14:17
TED2014

Jon Mooallem: How the teddy bear taught us compassion

ジョン・モアレム: 動物と人間との関係を浮き彫りにする、テディベアの奇妙なお話

Filmed:

1902年にセオドア・ルーズベルト大統領は、いわゆる”テディベア”狂騒を引き起こすきっかけとなる一匹のアメリカグマの命を助けたと語り伝えられています。ジョン・モアレム記者はこの説話を掘り下げ、私たちが野生動物について語るこの話が、種の生存、また自然界全体に実際どのように影響を持つのか、についての考察を促します。

- Writer
Jon Mooallem is the author of "Wild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals in America." Full bio

So it was the fall of 1902,
1902年の秋の事でした
00:12
and President Theodore Roosevelt
セオドア・ルーズベルト大統領は
00:15
needed a little break from the White House,
ちょっとした休暇を取る必要があったのです
00:17
so he took a train to Mississippi
それで彼はミシシッピの
00:19
to do a little black bear hunting outside of a town
スメデスという街の外れでクロクマ狩りをしようと
00:21
called Smedes.
列車で向かいました
00:23
The first day of the hunt,
they didn't see a single bear,
狩りの初日
一匹のクマも見かけることはなく
00:25
so it was a big bummer for everyone,
誰もがひどく落胆していたのですが
00:27
but the second day, the dogs cornered one
二日目 猟犬が長い追跡の末
00:29
after a really long chase, but by that point,
一匹を追い詰めたのです
でもその時までには
00:32
the president had given up
大統領は狩りを諦めて
00:34
and gone back to camp for lunch,
昼食をとりにキャンプに戻っていたのです
00:36
so his hunting guide cracked the animal
狩りのガイドはクマの
00:37
on the top of the head with the butt of his rifle,
頭を銃の台尻で殴り
00:40
and then tied it up to a tree
木へ括り付け
00:43
and started tooting away on his bugle
それを撃ち殺す栄誉を差し上げようと
00:44
to call Roosevelt back so he could have the honor
ルーズベルトを呼び戻すために
00:47
of shooting it.
ラッパを鳴らし始めたのです
00:49
The bear was a female.
メスのクマでした
00:51
It was dazed, injured,
呆然とし 怪我をしており
00:53
severely underweight, a little mangy-looking,
酷く痩せこけ 毛もまだらで
00:56
and when Roosevelt saw this animal
この動物が木に括られているのを
00:59
tied up to the tree,
ルーズベルトが見た時
01:01
he just couldn't bring himself to fire at it.
彼は引き金を引けませんでした
01:03
He felt like that would go against his code
彼はスポーツマンとして
01:05
as a sportsman.
守るべきものに反すると感じたのです
01:07
A few days later, the scene was memorialized
数日後 ワシントンで
01:09
in a political cartoon back in Washington.
その場面は 風刺画に刻まれました
01:11
It was called "Drawing a Line in Mississippi,"
それは「ミシシッピで一線を引く」と呼ばれ
01:14
and it showed Roosevelt with
his gun down and his arm out,
ルーズベルトは銃口を下げ 腕を伸ばし
01:17
sparing the bear's life,
クマの命を助けています
01:19
and the bear was sitting on its hind legs
後ろ脚で立っていたそのクマは
01:21
with these two big, frightened, wide eyes
怯えた目を大きく開き
01:22
and little ears pricked up at the top of its head.
頭のてっぺんには
小さな耳が付いていました
01:24
It looked really helpless, like you just wanted to
それは本当に無力で まるで
01:26
sweep it up into your arms
腕にかき抱き安心させて
01:28
and reassure it.
あげたくなるようなものでした
01:30
It wouldn't have looked familiar at the time,
当時それは馴染みあるようには
01:31
but if you go looking for the cartoon now,
見えなかったのですが
今 風刺画を見れば
01:32
you recognize the animal right away:
その動物を皆さんはすぐに認識するでしょう
01:34
It's a teddy bear.
それは「テディベア」です
01:37
And this is how the teddy bear was born.
こんな風にしてティディベアが誕生したのです
01:39
Essentially, toymakers took
the bear from the cartoon,
元々は 玩具会社が風刺画のクマを模し
01:41
turned it into a plush toy, and then named it
フワフワのオモチャにして
01:43
after President Roosevelt -- Teddy's bear.
ルーズベルト大統領にちなみ
「テディベア」と名付けたのです
01:45
And I do feel a little ridiculous
そして私はやや馬鹿らしくなっています
01:48
that I'm up here on this stage
この舞台に立ち
01:50
and I'm choosing to use my time
懐かしい子供のおもちゃの生誕についての
01:53
to tell you about a 100-year-old story
100年も昔の話をする為に
01:54
about the invention of a squishy kid's toy,
時間を費やそうと決めていることに
01:57
but I'd argue that the invention of the teddy bear,
でも 私はこの物語の中のテディベアの誕生と
02:00
inside that story is a more important story,
その内容はより重要な物語だと考えています
02:04
a story about how dramatically our ideas
それは私たちの自然に関する考え方が
02:07
about nature can change,
どのように劇的に変わりうるのか
02:09
and also about how, on the planet right now,
そして 今現在の地球上で
02:11
the stories that we tell
私たちが伝える物語が
02:14
are dramatically changing nature.
どんなに劇的に自然を変えているのか
なのです
02:16
Because think about the teddy bear.
何故なら テディベアを思い浮かべ
02:18
For us, in retrospect, it feels like an obvious fit,
振り返ってみると まさに私たちのためのもので
02:20
because bears are so cute and cuddly,
何故ならクマは 抱きしめたい程可愛らしく
02:22
and who wouldn't want to give
one to their kids to play with,
誰もが子供の遊び相手に
あげたくなるようなものだったのです
02:24
but the truth is that in 1902,
しかし実際は 1902年当時のクマは
02:26
bears weren't cute and cuddly.
可愛くも抱きしめたくなる
ようなものではなく
02:29
I mean, they looked the same,
現在と同じ姿形でしたが
02:30
but no one thought of them that way.
誰もクマをそんな風に考えませんでした
02:32
In 1902, bears were monsters.
1902年当時 クマは怪物でした
02:33
Bears were something that frickin' terrified kids.
クマは子供たちを脅かすものでした
02:36
For generations at that point,
当時の人々にとっては
02:39
the bear had been a shorthand for all the danger
クマは人々が辺境の地で出くわす
02:41
that people were encountering on the frontier,
あらゆる危険なものの象徴で
02:44
and the federal government was actually
事実 連邦政府は組織的に
02:46
systematically exterminating bears
クマを根絶やしにしようとしていたのです
02:47
and lots of other predators too,
コヨーテやオオカミといった
02:49
like coyotes and wolves.
他の多くの捕食者も同じです
02:51
These animals, they were being demonized.
これらの動物は 悪魔のごとく見られました
02:52
They were called murderers
家畜を殺したので
02:54
because they killed people's livestock.
殺し屋と呼ばれました
02:56
One government biologist, he explained this
ある政府の生物学者は
02:58
war on animals like the bear by saying
クマのような動物との闘争を
こう説明したのです
03:00
that they no longer had a place
我々の高度な文明社会の中には
03:02
in our advancing civilization,
それらの動物の生きる場所はないので
03:05
and so we were just clearing them out of the way.
我々は ただ一掃しているだけであると
03:07
In one 10-year period, close to half a million wolves
たった10年で 50万頭に近いオオカミが
03:11
had been slaughtered.
殺戮されました
03:15
The grizzly would soon be wiped out
灰色グマは元々のテリトリーの
03:16
from 95 percent of its original territory,
95%から排除されました
03:18
and whereas once there had been 30 million bison
また かつて3000万頭の水牛が
03:21
moving across the plains, and you would have
大平原を移動したときには
03:24
these stories of trains having to stop
うごめく巨大なこれらの群れが
線路を横切るので
03:26
for four or five hours so that these thick,
列車は4‐5時間も
停車せざるを得なかったことを
03:28
living rivers of the animals could pour over the tracks,
耳にしたことがあるでしょう
03:30
now, by 1902, there were maybe
less than 100 left in the wild.
1902年の時点では 野生の水牛の生き残りは100頭以下でした
03:33
And so what I'm saying is, the teddy bear was born
ですので 私が言いたいことは テディベアは
03:38
into the middle of this great spasm of extermination,
この壮大な一連の皆殺しの只中に誕生したので
03:41
and you can see it as a sign that
それは心のどこかでその殺戮に
03:45
maybe some people deep down
葛藤を覚え始めた人も
03:46
were starting to feel conflicted about all that killing.
いたことを示すと
考えることもできるでしょう
03:48
America still hated the bear and feared it,
アメリカは 未だクマを嫌い 恐れていました
03:52
but all of a sudden, America also wanted
しかし アメリカは突然
03:55
to give the bear a great big hug.
クマに大きなハグをあげたくなったのです
03:57
So this is something that I've been really
curious about in the last few years.
私はこの数年間
次のようなことを知りたいと思っていました
04:00
How do we imagine animals,
我々が動物について
04:02
how do we think and feel about them,
どのように想像し 考え 感じるのか
04:03
and how do their reputations get written
そしてそれらへの感じ方が どのように我々の心に
04:05
and then rewritten in our minds?
刻まれ そして上書きされるのか—
04:08
We're here living in the eye of a great storm
世紀末までに半分もの地球上の生物が絶滅するような
04:10
of extinction where half the species on the planet
この大いなる絶滅の嵐の只中で
04:13
could be gone by the end of the century,
我々は生きているのに
04:16
and so why is it that we come to care about
何故 我々は他を差し置いて
04:18
some of those species and not others?
特定の動物だけを
気に掛けはじめたのでしょうか?
04:19
Well, there's a new field, a relatively new field
さて 比較的新しい
04:22
of social science that started looking at
社会科学の分野では
04:24
these questions and trying to unpack the powerful
これらの疑問が研究され始め
強力で
04:26
and sometimes pretty schizophrenic relationships
時にかなり 精神分裂症的な
04:28
that we have to animals,
我々と動物との関係が
明らかになりつつあります
04:30
and I spent a lot of time looking through
私が学術誌を
04:32
their academic journals,
多くの時間を掛けて読み漁り言えることは
04:33
and all I can really say is that their findings
得られている知見は驚くほど
04:35
are astonishingly wide-ranging.
広範囲に渡るということです
04:37
So some of my favorites include that
私のお気に入りの幾つかには
04:39
the more television a person
watches in Upstate New York,
ニューヨーク北部で テレビをたくさん観ている人ほど
04:41
the more he or she is afraid
クロクマに襲われることを恐がっている
04:43
of being attacked by a black bear.
というものがあります
04:45
If you show a tiger to an American,
また アメリカ人はトラを見ると
04:47
they're much more likely to assume that it's female
オスではなくてメスであると
04:50
and not male.
見なしがちなのです
04:52
In a study where a fake snake
ある研究では
04:53
and a fake turtle were put on the side of the road,
ヘビとカメのニセモノを路肩に置くと
04:55
drivers hit the snake much
more often than the turtle,
ヘビがカメよりも多く轢かれ
04:57
and about three percent of
drivers who hit the fake animals
いずれかを轢いた人の内 約3%は
04:59
seemed to do it on purpose.
故意に轢いたようだといいます
05:01
Women are more likely than men to get a
波間にイルカを見た時
05:03
"magical feeling" when they see dolphins in the surf.
女性は男性よりも
「魔法にかかった気持ち」になりやすく
05:06
Sixty-eight percent of mothers with
「権利意識と自尊心が高い」母親の
05:09
"high feelings of entitlement and self-esteem"
68パーセントはプリナのCMの中の
05:11
identified with the dancing cats
踊る猫に共感したということです
05:14
in a commercial for Purina. (Laughter)
(笑)
05:16
Americans consider lobsters
アメリカ人はハトと比べて
05:18
more important than pigeons
ロブスターを重要だと思うものの
05:20
but also much, much stupider.
遥かに頭が悪いと考えています
05:21
Wild turkeys are seen as only slightly
more dangerous than sea otters,
野生の七面鳥はカワウソよりも少しだけ危険で
05:23
and pandas are twice as lovable as ladybugs.
パンダはテントウムシの2倍
愛らしいと見られているということです
05:26
So some of this is physical, right?
見た目が理由というのもありますよね?
05:32
We tend to sympathize more
with animals that look like us,
私たちは 自分たちに似た外見の動物
05:33
and especially that resemble human babies,
特にヒトの赤ちゃんに似て
05:36
so with big, forward-facing eyes
正面を向いた大きな瞳と
05:37
and circular faces,
丸い顔でぷくぷくとした
05:39
kind of a roly-poly posture.
体格の動物に親しみを覚えます
05:40
This is why, if you get a Christmas card from, like,
これは 何故ミネソタの大叔母からの
クリスマスカードには
05:42
your great aunt in Minnesota,
グロテスクなクモのようなものではなく
05:44
there's usually a fuzzy penguin chick on it,
フワフワのペンギンの雛が描かれているのか
05:45
and not something like a Glacier Bay wolf spider.
その理由なのです
05:46
But it's not all physical, right?
でも見た目が全てではないですよね?
05:49
There's a cultural dimension to
how we think about animals,
我々の考える動物像には
文化的な面があり
05:52
and we're telling stories about these animals,
これらの動物についての物語は
05:55
and like all stories,
―あらゆる物語と同様に―
05:57
they are shaped by the times and the places
それが語られた時と場所によって
05:58
in which we're telling them.
紡がれていくものです
06:00
So think about that moment
ですから 1902年当時に遡って
06:01
back in 1902 again where a ferocious bear
獰猛なクマがティディベアになった
06:03
became a teddy bear.
瞬間を考えてください
06:06
What was the context?
Well, America was urbanizing.
状況はどうだったでしょうか?
アメリカは都会化していました
06:07
For the first time, nearly a
majority of people lived in cities,
初めて 大半の人々が都市に住んでいたので
06:10
so there was a growing distance
between us and nature.
自然と人間の間には距離が出来ていました
06:13
There was a safe space where we could
クマについて考え直し 夢想しても
06:15
reconsider the bear and romanticize it.
安全な距離があったのです
06:17
Nature could only start to
seem this pure and adorable
自然はただこんな風に
純粋で愛すべきもののようになり始めたのです
06:20
because we didn't have to be afraid of it anymore.
何故なら もはや恐れる必要がなくなったからです
06:22
And you can see that cycle playing out
この一連の流れが
あらゆる動物で
06:25
again and again with all kinds of animals.
繰り返されたことがわかるでしょう
06:27
It seems like we're always stuck between
動物を悪魔のように見て
根絶をめざし
06:29
demonizing a species and wanting to wipe it out,
やがて根絶の寸前になると
06:31
and then when we get very close to doing that,
弱者として同情し
06:33
empathizing with it as an underdog
憐れみを見せたい気持ちになる―
06:35
and wanting to show it compassion.
こんな袋小路から抜け出せないようです
06:37
So we exert our power,
我々は力を及ぼしますが
06:40
but then we're unsettled
その力強さ故に
06:42
by how powerful we are.
不安定なのです
06:43
So for example, this is one of
例えば これは
06:46
probably thousands of letters and drawings
子どもたちからブッシュ陣営に
送られた何千もの
06:48
that kids sent to the Bush administration,
手紙と絵のうちの1通で
06:51
begging it to protect the polar bear
絶滅危惧種保護法でシロクマを
06:52
under the Endangered Species Act,
保護して欲しいという手紙です
06:54
and these were sent back in the mid-2000s,
2000年台の半ば
気候変動への関心が
06:55
when awareness of climate
change was suddenly surging.
急に高まったときに
送られてきたものです
06:58
We kept seeing that image of a polar bear
我々はシロクマが不機嫌そうに
07:00
stranded on a little ice floe
流氷の上で
立ち往生する姿を
07:01
looking really morose.
何度も目にしました
07:02
I spent days looking through these files.
これらの資料を時間を掛けて調べました
07:04
I really love them. This one's my favorite.
どれも素適な手紙です
この手紙も気に入りました
07:06
If you can see, it's a polar bear that's drowning
シロクマが溺れていて
また一方
07:08
and then it's also being eaten simultaneously
ロブスターやサメに食べられているのが
07:10
by a lobster and a shark.
分かるでしょうか
07:12
This one came from a kid named Fritz,
この手紙はフリッツという子供からのもので
07:15
and he's actually got a solution to climate change.
彼は気候変動の解決策を知っています
07:17
He's got it all worked out to an ethanol-based solution.
エタノールを基にした解決策です
07:18
He says, "I feel bad about the polar bears.
彼はこう言いました
07:20
I like polar bears.
「僕はシロクマが好きで 彼らに悪いなと思っています
07:23
Everyone can use corn juice for cars. From Fritz."
車には(ガソリンではなく)コーンのジュース(エタノール)を
使えるのに フリッツより」
07:25
So 200 years ago, you would have Arctic explorers
200年前 北極探検家の記したものによると
07:31
writing about polar bears leaping into their boats
シロクマがボートに乗り込み
07:34
and trying to devour them,
例えクマに火を着けようとも
07:36
even if they lit the bear on fire,
彼らを貪り喰おうとしたということです
07:37
but these kids don't see the polar bear that way,
しかし子供たちは
シロクマをそんな風には思わず
07:39
and actually they don't even see the polar bear
私が80年代に抱いたイメージとも
07:41
the way that I did back in the '80s.
違った見方をしていました
07:43
I mean, we thought of these animals
我々はシロクマたちを
07:45
as mysterious and terrifying lords of the Arctic.
謎に満ちた 恐ろしい北極の支配者と
思っていました
07:46
But look now how quickly that climate change
しかし 現在は気候変動が どれ程あっという間に
07:49
has flipped the image of the animal in our minds.
我々の心に刻まれた動物のイメージを
覆したことでしょう
07:51
It's gone from that bloodthirsty man-killer
血に飢えた人殺しから
07:54
to this delicate, drowning victim,
傷つきやすい 溺れる犠牲者へ
シロクマのイメージは変化しました
07:56
and when you think about it, that's kind of
考えてみるとそれは
07:59
the conclusion to the story
遡って1902年にティディベアによって
08:01
that the teddy bear started telling back in 1902,
語られ始めた物語の
ある種の結論になります
08:03
because back then, America had more or less
当時 アメリカは自大陸の征服を
08:06
conquered its share of the continent.
ほぼ終えたところでした
08:09
We were just getting around to
そして 最後の野生の捕食者を
08:10
polishing off these last wild predators.
まさに 片づけようというところでした
08:12
Now, society's reach has expanded
さて我々の社会の範疇は
08:14
all the way to the top of the world,
はるばる遠く
北極地方にまで到達し
08:16
and it's made even these, the most remote,
いちばん辺鄙なところに住む
地上最強のクマでさえ
08:18
the most powerful bears on the planet,
愛らしく無実な犠牲者たちに
08:21
seem like adorable and blameless victims.
見えるようにしてしまいました
08:23
But you know, there's also a
postscript to the teddy bear story
しかし ティディベアの物語には
多くの人々が話題にしない
08:26
that not a lot of people talk about.
後日談があります
08:29
We're going to talk about it,
その話もしましょう
08:31
because even though it didn't really take long
1902年のルーズベルトの狩りから
08:33
after Roosevelt's hunt in 1902
程なくそのオモチャは
08:35
for the toy to become a full-blown craze,
爆発的に流行ったものの
08:36
most people figured it was a fad,
殆どの人はそれは一時的なブームで
08:38
it was a sort of silly political novelty item
つまらない政治的なグッズに過ぎず
08:41
and it would go away once the president left office,
大統領の任期と共に消え去ると踏んでいました
08:43
and so by 1909, when Roosevelt's successor,
そして1909年までに ルーズベルトの後継者
08:45
William Howard Taft,
ウィリアム・ハワード・タフトが
08:49
was getting ready to be inaugurated,
就任しようかという頃
08:51
the toy industry was on the hunt
オモチャ産業は次の
08:52
for the next big thing.
大ヒットを探していたのです
08:54
They didn't do too well.
それは上手く行きませんでした
08:57
That January, Taft was the guest of honor
その1月 タフトはアトランタでの宴会の
08:59
at a banquet in Atlanta,
主賓でした
09:02
and for days in advance,
数日前から宴会のメニューが
09:03
the big news was the menu.
大きな話題となっていました
09:05
They were going to be serving him
南部の郷土料理である
09:06
a Southern specialty, a delicacy, really,
「オポッサムとポテト」と呼ばれる珍味で
09:08
called possum and taters.
もてなす予定でした
09:10
So you would have a whole opossum
スウィートポテトの上に
09:12
roasted on a bed of sweet potatoes,
オポッサムの丸焼きが乗っており
09:15
and then sometimes they'd leave
肉付きのよい 太麺のような
09:16
the big tail on it like a big, meaty noodle.
しっぽも付けたままのこともあります
09:18
The one brought to Taft's table
タフトのテーブルに給仕されたのは
09:21
weighed 18 pounds.
8キロ強もあるものでした
09:23
So after dinner, the orchestra started to play,
晩餐後 オーケストラが音楽を奏で始め
09:26
and the guests burst into song,
お客さんたちは唄い出しました
09:29
and all of a sudden, Taft was surprised
突然 タフトは
09:31
with the presentation of a gift
地元の支援者グループからの
09:32
from a group of local supporters,
贈り物に驚かされました
09:34
and this was a stuffed opossum toy,
これはオポッサムのぬいぐるみで
09:36
all beady-eyed and bald-eared,
ビーズの瞳と禿げた耳
09:38
and it was a new product they were putting forward
ルーズベルト大統領のティディベアに対する
09:41
to be the William Taft presidency's answer
ウィリアム・タフト政権版のぬいぐるみとして
09:43
to Teddy Roosevelt's teddy bear.
彼らが開発した新商品だったのです
09:46
They were calling it the "billy possum."
彼らは「ビリーポッサム」と呼んでいました
09:50
Within 24 hours, the Georgia Billy Possum Company
24時間の内にジョージア・ビリー・ポッサム社は
09:54
was up and running, brokering deals
これらを全国的に
09:58
for these things nationwide,
取引する準備に奔走し
09:59
and the Los Angeles Times announced,
そしてロサンゼルスタイムズは
10:01
very confidently, "The teddy bear
自信たっぷりにこう告知したのです
10:03
has been relegated to a seat in the rear,
「ティディベアはお払い箱となり
10:05
and for four years, possibly eight,
(任期の)4年間 ことによると8年間は
10:07
the children of the United States
アメリカ合衆国の子供たちは
10:10
will play with billy possum."
ビリーポッサムと遊ぶことになるでしょう」
10:12
So from that point, there was a fit of opossum fever.
その時から オポッサムは一時流行りました
10:15
There were billy possum postcards, billy possum pins,
ビリーポッサム ポストカードやバッジ
10:17
billy possum pitchers for your cream at coffee time.
お茶の時間のクリーム用ピリーポッサム ピッチャー
10:20
There were smaller billy possums on a stick
子ども達が旗の如く振れるように
10:22
that kids could wave around like flags.
ステッキの上には小さなビリーポッサムが付いてました
10:23
But even with all this marketing,
しかしこのマーケティングの甲斐無く
10:26
the life of the billy possum
ビリーポッサムの寿命は
10:28
turned out to be just pathetically brief.
憐れなほど短いものだったのです
10:30
The toy was an absolute flop,
そのオモチャはばったりと売れなくなり
10:34
and it was almost completely forgotten
年末までには
10:36
by the end of the year,
ほぼ完全に消えさりました
10:37
and what that means is that the billy possum
つまり ビリーポッサムは
10:38
didn't even make it to Christmastime,
クリスマスの時期まで
10:41
which when you think about it is
持ちこたえられず
10:42
a special sort of tragedy for a toy.
それは オモチャにとって
格別な悲劇といえるものでした
10:43
So we can explain that failure two ways.
その敗因を2通り説明できます
10:47
The first, well, it's pretty obvious.
1つは かなり明白なのものです
10:49
I'm going to go ahead and say it out loud anyway:
この際ハッキリ言ってしまいますが
10:51
Opossums are hideous. (Laughter)
オポッサムは醜いからです(笑)
10:53
But maybe more importantly is that
しかし 恐らくもっと重要なのは
10:56
the story of the billy possum was all wrong,
ビリーポッサムの話は
10:59
especially compared
特にティディベア秘話と比べると
11:01
to the backstory of the teddy bear.
全くダメなのです
11:03
Think about it: for most of
human's evolutionary history,
考えてみてください
人類の進化の歴史の大半で
11:05
what's made bears impressive to us
クマから受ける印象と言えば
11:07
has been their complete independence from us.
我々から全く独立した生き物でした
11:09
It's that they live these parallel lives
つまり 脅威として ライバルとして
交わることなく暮らしている生き物でした
11:12
as menaces and competitors.
つまり 脅威として ライバルとして
交わることなく暮らしている生き物でした
11:14
By the time Roosevelt went hunting in Mississippi,
ルーズベルトがミシシッピに狩りに行く頃までには
11:17
that stature was being crushed,
その姿は押し砕かれ
11:19
and the animal that he had roped to a tree
そして彼のために木に括りつけられた姿が
11:21
really was a symbol for all bears.
全てのクマの象徴となったのです
11:23
Whether those animals lived or died now
それらの動物の生死は
11:26
was entirely up to the compassion
完全に人々の同情心か無関心次第となったのです
11:28
or the indifference of people.
完全に人々の同情心か無関心次第となったのです
11:31
That said something really ominous
このことはクマの未来に
11:33
about the future of bears,
実に不吉な影を落としましたが
11:35
but it also said something very
unsettling about who we'd become,
でも もしそのような動物の生存ですら
我々次第であったなら
11:38
if the survival of even an animal like that
我々の成れの果てについても
11:41
was up to us now.
大いなる不安が ほのめかされます
11:43
So now, a century later, if you're at all
ですから1世紀後の今 もし皆さんが
11:46
paying attention to what's
happening in the environment,
環境に起きていることに
何らかの関心を払っているのなら
11:48
you feel that discomfort so much more intensely.
更に烈しい当惑を味わっているでしょう
11:50
We're living now in an age of what scientists
我々は科学者が「保護依存」と呼び始めた
11:54
have started to call "conservation reliance,"
そんな時代を生きていて
11:57
and what that term means is that we've disrupted
そしてその言葉が意味するのは
我々が余りにも
11:59
so much that nature can't possibly
stand on its own anymore,
破壊し過ぎた為に
自然は恐らく 自力で持ちこたえられず
12:01
and most endangered species
そして絶滅危機に瀕した種の大半は
12:04
are only going to survive
彼らの好むよう造られた土地から
12:06
if we stay out there in the landscape
我々が姿を消さなければ
12:08
riggging the world around them in their favor.
生き延びることができないという事です
12:10
So we've gone hands-on
さあ 我々は自然保護に取り組んでおり
12:12
and we can't ever take our hands off,
もう決して手を放すことはできません
12:14
and that's a hell of a lot of work.
途方もなく多くのやるべき事があるのです
12:16
Right now, we're training condors
現在 我々は電線に止まらないよう
12:18
not to perch on power lines.
コンドルをトレーニングしています
12:21
We teach whooping cranes
to migrate south for the winter
アメリカシロヅルに超軽量飛行機の後ろに付き
12:23
behind little ultra-light airplanes.
冬の期間は南に渡るように教えます
12:26
We're out there feeding plague vaccine to ferrets.
フェレットにはペストワクチンを与え
12:28
We monitor pygmy rabbits with drones.
無人偵察機でピグミーウサギを監視します
12:32
So we've gone from annihilating species
我々は種を死に絶えさせる代わりに
12:36
to micromanaging the survival of a lot of species
今では多くの種を生存させるよう
こと細かに管理しているのです
12:39
indefinitely, and which ones?
無期限に—でもどの種を?
12:43
Well, the ones that we've told
それはお話しした
12:45
compelling stories about,
魅力的な物語の生き物たちです
12:46
the ones we've decided ought to stick around.
我々が存在し続けるべきだと決めたものたちです
12:48
The line between conservation and domestication
保護と飼い慣らしの境界線は
12:51
is blurred.
曖昧です
12:54
So what I've been saying is that the stories
私が言い続けているのは
12:56
that we tell about wild animals are so subjective
私たちが野生動物について語るその物語は
12:58
they can be irrational
とても主観的で 馬鹿げたものにも
13:01
or romanticized or sensationalized.
ロマンチックにも センセーショナルにもなり得るのです
13:02
Sometimes they just have
nothing to do with the facts.
時には全く事実とは関係ないこともあります
13:04
But in a world of conservation reliance,
しかし保護依存の世界においては
13:07
those stories have very real consequences,
それらの物語は
大変現実的な結果を伴います
13:10
because now, how we feel about an animal
何故なら 今 我々が動物について
どんな風に感じるかということが
13:12
affects its survival
あなたが環境の教科書で読んだ
13:15
more than anything that you read about
どんなことよりも
13:17
in ecology textbooks.
その生存に影響するからです
13:19
Storytelling matters now.
「物語を伝えること」は今 重要なのです
13:21
Emotion matters.
「感情」には意味があるのです
13:23
Our imagination has become an ecological force.
我々の想像力は環境へ及ぼす力となっています
13:25
And so maybe the teddy bear worked in part
そして恐らくティディベアはある役を果たしました
13:31
because the legend of Roosevelt
何故ならルーズベルト大統領と
13:32
and that bear in Mississippi
ミシシッピ州のあのクマの言い伝えは
13:35
was kind of like an allegory
社会が当時
13:37
of this great responsibility that society
直視し始めた大いなる責任についての
13:39
was just beginning to face up to back then.
寓話のようなものだったのです
13:41
It would be another 71 years
絶滅危惧種保護法の失効まで
13:43
before the Endangered Species Act was passed,
あと71年ありますが
13:46
but really, here's its whole ethos
しかし この寓話は
13:48
boiled down into something like a scene
人々の思潮をステンドグラスの1場面に
13:50
you'd see in a stained glass window.
昇華したかのようです
13:52
The bear is a helpless victim tied to a tree,
「クマは木に結び付けられた しがない犠牲者」で
13:54
and the president of the United States
そして「アメリカ合衆国大統領は
13:57
decided to show it some mercy.
憐れみを施すと決めた」のです
14:00
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
14:02
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:05
[Illustrations by Wendy MacNaughton]
[イラストレーション:ウェンディ・マクノートン]
14:07
Translated by Masami Hisai
Reviewed by Eriko T.

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jon Mooallem - Writer
Jon Mooallem is the author of "Wild Ones: A Sometimes Dismaying, Weirdly Reassuring Story About Looking at People Looking at Animals in America."

Why you should listen

What do we see when we look at wild animals -- do we respond to human-like traits, or thrill to the idea of their utter unfamiliarity? Jon Mooallem's book, Wild Ones , examines our relationship with wild animals both familiar and feral, telling stories of the North American environmental movement from its unlikely birth, and following three species who've come to symbolize our complicated relationship with whatever "nature" even means anymore.

Mooallem has written about everything from the murder of Hawaiian monk seals, to Idahoan utopians, to the world’s most famous ventriloquist, to the sad, secret history of the invention of the high five. A recent piece, "American Hippopotamus," was an Atavist story on, really, a plan in 1910 to jumpstart the hippopotamus ranching industry in America.

More profile about the speaker
Jon Mooallem | Speaker | TED.com