sponsored links
TED2013

Daniel Reisel: The neuroscience of restorative justice

ダニエル・リーゼル: 修復的司法の神経科学

February 27, 2013

ダニエル・リーゼルは精神病質犯罪者の脳を研究しています。彼は大きな問いを投げかけます。「犯罪者を、ただ纏めて収容するのでなく、脳についての科学的知識を用い、彼らをリハビリさせるべきではないだろうか?」というものです。言い換えるならば、「事故で損傷を起こした脳に新しく神経回路ができるなら、脳に道徳心を再生させることもできるのではだろうか?」ということです。

Daniel Reisel - Neuroscientist
Daniel Reisel searches for the psychological and physical roots of human morality. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'd like to talk today
今日お話ししたいことは
00:12
about how we can change our brains
私たちの脳や社会を
変えられるということについてです
00:14
and our society.
私たちの脳や社会を
変えられるということについてです
00:16
Meet Joe.
彼はジョー
00:19
Joe's 32 years old and a murderer.
32才の殺人犯です
00:21
I met Joe 13 years ago on the lifer wing
私は13年前 ロンドンのワームウッド・
スクラブズ刑務所の
00:25
at Wormwood Scrubs high-security prison in London.
厳重に警備された無期刑囚の収容棟で
彼に会いました
00:27
I'd like you to imagine this place.
この場所を想像して頂くと
00:31
It looks and feels like it sounds:
ワームウッド・スクラブズ(ヨモギの低木)
という名の通りの所です
00:33
Wormwood Scrubs.
ワームウッド・スクラブズ(ヨモギの低木)
という名の通りの所です
00:36
Built at the end of the Victorian Era
ビクトリア朝後期に
00:39
by the inmates themselves,
囚人達によって建てられ
00:41
it is where England's most
dangerous prisoners are kept.
イングランドの最も危険な囚人
00:43
These individuals have committed acts
極悪の犯罪を犯した者達が
収容されています
00:46
of unspeakable evil.
極悪の犯罪を犯した者達が
収容されています
00:48
And I was there to study their brains.
私はそこに彼らの脳を
研究する為に
00:50
I was part of a team of researchers
UCL研究チームの
一員としていました
00:54
from University College London,
UCL研究チームの
一員としていました
00:56
on a grant from the U.K. department of health.
私たちは 英国保健医療省から
研究助成金を受けていて
00:57
My task was to study a group of inmates
私の仕事は
01:00
who had been clinically diagnosed as psychopaths.
精神病質者と診断された者達を
研究することでした
01:02
That meant they were the most
つまり その刑務所の囚人の中で
01:05
callous and the most aggressive
最も冷酷で攻撃的な者ということです
01:06
of the entire prison population.
最も冷酷で攻撃的な者ということです
01:08
What lay at the root of their behavior?
そんな行動の根源には
何があるのでしょう?
01:11
Was there a neurological cause for their condition?
神経学的原因が
あるのでしょうか?
01:15
And if there was a neurological cause,
もし そうだとしたなら
01:19
could we find a cure?
治療法が見つかるのでは?
01:22
So I'd like to speak about change, and
especially about emotional change.
それで情動変化について
お話ししたいと思います
01:25
Growing up, I was always intrigued
子供の頃 常に私は
01:29
by how people change.
人が どう変わるか
興味がありました
01:31
My mother, a clinical psychotherapist,
私の母は臨床心理士で
01:34
would occasionally see patients at home
時々 夜に家で患者を
看ることがあり
01:37
in the evening.
時々 夜に家で患者を
看ることがあり
01:39
She would shut the door to the living room,
その時は 母は
居間のドアを閉め
01:41
and I imagined
私は想像しました
01:42
magical things happened in that room.
居間で何か摩訶不思議な事が
起きているのではないかと
01:44
At the age of five or six
5才か6才の頃
01:47
I would creep up in my pajamas
パジャマのまま
そっと忍び寄り
01:48
and sit outside with my ear glued to the door.
ドアに耳をピッタリくっつけて
座っていたものでした
01:51
On more than one occasion, I fell asleep
何度となくそこで眠ってしまい
01:54
and they had to push me out of the way
セッションが終わると母たちは
私を押して出なくてはなりませんでした
01:55
at the end of the session.
セッションが終わると母たちは
私を押して出なくてはなりませんでした
01:57
And I suppose that's how I found myself
そんな私が
ワームウッド・スクラブズでの第一日目
01:59
walking into the secure interview room
警備された接見室に
02:02
on my first day at Wormwood Scrubs.
入って行くことになったのです
02:04
Joe sat across a steel table
ジョーは鉄のテーブルの反対側に座って
02:08
and greeted me with this blank expression.
無表情な顔で私に挨拶をし
02:10
The prison warden, looking equally indifferent,
看守も同じように無表情で
02:14
said, "Any trouble, just press the red buzzer,
「何かあったら、その赤いブザーを押して下さい」
02:17
and we'll be around as soon as we can."
「直ぐに駆けつけますから」と言いました
02:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:22
I sat down.
私は座り
02:25
The heavy metal door slammed shut behind me.
重い金属製のドアが私の背後で
ガチャンと閉められました
02:27
I looked up at the red buzzer
赤いブザーを見上げると
02:30
far behind Joe on the opposite wall.
それは反対側のジョーの
ずっと後ろにあったのです
02:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:34
I looked at Joe.
私はジョーを見
02:37
Perhaps detecting my concern,
ジョーは私の心配を読み取り
02:39
he leaned forward, and said,
身を乗り出し
02:41
as reassuringly as he could,
精一杯 私を安心させようと
こう言ったのです
02:42
"Ah, don't worry about the buzzer,
「ブザーのことは心配するな
02:44
it doesn't work anyway."
どうせ鳴らないんだから」
02:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:48
Over the subsequent months,
それから数ヶ月間
02:55
we tested Joe and his fellow inmates,
私たちはジョーと他の囚人を
検査しました
02:57
looking specifically at their ability
種々な感情を示す写真を
03:01
to categorize different images of emotion.
分類する彼らの能力を特に診て
03:03
And we looked at their physical response
そうした感情に対する
彼らの生理的反応を調べました
03:08
to those emotions.
そうした感情に対する
彼らの生理的反応を調べました
03:10
So, for example, when most of us look
例えば私たちの殆どは
03:11
at a picture like this of somebody looking sad,
このように
悲しそうな人の写真を見ると
03:13
we instantly have a slight,
直ぐに 少しですが
03:16
measurable physical response:
はっきりした生理的反応があり
03:19
increased heart rate, sweating of the skin.
心拍数は増え 汗が出ます
03:21
Whilst the psychopaths in our study were able
私たちの研究対象の精神病質者は
03:25
to describe the pictures accurately,
写真を正確に説明出来ましたが
03:26
they failed to show the emotions required.
それに伴う感情や
03:28
They failed to show a physical response.
生理的反応を示す事は
できませんでした
03:32
It was as though they knew the words
彼らは言葉の意味は分かっても
03:36
but not the music of empathy.
感情移入の喜びを
知らないかのようでした
03:38
So we wanted to look closer at this
もっと詳しく調べたかったので
03:41
to use MRI to image their brains.
MRIを使って彼らの
脳の画像を取りました
03:43
That turned out to be not such an easy task.
これは それ程簡単な事
ではありませんでした
03:46
Imagine transporting a collection
ロンドン中心部を
03:49
of clinical psychopaths across central London
精神病質者達に
03:51
in shackles and handcuffs
足枷や手錠をかけて
03:54
in rush hour,
ラッシュアワーの中を
移動させました
03:56
and in order to place each
of them in an MRI scanner,
彼らを一人一人
MRIの台に乗せる前
03:58
you have to remove all metal objects,
金属は全部
取り除かなくてはなりません
04:01
including shackles and handcuffs,
足枷と手錠は勿論の事
04:03
and, as I learned, all body piercings.
体に入れている
全てのピアスも取るのです
04:05
After some time, however,
we had a tentative answer.
検査後しばらくして
暫定的な結論が出ました
04:09
These individuals were not just the victims
彼らは悲惨な子供時代の
犠牲者だというだけではなく
04:13
of a troubled childhood.
彼らは悲惨な子供時代の
犠牲者だというだけではなく
04:16
There was something else.
他にも原因があったのです
04:18
People like Joe have a deficit in a brain area
ジョーのような人々は
脳のある部分—
04:21
called the amygdala.
扁桃体に欠陥があるのです
04:24
The amygdala is an almond-shaped organ
扁桃体はアーモンドの形をして
04:26
deep within each of the hemispheres of the brain.
脳の両半球深くにあり
04:28
It is thought to be key to the experience of empathy.
感情移入反応の鍵だと
と考えられています
04:32
Normally, the more empathic a person is,
通常 他の人と共感出来る人程
04:36
the larger and more active their amygdala is.
扁桃体はより大きく活動的です
04:39
Our population of inmates
私たちが検査した囚人は
04:42
had a deficient amygdala,
扁桃体に問題がありました
04:44
which likely led to their lack of empathy
それで彼らが感情移入できなくなり
04:45
and to their immoral behavior.
非道な行動へ至ったのでしょう
04:47
So let's take a step back.
では1歩下がってみましょう
04:50
Normally, acquiring moral behavior
普通 道徳的な行動を学ぶのは
04:53
is simply part of growing up,
成長の一過程というだけで
04:56
like learning to speak.
言葉を学ぶようなものです
04:58
At the age of six months, virtually every one of us
殆どの子供が 生後6ヶ月で
05:01
is able to differentiate between
animate and inanimate objects.
生物と無生物の違いが
分かるようになります
05:04
At the age of 12 months,
1才で
05:08
most children are able to imitate
人の意図的行動を
真似できます
05:10
the purposeful actions of others.
人の意図的行動を
真似できます
05:14
So for example, your mother raises her hands
例えば母親が手を上げ
05:15
to stretch, and you imitate her behavior.
背伸びをすると
子供もその真似をします
05:18
At first, this isn't perfect.
最初は
完全な模倣ではありませんが
05:21
I remember my cousin Sasha,
私のいとこのサーシャは
05:24
two years old at the time,
2才の時
05:26
looking through a picture book
絵本を見ていて
05:28
and licking one finger and flicking
the page with the other hand,
指をなめながら もう一方の手で
ページをめくっていました
05:30
licking one finger and flicking
the page with the other hand.
指をなめながら もう一方の手で
ページをめくっていました
05:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:35
Bit by bit, we build the foundations
of the social brain
それから少しずつ
社会性を持った脳の基礎が作られて
05:37
so that by the time we're three, four years old,
3、4才までに
05:41
most children, not all,
全てではないのですが
殆どの子供が
05:46
have acquired the ability to understand
他人の意図を理解するという
05:47
the intentions of others,
感情移入に欠かせないことが
05:49
another prerequisite for empathy.
出来るようになります
05:51
The fact that this developmental progression
この発育過程が
05:54
is universal,
世界中どこであろうと
05:56
irrespective of where you live in the world
世界中どこであろうと
05:58
or which culture you inhabit,
どの文化であろうと
同じだという事実は
06:00
strongly suggests that the foundations
道徳的行動の基盤は
06:03
of moral behavior are inborn.
先天的なものだということを
強く示唆しています
06:05
If you doubt this,
疑われるなら
06:08
try, as I've done, to renege on a promise you've made
私もやったことがありますが
4歳児との約束を破ってみて下さい
06:10
to a four-year-old.
私もやったことがありますが
4歳児との約束を破ってみて下さい
06:14
You will find that the mind of a four-year old
4歳児は決してうぶでは
06:16
is not naïve in the slightest.
ない事が 分かるでしょう
06:18
It is more akin to a Swiss army knife
スイスアーミーナイフのように
06:20
with fixed mental modules
不動の判断基準で
06:23
finely honed during development
成長過程に研ぎすまされ
06:25
and a sharp sense of fairness.
鋭い公平感覚を持っているのです
06:27
The early years are crucial.
発育初期は道徳心を学ぶための
06:30
There seems to be a window of opportunity,
絶好のチャンスであり きわめて重要です
06:33
after which mastering moral questions
その後は道徳心を習得するのは
06:35
becomes more difficult,
もっと難しくなります
06:38
like adults learning a foreign language.
大人が外国語を学ぶようなものです
06:39
That's not to say it's impossible.
不可能ではありませんが
06:43
A recent, wonderful study from Stanford University
最近のスタンフォード大学の
研究によると
06:45
showed that people who have played
仮想現実のゲームの中で
06:48
a virtual reality game in which they took on
善良なる人助けをする
06:51
the role of a good and helpful superhero
スーパーヒーローの役をした人は
06:53
actually became more caring and helpful
実生活でも 思いやりが増し
06:55
towards others afterwards.
人の役に立とうとするように
なったということです
06:58
Now I'm not suggesting
犯罪者にスーパーパワーを
07:00
we endow criminals with superpowers,
と提案しているのではないのですが
07:02
but I am suggesting that we need to find ways
ジョーや彼のような人々の脳や行動を
07:05
to get Joe and people like him
変える方法を
見つける必要があると思うのです
07:09
to change their brains and their behavior,
変える方法を
見つける必要があると思うのです
07:11
for their benefit
彼らの為にも
07:13
and for the benefit of the rest of us.
私たち皆の為にも
07:15
So can brains change?
では脳は変わることが
できるでしょうか?
07:18
For over 100 years,
過去1世紀以上
07:22
neuroanatomists and later neuroscientists
神経解剖学者や
神経科学者の考えとは
07:24
held the view that after initial
development in childhood,
幼年期の発育段階を過ぎると
07:27
no new brain cells could grow
成人の脳では
新しい細胞が増える事はなく
07:31
in the adult human brain.
成人の脳では
新しい細胞が増える事はなく
07:34
The brain could only change
脳はある限界の中でのみ変わる
というものでした
07:35
within certain set limits.
脳はある限界の中でのみ変わる
というものでした
07:36
That was the dogma.
それが定説でした
07:38
But then, in the 1990s,
しかし1990年代に
07:40
studies starting showing,
プリンストン大の
07:43
following the lead of Elizabeth
Gould at Princeton and others,
エリザベス・ゴールドなどの研究により
07:44
studies started showing the
evidence of neurogenesis,
成体哺乳類の脳で
07:47
the birth of new brain cells
ニューロン新生 つまりー
07:50
in the adult mammalian brain,
新しい脳細胞の形成が行われる
ことが示されるようになりました
07:53
first in the olfactory bulb,
最初は嗅覚を司る嗅球に
07:56
which is responsible for our sense of smell,
最初は嗅覚を司る嗅球に
07:57
then in the hippocampus
次に短期記憶を司る海馬に
07:59
involving short-term memory,
次に短期記憶を司る海馬に
08:01
and finally in the amygdala itself.
そして ついに扁桃体で
新細胞の出現が確認されました
08:03
In order to understand
この過程を理解する為に
08:07
how this process works,
この過程を理解する為に
08:08
I left the psychopaths and joined a lab in Oxford
私は精神病質者の研究を離れ
オックスフォード大の研究所で
08:10
specializing in learning and development.
「学習と発育」を専門に
08:13
Instead of psychopaths, I studied mice,
精神病質者の代わりに
マウスを使って研究しました
08:17
because the same pattern of brain responses
同じような脳反応が
08:20
appears across many different
species of social animals.
種々の社会的動物に渡り
見られるからです
08:23
So if you rear a mouse in a standard cage,
もし普通のケージか
靴箱に脱脂綿を入れて
08:26
a shoebox, essentially, with cotton wool,
マウスを飼い
08:31
alone and without much stimulation,
あまり刺激を与えなければ
08:34
not only does it not thrive,
元気に育たないだけでなく
08:35
but it will often develop strange,
頻繁に おかしな反復行動を
するようになります
08:37
repetitive behaviors.
頻繁に おかしな反復行動を
するようになります
08:39
This naturally sociable animal
本質的には社会的な動物なのに
08:40
will lose its ability to bond with other mice,
他のマウスと仲良くする
能力を失い
08:43
even becoming aggressive when introduced to them.
他のマウス達の中に入れると
攻撃的にさえなります
08:45
However, mice reared in what we called
しかし所謂 豊かな環境—
08:49
an enriched environment,
しかし所謂 豊かな環境—
08:51
a large habitation with other mice
他のマウス達とともに 広々とした
08:53
with wheels and ladders and areas to explore,
回し車やはしごや探索する場所もある
環境で育ったマウスには
08:55
demonstrate neurogenesis,
新生ニューロン
08:59
the birth of new brain cells,
つまり新しい脳細胞ができ
09:00
and as we showed, they also perform better
記憶がよく学習が上手です
09:02
on a range of learning and memory tasks.
記憶がよく学習が上手です
09:05
Now, they don't develop morality to the point of
道を渡る年老いたマウスの
買い物袋を
09:08
carrying the shopping bags of little old mice
運んであげる程の
09:10
across the street,
道徳心はできませんが
09:12
but their improved environment results in healthy,
良い環境は
健康的で社会性のある行動を生みます
09:14
sociable behavior.
良い環境は
健康的で社会性のある行動を生みます
09:17
Mice reared in a standard cage, by contrast,
一方 普通のケージで
育ったマウスは
09:19
not dissimilar, you might say, from a prison cell,
その環境は監獄と
同じとまででは行かなくても
09:22
have dramatically lower levels of new neurons
脳内で新しいニューロンができる度合いが
劇的に低いのです
09:24
in the brain.
脳内で新しいニューロンができる度合いが
劇的に低いのです
09:27
It is now clear that the amygdala of mammals,
私たちのような霊長類を含む
哺乳類の扁桃体には
09:29
including primates like us,
私たちのような霊長類を含む
哺乳類の扁桃体には
09:32
can show neurogenesis.
明らかにニューロン新生が見られ
09:33
In some areas of the brain,
脳のある部分では
09:36
more than 20 percent of cells are newly formed.
細胞の20%以上が
新しく作られています
09:37
We're just beginning to understand
最近やっとこれらの細胞が
どんな働きをするのか正確に
09:41
what exact function these cells have,
分かり始めたばかりですが
09:43
but what it implies is that the brain is capable
脳は大人になっても
09:45
of extraordinary change way into adulthood.
大きく変わり得る
ということです
09:48
However, our brains are also
私たちの脳はまた
09:53
exquisitely sensitive to stress in our environment.
ストレスを繊細に感じ易いのです
09:55
Stress hormones, glucocorticoids,
ストレスホルモンである
グルココルチコイドが
09:59
released by the brain,
脳から放出されると
10:01
suppress the growth of these new cells.
新しい細胞産生を抑制します
10:03
The more stress, the less brain development,
ストレスがあればある程
脳の発達は妨げられ
10:06
which in turn causes less adaptability
それにより
順応性がなくなり
10:09
and causes higher stress levels.
さらにストレスレベルが
上がることになります
10:13
This is the interplay between nature and nurture
これが私たちが実生活で
直に目にしている
10:16
in real time in front of our eyes.
「自然と育成」の相互作用です
10:20
When you think about it,
このように考えると
10:23
it is ironic that our current solution
ストレスを受けた扁桃体を持つ人々を
10:26
for people with stressed amygdalae
脳の成長を妨げる環境に置いて
10:28
is to place them in an environment
解決法だとしている今の状況は
10:30
that actually inhibits any chance of further growth.
皮肉なものです
10:32
Of course, imprisonment is a necessary part
勿論 懲役刑は刑事司法システム上
10:36
of the criminal justice system
必要なもので
10:38
and of protecting society.
社会を守る為にも必要です
10:41
Our research does not suggest
私たちの研究が示しているのは
10:43
that criminals should submit their MRI scans
「犯罪者は裁判で
MRIスキャンした画像を
10:44
as evidence in court
証拠として提出し
10:47
and get off the hook because
they've got a faulty amygdala.
扁桃体の欠陥があれば責任を回避される
べきだ」というものではありません
10:48
The evidence is actually the other way.
むしろその逆です
10:52
Because our brains are capable of change,
私たちの脳は変わり得るので
10:54
we need to take responsibility for our actions,
自分たちの行動には責任を
持たなければならないし
10:57
and they need to take responsibility
扁桃体に欠陥がある人は
責任を持って
10:59
for their rehabilitation.
リハビリに取り組まなければならない
ということです
11:01
One way such rehabilitation might work
そのリバビリが
うまく行く可能性を持つ
11:04
is through restorative justice programs.
1つの方法が
「修復的司法プログラム」を使うことです
11:06
Here victims, if they choose to participate,
被害者が参加することを選んだ場合は
11:09
and perpetrators meet face to face
安全で整備された環境の中で
11:12
in safe, structured encounters,
加害者と向き合います
11:14
and the perpetrator is encouraged
加害者は自分の行動に
11:17
to take responsibility for their actions,
責任を取るようにと促され
11:18
and the victim plays an active role in the process.
被害者はその過程で
積極的な役割を果たします
11:20
In such a setting, the perpetrator can see,
そんな状況下で加害者は
11:24
perhaps for the first time,
たぶん初めて
11:27
the victim as a real person
被害者を 考えや感情を持った—
11:29
with thoughts and feelings and a genuine
真の感情で反応する
生の人間として見ることができます
11:31
emotional response.
真の感情で反応する
生の人間として見ることができます
11:33
This stimulates the amygdala
これは扁桃体を刺激し
11:35
and may be a more effective rehabilitative practice
ただの投獄より もっと効果的な
リハビリ実践になるかもしれません
11:37
than simple incarceration.
ただの投獄より もっと効果的な
リハビリ実践になるかもしれません
11:40
Such programs won't work for everyone,
皆に効果がある訳ではありませんが
11:43
but for many, it could be a way
多くの人にとって
11:45
to break the frozen sea within.
内からの打開策の1つです
11:48
So what can we do now?
今何ができるでしょうか?
11:52
How can we apply this knowledge?
この知識をどう応用できるのでしょうか?
11:55
I'd like to leave you with
最後に私が学んだ3つの事を
お話しします
11:57
three lessons that I learned.
最後に私が学んだ3つの事を
お話しします
12:00
The first thing that I learned was that
まずは
12:01
we need to change our mindset.
我々の意識改革が必要です
12:03
Since Wormwood Scrubs was built 130 years ago,
ワームウッド・スクラブズが
130年前に建てられて以来
12:05
society has advanced in virtually every aspect,
学校や病院の運営方法など
社会はあらゆる面で進歩してきました
12:08
in the way we run our schools, our hospitals.
学校や病院の運営方法など
社会はあらゆる面で進歩してきました
12:11
Yet the moment we speak about prisons,
しかし刑務所に関しての話になると
途端に
12:15
it's as though we're back in Dickensian times,
まるで19世紀にもどったかのようです
12:17
if not medieval times.
中世までとは言わないにしても
12:20
For too long, I believe,
私たちは あまりに長い間
12:22
we've allowed ourselves to be persuaded
人が持つ人間性は変えられないという
12:24
of the false notion that human
nature cannot change,
間違った考えを植え付けられてきたので
12:28
and as a society, it's costing us dearly.
社会全体が大きな代償を払うことに
なっています
12:31
We know that the brain is
capable of extraordinary change,
脳は大きく変われることが
分かっています
12:34
and the best way to achieve that,
それを成人においてでも
成し遂げる一番の方法は
12:38
even in adults, is to change and modulate
私たちの環境を変え
調節する事です
12:41
our environment.
私たちの環境を変え
調節する事です
12:44
The second thing I have learned
私が学んだ2つ目の事は
12:46
is that we need to create an alliance
社会に変化をもたらす為には
12:48
of people who believe that science is integral
科学が不可欠だと信じる人々を
12:51
to bringing about social change.
結びつける必要があるという事です
12:55
It's easy enough for a neuroscientist to place
1人の神経科学者が
厳重に監視された囚人を
12:57
a high-security inmate in an MRI scanner.
MRIの機械に乗せるのは
簡単なことです
13:00
Well actually, that turns out not to be so easy,
実は 簡単ではなかったのですが・・・
13:02
but ultimately what we want to show
最終的には
13:05
is whether we're able to
reduce the reoffending rates.
再犯率を減らせるかどうかです
13:07
In order to answer complex questions like that,
そんな複雑な質問に答える為に
13:11
we need people of different backgrounds --
違った背景の人々を
必要としています
13:14
lab-based scientists and clinicians,
実験ベースの科学者
臨床医
13:16
social workers and policy makers,
ソーシャルワーカー
政治家
13:19
philanthropists and human rights activists —
慈善事業家そして
人権活動家などが
13:21
to work together.
共に働くのです
13:24
Finally, I believe we need
最後に
私たち自身の扁桃体を
13:25
to change our own amygdalae,
変える必要があると思います
13:27
because this issue goes to the heart
なぜならこの問題は
ジョーだけでなく
13:29
not just of who Joe is,
私たちは誰なのかという
13:32
but who we are.
核心の問いに触れるからです
13:33
We need to change our view of Joe
ジョーのような人間は
全く矯正不可能だという
13:35
as someone wholly irredeemable,
私たちの考えを
変える必要があります
13:38
because if we see Joe as wholly irredeemable,
なぜなら彼を完全に
矯正不可能と見るなら
13:42
how is he going to see himself as any different?
彼はどうやって自分を
変えて行けるでしょう?
13:46
In another decade, Joe will be released
後10年でジョーは
ワームウッド・スクラブズから
13:50
from Wormwood Scrubs.
出所します
13:52
Will he be among the 70 percent of inmates
彼は再犯してしまう
70%の囚人の中に入り
13:54
who end up reoffending
彼は再犯してしまう
70%の囚人の中に入り
13:57
and returning to the prison system?
刑務所に戻るのでしょうか
13:59
Wouldn't it be better if, while serving his sentence,
それよりも
刑に服している間
14:02
Joe was able to train his amygdala,
ジョーが自分の扁桃体を
リバビリで訓練して
14:04
which would stimulate the growth of new brain cells
新たな脳細胞の成長と結びつきを
促進することで
14:06
and connections,
新たな脳細胞の成長と結びつきを
促進することで
14:08
so that he will be able to face the world
出所後 世間と向き合って行けるように
なることの方が
14:10
once he gets released?
よいのではないでしょうか?
14:12
Surely, that would be in the interest of all of us.
きっと それは私たちみんなにも
利益となるでしょう
14:14
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:21
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございました(拍手)
14:24
Translator:Reiko O Bovee
Reviewer:Wataru Narita

sponsored links

Daniel Reisel - Neuroscientist
Daniel Reisel searches for the psychological and physical roots of human morality.

Why you should listen

Daniel Reisel grew up in Norway but settled in the UK in 1995. He works as a hospital doctor and as a research fellow in epigenetics at University College London. He completed his PhD in Neuroscience in 2005, investigating how learning rewires the brain. Since then, his research has been concerned with the effect of life events on gene function. Daniel is currently training to become an accredited restorative justice facilitator with the UK Restorative Justice Council.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.