sponsored links
TED@BCG San Francisco

Philip Evans: How data will transform business

フィリップ・エバンス: データはビジネスをどう変容させるか

November 11, 2013

将来のビジネスはどう変容しているでしょう?フィリップ・エバンスはこの教育的なトークで、ビジネス戦略において長い間評価の高かった2つの理論について初歩的な手ほどきを行い - そしてこれらの理論が実際上 破たんしている理由を説き明かします。

Philip Evans - Consultant
BCG's Philip Evans has a bold prediction for the future of business strategy -- and it starts with Big Data. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'm going to talk a little bit about strategy
戦略について
少しお話ししたいと思います
00:12
and its relationship with technology.
技術と関連付けた話です
00:14
We tend to think of business strategy
ビジネス戦略を考えるとき
00:18
as being a rather abstract body
本質的に経済学的な概念による
00:21
of essentially economic thought,
抽象的な対象としてとらえ
00:23
perhaps rather timeless.
時間軸を考えないでしょう
00:25
I'm going to argue that, in fact,
でも 私はこのように考えています
00:26
business strategy has always been premised
ビジネス戦略はいつでも―
00:28
on assumptions about technology,
技術を前提に立てられますが
00:31
that those assumptions are changing,
その前提が変化しているのです
00:33
and, in fact, changing quite dramatically,
実際 めまぐるしく変化しており
00:35
and that therefore what that will drive us to
それゆえに ビジネス戦略という言葉で
00:38
is a different concept of what we mean
意味するところの概念は
00:41
by business strategy.
変化していくのです
00:44
Let me start, if I may,
まずは その歴史について
00:46
with a little bit of history.
少し話をさせて下さい
00:48
The idea of strategy in business
ビジネス戦略の概念は
00:51
owes its origins to two intellectual giants:
2人の知的な偉人に起源を
遡ることができます
00:52
Bruce Henderson, the founder of BCG,
BCGを創立したブルース・ヘンダーソンと
00:56
and Michael Porter, professor
at the Harvard Business School.
ハーバード・ビジネススクールの
マイケル・ポーターです
00:58
Henderson's central idea was what you might call
ヘンダーソンの考えの核心部分は
01:02
the Napoleonic idea of concentrating mass
ナポレオン的な考えと言えるもの
つまり弱者に対し
01:04
against weakness, of overwhelming the enemy.
数で相手を圧倒するということでした
01:07
What Henderson recognized was that,
ヘンダーソンが理解したことは
01:10
in the business world,
ビジネスの世界では
01:12
there are many phenomena which are characterized
様々な経済現象が
エコノミストが主張する通り
01:13
by what economists would call increasing returns --
規模と経験に伴って“収穫逓増”を
01:16
scale, experience.
もたらしているということです
01:18
The more you do of something,
より多く経済活動を行えば
01:19
disproportionately the better you get.
比例以上の報酬が得られるということです
01:21
And therefore he found a logic for investing
そこで 競争における優位を得るために
01:24
in such kinds of overwhelming mass
圧倒的な数でもって投資するという
01:27
in order to achieve competitive advantage.
論法を見出したのです
01:29
And that was the first introduction
これは本質的に軍隊における戦略の概念を
01:32
of essentially a military concept of strategy
ビジネスの世界に導入した
01:34
into the business world.
最初の事例だったのです
01:37
Porter agreed with that premise,
ポーターはその考えに
同意するにとどまらず
01:40
but he qualified it.
改善したのです
01:42
He pointed out, correctly, that that's all very well,
彼は この戦略は上手くいくが
実際 ビジネスには
01:44
but businesses actually have multiple steps to them.
そこに至る複数の段階がある事を
正確に指摘したのです
01:47
They have different components,
異なるいくつの要素があって
01:51
and each of those components might be driven
個々の要素には
01:52
by a different kind of strategy.
異なる戦略が必要かもしれないのです
01:55
A company or a business
might actually be advantaged
特定の会社やビジネスの有り方は
01:57
in some activities but disadvantaged in others.
ある経済活動では有利であり
別の場合には不利になるかもしれません
01:59
He formed the concept of the value chain,
彼は価値連鎖という概念を
生み出しました
02:03
essentially the sequence of steps with which
要は 生産の一連の過程において
02:05
a, shall we say, raw material, becomes a component,
例えば 原材料が部品となり
02:08
becomes assembled into a finished product,
これを組み立てて製品が作られ
02:11
and then is distributed, for example,
流通に回るというようなもので
02:12
and he argued that advantage accrued
彼が議論したことは優位性は―
02:15
to each of those components,
個々の要素ごとに積み重ねられ
02:17
and that the advantage of the whole
全体としての価値は
02:19
was in some sense the sum or the average
各要素の合計ないし平均により
02:21
of that of its parts.
評価されるというような ことなのです
02:23
And this idea of the value chain was predicated
そして彼の価値連鎖の考えにおいて
02:25
on the recognition that
前提となる考えは
02:28
what holds a business together is transaction costs,
取引のコストを調整することで
ビジネスが最適化されるということであり
02:30
that in essence you need to coordinate,
組織は市場よりもそれを効率的に
02:34
organizations are more efficient at coordination
行うことができるということが
本質的なのでした
02:36
than markets, very often,
それゆえ しばしば
02:39
and therefore the nature and role and boundaries
事業者間の協力関係において
02:40
of the cooperation are defined by transaction costs.
その性質 役割 境界は
取引コストで定義されるのです
02:43
It was on those two ideas,
この2つの考え つまり
02:47
Henderson's idea of increasing returns
ヘンダーソンのいう
規模や経験に応じた
02:50
to scale and experience,
“収穫逓増”の考え
02:53
and Porter's idea of the value chain,
そしてこれに続き
ビジネス戦略の全体像における
02:55
encompassing heterogenous elements,
様々な異なる要素を包括した
02:57
that the whole edifice of business strategy
ポーターの価値連鎖の考えが
02:59
was subsequently erected.
形作られたのでした
03:02
Now what I'm going to argue is
ここで私が議論したいことは
03:05
that those premises are, in fact, being invalidated.
こういった前提が
無効になっていくという事実です
03:08
First of all, let's think about transaction costs.
まず初めに取引コストを
考えてみましょう
03:13
There are really two components
to transaction costs.
取引コストには2つの要素があります
03:16
One is about processing information,
and the other is about communication.
一つは情報を処理すること
もう一つは通信です
03:18
These are the economics of
processing and communicating
処理と通信が長い時間をかけて
ここまで進化してこれたのは
03:21
as they have evolved over a long period of time.
それ自身の経済の結果です
03:24
As we all know from so many contexts,
皆さんがご存じの様に
いろんな意味において
03:27
they have been radically transformed
これらの要素は
03:30
since the days when Porter and Henderson
ポーターとヘンダーソンが
理論を初めて提唱して以来
03:32
first formulated their theories.
劇的に変化してきました
03:35
In particular, since the mid-'90s,
特に90年代中頃から
03:37
communications costs have actually been falling
通信コストは下がり続け
03:39
even faster than transaction costs,
取引コストの低下よりも速く
03:41
which is why communication, the Internet,
だからこそ 通信 つまりインターネットは
03:43
has exploded in such a dramatic fashion.
劇的に普及したのです
03:45
Now, those falling transaction costs
このような取引コストの低減は
03:50
have profound consequences,
重要な結果をもたらします
03:52
because if transaction costs are the glue
というのは 取引コストが価値連鎖を
03:54
that hold value chains together, and they are falling,
結びつけているのだとすると
その低下につれて
03:56
there is less to economize on.
さらなる低下の余地が無くなっていきます
03:58
There is less need for vertically
integrated organization,
すると縦につながった組織の必要性が減り
04:00
and value chains at least can break up.
価値連鎖の分割さえあるのです
04:03
They needn't necessarily, but they can.
そうすべきと いうのではなく
有り得る ということです
04:06
In particular, it then becomes possible for
特に起こり得ることは
04:08
a competitor in one business
一つのビジネスにおける
競争相手の一方が
04:10
to use their position in one step of the value chain
価値連鎖のあるステップにおける
立場を利用し
04:12
in order to penetrate or attack
別のステップでは
競合相手の立場を奪ったり
04:15
or disintermediate the competitor in another.
敵対行動を行ったり仲介者を排除した
投資を行ったりするのです
04:17
That is not just an abstract proposition.
これは単に概念的な提案ということでなく
04:20
There are many very specific stories
実際にそのような事例が
04:23
of how that actually happened.
いくつも起きているのです
04:25
A poster child example was
the encyclopedia business.
典型的な例が
百科事典のビジネスです
04:26
The encyclopedia business
革装の本であった時代の
百科事典ビジネスは
04:30
in the days of leatherbound books
革装の本であった時代の
百科事典ビジネスは
04:31
was basically a distribution business.
基本的に流通業であり
04:33
Most of the cost was the
commission to the salesmen.
主なコストは販売員への手数料でした
04:35
The CD-ROM and then the Internet came along,
CD-ROM そしてインターネットが
登場すると
04:38
new technologies made the distribution of knowledge
新しい技術は知識の流通のコストを
04:40
many orders of magnitude cheaper,
何ケタも安くし
04:44
and the encyclopedia industry collapsed.
百科事典ビジネスはつぶれました
04:46
It's now, of course, a very familiar story.
今となっては勿論
とてもよく知られていることです
04:49
This, in fact, more generally was the story
これはインターネット・ビジネスの
04:51
of the first generation of the Internet economy.
第一世代でよくあったことでした
04:53
It was about falling transaction costs
取引のコストが低下したことによって
04:56
breaking up value chains
価値連鎖が分断され
04:58
and therefore allowing disintermediation,
それゆえ直接取引が可能になったり
05:00
or what we call deconstruction.
“脱構築”というものが起こり得るのです
05:02
One of the questions I was occasionally asked was,
しばしば受ける質問の一つが
05:05
well, what's going to replace the encyclopedia
ブリタニカのビジネスモデルが
成り立たなくなったので
05:07
when Britannica no longer has a business model?
何が百科事典ビジネスを取って代わるのか?
05:09
And it was a while before
the answer became manifest.
その答えが明らかになるまでに
少し時間がかかりました
05:12
Now, of course, we know
what it is: it's the Wikipedia.
今や周知のとおりウィキペディアです
05:14
Now what's special about the
Wikipedia is not its distribution.
ウィキペディアが特別なのは
流通方式についてではありません
05:17
What's special about the Wikipedia
is the way it's produced.
ウィキペディアの特徴は
それが作られる過程です
05:20
The Wikipedia, of course, is an encyclopedia
ウィキペディアは勿論 百科事典ですが
05:23
created by its users.
ユーザーによってつくられるのです
05:25
And this, in fact, defines what you might call
これはインターネット経済を
05:27
the second decade of the Internet economy,
10年単位で表せば
第2期といえるかもしれません
05:29
the decade in which the Internet as a noun
この期間ではインターネットは
名詞ではなく
05:32
became the Internet as a verb.
動詞的なものになったのです
05:35
It became a set of conversations,
様々な会話の形態ができ
05:37
the era in which user-generated
content and social networks
ユーザーが中身を作ったり
ソーシャルネットワークが
05:39
became the dominant phenomenon.
流行する時代になったのです
05:43
Now what that really meant
これが意味するところは
05:46
in terms of the Porter-Henderson framework
ポーターとヘンダーソンの枠組みにおける
05:48
was the collapse of certain
kinds of economies of scale.
ある種の“規模の経済”というものは
崩壊したということなのです
05:51
It turned out that tens of thousands
判明したことは何万人もの
05:54
of autonomous individuals writing an encyclopedia
個人個人が自主的に百科事典を作り上げ
05:57
could do just as good a job,
階級的な組織に属する プロよりも
06:00
and certainly a much cheaper job,
同じレベルの仕事を
06:01
than professionals in a hierarchical organization.
ずっと安く成し遂げたということです
06:03
So basically what was happening was that one layer
基本的にここで起きていることは
06:06
of this value chain was becoming fragmented,
価値連鎖の一つの層が
ばらばらに分裂し
06:08
as individuals could take over
個人個人がこれに取って代わり
06:11
where organizations were no longer needed.
組織がもやは不要になったという
ことなのです
06:13
But there's another question
that obviously this graph poses,
しかし このグラフから明らかなように
別の問いが現れます
06:17
which is, okay, we've
gone through two decades --
ここまで第1期と第2期を見てきましたが
06:19
does anything distinguish the third?
第3期の特徴はなんでしょう?
06:21
And what I'm going to argue is that indeed
私が議論しようとしていることは まさに
06:24
something does distinguish the third,
第3期を特徴付ける“何か”です
06:26
and it maps exactly on to the kind of
これこそがここまで語ってきた
06:28
Porter-Henderson logic that
we've been talking about.
ポーター-ヘンダーソンの理論を
新しい枠組みで位置づけるものです
06:30
And that is, about data.
それはデータに関するものです
06:33
If we go back to around 2000,
2000年まで遡ると
06:35
a lot of people were talking
about the information revolution,
人々は情報革命を議論し
06:37
and it was indeed true that the world's stock of data
実際 データが次々と蓄積―
06:39
was growing, indeed growing quite fast.
大変な勢いで蓄積されていきました
06:42
but it was still at that point overwhelmingly analog.
しかしこの段階ではまだ
アナログデータが圧倒的です
06:44
We go forward to 2007,
2007年に進みましょう
06:47
not only had the world's stock of data exploded,
データの蓄積は爆発的に増えるだけでなく
06:49
but there'd been this massive substitution
アナログデータからデジタルデータへの
06:52
of digital for analog.
置換が行われてきました
06:54
And more important even than that,
さらに重要なことは
06:56
if you look more carefully at this graph,
グラフをもっと注意して―
06:58
what you will observe is that about a half
見てみると分ることは
デジタルデータの半分ほどが
07:00
of that digital data
見てみると分ることは
デジタルデータの半分ほどが
07:02
is information that has an I.P. address.
サーバーであれ個人PCであれ
IPアドレス情報が付加されていることです
07:03
It's on a server or it's on a P.C.
サーバーであれ個人PCであれ
IPアドレス情報が付加されていることです
07:06
But having an I.P. address means that it
IPアドレスが分るということは
07:09
can be connected to any other data
IPアドレスのある別のデータと
07:11
that has an I.P. address.
関連付けられるので
07:13
It means it becomes possible
世界中の半分の知識を集め
07:15
to put together half of the world's knowledge
パターンを分析することが
可能になるのです
07:16
in order to see patterns,
パターンを分析することが
可能になるのです
07:19
an entirely new thing.
全く新しいことです
07:21
If we run the numbers forward to today,
さて現在に時を戻しますと
07:23
it probably looks something like this.
おそらく こんな感じでしょう
07:25
We're not really sure.
正確な数字は分りません
07:27
If we run the numbers forward to 2020,
2020年まで先に進めますと
07:28
we of course have an exact number, courtesy of IDC.
IDCのおかげで勿論正確な数字が分ります
07:30
It's curious that the future is so much
more predictable than the present.
現在のことよりも将来のことが
良く分るとは興味深いことです
07:33
And what it implies is a hundredfold multiplication
これが意味することは
何百倍もの
07:37
in the stock of information that is connected
蓄積されたデータが
07:42
via an I.P. address.
IPアドレスで関連付けられるということです
07:44
Now, if the number of connections that we can make
情報の結びつきの組合せ数が
07:47
is proportional to the number of pairs of data points,
データ間の対の数に
比例するならば
07:50
a hundredfold multiplication in the quantity of data
データが100倍に増えると
07:53
is a ten-thousandfold multiplication
1万倍ほどの
07:56
in the number of patterns
パターンを
07:58
that we can see in that data,
データに見出すことができます
07:59
this just in the last 10 or 11 years.
これは過去僅か10~11年で起きたことで
08:02
This, I would submit, is a sea change,
これは我々が住む世界の
08:04
a profound change in the economics
経済における目覚しい変化
08:07
of the world that we live in.
深遠なる変化と申し上げたいのです
08:09
The first human genome,
人類の最初のゲノムとして
08:11
that of James Watson,
ジェームス・ワトソンのゲノムが
08:12
was mapped as the culmination of the
Human Genome Project in the year 2000,
2000年に行われたヒトゲノム計画の
究極的な成果物として解析された時
08:14
and it took about 200 million dollars
2億ドルの費用がかかり
08:18
and about 10 years of work to map
しかも一人の人間のゲノム解析に
08:20
just one person's genomic makeup.
10年の時を要したのです
08:22
Since then, the costs of mapping
the genome have come down.
それ以降ゲノムの解析コストは下がり
08:24
In fact, they've come down in recent years
ここ数年のコストダウンは
08:27
very dramatically indeed,
実に劇的で
08:29
to the point where the cost
is now below 1,000 dollars,
今や1000ドルを下回るに至り
08:30
and it's confidently predicted that by the year 2015
2015年までには100ドルを下回るという
08:33
it will be below 100 dollars --
確かな予測があります
08:36
a five or six order of magnitude drop
過去15年間においてゲノムの解析コストが
5-6ケタ下がったのです
08:38
in the cost of genomic mapping
過去15年間においてゲノムの解析コストが
5-6ケタ下がったのです
08:41
in just a 15-year period,
過去15年間においてゲノムの解析コストが
5-6ケタ下がったのです
08:43
an extraordinary phenomenon.
これは とてつもないことです
08:45
Now, in the days when mapping a genome
ゲノム解析に
08:48
cost millions, or even tens of thousands,
100万ドル ないし1万ドル
掛かっていた時代では
08:52
it was basically a research enterprise.
これはまさに研究事業であり
08:55
Scientists would gather some representative people,
各分野を代表するような
科学者たちが集まり
08:57
and they would see patterns, and they would try
人類の特徴や病気について
08:59
and make generalizations about
human nature and disease
選ばれた限られた人から
人間の特徴や病気に関する
09:01
from the abstract patterns they find
抽象的なパターンを見出し
09:04
from these particular selected individuals.
一般化しようとしたのです
09:05
But when the genome can
be mapped for 100 bucks,
しかしゲノムが100ドルで
解析できるようになると
09:09
99 dollars while you wait,
さらに少し待って99ドルになると
09:11
then what happens is, it becomes retail.
解析装置は誰にでも
使われるようになります
09:14
It becomes above all clinical.
全ての病院で使われるのです
09:16
You go the doctor with a cold,
風邪をひいて病院に行くと
09:18
and if he or she hasn't done it already,
まだ解析データがなければ
09:19
the first thing they do is map your genome,
まずはあなたのゲノムを解析します
09:21
at which point what they're now doing
この時点で医者は
09:23
is not starting from some abstract
knowledge of genomic medicine
ゲノム医学の抽象的な知識を元に
あなたに効果があるかを―
09:25
and trying to work out how it applies to you,
試していく代わりに
09:29
but they're starting from your particular genome.
あなたのゲノムに合わせた処方を探していくのです
09:31
Now think of the power of that.
このことの可能性を考えてみましょう
09:34
Think of where that takes us
どの様な道が開けるでしょうか
09:35
when we can combine genomic data
ゲノム解析データが
09:37
with clinical data
臨床データ
09:40
with data about drug interactions
薬との相互作用に関するデータ
09:42
with the kind of ambient data that devices
さらには電話や医療センサーで測る
周囲のデータなども
09:44
like our phone and medical sensors
次々と集められ
09:46
will increasingly be collecting.
結び付けられることでしょう
09:48
Think what happens when we collect all of that data
これらのデータを全て集めて
09:50
and we can put it together
一緒にすれば
09:52
in order to find patterns we wouldn't see before.
これまでに見えなかったパターンが
見つかるかもしれません
09:54
This, I would suggest, perhaps it will take a while,
時間が掛かるかもしれませんが
09:56
but this will drive a revolution in medicine.
医学の革命が起こるかもしれません
09:59
Fabulous, lots of people talk about this.
素晴らしいことです
多くの人々がこのことを語っています
10:01
But there's one thing that
doesn't get much attention.
でも 注目されていないことが
一つあります
10:04
How is that model of colossal sharing
様々なデータベースを
10:06
across all of those kinds of databases
徹底的に結び付けて行こうというモデルは
10:09
compatible with the business models
今日のビジネスに関連した
10:12
of institutions and organizations and corporations
組織 機関 法人の事業モデルと
10:15
that are involved in this business today?
相容れるものでしょうか?
10:17
If your business is based on proprietary data,
独占的に所有するデータに依存するビジネスや
10:19
if your competitive advantage
is defined by your data,
データこそが強みだ
というビジネスを行なっている
10:22
how on Earth is that company or is that society
このような会社や組織は
10:25
in fact going to achieve the value
技術によって裏付けられる価値を
10:29
that's implicit in the technology? They can't.
これまで同様に生み出せるのでしょうか
それは不可能です
10:31
So essentially what's happening here,
本質的に 何が起きているかというと―
10:34
and genomics is merely one example of this,
遺伝子工学は一つの例に過ぎず―
10:36
is that technology is driving
技術はビジネスの規模を
10:39
the natural scaling of the activity
これまで その枠の中で考えることに慣れていた
10:41
beyond the institutional boundaries within which
組織の境界を越えて自然に拡大させています
10:43
we have been used to thinking about it,
組織の境界を越えて自然に拡大させています
10:46
and in particular beyond the institutional boundaries
特に ビジネス戦略は
10:49
in terms of which business strategy
組織の境界を越えてはならないという
規律を保つことだったのです
10:51
as a discipline is formulated.
組織の境界を越えてはならないという
規律を保つことだったのです
10:53
The basic story here is that what used to be
基本的な流れは
10:56
vertically integrated, oligopolistic competition
垂直的に統合された組織で
売り手による寡占的な市場での競争に―
11:00
among essentially similar kinds of competitors
慣れていた
同じような形態をもつ競合者達が
11:04
is evolving, by one means or another,
何らかの方法で
11:06
from a vertical structure to a horizontal one.
縦の繋がりから 横に広がった
ビジネスへと進化を遂げることなのです
11:09
Why is that happening?
なぜそんなことが起こるのでしょうか?
11:12
It's happening because
transaction costs are plummeting
それは取引コストが下がり
11:14
and because scale is polarizing.
規模が分極化しているからです
11:16
The plummeting of transaction costs
取引コストの低下は
11:18
weakens the glue that holds value chains together,
価値連鎖の繋がりを弱くし
11:20
and allows them to separate.
分割を促すのです
11:23
The polarization of scale economies
規模の経済が 分極して
11:24
towards the very small -- small is beautiful --
小さくなる側では
-小さいことは美しいことですが-
11:26
allows for scalable communities
規模を変えられる共同体によって
11:29
to substitute for conventional corporate production.
これまでの企業による生産を
とって代わることが可能になります
11:32
The scaling in the opposite direction,
逆に ビッグデータで象徴される
11:35
towards things like big data,
大規模化の方向では
11:37
drive the structure of business
ビジネスの構造を
11:39
towards the creation of new kinds of institutions
新たな規模を達成するような
新しいタイプの組織が
11:41
that can achieve that scale.
生み出されます
11:43
But either way, the typically vertical structure
しかし 何れにしろ
典型的な垂直型の構造は
11:45
gets driven to becoming more horizontal.
水平的なものへと 変容していくのです
11:48
The logic isn't just about big data.
この理屈はビッグ・データに限りません
11:51
If we were to look, for example,
at the telecommunications industry,
例えば通信業界を見てみると
11:54
you can tell the same story about fiber optics.
光通信技術で似たような状況が
見出されるでしょう
11:57
If we look at the pharmaceutical industry,
製薬業界では
11:59
or, for that matter, university research,
この場合 大学での研究を含みますが
12:01
you can say exactly the same story
いわゆる“ビッグ・サイエンス”について
全く同じことが言えます
12:03
about so-called "big science."
いわゆる“ビッグ・サイエンス”について
全く同じことが言えます
12:05
And in the opposite direction,
逆向きのことになりますが
12:07
if we look, say, at the energy sector,
エネルギー部門を見てみると
12:08
where all the talk is about how households
各家庭が
12:10
will be efficient producers of green energy
環境に優しいエネルギーの
効率的な生産者となり
12:13
and efficient conservers of energy,
しかもエネルギーの効率的な
節約者として語られています
12:17
that is, in fact, the reverse phenomenon.
これは実際逆向きの現象です
12:19
That is the fragmentation of scale
これは細分化であり
12:21
because the very small can substitute
とても小さいものが
12:23
for the traditional corporate scale.
典型的な大規模な企業を
とって代わるのです
12:26
Either way, what we are driven to
何れにしろ
12:28
is this horizontalization of the structure of industries,
産業構造の水平化が起こり
これは―
12:30
and that implies fundamental changes
ビジネス戦略を考える上での
根本的な変化を意味するのです
12:33
in how we think about strategy.
ビジネス戦略を考える上での
根本的な変化を意味するのです
12:36
It means, for example, that we need to think
つまり 我々が考えるべきことは
例えば―
12:38
about strategy as the curation
ビジネス戦略を このような
12:40
of these kinds of horizontal structure,
水平構造を作りだすものと考え
12:43
where things like business definition
ビジネスの定義や
12:45
and even industry definition
さらには産業の定義さえも
12:47
are actually the outcomes of strategy,
ビジネス戦略の結果として
再定義するのです
12:48
not something that the strategy presupposes.
戦略の前提ではないのです
12:51
It means, for example, we need to work out
そして我々が解決すべき課題は
例えば―
12:54
how to accommodate collaboration
協力と競争をどの様にして
12:58
and competition simultaneously.
同時に釣り合わせるか ということです
13:00
Think about the genome.
ゲノムの場合なら
13:02
We need to accommodate the very large
巨大なデータと
13:03
and the very small simultaneously.
個々への適用という問題を
同時に扱う必要があります
13:05
And we need industry structures
産業の構造は
13:07
that will accommodate very,
very different motivations,
極めて異なった動機を受け入れられなければなりません
13:09
from the amateur motivations
of people in communities
例えば 共同体における
素人的な関心から
13:12
to maybe the social motivations
政府によって建設されるインフラといった
13:14
of infrastructure built by governments,
社会的な動機もあるかもしれませんし
13:16
or, for that matter, cooperative institutions
普段 競合関係にある会社同士が
13:19
built by companies that are otherwise competing,
組織を共同で設立するかもしれません
13:21
because that is the only way
that they can get to scale.
なぜなら それが規模を大きくする
唯一の方法だからです
13:24
These kinds of transformations
この様な変革は
13:27
render the traditional premises
of business strategy obsolete.
伝統的なビジネス戦略の前提を
時代遅れのものにし
13:29
They drive us into a completely new world.
全く新しい世界へと導きます
13:32
They require us, whether we are
ここで必要とされることは
13:35
in the public sector or the private sector,
公共部門であれ 民間部門であれ
13:36
to think very fundamentally differently
ビジネスの構造についての
13:39
about the structure of business,
根本的に異なった考え方です
13:41
and, at last, it makes strategy interesting again.
ビジネス戦略は
ついに再び興味深いものになるでしょう
13:43
Thank you.
どうも有難うございました
13:47
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:50
Translator:Tomoyuki Suzuki
Reviewer:Yuko Yoshida

sponsored links

Philip Evans - Consultant
BCG's Philip Evans has a bold prediction for the future of business strategy -- and it starts with Big Data.

Why you should listen

Since the 1970s, business strategy has been dominated by two major theories: Bruce Henderson's idea of increasing returns to scale and experience and Michael Porter's value chain. But now decades later, in the wake of web 2.0, Philip Evans argues that a new force will rule business strategy in the future -- the massive amount of data shared by competing groups.

Evans, a senior partner and managing director at the Boston Consulting Group, is the co-author of Blown to Bits, about how the information economy is bringing the trade-off between "richness and reach" to the forefront of business. Evans is based in Boston.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.