20:28
TED2014

Andrew Solomon: How the worst moments in our lives make us who we are

アンドリュー・ソロモン: 人生で最も苦しい経験から、自分らしくなる

Filmed:

アンドリュー・ソロモンは、その作家人生を通じて、苦難を抱える人たちの生き様を語ってきました。ここで彼は、その内面に向き合い、子供時代の葛藤を語り、これまでに会った勇気ある人たちの話を紹介します。この感動的で時に底抜けに明るいトークで、ソロモンは最も苦しいときこそ、そこから意味を創り出すべきだと強く呼びかけます。

- Writer
Andrew Solomon writes about politics, culture and psychology. Full bio

As a student of adversity,
逆境ばかりの人生を送ってきた私は
00:12
I've been struck over the years
ここ何年もの間
00:16
by how some people
苦境に立たされた人たちが
00:17
with major challenges
そこから 力を得て
00:19
seem to draw strength from them,
立ち上がる姿に
感銘を受けてきました
00:21
and I've heard the popular wisdom
苦境にあるときには
00:24
that that has to do with finding meaning.
そこに意味を見出すことだ
とよく耳にしました
00:26
And for a long time,
長い間
00:28
I thought the meaning was out there,
「意味」というものは
そこにあって
00:30
some great truth waiting to be found.
大いなる真理は発見される時を
待っているのだと思っていました
00:32
But over time, I've come to feel
でも 次第に私は
00:35
that the truth is irrelevant.
真理は重要では無いと感じるようになりました
00:38
We call it finding meaning,
「意味を見出す」と言いますが
00:40
but we might better call it forging meaning.
意味を与え 「創り出す」と言うべきでしょう
00:42
My last book was about how families
最近の著書で 私は
00:47
manage to deal with various kinds of challenging
さまざまな障害を抱えたり
普通とは違う子どもを
00:49
or unusual offspring,
家族がどう受け止めるかについて
書きました
00:52
and one of the mothers I interviewed,
取材した母親の一人は
00:54
who had two children with
multiple severe disabilities,
複数の重度障害を抱える
お子さんを二人お持ちでしたが
00:56
said to me, "People always give us
こう仰っていました
00:59
these little sayings like,
「皆さんから いつも
01:02
'God doesn't give you any
more than you can handle,'
『神は乗り越えられない試練は与えない』
といった言葉をもらいます
01:03
but children like ours
でも こうした子どもたちは
01:07
are not preordained as a gift.
最初から『神からの贈り物』
だったわけではありません
01:09
They're a gift because that's what we have chosen."
私たちが 『贈り物』だと
考えることを選んだのです」
01:13
We make those choices all our lives.
私たちは人生で
このような選択を繰り返しています
01:18
When I was in second grade,
私が小学校2年のとき
01:22
Bobby Finkel had a birthday party
ボビー・フィンケルの
誕生日パーティーがあり
01:25
and invited everyone in our class but me.
私を除いたクラス全員が
招待されていました
01:27
My mother assumed there
had been some sort of error,
母は 何か手違いがあったのだと思い
01:32
and she called Mrs. Finkel,
ボビーのお母さんに電話しました
01:34
who said that Bobby didn't like me
すると こう言われたのです
01:36
and didn't want me at his party.
ボビーは私が嫌いだから
招待しなかったのだと
01:38
And that day, my mom took me to the zoo
その日 母は私を動物園に連れて行き
01:42
and out for a hot fudge sundae.
温かいチョコのかかったパフェも
食べさせてくれました
01:45
When I was in seventh grade,
中学1年のとき
01:48
one of the kids on my school bus
スクールバスで一緒だった子に
01:49
nicknamed me "Percy"
「(ゲイの)パーシー」と
あだ名を付けられました
01:52
as a shorthand for my demeanor,
私の立ち居振る舞いが
ゲイっぽかったからで
01:54
and sometimes, he and his cohort
時折 彼は仲間と一緒になって
そのあだ名を
01:56
would chant that provocation
大合唱して
からかうようになりました
01:59
the entire school bus ride,
それも スクールバスに乗っている間中で
02:02
45 minutes up, 45 minutes back,
行きに45分 帰りに45分です
02:03
"Percy! Percy! Percy! Percy!"
「パーシー!パーシー!パーシー!パーシー!」
02:07
When I was in eighth grade,
中学2年のときには
02:12
our science teacher told us
科学の先生がこんなことを言いました
02:14
that all male homosexuals
「同性愛の男性は
02:16
develop fecal incontinence
便失禁になるんだ
02:18
because of the trauma to their anal sphincter.
肛門括約筋が傷つくから」
02:20
And I graduated high school
高校を卒業するまで
02:25
without ever going to the cafeteria,
一度も学食に行くことは
ありませんでした
02:26
where I would have sat with the girls
女の子たちと座っていれば
02:29
and been laughed at for doing so,
それだけで からかわれ
02:31
or sat with the boys
男の子といれば
02:33
and been laughed at for being a boy
女の子と一緒にいるべきだと
02:35
who should be sitting with the girls.
からかわれるからです
02:37
I survived that childhood through a mix
私は子ども時代を
02:39
of avoidance and endurance.
問題から逃げ 耐え忍ぶことで
やり過ごしました
02:42
What I didn't know then,
当時 私が知らず
02:45
and do know now,
今になって わかったのですが
02:47
is that avoidance and endurance
あの逃げ 耐え忍んだ経験は
02:49
can be the entryway to forging meaning.
そこから意味を 創り出す第一歩となりえます
02:51
After you've forged meaning,
意味を創り出したあとは
02:56
you need to incorporate that meaning
その意味を取り入れ
02:58
into a new identity.
新しいアイデンティティにします
03:00
You need to take the traumas and make them part
トラウマを受け入れ
03:02
of who you've come to be,
新たな自分の一部にするのです
03:06
and you need to fold the worst events of your life
そして 人生で起こった最悪の出来事を
03:08
into a narrative of triumph,
勝利の物語に織り込み
03:11
evincing a better self
傷ついた出来事への応えとしての
03:13
in response to things that hurt.
より良い自分の姿を
描き出すのです
03:15
One of the other mothers I interviewed
本の執筆にあたって
03:18
when I was working on my book
取材をした母親の中に
03:20
had been raped as an adolescent,
思春期にレイプされ
03:22
and had a child following that rape,
そのときに子どもを宿したことで
03:25
which had thrown away her career plans
人生設計も台無しにされ
03:28
and damaged all of her emotional relationships.
人との感情的な繋がりが
すべて損なわれた方がいました
03:31
But when I met her, she was 50,
お会いしたとき
50歳になっていた彼女に
03:35
and I said to her,
私はこう聞きました
03:38
"Do you often think about the man who raped you?"
「レイプをした男性について
よく考えますか?」
03:39
And she said, "I used to think about him with anger,
「以前は彼について抱くのは
怒りでしたが
03:42
but now only with pity."
今はただ同情しています」
と答えました
03:46
And I thought she meant pity because he was
その男性はこんな酷いことをするほど
03:48
so unevolved as to have done this terrible thing.
未成熟だから 同情しているのだろうと思い
03:51
And I said, "Pity?"
「同情ですか?」と言うと
03:54
And she said, "Yes,
彼女はこう言ったのです
03:56
because he has a beautiful daughter
「そうです 彼には
こんなに美しい娘と
03:57
and two beautiful grandchildren
素晴らしい孫が二人もいるのに
04:00
and he doesn't know that, and I do.
彼は知らず 私だけが知っています
04:02
So as it turns out, I'm the lucky one."
ですから 私はラッキーなんです」
04:06
Some of our struggles are things we're born to:
私たちの抱える困難には
生まれながらの―
04:12
our gender, our sexuality, our race, our disability.
ジェンダー、性別、人種、障害のほか
04:15
And some are things that happen to us:
途中で身にふりかかってくる
ものもあります
04:21
being a political prisoner, being a rape victim,
政治犯やレイプ被害者になったり
04:23
being a Katrina survivor.
ハリケーン・カトリーナに被災したりです
04:27
Identity involves entering a community
アイデンティティは
コミュニティの中に入り
04:29
to draw strength from that community,
そのコミュニティから 力を引き出したり
04:32
and to give strength there too.
そこに力を与えたりすることにも
関わります
04:35
It involves substituting "and" for "but" --
アイデンティティは
「でも」を「だから」に変えることです
04:37
not "I am here but I have cancer,"
例えば「私はここにいる
でも ガンを患っている」を
04:42
but rather, "I have cancer and I am here."
「私はガンを患っている
だから ここにいる」という具合にです
04:46
When we're ashamed,
恥じ入っている時には
04:51
we can't tell our stories,
自らを語ることができませんが
04:53
and stories are the foundation of identity.
そうした物語こそ
アイデンティティの基礎となるものです
04:55
Forge meaning, build identity,
意味を創り出し
アイデンティティを築く
05:00
forge meaning and build identity.
意味を創り出し
アイデンティティを築く
05:04
That became my mantra.
これが私の信念になりました
05:07
Forging meaning is about changing yourself.
意味を創り出すことは
自らを変えることでもあります
05:10
Building identity is about changing the world.
アイデンティティを形づくることは
世界を変えることでもあります
05:13
All of us with stigmatized identities
私たちは皆
不名誉なアイデンティティを抱えており
05:17
face this question daily:
日々 この問いに直面しています
05:19
how much to accommodate society
社会に順応するために
05:21
by constraining ourselves,
どこまで自分を制限するのか?
05:24
and how much to break the limits
どこまで行けば
05:26
of what constitutes a valid life?
「普通の人生」の一線を越えるのか?
05:29
Forging meaning and building identity
意味を創り上げ
アイデンティティを築くことは
05:32
does not make what was wrong right.
間違いを正すことではありません
05:35
It only makes what was wrong precious.
間違いを 価値あるものにするだけです
05:38
In January of this year,
今年1月に
05:43
I went to Myanmar to interview political prisoners,
私はミャンマーを訪れ
政治犯の人たちを取材し
05:45
and I was surprised to find them less bitter
予想していたより
彼らが悲惨な様子ではないのに
05:49
than I'd anticipated.
驚きました
05:52
Most of them had knowingly committed
ほとんどの方は 故意に
05:53
the offenses that landed them in prison,
罪を犯して収監されていますから
05:55
and they had walked in with their heads held high,
胸を張って刑務所に入り
05:58
and they walked out with their heads
何年後かに刑期を終えたときも
06:01
still held high, many years later.
胸を張って出所するのです
06:03
Dr. Ma Thida, a leading human rights activist
マ・ティーダ氏は有力な人権活動家で
06:07
who had nearly died in prison
獄中生活では死にかけ
06:10
and had spent many years in solitary confinement,
独房で何年もの歳月を過ごしました
06:12
told me she was grateful to her jailers
そんな彼女はこう言います
「看守には感謝しています
06:15
for the time she had had to think,
彼らのお蔭で 考える時間が持て
06:19
for the wisdom she had gained,
英知を得ることができ
06:21
for the chance to hone her meditation skills.
瞑想のスキルも向上したからです」
06:23
She had sought meaning
彼女は そこで意味を探求し
06:27
and made her travail into a crucial identity.
味わった辛苦を
決定的なアイデンティティとしたのです
06:29
But if the people I met
こうした方々は
06:33
were less bitter than I'd anticipated
予想よりも 獄中生活に
06:35
about being in prison,
苦しんでいなかったのですが
06:37
they were also less thrilled than I'd expected
私が思い描いていたよりも
06:38
about the reform process going on
ミャンマーで進んでいる改革を
06:41
in their country.
喜んでもいませんでした
06:43
Ma Thida said,
マ・ティーダ氏は言います
06:45
"We Burmese are noted
「私たち ビルマ人は
06:47
for our tremendous grace under pressure,
追い詰められたときでさえ
とても寛容だと言われます
06:48
but we also have grievance under glamour,"
でも その魅力の下には
怒りもあるのです
06:52
she said, "and the fact that there have been
そして これまで
このように様々な変化が
06:56
these shifts and changes
あったという事実が
06:58
doesn't erase the continuing problems
社会にはびこる問題を
07:00
in our society
消し去るという事は無いのです
07:02
that we learned to see so well
刑務所にいる間に
こうしたことが
07:04
while we were in prison."
よく見えるようになりました」
07:06
And I understood her to be saying
私の理解では
彼女が言わんとしているのは
07:08
that concessions confer only a little humanity,
一部の者だけが利権を握り
07:10
where full humanity is due,
全ての者に開かれていない状況で
07:14
that crumbs are not the same
テーブルに着く場所によって
07:16
as a place at the table,
与えられる食べ物も違うということです
07:18
which is to say you can forge meaning
つまり 意味を創り出し
07:20
and build identity and still be mad as hell.
アイデンティティを築いても
猛烈な怒りは収まらないのです
07:23
I've never been raped,
私は レイプされたこともなければ
07:29
and I've never been in anything
remotely approaching
ビルマでの投獄に近いような
07:31
a Burmese prison,
経験すらありません
07:34
but as a gay American,
でも アメリカ人のゲイとして
07:36
I've experienced prejudice and even hatred,
偏見や嫌悪の目にさらされてきた私は
07:37
and I've forged meaning and I've built identity,
意味を創り出し
アイデンティティを築きました
07:42
which is a move I learned from people
これは 私が知りうる以上の
07:46
who had experienced far worse privation
ひどい憂き目にあってきた人たちから
07:48
than I've ever known.
学んだ やり方です
07:51
In my own adolescence,
思春期には
07:53
I went to extreme lengths to try to be straight.
極端なほど
ストレートになる努力をしました
07:55
I enrolled myself in something called
「セックス・セラピー」と言われるものを
07:59
sexual surrogacy therapy,
受けたりもしました
08:01
in which people I was encouraged to call doctors
そこでは 「医者」と呼ばれる人たちが
08:03
prescribed what I was encouraged to call exercises
「女性とのエクササイズ」と
呼ばれる行為を処方します
08:07
with women I was encouraged to call surrogates,
女性のことは「セラピスト」と
呼ぶように指導されます
08:10
who were not exactly prostitutes
彼女たちは売春婦ではないのですが
08:14
but who were also not exactly anything else.
それ以外の何者でもありませんでした
08:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:20
My particular favorite
私のお気に入りは
08:24
was a blonde woman from the Deep South
ディープサウス出身のブロンド女性で
08:26
who eventually admitted to me
しまいには
08:28
that she was really a necrophiliac
彼女は屍姦愛好家で
08:30
and had taken this job after she got in trouble
死体安置所でトラブルになり
08:32
down at the morgue.
この仕事に就いたのだと告白しました
08:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:37
These experiences eventually allowed me to have
こうした経験を通じて 私はついに
08:43
some happy physical relationships with women,
女性との幸せな肉体関係を
いくつか持つことが出来て
08:46
for which I'm grateful,
それには感謝していますが
08:49
but I was at war with myself,
自分自身の中に大きな葛藤が生まれ
08:50
and I dug terrible wounds into my own psyche.
心に深い傷を負うことになりました
08:53
We don't seek the painful experiences
私たちは
アイデンティティを切り刻むような
08:58
that hew our identities,
痛ましい経験は求めていません
09:01
but we seek our identities
私達は
09:04
in the wake of painful experiences.
痛ましい経験をした時に
アイデンティティを求めるのです
09:06
We cannot bear a pointless torment,
無意味な苦痛は耐えられませんが
09:09
but we can endure great pain
その苦痛が目的があるものと信じれば
09:12
if we believe that it's purposeful.
大きな苦痛にも 耐えることができます
09:14
Ease makes less of an impression on us
簡単なことより 難しいことの方が
09:18
than struggle.
印象に残ります
09:20
We could have been ourselves without our delights,
喜びがなくとも
自分らしくいられますが
09:21
but not without the misfortunes
意味の探究に向かわせる―
09:24
that drive our search for meaning.
不運なことがなければ
自分らしさは生まれないでしょう
09:26
"Therefore, I take pleasure in infirmities,"
「だから 私は弱さに甘んじよう」
と使徒パウロは
09:29
St. Paul wrote in Second Corinthians,
『コリント人への第二の手紙』で
書いています
09:33
"for when I am weak, then I am strong."
「なぜなら 私が弱い時にこそ
私は強いからである」と
09:35
In 1988, I went to Moscow
1988年 私はモスクワに行き
09:39
to interview artists of the Soviet underground,
ソビエト・アンダーグラウンド芸術の
アーティストを取材しました
09:42
and I expected their work to be
彼らの作品は
09:46
dissident and political.
過激で政治的なものだろう
と思っていました
09:47
But the radicalism in their work actually lay
でも 作品に現れている急進主義は
09:50
in reinserting humanity into a society
人間性を否定する社会に
09:53
that was annihilating humanity itself,
人間性を再び取り入れるところに
ありました
09:56
as, in some senses, Russian society
ある意味 ロシア社会は
09:58
is now doing again.
今まさに 同じことをしていますね
10:01
One of the artists I met said to me,
お会いしたアーティストの一人は言いました
10:03
"We were in training to be not artists but angels."
「私たちはアーティストではなく
天使になる訓練をしていたのだ」と
10:05
In 1991, I went back to see the artists
1991年に
取材したアーティストに
10:10
I'd been writing about,
再び会いに行き
10:13
and I was with them during the putsch
ソビエト連邦を崩壊に招いた―
10:14
that ended the Soviet Union,
クーデターの間
彼らと一緒にいました
10:16
and they were among the chief organizers
実は 彼らは
あのクーデターへの抵抗勢力を
10:18
of the resistance to that putsch.
組織している人たちでした
10:21
And on the third day of the putsch,
クーデターの3日目
10:24
one of them suggested we walk up to Smolenskaya.
誰かが スモレンスカヤまで行こうと言い
10:27
And we went there,
私たちはそこに行き
10:30
and we arranged ourselves in
front of one of the barricades,
バリケードの正面に陣取りました
10:31
and a little while later,
その少しあと
10:35
a column of tanks rolled up,
戦車の隊列がやってきて
10:36
and the soldier on the front tank said,
先頭の戦車に乗っている兵士が
言いました
10:39
"We have unconditional orders
「我々は このバリケードを破壊する―
10:41
to destroy this barricade.
無条件命令を受けている
10:43
If you get out of the way,
道をあけてくれれば
10:44
we don't need to hurt you,
君たちを傷つけなくてすむ
10:46
but if you won't move, we'll have no choice
そこを動かなければ
10:48
but to run you down."
君たちを ひく以外の選択肢はない」
10:50
And the artists I was with said,
一緒にいたアーティストたちは言いました
10:51
"Give us just a minute.
「少しだけ時間を下さい
10:53
Give us just a minute to tell you why we're here."
なぜ私たちがここにいるのか
説明しますから」
10:54
And the soldier folded his arms,
すると 兵士は腕を組み
10:59
and the artist launched into a
Jeffersonian panegyric to democracy
アーティストは
民主主義を称賛する演説を始めました
11:01
such as those of us who live
既にジェファーソン流民主主義に生きる―
11:05
in a Jeffersonian democracy
私たちのような者には
11:07
would be hard-pressed to present.
あり得ない光景です
11:09
And they went on and on,
アーティストたちは熱弁し
11:13
and the soldier watched,
兵士はじっと見入って
11:14
and then he sat there for a full minute
演説が終わっても
11:16
after they were finished
丸1分もの間 座ったままでした
11:18
and looked at us so bedraggled in the rain,
ようやく 雨でずぶ濡れになった
私たちを見やると
11:20
and said, "What you have said is true,
その兵士は言いました
「今 君たちが言ったことは真実だ
11:22
and we must bow to the will of the people.
我々は 国民の意思に従わねばならない
11:26
If you'll clear enough space for us to turn around,
Uターンするスペースを空けてくれれば
11:30
we'll go back the way we came."
元来た道を帰るよ」
11:32
And that's what they did.
そして その通りに帰って行きました
11:35
Sometimes, forging meaning
時に 意味を創り出すことで
11:37
can give you the vocabulary you need
究極の自由を手に入れるために
11:39
to fight for your ultimate freedom.
必要な言葉を得ることができます
11:42
Russia awakened me to the lemonade notion
ロシアで私は レモネードのような
甘酸っぱい事実に気付きました
11:45
that oppression breeds the power to oppose it,
抑圧は それに対抗する力を育てるのです
11:48
and I gradually understood that as the cornerstone
そして 次第にそれは
アイデンティティに
11:51
of identity.
無くてはならないものだと分かりました
11:54
It took identity to rescue me from sadness.
悲しみから立ち直るには
アイデンティティが必要でした
11:55
The gay rights movement posits a world
ゲイ・ライツ・ムーブメントは
12:00
in which my aberrances are a victory.
私が人と違うことを良しとします
12:02
Identity politics always works on two fronts:
アイデンティティ政治は
常に2つの面があります
12:05
to give pride to people who have a given condition
ある条件や特徴を持つ人たちに
12:09
or characteristic,
誇りを与えることと
12:12
and to cause the outside world
まわりの世界にそうした人たちを
12:13
to treat such people more gently and more kindly.
より温かく優しく受け入れさせることです
12:15
Those are two totally separate enterprises,
これらは 全く違うことですが
12:18
but progress in each sphere
一方で進展があれば
12:22
reverberates in the other.
他方もそれに影響されます
12:24
Identity politics can be narcissistic.
アイデンティティ政治は
自己陶酔的でもありえます
12:26
People extol a difference only because it's theirs.
「違い」を讃えるのは
ただ それが自分のものだからです
12:30
People narrow the world and function
人々は 自らの世界を狭めて
12:33
in discrete groups without empathy for one another.
個々のグループの中で生き
他者に思いを馳せることもありません
12:36
But properly understood
でも 正しく理解され
12:39
and wisely practiced,
懸命に実践されれば
12:41
identity politics should expand
アイデンティティ政治は
12:43
our idea of what it is to be human.
「人間らしさ」の考えを
広めて行くでしょう
12:45
Identity itself
アイデンティティそのものは
12:48
should be not a smug label
独りよがりのレッテルや
12:49
or a gold medal
金メダルのようなものであってはならず
12:52
but a revolution.
革命であるべきです
12:54
I would have had an easier life if I were straight,
もし私がストレートだったら
人生はもっと楽だったでしょう
12:56
but I would not be me,
でも それは私ではありません
13:00
and I now like being myself better
今 私は自分らしくある方が
13:02
than the idea of being someone else,
違う人になるより好きです
13:04
someone who, to be honest,
正直なところ
13:07
I have neither the option of being
違う人になるという選択肢も
13:08
nor the ability fully to imagine.
そう想像し得る能力も
持ち合わせていません
13:10
But if you banish the dragons,
ドラゴンを追い払えば
13:13
you banish the heroes,
ヒーローも追い払うことになります
13:15
and we become attached
私たちは人生において
13:17
to the heroic strain in our own lives.
ヒーローのような気質に憧れるものです
13:19
I've sometimes wondered
時々思ったものです
13:22
whether I could have ceased
to hate that part of myself
ゲイであることの誇りを
おおっぴらに称えることなく
13:23
without gay pride's technicolor fiesta,
ゲイである私の一部への
嫌悪を止められるか?
13:26
of which this speech is one manifestation.
このスピーチも 誇りの現れですが
13:29
I used to think I would know myself to be mature
何の思いもなく ただゲイでいられたとき
13:33
when I could simply be gay without emphasis,
私は本当に自分をよく知っている
と思っていました
13:36
but the self-loathing of that period left a void,
でも 自己嫌悪していたときは
心にぽっかり穴が空き
13:39
and celebration needs to fill and overflow it,
そこを誇り称え
満たしてしまう必要がありました
13:43
and even if I repay my private debt of melancholy,
自らの憂鬱な気持ちをどうにかできても
13:47
there's still an outer world of homophobia
同性愛者を嫌う世界は依然としてあり
13:50
that it will take decades to address.
解決には何十年もかかるでしょう
13:53
Someday, being gay will be a simple fact,
いつかゲイであることが単なる事実となり
13:56
free of party hats and blame,
デモや避難の的にならない日が来るでしょう
13:59
but not yet.
でも それはまだ先です
14:02
A friend of mine who thought gay pride
友人は ゲイのプライドは
14:04
was getting very carried away with itself,
少し先走ってしまっていると感じ
14:06
once suggested that we organize
かつて こんなことを提案しました
14:08
Gay Humility Week.
「ゲイ謙遜週間」
14:10
(Laughter) (Applause)
(笑)(拍手)
14:12
It's a great idea,
素晴らしいアイデアですが
14:18
but its time has not yet come.
まだ時期尚早ですね
14:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:23
And neutrality, which seems to lie
中立であることは
14:25
halfway between despair and celebration,
絶望と至福の間にあるように思えますが
14:27
is actually the endgame.
実は最終局面です
14:30
In 29 states in the U.S.,
アメリカでは29州で
14:33
I could legally be fired or denied housing
ゲイであるという理由で
私は合法的に
14:36
for being gay.
解雇されたり
入居を拒否されたりします
14:39
In Russia, the anti-propaganda law
ロシアでは
同性愛宣伝禁止法により
14:41
has led to people being beaten in the streets.
人々が街中で暴力をふるわれました
14:44
Twenty-seven African countries
アフリカの27ヶ国では
14:47
have passed laws against sodomy,
ソドミー禁止法が制定され
14:49
and in Nigeria, gay people can legally
ナイジェリアでは
ゲイの人たちは法律により
14:52
be stoned to death,
投石され殺されることもあり
14:54
and lynchings have become common.
リンチも日常茶飯事です
14:55
In Saudi Arabia recently, two men
サウジアラビアでは 最近
14:58
who had been caught in carnal acts,
男性2名が性行為をしたことで
15:01
were sentenced to 7,000 lashes each,
それぞれ 鞭打ち7千回の刑を受け
15:03
and are now permanently disabled as a result.
そのせいで今や
障がい者となってしまいました
15:08
So who can forge meaning
これでは 誰も
意味を創り出し
15:11
and build identity?
アイデンティティを築くことなど
できないでしょう
15:13
Gay rights are not primarily marriage rights,
ゲイの権利は
結婚する権利だけではありません
15:16
and for the millions who live in unaccepting places
何百万の人たちが
ゲイであることが受け入れられず
15:19
with no resources,
何の支援も得られないところで暮らし
15:22
dignity remains elusive.
尊厳すら危うい状況に置かれています
15:24
I am lucky to have forged meaning
私は幸運にも 意味を創り出し
15:27
and built identity,
アイデンティティを築くことができました
15:30
but that's still a rare privilege,
でも それは本当に稀なことで
15:32
and gay people deserve more collectively
ゲイの人たちは皆
きちんとした正義を
15:34
than the crumbs of justice.
受けるに値します
15:37
And yet, every step forward
とはいえ どんな前進も
15:40
is so sweet.
素晴らしいものです
15:43
In 2007, six years after we met,
出会いから6年後の2007年
15:45
my partner and I decided
私はパートナーと
15:49
to get married.
結婚することに決めました
15:51
Meeting John had been the discovery
ジョンに出会い
15:53
of great happiness
大きな幸せを手に入れ
15:55
and also the elimination of great unhappiness,
それまでの不幸は消えました
15:57
and sometimes, I was so occupied
時に私は あの苦難が消えたことで
16:00
with the disappearance of all that pain
頭がいっぱいになってしまい
16:03
that I forgot about the joy,
喜びを味わうのを忘れるくらいでした
16:05
which was at first the less
remarkable part of it to me.
最初はその喜びは
大きくは感じられなかったのです
16:07
Marrying was a way to declare our love
結婚は 私たちの愛を
16:11
as more a presence than an absence.
ここに存在するものとして
宣言することでした
16:14
Marriage soon led us to children,
結婚してすぐ 子どもを迎えて
16:18
and that meant new meanings
私たちと子どもたちの
16:20
and new identities, ours and theirs.
新しい意味 新しいアイデンティティが
できました
16:22
I want my children to be happy,
子どもたちには
幸せでいてほしいと思いますし
16:26
and I love them most achingly when they are sad.
子どもたちが悲しいときは
私も心を痛めるほど愛しています
16:29
As a gay father, I can teach them
ゲイの父親として
彼らに教えられるのは
16:33
to own what is wrong in their lives,
人生の「間違い」を受け入れることです
16:36
but I believe that if I succeed
たとえ子どもたちを困難から
16:38
in sheltering them from adversity,
遠ざけて守れたとしても
16:40
I will have failed as a parent.
親としては失格だと思うのです
16:42
A Buddhist scholar I know once explained to me
知り合いの仏教学者が
教えてくれたことがあります
16:45
that Westerners mistakenly think
西洋人は誤解していますが
16:48
that nirvana is what arrives
涅槃(ニルヴァーナ)が訪れるのは
16:50
when all your woe is behind you
苦難がすべて過ぎ去り
16:53
and you have only bliss to look forward to.
無上の喜びの到来を待っているとき
ではないそうです
16:55
But he said that would not be nirvana,
それは涅槃ではないのです
16:59
because your bliss in the present
今ある 無上の喜びは常に
17:01
would always be shadowed by the joy from the past.
過去の喜びの影に隠れているからです
17:02
Nirvana, he said, is what you arrive at
涅槃に到達するのは
17:06
when you have only bliss to look forward to
無上の喜びの到来を待ち
17:09
and find in what looked like sorrows
悲哀とも思えるものの中に
17:11
the seedlings of your joy.
自らの喜びの萌芽を見出したとき
なのだそうです
17:14
And I sometimes wonder
私は時々考えます
17:17
whether I could have found such fulfillment
結婚や子どもたちに
そのような満足感を
17:19
in marriage and children
私は得られたのだろうか
17:21
if they'd come more readily,
もし それらが
当然のように手に入り
17:22
if I'd been straight in my youth or were young now,
昔からストレートだったり
今でも若かったりすれば
17:24
in either of which cases this might be easier.
もっと容易に満足感を得られたのだろうかと
17:28
Perhaps I could.
たぶん そうでしょう
17:32
Perhaps all the complex imagining I've done
たぶん 私がしたような複雑な想像は
17:33
could have been applied to other topics.
すべて他のことにも当てはまります
17:36
But if seeking meaning
でも もし意味を探すことが
17:38
matters more than finding meaning,
見つけることより重要だとしたら
17:40
the question is not whether I'd be happier
考えるべきは 私が
いじめられたことを より幸せに
17:41
for having been bullied,
受け止められるかではなく
17:45
but whether assigning meaning
そうした経験に対して
17:46
to those experiences
意味を与えることによって
17:48
has made me a better father.
より良い父親になれたかです
17:50
I tend to find the ecstasy hidden in ordinary joys,
私は日常の喜びの中に隠された
至福を見つける傾向があります
17:52
because I did not expect those joys
そうした喜びさえ
17:56
to be ordinary to me.
私にとっては普通ではなかったからです
17:58
I know many heterosexuals who have
異性愛者で同じように
幸せに結婚して
18:01
equally happy marriages and families,
家庭を持っている人々を知っていますが
18:02
but gay marriage is so breathtakingly fresh,
同性愛者間の結婚は 息をのむほど新鮮で
18:05
and gay families so exhilaratingly new,
その家族も ウキウキするほど新しく
18:08
and I found meaning in that surprise.
私は そうした驚きの中に意味を見つけました
18:11
In October, it was my 50th birthday,
10月に私は50歳の誕生日を迎え
18:15
and my family organized a party for me,
家族がパーティーを開いてくれました
18:19
and in the middle of it,
その最中に
18:22
my son said to my husband
息子が 私の夫に
18:23
that he wanted to make a speech,
スピーチをしたいと言い出しました
18:25
and John said,
ジョンはこう言います
18:26
"George, you can't make a speech. You're four."
「ジョージ スピーチはできないよ
まだ4歳だからね」
18:27
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:32
"Only Grandpa and Uncle David and I
「おじいちゃん、デイビッドおじさんと私が
18:34
are going to make speeches tonight."
今夜 スピーチをするんだよ」
18:36
But George insisted and insisted,
でも ジョージはとことん食い下がり
18:38
and finally, John took him up to the microphone,
ついにジョンは彼を
マイクのところに連れて行きます
18:41
and George said very loudly,
すると ジョージは
大きな声で言ったのです
18:44
"Ladies and gentlemen,
「皆さまに申し上げます」
18:47
may I have your attention please."
「ちょっとお耳を拝借」
18:49
And everyone turned around, startled.
誰もが驚いて ふり向きました
18:52
And George said,
ジョージは続けます
18:55
"I'm glad it's Daddy's birthday.
「今日はお父さんの誕生日で嬉しいです
18:57
I'm glad we all get cake.
皆でケーキを食べられて嬉しいです
18:59
And daddy, if you were little,
お父さん もっと小さかったら
19:02
I'd be your friend."
僕たち 友だちだったね」
19:06
And I thought — Thank you.
それで― ありがとうございます
19:09
I thought that I was indebted
それで 私はあのボビー・フィンケルにさえ
19:12
even to Bobby Finkel,
借りがあると思いました
19:15
because all those earlier experiences
なぜなら これまでの全ての経験は
19:16
were what had propelled me to this moment,
この瞬間のためにあったからです
19:19
and I was finally unconditionally grateful
一時は必死に変えようとしていた人生を
19:22
for a life I'd once have done anything to change.
そのとき初めて ただただ有難く感じました
19:24
The gay activist Harvey Milk
ゲイの権利活動家のハーヴェイ・ミルクは
19:28
was once asked by a younger gay man
若いゲイの男性に
19:30
what he could do to help the movement,
「この活動のために何ができるか」と聞かれ
19:32
and Harvey Milk said,
こう答えていました
19:35
"Go out and tell someone."
「ここを出て誰かに話しに行くことだ」
19:36
There's always somebody who wants to confiscate
いつでも 私たちの人間性を
19:38
our humanity,
踏みにじりたがる人がいるもので
19:41
and there are always stories that restore it.
人間性を取り戻す話もたくさんあります
19:43
If we live out loud,
堂々と生きれば
19:45
we can trounce the hatred
そうした嫌悪を打ちのめし
19:47
and expand everyone's lives.
皆の人生を広げることができます
19:49
Forge meaning. Build identity.
意味を創り出し
アイデンティティを築く
19:52
Forge meaning.
意味を創り出し
19:56
Build identity.
アイデンティティを築く
19:58
And then invite the world
そして 世界の人たちに
20:01
to share your joy.
あなたの喜びを共有しましょう
20:02
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
20:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:07
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとう(拍手)
20:09
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとう(拍手)
20:12
Thank you. (Applause)
(拍手)
20:16
Translated by Yuko Yoshida
Reviewed by Eriko T.

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Andrew Solomon - Writer
Andrew Solomon writes about politics, culture and psychology.

Why you should listen

Andrew Solomon is a writer, lecturer and Professor of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University. He is president of PEN American Center. He writes regularly for The New Yorker and the New York Times.

Solomon's newest book, Far and Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change, Seven Continents, Twenty-Five Years was published in April, 2016. His previous book, Far From the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity won the National Book Critics Circle award for nonfiction, the Wellcome Prize and 22 other national awards. It tells the stories of parents who not only learn to deal with their exceptional children but also find profound meaning in doing so. It was a New York Times bestseller in both hardcover and paperback editions. Solomon's previous book, The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression, won the 2001 National Book Award for Nonfiction, was a finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize and was included in The Times of London's list of one hundred best books of the decade. It has been published in twenty-four languages. Solomon is also the author of the novel A Stone Boat and of The Irony Tower: Soviet Artists in a Time of Glasnost.

Solomon is an activist in LGBT rights, mental health, education and the arts. He is a member of the boards of directors of the National LGBTQ Force and Trans Youth Family Allies. He is a member of the Board of Visitors of Columbia University Medical Center, serves on the National Advisory Board of the Depression Center at the University of Michigan, is a director of Columbia Psychiatry and is a member of the Advisory Board of the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. Solomon also serves on the boards of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Yaddo and The Alex Fund, which supports the education of Romani children. He is also a fellow of Berkeley College at Yale University and a member of the New York Institute for the Humanities and the Council on Foreign Relations.

Solomon lives with his husband and son in New York and London and is a dual national. He also has a daughter with a college friend; mother and daughter live in Texas but visit often.


More profile about the speaker
Andrew Solomon | Speaker | TED.com