stay in the center of gravity,
ずっと滞留しないにしても
05:46
but over time, they gravitate there.
しだいに集まってきます
05:48
It's where you expect to find stuff.
なくしたものは そこで見つかるかも
05:50
And in fact, when you're turning around,
探しものをするとき
05:52
and you're looking inside the house,
家の中を探すときに
05:53
and you're looking for this stuff,
この手の物を探していたら
05:55
this is where you look first, right?
重力の中心を最初に見るはずです
05:57
OK, so when we did this research,
この研究でわかったことですが
05:59
we found the absolutely, 100 percent, guaranteed way
こんな風に探し物をすれば
100%確実に見つかるし
06:03
to never forget anything ever, ever again.
二度と忘れることはありません
06:06
And that is, quite simply, to have nothing to remember.
簡単に言えば 覚えておく必要すら無いのです
06:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:14
OK, now, that sounds like something you get on a Chinese fortune cookie, right?
なんだかフォーチュンクッキーの
おみくじみたいですよね?
06:16
But is, in fact, about the art of delegation.
実は これはデリゲーションという
技法を使っているのです
06:19
And from a design perspective,
設計という視点から見ると
06:23
it's about understanding what you can delegate to technology
これは テクノロジーに委ねることが出来ること
06:25
and what you can delegate to other people.
他人に委ねることについて
理解することに関係しています
06:30
And it turns out, delegation -- if you want it to be --
デリゲーションは
06:33
can be the solution for pretty much everything,
トイレに行くというような
肉体的機能に関するものを除いては
06:35
apart from things like bodily functions, going to the toilet.
ほとんどすべてのことがらについての
解決法となりえます
06:39
You can't ask someone to do that on your behalf.
トイレは誰かに頼めません
06:42
And apart from things like entertainment,
それと エンターテインメントも除きます
06:44
you wouldn't pay for someone to go to the cinema for you and have fun on your behalf,
映画はお金を払って誰かに代わりに
楽しんできてもらうわけにいきません
06:47
or, at least, not yet.
少なくとも現時点では
06:50
Maybe sometime in the future, we will.
いつかそんな未来がくるのかもしれません
06:52
So, let me give you an example of delegation in practice, right.
それでは実際のデリゲーションの
例をご紹介しましょう
06:55
So this is -- probably the thing I'm most passionate about
これは 個人的に最も力を入れている
非識字についての―
06:59
is the research that we've been doing on illiteracy
研究の例です
非識字の人たちは
07:02
and how people who are illiterate communicate.
どうやって電話するのでしょうか
07:04
So, the U.N. estimated -- this is 2004 figures --
2004年の国連の統計によれば
07:06
that there are almost 800 million people who can't read and write, worldwide.
世界で8億人の人々は
読むことも書くこともできません
07:10
So, we've been conducting a lot of research.
私たちは数多くの調査をしました
07:14
And one of the things we were looking at is --
そこで私たちが着目したことの一つは
07:18
if you can't read and write,
読み書きができない人であっても
07:21
if you want to communicate over distances,
遠くの人に連絡を取りたいときに
07:23
you need to be able to identify the person
まず連絡を取りたい相手を
07:25
that you want to communicate with.
特定する必要があるということです
07:28
It could be a phone number, it could be an e-mail address,
それは電話番号 メールアドレス
07:30
it could be a postal address.
郵便番号かもしれません
07:32
Simple question: if you can't read and write,
要するに もし読み書きができないなら
07:33
how do you manage your contact information?
連絡先をどうやって管理するのでしょう?
07:35
And the fact is that millions of people do it.
答えは実際に数百万人の
人々がやっていることです
07:37
Just from a design perspective, we didn't really understand how they did it,
設計上の視点からは彼らのやり方が
まったく理解できませんでした
07:40
and so that's just one small example
これは我々の研究で行ってきたことの
07:44
of the kind of research that we were doing.
一つの小さな例です
07:46
And it turns out that illiterate people are masters of delegation.
非識字の人々はデリゲーションの
達人でした
07:49
So they delegate that part of the task process to other people,
彼らは自分自身では
できない仕事のプロセスの一部を
07:52
the stuff that they can't do themselves.
他の人々にお願いしていたのです
07:56
Let me give you another example of delegation.
別の事例をご紹介しましょう
07:59
This one's a little bit more sophisticated,
これはもう少し洗練されています
08:01
and this is from a study that we did in Uganda
これはウガンダで行った―
08:03
about how people who are sharing devices, use those devices.
携帯を共有する人々の
使い方に関する研究に由来します
08:05
Sente is a word in Uganda that means money.
"Sente"とはウガンダでお金を意味する言葉です
08:09
It has a second meaning, which is to send money as airtime. OK?
もうひとつは通話料金を意味します
08:12
And it works like this.
こんな風に運用されます
08:17
So let's say, June, you're in a village, rural village.
あなた ジューンは辺鄙な村に
住んでいるとします
08:19
I'm in Kampala and I'm the wage earner.
私はカンパラにいる稼ぎ手です
08:22
I'm sending money back, and it works like this.
私が送金するときはこんな風に行います
08:26
So, in your village, there's one person in the village with a phone,
あなたの村には一人だけ
電話を持っている人がいます
08:29
and that's the phone kiosk operator.
いわば公衆電話端末のオペレータです
08:32
And it's quite likely that they'd have a quite simple mobile phone as a phone kiosk.
非常にシンプルな機能の携帯電話を
公衆電話代わりに利用しているのです
08:33
So what I do is, I buy a prepaid card like this.
そこで私はこのような
プリペイドカードを1枚買いました
08:37
And instead of using that money to top up my own phone,
そのカードを私自身の携帯電話に
チャージするかわりに
08:42
I call up the local village operator.
地元のオペレータを呼び出します
08:45
And I read out that number to them, and they use it to top up their phone.
そして彼らに番号を教え
彼らは自分の電話にチャージするのです
08:47
So, they're topping up the value from Kampala,
これでカンパラからチャージできました
08:51
and it's now being topped up in the village.
つまり村に居ながらにして
チャージすることができるのです
08:53
You take a 10 or 20 percent commission, and then you --
あなたは10%から20%の
手数料を受け取ります
08:56
the kiosk operator takes 10 or 20 percent commission,
つまり公衆電話ボックスのオペレータは
10%から20%の手数料を受け取り
08:59
and passes the rest over to you in cash.
残りを現金であなたに渡します
09:02
OK, there's two things I like about this.
私が気に入っている点は2つあります
09:06
So the first is, it turns anyone who has access to a mobile phone --
まず携帯電話にアクセスできる人なら誰でも
09:08
anyone who has a mobile phone --
携帯電話を持っている人なら誰でも
09:13
essentially into an ATM machine.
実質的にATMマシンになりえるのです
09:15
It brings rudimentary banking services to places
これにより金融機関のインフラが
未整備の地域でも
09:17
where there's no banking infrastructure.
基本的なバンキングサービスが
利用可能になります
09:20
And even if they could have access to the banking infrastructure,
もし彼らが金融機関のインフラに
アクセスできたとしても
09:22
they wouldn't necessarily be considered viable customers,
銀行口座を開設できるとは限りません
09:25
because they're not wealthy enough to have bank accounts.
なぜなら銀行に口座を開けるほど
豊かではないからです
09:28
There's a second thing I like about this.
私が気に入っている2つ目の特徴は次のことです
09:31
And that is that despite all the resources at my disposal,
私の自由にできる様々なリソースや
09:34
and despite all our kind of apparent sophistication,
高度な知的ツールを組み合わせても
09:38
I know I could never have designed something as elegant
現場の状況に完全に対応した
09:40
and as totally in tune with the local conditions as this. OK?
こんなに洗練された設計は
私には不可能でした
09:44
And, yes, there are things like Grameen Bank and micro-lending.
グラミン銀行や
マイクロバンキングはありますが
09:49
But the difference between this and that
でもこの事例との違いは
09:52
is, there's no central authority trying to control this.
中心的な管理組織が無いということです
09:54
This is just street-up innovation.
まさに街角のイノベーションです
09:58
So, it turns out the street is a never-ending source of
このように街は私たちにとって
10:03
inspiration for us.
尽きることのない発想の宝庫なのです
10:06
And OK, if you break one of these things here, you return it to the carrier.
そしてもしこの手のデバイスか壊れたら
それを携帯電話会社に返します
10:08
They'll give you a new one.
すると新品がもらえます
10:12
They'll probably give you three new ones, right?
たぶん3つ分も
10:13
I mean, that's buy three, get one free. That kind of thing.
つまり3つ購入すれば1つただという具合です
10:15
If you go on the streets of India and China, you see this kind of stuff.
インドや中国に行けば街には
こんな店があり
10:18
And this is where they take the stuff that breaks,
壊れた電話はここに持っていって
10:22
and they fix it, and they put it back into circulation.
修理します
そしてまた使うのです
10:24
This is from a workbench in Jilin City, in China,
ここは中国の吉林市にある
電話修理の作業場です
10:30
and you can see people taking down a phone
電話を分解してから
10:34
and putting it back together.
もう一度組み立て直しています
10:36
They reverse-engineer manuals.
マニュアルもリバースエンジニアリングで作ったものです
10:38
This is a kind of hacker's manual,
これは一種のハッキングマニュアルです
10:41
and it's written in Chinese and English.
しかも中国語と英語で書かれています
10:44
They also write them in Hindi.
ヒンズー語版もあります
10:46
You can subscribe to these.
マニュアルの購読システムもあります
10:48
There are training institutes where they're churning out people
こういったものを
上手に修理することができる人々を
10:51
for fixing these things as well.
大勢送り出している訓練機関があります
10:54
But what I like about this is,
この事例が気に入っているのは
10:57
it boils down to someone on the street with a small, flat surface,
結局のところ 街の中で
製品知識のある人に
11:00
a screwdriver, a toothbrush for cleaning the contact heads --
僅かな作業スペースと小さなドライバーと
接点を掃除する歯ブラシがあれば
11:06
because they often get dust on the contact heads -- and knowledge.
この仕事ができるということ
―接点の掃除は大事なんですよ
11:10
And it's all about the social network of the knowledge, floating around.
これが世界中に広まっている
知識のソーシャルネットワークの姿です
11:14
And I like this because it challenges the way that we design stuff,
これが私たちの設計や製造の手法や
おそらくは流通の手法にも
11:18
and build stuff, and potentially distribute stuff.
そぐわないという点が面白いのです
11:22
It challenges the norms.
規範への挑戦です
11:24
OK, for me the street just raises so many different questions.
私は 街から多くのさまざまな
問題を見出します
11:27
Like, this is Viagra that I bought from a backstreet sex shop in China.
これは中国のアダルトショップで
購入したバイアグラです
11:33
And China is a country where you get a lot of fakes.
中国では模造品が大量に流通しています
11:39
And I know what you're asking -- did I test it?
試してみたかって?
11:42
I'm not going to answer that, OK.
お答えはできませんが
11:44
But I look at something like this, and I consider the implications
こういった事例は
11:46
of trust and confidence in the purchase process.
購買プロセスの信用と信頼の問題を
示唆しています
11:50
And we look at this and we think, well, how does that apply,
そしてこのようなことが例えば設計面で
11:53
for example, for the design of -- the lessons from this --
将来のこういう国でのオンラインサービスに対して
11:55
apply to the design of online services, future services in these markets?
どのように適用されるのか考察していくのです
11:58
This is a pair of underpants from --
これはチベットの下着です
12:05
(Laughter) --
(笑)
12:09
from Tibet.
これを見たとき正直
12:11
And I look at something like this, and honestly, you know,
なんで下着にこんなポケットが必要なのか
12:13
why would someone design underpants with a pocket, right?
不思議に思いました
12:16
And I look at something like this and it makes me question,
そしてこういう物を見て疑問がわくのです
12:19
if we were to take all the functionality in things like this,
こういった物の機能を全部集めて
12:22
and redistribute them around the body
身体の周囲に再び配置しなおすとしたら
12:26
in some kind of personal area network,
ある種のパーソナル・エリア・ネットワークとして
12:27
how would we prioritize where to put stuff?
何を最優先にするでしょう?
12:29
And yes, this is quite trivial, but actually the lessons from this can apply to that
こういったつまらない例であっても
そこから得られる知見は
12:31
kind of personal area networks.
パーソナル・エリア・ネットワークに
適用していけるのです
12:35
And what you see here is a couple of phone numbers
こちらに示すのは
ウガンダの田舎の
12:38
written above the shack in rural Uganda.
掘っ建て小屋に書かれた
いくつかの電話番号です
12:41
This doesn't have house numbers. This has phone numbers.
これは番地ではなく電話番号です
12:44
So what does it mean when people's identity is mobile?
では人の識別を携帯電話で行うようになったら
どうなるでしょう
12:49
When those extra three billion people's identity is mobile, it isn't fixed?
30億人もの人々が固定回線ではなく
携帯電話がIDになったとしたら?
12:55
Your notion of identity is out-of-date already, OK,
これまでの ID の考え方は
13:00
for those extra three billion people.
これからの30億人には
もはや通用しないわけです
13:04
This is how it's shifting.
変化はこのように起こります
13:07
And then I go to this picture here, which is the one that I started with.
次にこの写真を説明しましょう
13:09
And this is from Delhi.
研究を始めた頃のデリーでの写真です
13:14
It's from a study we did into illiteracy,
非識字の研究をしていた時のものです
13:17
and it's a guy in a teashop.
この男性はティーショップの店員です
13:20
You can see the chai being poured in the background.
後ろでチャイが注がれているのが見えます
13:22
And he's a, you know, incredibly poor teashop worker,
彼は信じられないほど貧しい
ティーショップの店員で
13:24
on the lowest rungs in the society.
社会の最下層に属しています
13:28
And he, somehow, has the appreciation
そして彼はなぜか Livestrongの考え方に
13:30
of the values of Livestrong.
共感しています
13:34
And it's not necessarily the same values,
まったく同じ価値観ではないかもしれませんが
13:36
but some kind of values of Livestrong,
実際に出かけて行ってそれらを買いもとめ
13:38
to actually go out and purchase them,
身につけているのですから
13:40
and actually display them.
Livestrong には違いありません
13:43
For me, this kind of personifies this connected world,
このことは 私にとっては
13:45
where everything is intertwined, and the dots are --
全てが接続されて絡まり合うこの世界を
13:47
it's all about the dots joining together.
人の姿としてとらえたものに見えました
13:51
OK, the title of this presentation is "Connections and Consequences,"
このプレゼンのタイトルは
「繋がりとその結果」です
13:54
and it's really a kind of summary of five years of trying to figure out
そしてそれは5年間の探求の
ある種の結論でもあります
13:58
what it's going to be like when everyone on the planet
地球上のすべての人々がつながり
14:03
has the ability to transcend space and time
個人が簡単な方法で
14:06
in a personal and convenient manner, right?
空間と時間を超越できるとしたら
14:09
When everyone's connected.
どんなことが起こるでしょう
14:12
And there are four things.
それは次のような4つのことです
14:14
So, the first thing is the immediacy of ideas,
一つ目は アイデアのスピードアップです
14:18
the speed at which ideas go around.
アイデアが伝わるスピードが加速します
14:20
And I know TED is about big ideas,
TEDは偉大なアイデアです
14:23
but actually, the benchmark for a big idea is changing.
しかし実際は偉大なアイデアを測る尺度も
変化します
14:25
If you want a big idea, you need to embrace everyone on the planet,
偉大なアイデアを目指すのなら
地球上の全員を包含するものでなければなりません
14:30
that's the first thing.
それが第1のポイントです
14:34
The second thing is the immediacy of objects.
2番目はオブジェクトの即時性です
14:36
And what I mean by that is, as these become smaller,
ここで私が言いたいことは
電話機が小さくなるほど
14:39
as the functionality that you can access through this becomes greater --
アクセスできる機能は
大きくなるということです
14:43
things like banking, identity --
例えば金融とか認証とか―
14:47
these things quite simply move very quickly around the world.
これらは非常に容易に
素早く世界中を移動します
14:49
And so the speed of the adoption of things
63億人がそれを手にいれたら
14:54
is just going to become that much more rapid,
そして世界規模の人口に成長したのなら
14:56
in a way that we just totally cannot conceive,
これらを受け付けるスピードも
14:58
when you get it to 6.3 billion
全体で想像もできないほど
15:01
and the growth in the world's population.
ずっと早くなります
15:03
The next thing is that, however we design this stuff --
3番目は我々がどんなにこれらを設計しても
15:06
carefully design this stuff --
街はそれを受取ると革新方法を探し出し
15:10
the street will take it, and will figure out ways to innovate,
基本的なニーズに合致する限り
15:11
as long as it meets base needs --
例えば空間と時間を超越する能力ですが
15:14
the ability to transcend space and time, for example.
我々が予想もしない方法で
15:17
And it will innovate in ways that we cannot anticipate.
革新しつづけるでしょう
15:20
In ways that, despite our resources, they can do it better than us.
我々がどんなに力を注いでも
彼らはもっと巧妙でしょう
15:25
That's my feeling.
それが私の感触です
15:28
And if we're smart, we'll look at this stuff that's going on,
それに対する賢明な対応は
何が起きるかよく見続け
15:30
and we'll figure out a way to enable it to inform and infuse
そこから得られた知見を
我々が何を設計しどう設計するかに
15:34
both what we design and how we design.
反映し取り込んでいく方法を考えていくことです
15:39
And the last thing is that -- actually, the direction of the conversation.
最後は会話の方向性についてです
15:42
With another three billion people connected,
残り30億の人が繋がったら
15:49
they want to be part of the conversation.
彼らは会話に加わりたいと考えます
15:54
And I think our relevance and TED's relevance
そして我々の
そしてTEDのかかわり方としては
15:56
is really about embracing that and learning how to listen, essentially.
それを受入れ
どのように聞くかを学ぶことが 重要でしょう
16:01
And we need to learn how to listen.
私たちは聞き取り方を学ぶ必要があるのです
16:07
So thank you very, very much.
ありがとうございました
16:08
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:10
Translated by Ken Yoda
Reviewed by Misaki Sato

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jan Chipchase - User anthropologist
As Executive Creative Director of global insights for frog design, Jan Chipchase travels around the world and inside our pockets in search of behavioral patterns that will inform the design of products we don't even know we want. Yet.

Why you should listen

Jan Chipcase can guess what's inside your bag and knows all about the secret contents of your refrigerator. It isn't a second sight or a carnival trick; he knows about the ways we think and act because he's spent years studying our behavioral patterns. He's traveled from country to country to learn everything he can about what makes us tick, from our relationship to our phones (hint: it's deep, and it's real) to where we stow our keys each night. He oversees the creative direction of frog design , an innovation firm that advises the design products for Microsoft Office, Nike, UNICEF, GE, Sephora, Gatorade and Alitalia.

Before moving to frog design, Jan's discoveries and insights helped to inspire the development of the next generations of phones and services at Nokia. As he put it, if he does his job right, you should be seeing the results of his research hitting the streets and airwaves within the next 3 to 15 years.

More profile about the speaker
Jan Chipchase | Speaker | TED.com