sponsored links
TED2014

Bran Ferren: To create for the ages, let's combine art and engineering

ブラン・フェレン: 芸術と技術を融合し、 時代を超えた創造を

March 18, 2014

ブラン・フェレンは9歳の時両親に連れられてローマのパンテオンを見に行きました。それが彼の全てを変えました。科学の手段と技術は、芸術・デザイン・美と組み合わされた時にもっと力強くなることを、その瞬間から理解し始めたのです。それ以来ローマ時代の傑作に匹敵する現代作品を探し求めています。講演最後の提案にご注目を。

Bran Ferren - Technology designer
Once known for entertaining millions by creating special effects for Hollywood, theme parks and Broadway, Applied Minds cofounder Bran Ferren now solves impossible tech challenges with previously unimaginable inventions. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
おはようございます
00:12
Good morning.
私が少年だった時
00:15
When I was a little boy,
人生を変える出来事が起こりました
00:16
I had an experience that changed my life,
その結果
私は今日ここにいるのです
00:20
and is in fact why I'm here today.
それは
00:22
That one moment
芸術 デザイン エンジニアリングに対する私の考え方に
00:24
profoundly affected how I think about
とても大きな影響を与えました
00:27
art, design and engineering.
私は幸せな環境で成長しました
00:30
As background, I was fortunate enough to grow up
愛情にあふれ 才能あるアーティストである家族と
00:33
in a family of loving and talented artists
世界で素晴らしい都市の一つで育ちました
00:36
in one of the world's great cities.
私の父、ジョン・フェレンは私が15才の時に亡くなりましたが
00:39
My dad, John Ferren, who died when I was 15,
情熱と職業の両方において芸術家でした
00:43
was an artist by both passion and profession,
母のレイもそうでした
00:46
as is my mom, Rae.
父はニューヨーク抽象表現派のひとりで
00:49
He was one of the New York School
父はニューヨーク抽象表現派のひとりで
00:50
abstract expressionists who,
同世代の画家たちとともに
00:52
together with his contemporaries,
アメリカンモダンアートを創りました
00:55
invented American modern art,
そしてアメリカの時代思潮を
00:58
and contributed to moving the American zeitgeist
20世紀モダニズムに向かわせるのに貢献しました
01:01
towards modernism in the 20th century.
驚くべきことだと思いませんか
01:05
Isn't it remarkable that, after thousands of years
何千年にわたる具象絵画時代と比べると
01:08
of people doing mostly representational art,
モダンアートの歴史は
01:12
that modern art, comparatively speaking,
たったの15分です
01:14
is about 15 minutes old,
そして今もなお拡張しています
01:16
yet now pervasive.
他の多くの重要なイノベーションと同様に
01:18
As with many other important innovations,
これらの革命的なアイディアは新技術ではなく
01:20
those radical ideas required no new technology,
新鮮なアイディアと実験への意欲
01:24
just fresh thinking and a willingness to experiment,
多方面からの批判や
01:27
plus resiliency in the face of near-universal criticism
拒絶に耐える力から生まれました
01:31
and rejection.
私の家では いたるところにアートがありました
01:32
In our home, art was everywhere.
それは私たち生命にとって不可欠な
01:35
It was like oxygen,
酸素のような存在でした
01:36
around us and necessary for life.
私が父の製作を見ているとき
01:39
As I watched him paint,
父は教えてくれました
01:41
Dad taught me that art
芸術とは装飾ではなく
01:44
was not about being decorative,
アイディアを伝えるための方法であると
01:46
but was a different way of communicating ideas,
それは知識と洞察を
01:49
and in fact one that could bridge the worlds
結び付けることができるかもしれないと
01:51
of knowledge and insight.
このような豊かな芸術的環境の中でなら
01:54
Given this rich artistic environment,
私が芸術の世界に入っていったと
01:56
you'd assume that I would have been compelled
思うでしょう
01:58
to go into the family business,
違いました
02:00
but no.
私は他の多くの子供たちが
02:02
I followed the path of most kids
生まれつきそうであるように
02:04
who are genetically programmed
両親を困らせました
02:05
to make their parents crazy.
私は芸術家になることに何の興味もありませんでした
02:08
I had no interest in becoming an artist,
ましてや画家になりたいとは
02:10
certainly not a painter.
私が大好きだったのはエレクトロニクスと機械
02:12
What I did love was electronics and machines --
それらを分解し 新しい物を作る
02:15
taking them apart, building new ones,
そして動かすことです
02:17
and making them work.
幸運なことに 家族にはエンジニアもいました
02:19
Fortunately, my family also had engineers in it,
そして両親とともに
02:23
and with my parents,
彼らは私の最初のロールモデルとなりました
02:24
these were my first role models.
彼らは共通して
02:26
What they all had in common
とても仕事熱心でした
02:28
was they worked very, very hard.
祖父は 板金の食器棚を製造する工場を
02:30
My grandpa owned and operated a sheet metal
ブルックリンで経営していました
02:33
kitchen cabinet factory in Brooklyn.
週末に 祖父と私はよく一緒に
コートランド通りにある
02:36
On weekends, we would go
together to Cortlandt Street,
ニューヨークシティーの電気街に行きました
02:39
which was New York City's radio row.
払い下げ品の電子機器が山積みでした
02:42
There we would explore massive piles
02:44
of surplus electronics,
ノーデン爆撃照準器のような宝物や
02:46
and for a few bucks bring home treasures
IBM最初の真空管式コンピュータの部品を
02:48
like Norden bombsights
02:49
and parts from the first IBM tube-based computers.
数ドルで買って帰りました
これらは私にとって価値があり魅力的でした
02:54
I found these objects both useful and fascinating.
エンジニアリングや
物がどう動くのかを学びました
02:57
I learned about engineering and how things worked,
学校ではなく
03:00
not at school
これらの とてつもなく複雑な機器を
03:01
but by taking apart and studying
分解して 調べることでです
03:03
these fabulously complex devices.
私はこれを毎日何時間もやりました
03:05
I did this for hours every day,
どうやら感電死は逃れました
03:08
apparently avoiding electrocution.
とても楽しい時でした
03:11
Life was good.
でも悲しい事に
03:13
However, every summer, sadly,
両親と私が 歴史 芸術
そしてデザインを経験するための
03:15
the machines got left behind
03:17
while my parents and I traveled overseas
海外旅行に行くため
毎年夏にこの機械たちは
家に置き去りにされました
03:19
to experience history, art and design.
ヨーロッパと中東の
03:23
We visited the great museums and historic buildings
素晴らしい美術館や歴史的建造物を訪れました
03:25
of both Europe and the Middle East,
でも 私の科学や技術に対する
03:27
but to encourage my growing interest
興味も満足させるため
03:29
in science and technology,
ロンドン科学博物館のような場所に
03:31
they would simply drop me off in places
連れて行き
03:34
like the London Science Museum,
そこで私は時間を忘れて
03:36
where I would wander endlessly for hours by myself
科学と技術の歴史を学びました
03:40
studying the history of science and technology.
私が9才のときに
03:44
Then, when I was about nine years old,
ローマに行きました
03:47
we went to Rome.
特に暑い夏の日でした
03:49
On one particularly hot summer day,
外見からは特に面白味のなさそうな
03:51
we visited a drum-shaped
building that from the outside
ドラム型の建造物を訪れました
03:54
was not particularly interesting.
父は それがパンテオンだと教えてくれました
03:56
My dad said it was called the Pantheon,
神々が集まる神殿だと
03:59
a temple for all of the gods.
外から見たところ特別ではありませんでした
04:01
It didn't look all that special from the outside,
しかし 中に入ってみると
04:03
as I said, but when we walked inside,
私は3つのことで
驚きに打たれました
04:06
I was immediately struck by three things:
1つめはひんやりとして気持ちよかったことです
04:09
First of all, it was pleasantly cool
外はあんなに暑かったのに
04:12
despite the oppressive heat outside.
そこはとても暗くて
04:14
It was very dark, the only source of light
屋根の大きな穴からだけ光が差していました
04:17
being an big open hole in the roof.
父は それは穴ではなく
04:20
Dad explained that this wasn't a big open hole,
"オキュラス(天窓)" だと教えてくれました
04:22
but it was called the oculus,
それは 天を仰ぐためのもの
04:24
an eye to the heavens.
その場所には何か特別なものがありました
04:26
And there was something about this place,
なぜだかわかりませんでしたが
ただそう感じました
04:28
I didn't know why, that just felt special.
建物の中心に歩いて行き
04:31
As we walked to the center of the room,
オキュラスから天を仰ぎました
04:33
I looked up at the heavens through the oculus.
神と人の間の拘束されない姿を
04:36
This was the first church that I'd been to
見せてくれた
04:38
that provided an unrestricted view
初めての教会でした
04:41
between God and man.
ふと 雨が降ったときはどうするのかと思いました
04:44
But I wondered, what about when it rained?
父は これをオキュラスと言ったけれど
04:47
Dad may have called this an oculus,
実際には屋根に開いた大きな穴です
04:49
but it was, in fact, a big hole in the roof.
私は石の床が削られて
04:52
I looked down and saw floor drains
排水溝になっているのを見つけました
04:54
had been cut into the stone floor.
私は中の暗さに慣れて
04:56
As I became more accustomed to the dark,
床の細かい部分や
04:59
I was able to make out details of the floor
周囲の壁も見えるようになりました
05:01
and the surrounding walls.
特別なことではなく
ローマのいたるところにある
05:03
No big deal here, just the same statuary stuff
彫像がここにも見られました
05:06
that we'd seen all over Rome.
アッピア街道の
05:07
In fact, it looked like the Appian Way
大理石売りが現れて
05:09
marble salesman showed up
ハドリアヌスにカタログを見せる
05:11
with his sample book, showed it to Hadrian,
ハドリアヌスは「全部買うよ」と言っているようでした
05:14
and Hadrian said, "We'll take all of it."
(笑)
05:16
(Laughter)
その天井は素晴らしかった
05:18
But the ceiling was amazing.
バックミンスター・フラーの
ジオデシック・ドームのようでした
05:21
It looked like a Buckminster Fuller geodesic dome.
私はそれを以前見たことがあります
05:24
I'd seen these before,
05:25
and Bucky was friends with my dad.
バッキーは私の父の友人なのです
それは現代的で 高度な技術を使い 印象的な
05:28
It was modern, high-tech, impressive,
巨大で 直径も
05:31
a huge 142-foot clear span
高さも同じ42メートルです
05:34
which, not coincidentally, was exactly its height.
私はこの場所が大好きになりました
05:37
I loved this place.
私が今まで見た何よりも美しいものでした
05:38
It was really beautiful and unlike
anything I'd ever seen before,
父に 「いつできたの?」と聞くと
05:42
so I asked my dad, "When was this built?"
「2000年くらい前だ」と答えました
05:45
He said, "About 2,000 years ago."
私は 「いや 屋根のことだよ」と言いました
05:48
And I said, "No, I mean, the roof."
本来の屋根は
05:51
You see, I assumed that this was a modern roof
過去の戦争で壊され
05:53
that had been put on because the original
作り替えられた近代の屋根に見えたのです
05:55
was destroyed in some long-past war.
父は 「これが元からの屋根だよ」と言いました
05:58
He said, "It's the original roof."
その瞬間 私の人生が変わりました
06:02
That moment changed my life,
そして私はそれを昨日のことのように思い出せます
06:04
and I can remember it as if it were yesterday.
2000年前の人たちはこんなに賢かったのだと
06:07
For the first time, I realized people were smart
初めて思いました(笑)
06:09
2,000 years ago. (Laughter)
それまでそんなことが頭をよぎったことはありませんでした
06:12
This had never crossed my mind.
私にとって数年前に訪れた
06:14
I mean, to me, the pyramids at Giza,
ギザのピラミッドは
06:18
we visited those the year before,
たしかに印象的で 素晴らしいデザインですが
06:19
and sure they're impressive, nice enough design,
無制限の予算と
06:22
but look, give me an unlimited budget,
2万から4万の労働者
そして10年から20年くらいをかけて
06:25
20,000 to 40,000 laborers, and about 10 to 20 years
採石し 国を横切って運べば
06:29
to cut and drag stone blocks
across the countryside,
私にもピラミッドが作れます
06:32
and I'll build you pyramids too.
しかしどんな筋力を使っても
06:35
But no amount of brute force
パンテオンのドームを作ることはできません
06:38
gets you the dome of the Pantheon,
2000年前でも 今日でも同じです
06:41
not 2,000 years ago, nor today.
ついでながら
それはこれまでに作られた
06:44
And incidentally, it is still the largest
最大の補強なしのコンクリートのドームでもあります
06:47
unreinforced concrete dome that's ever been built.
パンテオンが作られたことは
奇跡のようです
06:51
To build the Pantheon took some miracles.
奇跡であるということの意味は
06:54
By miracles, I mean things that are
技術的にぎりぎりの可能性で
06:56
technically barely possible,
非常にリスクが高く
06:59
very high-risk, and might not be
現在でも実現不可能かもしれないということです
07:02
actually accomplishable at this moment in time,
皆さんにはできないと思います
07:04
certainly not by you.
例えばここにもパンテオンの奇跡があります
07:09
For example, here are some
of the Pantheon's miracles.
構造的に可能にするため
07:12
To make it even structurally possible,
非常に強靭なコンクリートを発明することが必要でした
07:14
they had to invent super-strong concrete,
重さを制御するために
07:17
and to control weight,
ドームの上部になるにしたがって
07:19
varied the density of the aggregate
骨材の密度を変化させ
07:21
as they worked their way up the dome.
ドームの構造を強く 軽くするために
07:24
For strength and lightness, the dome structure
格間の5つの輪が使われ
07:26
used five rings of coffers,
次第にサイズを小さくし
07:28
each of diminishing size,
それはデザインに
07:30
which imparts a dramatic forced perspective
劇的で強調された遠近感を与えました
07:32
to the design.
中が とても涼しかったのは
07:34
It was wonderfully cool inside
巨大な熱質量と
07:36
because of its huge thermal mass,
オキュラスへと抜ける
07:38
natural convection of air rising up
自然な上昇気流と
07:41
through the oculus,
建物の上部を吹く風による
07:42
and a Venturi effect when wind blows across
ベンチュリー効果のおかげです
07:44
the top of the building.
私はその時初めて 光そのものが
07:47
I discovered for the first time that light itself
物質であることを発見しました
07:51
has substance.
オキュラスからさす一筋の光は
07:53
The shaft of light beaming through the oculus
美しく 手に取れるようでした
07:55
was both beautiful and palpable,
そして私は初めて知ったのです
07:58
and I realized for the first time
光がデザインできるものだと
08:00
that light could be designed.
さらにデザインのすべての形
08:02
Further, that of all of the forms of design,
視覚的デザインは
08:07
visual design,
光なしには何も意味をなしません
08:08
they were all kind of irrelevant without it,
光なしには何も見えないからです
08:10
because without light, you can't see any of them.
ここがとても特別な場所だと
08:14
I also realized that I wasn't the first person
思ったのは
私が初めてではありません
08:16
to think that this place was really special.
重力 蛮族 略奪者 都市開発
08:20
It survived gravity, barbarians, looters, developers
そして長い年月による荒廃に耐えた
08:24
and the ravages of time to become
歴史において最も長い間
08:26
what I believe is the longest
使用された建物です
08:27
continuously occupied building in history.
ここに来たことで
08:30
Largely because of that visit,
私が学校で習ったこととは違って
08:32
I came to understand that,
アートとデザインの世界は
08:34
contrary to what I was being told in school,
科学や技術と
08:37
the worlds of art and design
相いれないものではないということを
08:39
were not, in fact, incompatible
理解することができました
08:41
with science and engineering.
そして さらにそれらを融合することで
08:42
I realized, when combined,
すばらしい物を創り出すことができるということを
08:44
you could create things that were amazing
それぞれの分野単独では実現できないことです
08:47
that couldn't be done in either domain alone.
しかし学校では 例外無しに
08:50
But in school, with few exceptions,
それらは異なる世界であると教えられてきました
08:53
they were treated as separate worlds,
今もそうです
08:54
and they still are.
先生は 1つのことだけに集中し
真面目に取り組まなければらならないと
08:57
My teachers told me that I had to get serious
08:59
and focus on one or the other.
私に教えました
しかし 専門化を促されることで
09:01
However, urging me to specialize
私はますます多才 博識家の価値を感じました
09:05
only caused me to really
appreciate those polymaths
ミケランジェロやレオナルド・ダ・ヴィンチ
09:08
like Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci,
ベンジャミン・フランクリンなど
09:12
Benjamin Franklin,
まさに反対のことをした人たちです
09:13
people who did exactly the opposite.
そして私は彼らを信奉し
09:16
And this led me to embrace
両方の世界にいたいと思いました
09:18
and want to be in both worlds.
パンテオンのように
かつてない創造的な構想と技術的に複雑な
09:21
So then how do these projects of unprecedented creative vision and technical complexity
これらのプロジェクトを
どのように実現すればいいのか
09:27
like the Pantheon actually happen?
ハドリアヌスのように
09:30
Someone themselves, perhaps Hadrian,
素晴らしく創造的な構想が必要です
09:34
needed a brilliant creative vision.
そしてさらに 伝える力と
資金を獲得し 実行するための
09:37
They also needed the storytelling
and leadership skills
リーダーシップも必要です
09:40
necessary to fund and execute it,
そしてイノベーションをさらに発展させるために
09:42
and a mastery of science and technology
能力と実践的手法において
09:45
with the ability and knowhow
科学技術に精通していなければなりません
09:47
to push existing innovations even farther.
このような大変革をもたらすためには
09:51
It is my belief that to create
these rare game changers
5つの奇跡を実現しなければなりません
09:55
requires you to pull off at least five miracles.
問題は いかに才能にあふれ
09:59
The problem is, no matter how talented,
裕福で 賢明でも
10:02
rich or smart you are,
人は1つか1つ半の
奇跡しか起こせないことです
10:04
you only get one to one and a half miracles.
それきりです それが分け前なのです
10:07
That's it. That's the quota.
時間か資金か情熱か
10:09
Then you run out of time, money, enthusiasm,
何かがなくなります
10:11
whatever.
ほとんどの人はこれらの奇跡のひとつも
10:13
Remember, most people can't even imagine
想像すらできません
10:15
one of these technical miracles,
パンテオンを作るためには5つ必要です
10:17
and you need at least five to make a Pantheon.
私の経験では
10:20
In my experience, these rare visionaries
芸術 デザイン エンジニアリングの世界を越えて
考えることのできる人は
10:22
who can think across the worlds of art,
10:24
design and engineering
他人が奇跡を提供してくれた時
それに気付き
10:26
have the ability to notice
目的を実現可能にする
10:28
when others have provided enough of the miracles
能力を持っています
10:31
to bring the goal within reach.
彼らはビジョンが明確なので
10:34
Driven by the clarity of their vision,
勇気と決断を奮い起こし
10:36
they summon the courage and determination
さらなる奇跡を起こし
10:38
to deliver the remaining miracles
克服不可能と思われる障害を
10:41
and they often take what other people think to be
特徴あるものへと
10:44
insurmountable obstacles
変換します
10:46
and turn them into features.
パンテオンのオキュラスについて考えてみましょう
10:48
Take the oculus of the Pantheon.
デザインが主体であると主張すると
10:51
By insisting that it be in the design,
ローマ建築のアーチ用に開発された
構造的な技術は
10:53
it meant you couldn't use much
of the structural technology
ほとんど使えないことになります
10:56
that had been developed for Roman arches.
しかし 技術を取り入れることにし
10:59
However, by instead embracing it
重量と応力分布について考え直すと
11:02
and rethinking weight and stress distribution,
屋根にある大きな穴があって初めて
11:04
they came up with a design that only works
機能するデザインだとわかります
11:07
if there's a big hole in the roof.
それがなされると
11:08
That done, you now get the aesthetic
光と 涼しさと
そして重要な天への直接のつながりという
11:11
and design benefits of light, cooling
審美的 デザインの有用さが得られます
11:16
and that critical direct connection with the heavens.
うまくできていますね
11:19
Not bad.
これらの人々は不可能を可能にすることができるという
11:21
These people not only believed
信念を持っていただけではなく
11:23
that the impossible can be done,
そうすることが使命であると考えていました
11:25
but that it must be done.
古代史はこれで十分でしょう
11:28
Enough ancient history.
これから1,000年以上
11:30
What are some recent examples of innovations
人々の記憶に残り続ける
11:33
that combine creative design
現代における 創造的なデザインと技術の進歩を
11:35
and technological advances in a way so profound
結びつけるイノベーションには
11:39
that they will be remembered
どのようなものがあるでしょうか
11:40
a thousand years from now?
人類の月面着陸はよい一例ですね
11:42
Well, putting a man on the moon was a good one,
そして無事地球に帰還させたことも
11:45
and returning him safely to Earth wasn't bad either.
大きな飛躍について話をしましょう
11:48
Talk about one giant leap:
今いる世界から離れて
他の世界に足を踏み入れるよりも
11:50
It's hard to imagine a more profound moment
人類の歴史における
11:53
in human history
より大きな変革の瞬間を
11:54
than when we first left our world
想像するのは難しいことです
11:56
to set foot on another.
月面着陸の次には何がくるでしょうか
11:58
So what came after the moon?
今日のパンテオンはインターネットであるー
12:00
One is tempted to say that today's pantheon
と言いたい誘惑にかられますね
12:03
is the Internet,
しかし私はそれは間違いだと思います
12:05
but I actually think that's quite wrong,
もしくは 話の一部でしかありません
12:07
or at least it's only part of the story.
インターネットはパンテオンではありません
12:10
The Internet isn't a Pantheon.
それはコンクリートの発明のようなものです
12:13
It's more like the invention of concrete:
パンテオンを作り
12:15
important, absolutely necessary
維持するために
12:18
to build the Pantheon,
重要 かつ絶対必要なものです
12:19
and enduring,
しかし それ自身では不十分です
12:21
but entirely insufficient by itself.
コンクリート技術がパンテオンの実現に
12:24
However, just as the technology of concrete
不可欠であったのと同じように
12:27
was critical in realization of the Pantheon,
新進ディザイナー達はインターネット技術を使うでしょう
12:30
new designers will use the
technologies of the Internet
時代に耐える新しい概念を創り出すために
12:34
to create novel concepts that will endure.
スマートフォンは完璧な例です
12:37
The smartphone is a perfect example.
まもなく地球上の大多数の人が
12:39
Soon the majority of people on the planet
所有するでしょう
12:41
will have one,
そして 知識と人間関係の両面において
12:42
and the idea of connecting everyone
人々をつなぐというアイディアは
持続するでしょう
12:44
to both knowledge and each other will endure.
では 次には何が起こるでしょう
12:48
So what's next?
12:49
What imminent advance will be
the equivalent of the Pantheon?
パンテオンと同等の
今にも起こりそうな進歩について考えましょう
12:52
Thinking about this,
私はガン治療のように
12:54
I rejected many very plausible
多くの起こりそうで ドラマティックな
12:56
and dramatic breakthroughs to come,
ブレークスルーを否定します
12:58
such as curing cancer.
何故かというと パンテオンは
13:00
Why? Because Pantheons are anchored
見て 経験することだけで
13:03
in designed physical objects,
刺激を受けることができる
13:06
ones that inspire by simply seeing
デザインされた物理的な物体であり
13:09
and experiencing them,
また永遠に
そのような性質のものであるからです
13:10
and will continue to do so indefinitely.
それは 芸術のように 異なる種類の言葉です
13:13
It is a different kind of language, like art.
寿命を延ばし 苦しみから解き放つような
13:18
These other vital contributions that extend life
かけがえのない貢献は
13:20
and relieve suffering are, of course, critical,
重要で すばらしいものですが
13:23
and fantastic,
それらはインターネットのように
13:25
but they're part of the continuum of
私たちの知識や技術全体の
13:27
our overall knowledge and technology,
連続の一部分です
13:29
like the Internet.
さあ 次に来るのは何でしょうか
13:32
So what is next?
おそらく 直感に反して
13:34
Perhaps counterintuitively,
それは 1930年代後期に生まれた
13:36
I'm guessing it's a visionary idea
先見性のあるアイディアだと思います
13:38
from the late 1930s
それは 10年に一度リバイバルが訪れてきたもので
13:40
that's been revived every decade since:
自動運転車です
13:43
autonomous vehicles.
冗談はやめてくれと皆さんは言うかもしれません
13:45
Now you're thinking, give me a break.
自動速度制御装置の高級版が
13:47
How can a fancy version of cruise control
重要であるわけがない
13:50
be profound?
考えてみてください 私たちの世界は
13:52
Look, much of our world
道路と輸送手段を中心にデザインされています
13:54
has been designed around
roads and transportation.
アメリカにおいて繁栄と発展をとげた
13:58
These were as essential to the success
高速道路網は
13:59
of the Roman Empire
ローマ帝国の成功に果たした
14:01
as the interstate highway system
道路や輸送と
14:03
to the prosperity and development
同等のものです
14:05
of the United States.
今日私たちの世界を結びつけているこれらの道路は
14:07
Today, these roads that interconnect our world
乗用車とトラックで溢れています
14:10
are dominated by cars and trucks
100年の間 ここに
14:12
that have remained largely unchanged
大きな変化はありませんでした
14:14
for 100 years.
今日において明白でなくても
14:16
Although perhaps not obvious today,
自動運転はキーテクノロジーとなるでしょう
14:20
autonomous vehicles will be the key technology
それは都市をデザインし直し
14:24
that enables us to redesign our cities
ひいては 文明のデザインし直しとなるでしょう
14:27
and, by extension, civilization.
なぜなら
14:30
Here's why:
一度自動運転が普及すれば
14:31
Once they become ubiquitous,
毎年 アメリカだけでも
14:33
each year, these vehicles will save
何万人もの命を救うことができます
14:36
tens of thousands of lives in the United States alone
世界的にみれば百万人です
14:39
and a million globally.
自動車のエネルギー消費と大気汚染を
14:42
Automotive energy consumption and air pollution
劇的に削減することができます
14:45
will be cut dramatically.
渋滞のほとんどを
14:47
Much of the road congestion
解消することができます
14:48
in and out of our cities will disappear.
それは いかに私たちが都市をデザインし
14:52
They will enable compelling new concepts
働き 生きるべきかについての
14:55
in how we design cities, work,
新しいコンセプトを示します
14:57
and the way we live.
私たちはより早く移動できるようになるでしょう
14:59
We will get where we're going faster
そして社会は 交通渋滞により失われた
15:02
and society will recapture vast amounts
膨大な生産性を
15:05
of lost productivity
取り戻すでしょう
15:06
now spent sitting in traffic basically polluting.
でもなぜ今なのでしょう
なぜこの事を考えるのでしょうか
15:10
But why now? Why do we think this is ready?
それは30年以上にわたり
15:13
Because over the last 30 years,
自動車業界以外の人々が
15:15
people from outside the automotive industry
数えきれないほどのお金を費やして
15:17
have spent countless billions
必要となる奇跡を作っていたのです
15:19
creating the needed miracles,
しかしそれは全くもって違った目的のためでした
15:21
but for entirely different purposes.
米国防総省DARPAや大学や
15:24
It took folks like DARPA, universities,
まったく自動車産業ではない企業は
15:27
and companies completely
outside of the automotive industry
現在でも 賢いやり方をすれば
15:30
to notice that if you were clever about it,
自動運転は可能だと気付いたのです
15:32
autonomy could be done now.
自動車の自立運転に必要となる
5つの奇跡とは何でしょう?
15:35
So what are the five miracles
needed for autonomous vehicles?
1つ目はあなたが今いる場所と
15:38
One, you need to know
正確な現在時刻を知る必要があること
15:40
where you are and exactly what time it is.
これはGPSシステムが解決しました
15:42
This was solved neatly by the GPS system,
アメリカ政府が実現した―
15:45
Global Positioning System,
グローバル・ポジショニング・システムです
15:46
that the U.S. Government put in place.
地図情報と交通規則
15:49
You need to know where all the roads are,
そしてあなたが向かっている場所を知る必要があります
15:51
what the rules are, and where you're going.
個人向けや
車内でのナビシステムに必要な
15:54
The various needs of personal navigation systems,
さまざまな要求は
15:57
in-car navigation systems,
ウェブベースの地図が解決します
15:59
and web-based maps address this.
近距離連続通信によって
16:02
You must have near-continuous communication
高性能コンピュータネットワークと繋がり
16:04
with high-performance computing networks
また 近くの他の自動車との
16:06
and with others nearby
意思疎通が必要です
16:08
to understand their intent.
無線技術はモバイル機器のために開発されました
16:11
The wireless technologies
developed for mobile devices,
多少の改良は必要でしたが
16:14
with some minor modifications,
この問題を解決するにはもってこいでした
16:16
are completely suitable to solve this.
実用化するためには おそらく
16:19
You'll probably want some restricted roadways
専用レーンから開始し
16:21
to get started
社会と法律家が安全性に
16:23
that both society and its lawyers
同意するのがよいでしょう
16:25
agree are safe to use for this.
これは相乗り車専用車線から始めて
16:27
This will start with the HOV lanes
そこからの展開でしょう
16:29
and move from there.
しかし最終的には
16:31
But finally, you need to recognize
歩行者や標識、物体の認識も必要になり
16:34
people, signs and objects.
機械視覚、専用センサー
高性能コンピューティングが
16:36
Machine vision, special sensors,
and high-performance computing
大いに役立つでしょう
16:39
can do a lot of this,
しかしそれでもまだ 家庭用には
16:40
but it turns out a lot is not good enough
不十分でしょう
16:43
when your family is on board.
ときには人間が判断する必要があるでしょう
16:45
Occasionally, humans will
need to do sense-making.
このために 同乗者を起こして
16:48
For this, you might actually have to wake up
道の真ん中にある大きな障害物が一体何かを
16:52
your passenger and ask them what the hell
聞かなければならないかもしれません
16:54
that big lump is in the middle of the road.
自動運転の世界でも
役割が残っているのは
16:57
Not so bad, and it will give us a sense of purpose
悪いことではありません
16:59
in this new world.
ちなみに 最初の運転手が
17:01
Besides, once the first drivers explain
まごついている後続の運転手に
17:04
to their confused car
分岐点にいる巨大な鶏は
17:05
that the giant chicken at the fork in the road
実はレストランだから
17:08
is actually a restaurant,
そのまま進んで問題ないと教えれば
17:09
and it's okay to keep driving,
その後 すべての後続車は
17:12
every other car on the surface of the Earth
それを教わることができます
17:15
will know that from that point on.
5つの奇跡の ほとんどが実現したら
17:18
Five miracles, mostly delivered,
あとは誘惑するように美しく
新しく機能的なデザインの
17:20
and now you just need a clear vision
17:22
of a better world filled with autonomous vehicles
自動化された乗り物でいっぱいの
そして それを買って帰るために必要な
多くのお金とハードワークの
17:25
with seductively beautiful
and new functional designs
より良い世界を
17:29
plus a lot of money and hard work
はっきりと想像すればよいのです
17:31
to bring it home.
最初に実現し始めるのは数年以内でしょう
17:33
The beginning is now only a handful of years away,
自動化された乗り物は
17:36
and I predict that autonomous vehicles
数十年の間にこの世界を永久に変えると
17:37
will permanently change our world
私は予想します
17:40
over the next several decades.
結論として
次に生まれるパンテオンの要素が
17:44
In conclusion, I've come to believe
私たちの周りにあることを
17:46
that the ingredients for the next Pantheons
信じられるようになってきたのです
17:49
are all around us,
ただ先見の明を持つ人を待っているのです
17:50
just waiting for visionary people
広い知識を持ち
17:52
with the broad knowledge,
多くの専門分野にまたがるスキルを持ち
17:54
multidisciplinary skills,
強烈な情熱を持つ人が
17:56
and intense passion
夢を実現するためにそれらを利用するのです
17:57
to harness them to make their dreams a reality.
しかしこのような人々が
18:02
But these people don't spontaneously
自然に出てくることはありません
18:05
pop into existence.
そのような人は小さいころから
18:06
They need to be nurtured and encouraged
育まれ 勇気づけられる必要があります
18:08
from when they're little kids.
そのような人を愛し
18:10
We need to love them and help them
彼らが情熱を見つけるのを
助けなければなりません
18:12
discover their passions.
18:14
We need to encourage them to work hard
彼らが熱心に働くのを応援し
失敗は成功のもとであることを
18:16
and help them understand that failure
理解させなければなりません
18:18
is a necessary ingredient for success,
忍耐力も同様です
18:21
as is perseverance.
彼らが模範となる人を見つけるのを助け
18:23
We need to help them to find their own role models,
自身を信頼できるように
18:26
and give them the confidence
to believe in themselves
そして何でも実現可能だと信じられるよう
18:29
and to believe that anything is possible,
私の祖父が払い下げ品の買出しに
私を連れ出したように
18:32
and just as my grandpa did when
he took me shopping for surplus,
私の両親が
18:35
and just as my parents did
私を科学博物館に連れて行ったように
18:37
when they took me to science museums,
彼ら自身の道筋を見つけるのを
手助けする必要があります
18:39
we need to encourage them to find their own path,
たとえそれが私たちのものと
大きく異なっていても
18:42
even if it's very different from our own.
しかし注意すべきことがあります
18:45
But a cautionary note:
私たちは定期的に彼らを
18:46
We also need to periodically pry them away
コンピュータ 電話 タブレット ゲーム TVといった
18:49
from their modern miracles,
18:50
the computers, phones, tablets,
現代の奇跡から
引き離さなければなりません
18:52
game machines and TVs,
彼らを日光の下に引き出すことで
18:54
take them out into the sunlight
彼らに自然とデザインの両方が
18:56
so they can experience both the natural
この世界 この惑星 この文明の中で
18:58
and design wonders of our world,
素晴らしいものだと経験させなければなりません
19:01
our planet and our civilization.
そうしなければ 彼らは
19:03
If we don't, they won't understand
それらがどんなに貴重なものかを理解しないでしょう
19:06
what these precious things are
いつか彼らが
19:08
that someday they will be resopnsible
守り 向上させていくことに責任をもつのですから
19:11
for protecting and improving.
また 彼らに ますます技術に依存した世界で
19:13
We also need them to understand
高く評価されないように思われがちな
19:15
something that doesn't seem adequately appreciated
ポイントを理解させる必要があります
19:18
in our increasingly tech-dependent world,
すなわち 芸術とデザインは
19:20
that art and design
贅沢品ではなく
19:22
are not luxuries,
また科学や工学と
19:24
nor somehow incompatible
両立しない訳はないのです
19:26
with science and engineering.
それらは実際
我々が特別な存在であることに不可欠なのです
19:28
They are in fact essential to what makes us special.
いつかチャンスがあれば
19:33
Someday, if you get the chance,
子供を本物のパンテオンに
連れていくと良いでしょう
19:36
perhaps you can take your kids
19:37
to the actual Pantheon,
我々も 娘のキラに
19:39
as we will our daughter Kira,
驚くべきデザインの力を
19:42
to experience firsthand
直接に経験させようと思っています
19:44
the power of that astonishing design,
特別でないローマでのある一日に
19:48
which on one otherwise unremarkable day in Rome,
2000年の時を経て
19:52
reached 2,000 years into the future
私の人生のコースを変えたように
19:55
to set the course for my life.
ありがとうございました
19:57
Thank you.
19:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
Translator:Yoji Onishi
Reviewer:Masaki Yanagishita

sponsored links

Bran Ferren - Technology designer
Once known for entertaining millions by creating special effects for Hollywood, theme parks and Broadway, Applied Minds cofounder Bran Ferren now solves impossible tech challenges with previously unimaginable inventions.

Why you should listen

After dropping out of MIT in 1970, Bran Ferren became a designer and engineer for theater, touring rock bands, and dozens of movies, including Altered States and Little Shop of Horrors, before joining Disney as a lead Imagineer, then becoming president of R&D for the Walt Disney Company.

In 2000, Ferren and partner Danny Hillis left Disney to found Applied Minds, a playful design and invention firm dedicated to distilling game-changing inventions from an eclectic stew of the brightest creative minds culled from every imaginable discipline.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.