sponsored links
TED2014

Nicholas Negroponte: A 30-year history of the future

ニコラス・ネグロポンテ: 未来の30年史

March 19, 2014

MITメディアラボ創設者 ニコラス・ネグロポンテがあなたを過去30年間に起こったテクノロジーの発展の旅に誘います。この優れた予言者は、彼が1970年代と1980年代に予測し当時嘲笑されたインターフェースと技術革新が現在は普及しているという例を紹介し、最後の(とんでもない、あるいは鮮やかな)30年後の予測と共に締めくくります。

Nicholas Negroponte - Tech visionary
The founder of the MIT Media Lab, Nicholas Negroponte pushed the edge of the information revolution as an inventor, thinker and angel investor. He's the driving force behind One Laptop per Child, building computers for children in the developing world. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
(Video) Nicholas Negroponte:
Can we switch to the video disc,
(ビデオ)ニコラス・ネグロポンテ
(以下ネ):ビデオディスクに
00:12
which is in play mode?
切り替えて 再生モードにしましょう
00:14
I'm really interested in how you put people and computers together.
人々とコンピューターが一体となる
という事に興味があるのです
00:17
We will be using the TV screens or their equivalents
我々はTVスクリーンやその類いのものを
00:22
for electronic books of the future.
未来の電子ブックに使っているでしょう
00:25
(Music, crosstalk)
(音楽)
00:30
Very interested in touch-sensitive displays,
タッチセンシティブディスプレイに興味があります
00:49
high-tech, high-touch, not having
to pick up your fingers to use them.
ハイテク ハイタッチで
指を動かさなくても使えるようになります
00:52
There is another way where computers
もう一つのコンピューターが人と
00:56
touch people: wearing, physically wearing.
融合する形態とは
それを身に付けてしまう事です
00:58
Suddenly on September 11th,
突然 9月11日
01:08
the world got bigger.
世界が広がりました
01:10
NN: Thank you. (Applause)
ネ:ありがとうございます(拍手)
01:13
Thank you.
ありがとうございます
01:16
When I was asked to do this,
今回のトークを依頼されたとき
01:18
I was also asked to look at all 14 TED Talks
今までお話した14のTEDトークを
01:20
that I had given,
時系列に沿って
01:24
chronologically.
全て観るように頼まれました
01:26
The first one was actually two hours.
最初のトークは実は2時間あり
01:27
The second one was an hour,
次は1時間
01:30
and then they became half hours,
それからは30分となり—
01:31
and all I noticed was my bald spot getting bigger.
気付けば私の頭がどんどん薄くなっていました
01:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:37
Imagine seeing your life, 30 years of it, go by,
人生の30年分が目の前を走り過ぎるのを
想像してみて下さい
01:38
and it was, to say the least,
少なくとも私には
01:42
for me, quite a shocking experience.
大層ショッキングな経験でした
01:46
So what I'm going to do in my time
今から皆さんに
01:50
is try and share with you what happened
この30年間で起こった事を
01:52
during the 30 years,
お話ししたいと思います
01:53
and then also make a prediction,
それから未来を予測してみて
01:55
and then tell you a little bit
次に私がやっている事を
01:58
about what I'm doing next.
一部ご紹介します
02:00
And I put on a slide
スライドに私の人生において第1回目の
TEDが開催された時期を記していますが
02:02
where TED 1 happened in my life.
スライドに私の人生において第1回目の
TEDが開催された時期を記していますが
02:05
And it's rather important
私にとって重要な事です
02:09
because I had done 15 years of research before it,
TED以前の15年分の研究があったので
02:11
so I had a backlog, so it was easy.
内容にする蓄積があり 話すことは難しくはありませんでした
02:15
It's not that I was Fidel Castro
私はフィデル・カストロや
02:18
and I could talk for two hours,
バックミンスター・フラーのように
02:20
or Bucky Fuller.
2時間も話し続けられませんからね
02:21
I had 15 years of stuff,
当時の私には15年分の研究実績があり
02:23
and the Media Lab was about to start.
メディア・ラボが開設されようとしていた所だったので
02:25
So that was easy.
話せる内容は豊富にありました
02:27
But there are a couple of things
あの頃の時代について重要な点が
02:29
about that period
いくつか—
02:32
and about what happened that are
そしてあの頃に起こった重要な事柄が
02:33
really quite important.
いくつかあります
02:35
One is that
まず—
02:37
it was a period when computers
当時まだコンピューターは
02:40
weren't yet for people.
人々の為のものではありませんでした
02:43
And the other thing that sort of happened
もう一つ あの時代に
02:45
during that time is that
特徴的なことは
02:48
we were considered sissy computer scientists.
我々は「なんちゃってコンピューター科学者」だと
考えられていたことです
02:52
We weren't considered the real thing.
私達は 「本物」とは考えられていなかったのです
02:55
So what I'm going to show you is, in retrospect,
昔を振り返ると
02:56
a lot more interesting and a lot more accepted
今からお見せするものはあの時代よりも
03:00
than it was at the time.
今はもっと真面目に受け入れられているのです
03:03
So I'm going to characterize the years
過去の時代の特徴をお話しして
03:05
and I'm even going to go back
私のごく初期の作品についてもお話します
03:08
to some very early work of mine,
私のごく初期の作品についてもお話します
03:09
and this was the kind of stuff I was doing in the '60s:
これが私が60年代に行っていた研究です
03:12
very direct manipulation,
実に直接的な操作をしています
03:14
very influenced as I studied architecture
私は建築を学んだため
03:17
by the architect Moshe Safdie,
建築家モシェ・サフディからの影響を強く受けていて
03:19
and you can see that we even built robotic things
(彼の作品の)「アビタ67」の様な構造を造れる
03:21
that could build habitat-like structures.
ロボットのようなものも作りました
03:24
And this for me was
そしてこれは
03:27
not yet the Media Lab,
まだメディアラボ創設の前で
03:29
but was the beginning of what I'll call
私がセンサリー(触覚)コンピューティングと呼ぶものの
03:30
sensory computing,
始まりでした
03:33
and I pick fingers
私が選んだのは指でしたが
03:35
partly because everybody thought it was ridiculous.
指で操作することがばかげていると皆が思っていた事も
その理由のひとつです
03:37
Papers were published
指を使う事がいかにばかげているか
03:41
about how stupid it was to use fingers.
という論文が幾つも発表されました
03:43
Three reasons: One was they were low-resolution.
それには3つの理由があり、ひとつは解像度が低かったこと
03:47
The other is your hand would occlude
次に 手が視界をふさいでしまう
03:50
what you wanted to see,
ということで
03:52
and the third, which was the winner,
最後が傑作です
03:53
was that your fingers would get the screen dirty,
指は画面を汚してしまうからだめだ
というものでした
03:55
and hence, fingers would never be
よって 指は絶対に
03:59
a device that you'd use.
デバイスとはなり得ないと思われていました
04:01
And this was a device we built in the '70s,
これは70年代に私達が作ったデバイスでしたが
04:03
which has never even been picked up.
日の目を見る事がありませんでした
04:06
It's not just touch sensitive,
タッチセンシティブであるだけでなく
04:08
it's pressure sensitive.
圧力も感知します
04:09
(Video) Voice: Put a yellow circle there.
(ビデオ)声:黄色の円をそこに描いて
04:12
NN: Later work, and again this was before TED 1 —
ネ:この作品はもっと後のものですが
TED1が開催される以前のもので—
04:14
(Video) Voice: Move that west of the diamond.
(ビデオ)声:それをダイヤの左に動かして
04:17
Create a large green circle there.
緑色の大きな円を描いて
04:20
Man: Aw, shit.
男性:ああっ、ちぇっ
04:23
NN: — was to sort of do interface concurrently,
ネ:ある種 2種類のインターフェースを介し同時に
04:25
so when you talked and you pointed
人が話しかけ 指差すという
04:29
and you had, if you will,
いわゆる
04:31
multiple channels.
複数チャンネルでの操作でした
04:34
Entebbe happened.
そしてエンテベ事件が起こりました
04:35
1976, Air France was hijacked,
1976年にエールフランス機がハイジャックされ
04:37
taken to Entebbe,
エンテベ空港まで連れ去られ
04:41
and the Israelis not only did an extraordinary rescue,
その際イスラエル人達は鮮やかな救出活動を行いましたが
04:42
they did it partly because they had practiced
実はその為に彼らは
04:47
on a physical model of the airport,
空港の実物大モデルを砂漠に作ったのです
04:49
because they had built the airport,
彼らはそこで空港の間取りを
04:52
so they built a model in the desert,
体験し 熟知していた為
04:53
and when they arrived at Entebbe,
エンテベ空港に着いた時には
04:55
they knew where to go because
they had actually been there.
どう動けば良いか分かっていたのです
04:56
The U.S. government asked some of us, '76,
76年 アメリカ政府から 私達研究者の幾人かに
04:59
if we could replicate that computationally,
これをコンピューター上で再現出来ないかという打診があり
05:03
and of course somebody like myself says yes.
私のような者は当然イエスと言い
05:05
Immediately, you get a contract,
直ぐさま防衛省との
05:08
Department of Defense,
契約が結ばれ
05:10
and we built this truck and this rig.
我々はこのトラックと撮影装置を造りました
05:11
We did sort of a simulation,
ビデオディスクを使って
05:14
because you had video discs,
シミュレーションの一種を行いました
05:16
and again, this is '76.
繰り返しますがこれは76年です
05:18
And then many years later,
数年が経ち
05:20
you get this truck,
この車が出来上がり—
05:23
and so you have Google Maps.
その結果 グーグルマップとなりました
05:25
Still people thought,
それでも人々はこれを
05:28
no, that was not serious computer science,
真っ当なコンピューターサイエンスだとは見なしませんでしたが
05:29
and it was a man named Jerry Wiesner,
ジェリー・ウィーズナーという
05:33
who happened to be the president of MIT,
MITの学長は違いました
05:35
who did think it was computer science.
これを真っ当な研究だと考えたのです
05:38
And one of the keys for anybody
人生で何かをやってみようと
05:40
who wants to start something in life:
思う人への鍵となるアドバイスですが
05:43
Make sure your president is part of it.
組織の長を巻き込む事です
05:46
So when I was doing the Media Lab,
それでメディアラボの運営は
05:49
it was like having a gorilla in the front seat.
ゴリラを助手席に乗せているようなものでした
05:52
If you were stopped for speeding
スピード違反をして止められたら
05:55
and the officer looked in the window
窓を覗き込んだ警官は
05:58
and saw who was in the passenger seat,
助手席を見てこう言います
06:00
then, "Oh, continue on, sir."
「失礼しました どうぞお進み下さい」
06:02
And so we were able,
それで私達には制約が少なく研究が行えました
06:04
and this is a cute, actually, device, parenthetically.
これは可愛らしい「デバイス」です
06:05
This was a lenticular photograph of Jerry Wiesner
ジェリー・ウィーズナーのレンチキュラー写真で
06:09
where the only thing that changed in the photograph
口だけが動くようになっています
06:12
were the lips.
口だけが動くようになっています
06:15
So when you oscillated that little piece
このレンチキュラーシートに映る彼の写真を
06:16
of lenticular sheet with his photograph,
振動させると
06:19
it would be in lip sync
ごく単純な仕組みで
06:22
with zero bandwidth.
リップ・シンクが出来るのです
06:24
It was a zero-bandwidth teleconferencing system
当時のインターネットを介さないテレカンファレンス・システム
06:26
at the time.
というわけでした
06:29
So this was the Media Lab's —
これがメディアラボでやっていたことです—
06:31
this is what we said we'd do,
これは私達がやろうとしていたことで
06:35
that the world of computers, publishing,
コンピューターや出版の世界
06:37
and so on would come together.
等々を融合することです
06:39
Again, not generally accepted,
これも一般的には受け入れられてはいませんでしたが
06:42
but very much part of TED in the early days.
初期のTEDの哲学の中核を成していました
06:44
And this is really where we were headed.
これは私達の描いていた将来像でした
06:49
And that created the Media Lab.
それでメディアラボが生まれたのです
06:52
One of the things about age
年を重ねたお陰で
06:54
is that I can tell you with great confidence,
自信を持ってこう言えます—
06:58
I've been to the future.
私は未来に行ったのです
07:02
I've been there, actually, many times.
私は未来を 実際何度も体験したのです
07:05
And the reason I say that is,
こう言う理由は
07:08
how many times in my life have I said,
今までにもう何度も
07:10
"Oh, in 10 years, this will happen,"
「10年後にはこれは実現しているさ」と言い
07:12
and then 10 years comes.
そして10年が経ち 皆さんはそれからようやく
07:14
And then you say, "Oh, in
five years, this will happen."
「5年後にはこれは実現しているさ」
07:16
And then five years comes.
と言い5年後実現しているのです
07:18
So I say this a little bit with having felt
ですから未来に行ったと私が言うのは
07:19
that I'd been there a number of times,
今までに何度も未来を体験したと感じたことによります
07:23
and one of the things that is most quoted
それから 一番引用された
07:26
that I've ever said
私の言葉の中で
07:29
is that computing is not about computers,
「コンピューティングはコンピューターの中だけに
07:30
and that didn't quite get enough traction,
とどまらない」というのがありますが
これは最初注目を浴びず
07:33
and then it started to.
その後次第に注目されだしました
07:36
It started to because people caught on
なぜならついに人々は 媒体自体が
07:38
that the medium wasn't the message.
重要なのではない
ということが分かったからです
07:41
And the reason I show this car
この車をあまり見た目の良く無いスライドで
07:45
in actually a rather ugly slide
お見せしているのは
07:47
is just again to tell you the kind of story
私の人生の一部を形づくったような
07:50
that characterized a little bit of my life.
物語をお話しする為です
07:52
This is a student of mine
私の学生の一人ですが
07:55
who had done a Ph.D. called "Backseat Driver."
「バックシート・ドライバー」というテーマの
博士号論文を書きました
07:57
It was in the early days of GPS,
この頃はGPSの黎明期だったのですが
08:00
the car knew where it was,
この車は自分のいる場所を知っており
08:03
and it would give audio instructions
音声での指示をドライバーへ
08:04
to the driver, when to turn right,
when to turn left and so on.
いつ右へ曲がるのか または左へというように
出すのです
08:06
Turns out, there are a lot of things
実はこの時代
08:09
in those instructions that back in that period
こうした指示を出すと言うことには
08:11
were pretty challenging,
多くの課題があって
08:14
like what does it mean, take the next right?
例えば「次を右に曲がる」とはどういう意味か?
08:15
Well, if you're coming up on a street,
道を進むと「次の」「右」は多分
08:19
the next right's probably the one after,
もう一つ先を右に曲がることだろうとか
08:20
and there are lots of issues,
そうした問題が沢山あったのです
08:23
and the student did a wonderful thesis,
そして学生が素晴らしい論文を
書き上げたにも関わらず
08:24
and the MIT patent office said "Don't patent it.
MITの知財特許オフィスは「特許を申請するべきでは無い」と
すら言ったのです
08:26
It'll never be accepted.
「受理される見込みは到底無く
08:31
The liabilities are too large.
負うことになる責任が大き過ぎる
08:33
There will be insurance issues.
保険の問題も出て来るでしょう
08:35
Don't patent it."
特許を取らないで下さい」
08:37
So we didn't,
それで特許は取りませんでした
08:38
but it shows you how people, again, at times,
でもこれはいかに人々が
08:39
don't really look at what's happening.
物事の本質を見通せないときがあるか
ということを表しています
08:43
Some work, and I'll just go
through these very quickly,
いくつかの作品を駆け足でお見せしましょう
08:47
a lot of sensory stuff.
センサー(知覚)技術も多く出て来ます
08:50
You might recognize a young Yo-Yo Ma
若きヨーヨー・マです
08:52
and tracking his body for playing
チェロやハイパーチェロを弾く彼の
08:54
the cello or the hypercello.
体をトラッキングしています
08:58
These fellows literally walked
around like that at the time.
彼らはこの頃この格好で歩き回っていました
09:01
It's now a little bit more discreet
今ではもう少し大人しくなって
09:04
and more commonplace.
普通になっています
09:07
And then there are at least three heroes
そして少なくとも3人のヒーローについて
09:09
I want to quickly mention.
簡単に言及したいのですが
09:11
Marvin Minsky, who taught me a lot
マービン・ミンスキーは
09:13
about common sense,
常識について良く教えてくれました
09:15
and I will talk briefly about Muriel Cooper,
ミュリエル・クーパーの話もしましょう
09:16
who was very important to Ricky Wurman
リッキー・ワーマンとTEDにとってとても大切な人物ですが
09:20
and to TED, and in fact, when she got onstage,
彼女はステージに立って
09:22
she said, the first thing she said was,
最初にこう言いました
09:26
"I introduced Ricky to Nicky."
「私はリッキーをニッキーに紹介しました」
09:28
And nobody calls me Nicky
誰も私を「ニッキー」と呼ばず
09:30
and nobody calls Richard Ricky,
誰もリチャードを「リッキー」と呼ばなかったので
09:32
so nobody knew who she was talking about.
彼女が誰の事を話しているのか
誰にも分かりませんでした
09:34
And then, of course, Seymour Papert,
そしてもちろんシーモア・パパート—
09:37
who is the person who said,
彼はこう言った人です
09:40
"You can't think about thinking
「『考える』ことを考えることは不可能だ—
09:41
unless you think about thinking about something."
『何かについて考えている』ことを考えることなくしては」
09:42
And that's actually — you can unpack that later.
これは実に—どうぞあとでゆっくり解いて下さい—
09:45
It's a pretty profound statement.
これはとても深淵な言葉です
09:51
I'm showing some slides
TED2からのスライドを幾つか
09:55
that were from TED 2,
お見せします
09:56
a little silly as slides, perhaps.
たわいないスライドかも知れませんが
09:59
Then I felt television really was about displays.
私はテレビというものの意義はディスプレイにあるのだ
と感じるようになりました
10:02
Again, now we're past TED 1,
それはTED1が終わり
10:08
but just around the time of TED 2,
TED2が開催される頃でした
10:11
and what I'd like to mention here is,
ここで言及したい事は
10:14
even though you could imagine
知性がデバイスに宿る事が
10:16
intelligence in the device,
可能だとしても
10:18
I look today at some of the work
今日「モノのインターネット」(IoT)に
10:20
being done about the Internet of Things,
関わって作られている物を見ると
10:21
and I think it's kind of tragically pathetic,
嘆かわしい程に情け無く思うのです
10:24
because what has happened is people take
なぜなら今起こっていることは
10:27
the oven panel and put it on your cell phone,
オーブンの操作パネル機能を携帯に取り入れたり
10:29
or the door key onto your cell phone,
ドアの鍵を携帯の機能にしたり
10:33
just taking it and bringing it to you,
あらゆる物を手元に持って来ただけで
10:35
and in fact that's actually what you don't want.
しかも実はそれは避けるべきことなのです
10:37
You want to put a chicken in the oven,
そうではなく 鶏肉をオーブンに入れると
10:39
and the oven says, "Aha, it's a chicken,"
オーブンが「あ、チキンですね」と言って調理し始める
10:41
and it cooks the chicken.
と言ったものが必要なのです
10:44
"Oh, it's cooking the chicken for Nicholas,
「オーブンはニコラスの鶏肉を料理している
10:45
and he likes it this way and that way."
彼が好きな焼き加減は…」といった具合に
10:47
So the intelligence, instead of being in the device,
デバイス自体に知性を持たせる代わりに
10:49
we have started today
最近私達はそれを
10:52
to move it back onto the cell phone
携帯電話に持たせてしまったり
10:53
or closer to the user,
ユーザーの手元に持って来ただけです
10:55
not a particularly enlightened view
モノのインターネットの
10:58
of the Internet of Things.
有用性が十分に活かされていません
11:00
Television, again, television what I said today,
テレビについて
11:03
that was back in 1990,
1990年にこれが今日のテレビそして
11:06
and the television of tomorrow
未来のテレビは
11:09
would look something like that.
こんな風な物になると言いました
11:10
Again, people, but they laughed cynically,
人々は冷笑しましたが
11:13
they didn't laugh with much appreciation.
その実あまり理解もしていなかったのです
11:16
Telecommunications in the 1990s,
1990年のテレコミュニケーション
11:21
George Gilder decided that he would call this diagram
ジョージ・ギルダーはこのダイアグラムを
11:24
the Negroponte switch.
ネグロポンテ・スイッチと呼ぶ事にしました
11:30
I'm probably much less famous than George,
私はおそらくジョージに比べかなり知名度が低いので
11:32
so when he called it the Negroponte switch, it stuck,
彼がこれを「ネグロポンテ・スイッチ」と呼ぶと
それが定着しました
11:34
but the idea of things that came in the ground
地中のケーブルを介して通信していた電話に
携帯電話が取って代わり
11:38
would go in the air and stuff in the air
アンテナで受信していたテレビは
11:40
would go into the ground
地中のケーブルを介するようになる
11:42
has played itself out.
という予想は的中したのです
11:44
That is the original slide from that year,
これはその年に使われたスライドですが
11:46
and it has worked in lockstep obedience.
全く忠実に現実となりました
11:50
We started Wired magazine.
そしてワイアードを創刊しました
11:54
Some people, I remember we shared
我々は交代で
11:56
the reception desk periodically,
雑誌の受付窓口も担当しました
12:00
and some parent called up irate that his son
ひどく怒った親御さんの電話で 息子さんが
12:02
had given up Sports Illustrated
ワイアード誌を購読するために
12:06
to subscribe for Wired,
セクシーなスポーツ雑誌の購読を止めたので
12:09
and he said, "Are you some
porno magazine or something?"
「お宅はポルノ雑誌か何かなんですか?」と聞くのです
12:10
and couldn't understand why his son
彼は息子がワイアードに興味を抱く事など
12:14
would be interested in Wired, at any rate.
到底理解出来なかったようです
12:16
I will go through this a little quicker.
少し駆け足で話しましょう
12:20
This is my favorite, 1995,
これはお気に入りです1995年の
12:23
back page of Newsweek magazine.
ニューズウィーク誌の裏表紙です
読んでみて下さい(笑)
12:26
Okay. Read it. (Laughter)
[ニコラス・ネグロポンテ
メディアラボ・ディレクターは]
12:29
["Nicholas Negroponte, director of the MIT Media Lab, predicts that we'll soon buy books and newspapers straight over the Internet. Uh, sure."
—Clifford Stoll, Newsweek, 1995]
[本や新聞をインターネット経由で
買う未来を予測する]
12:31
You must admit that gives you,
[ええ、そうでしょうとも (皮肉)
ニューズウィーク1995]
12:33
at least it gives me pleasure
あなたが完全に間違っているという
12:35
when somebody says how dead wrong you are.
誰かの批判が 完全にくつがえった時
それは気持ちがいいものです
12:37
"Being Digital" came out.
自著『ビーイング・デジタル』を発表しました
12:41
For me, it gave me an opportunity
本作で大きな出版社から
12:43
to be more in the trade press
出版し 一般の人々へ広めるという
12:46
and get this out to the public,
機会が手に入りました
12:48
and it also allowed us to build the new Media Lab,
お陰で新しいメディアラボも造ることができました
12:51
which if you haven't been to, visit,
是非訪れてみてください
12:54
because it's a beautiful piece of architecture
素晴らしい職場というだけでなく
12:56
aside from being a wonderful place to work.
その美しい建築も一見の価値があります
12:59
So these are the things we were saying in those TEDs.
TEDでこんな話をして来ました
[マルチメディアは大がかりで室内に限定された体験です―]
13:02
[Today, multimedia is a desktop or living room experience, because the apparatus is so clunky. This will change dramatically with small, bright, thin, high-resolution displays. — 1995]
[マルチメディアは大がかりで室内に限定された体験です―]
13:04
We came to them.
私達はその時代に追いつきました
[小型で薄く明るい高画質ディスプレイはこれを激変させます 1995]
13:06
I looked forward to it every year.
毎年その時を楽しみに待ちわびました
[小型で薄く明るい高画質ディスプレイはこれを激変させます 1995]
13:08
It was the party that Ricky Wurman never had
昔のリッキー・ワーマンのパーティとは違い
13:10
in the sense that he invited many of his old friends,
私を含め 彼の古い友人たちが
実にたくさん招待されるように
13:13
including myself.
なったのです
13:16
And then something for me changed
それから私にとってあることが
13:17
pretty profoundly.
根本的に変化しました
13:20
I became more involved with computers and learning
私はよりコンピューターと学習ということについて興味を持ち
13:21
and influenced by Seymour,
シーモアに影響を受けたこともありますが
13:25
but particularly looking at learning
特に学習ということを
13:27
as something that is best approximated
最もコンピューター・プログラミングに
13:30
by computer programming.
類似したものとして捉えました
13:34
When you write a computer program,
コンピューター・プログラムを書く時
13:36
you've got to not just list things out
まずリストアップをし
13:38
and sort of take an algorithm
アルゴリズムを決めて
13:41
and translate it into a set of instructions,
1セットの指示にします
13:42
but when there's a bug, and all programs have bugs,
バグが見つかれば—全てのプログラムにつきものですが—
13:45
you've got to de-bug it.
デバッギングが必要です
13:48
You've got to go in, change it,
プログラムを直し
13:50
and then re-execute,
再度実行してみます
13:52
and you iterate,
そのように繰り返しを経ますが
13:53
and that iteration is really
そうした繰り返しの行為は
13:55
a very, very good approximation of learning.
実に学習ということと似ているのです
13:58
So that led to my own work with Seymour
それで私はシーモアとカンボジア等で
14:01
in places like Cambodia
子供たちそれぞれに一台ずつパソコンを与えるという
14:04
and the starting of One Laptop per Child.
ワン・ラップトップ・パー・チャイルド(OLPC)を始めました
14:07
Enough TED Talks on One Laptop per Child,
OLPCのTEDトークは十分あるので
14:10
so I'll go through it very fast,
そこは端折りましょう
14:12
but it did give us the chance
この活動は
14:14
to do something at a relatively large scale
学習、発育、コンピューティングの分野で
14:18
in the area of learning, development and computing.
比較的規模の大きい試みをする好機でした
14:22
Very few people know that One Laptop per Child
あまり知られていなかった事ですが OLPCは
14:26
was a $1 billion project,
10億ドル規模のプロジェクトで
14:28
and it was, at least over the seven years I ran it,
少なくとも私が運営していた7年間はそうでした
14:31
but even more important, the World Bank
世界銀行やアメリカ合衆国国際開発庁からの
14:34
contributed zero, USAID zero.
拠出金は無かったという事も重要な点です
14:36
It was mostly the countries
using their own treasuries,
殆どの国が自国の国庫から拠出しました
14:39
which is very interesting,
興味深い点です
14:43
at least to me it was very interesting
少なくとも私にとっては
14:45
in terms of what I plan to do next.
次にやろうとしていることに関わるので
14:46
So these are the various places it happened.
これらがOLPCの試みが行われた国々です
14:49
I then tried an experiment,
次に実験を試みました
14:52
and the experiment happened in Ethiopia.
エチオピアでのことでした
14:55
And here's the experiment.
内容はこうです
15:00
The experiment is,
この実験は
15:02
can learning happen where there are no schools.
学校が無い場所で学習はできるのか というテーマで
15:04
And we dropped off tablets
我々はタブレットPCを
15:08
with no instructions
何ら取扱説明書も無しにばらまき
15:10
and let the children figure it out.
子供たちに使い方を考えさせました
15:12
And in a short period of time,
子供たちはすぐに電源を入れて
15:16
they not only
子供たちはすぐに電源を入れて
15:19
turned them on and were using 50 apps per child
5日のうちに一人当たり50のアプリを使いこなし
15:21
within five days,
2週間で「ABCの歌」を歌っていただけでなく
15:24
they were singing "ABC" songs within two weeks,
2週間で「ABCの歌」を歌っていただけでなく
15:27
but they hacked Android within six months.
6ヶ月でアンドロイドをハックしてしまいました
15:29
And so that seemed sufficiently interesting.
十分に興味深い結果でした
15:33
This is perhaps the best picture I have.
これが一番良く映っている写真だと思いますが
15:37
The kid on your right
右手の子供は自ら
15:39
has sort of nominated himself as teacher.
教師役を買って出た子供で
15:44
Look at the kid on the left, and so on.
左にいる子供たちを教えています
15:46
There are no adults involved in this at all.
ここには大人の姿は全くありません
15:49
So I said, well can we do this
私は「これをもっと大きな規模で
15:52
at a larger scale?
やってみられるだろうか?」と言い
15:53
And what is it that's missing?
「その為に足りないのは何だろう?」と問いました
15:55
The kids are giving a press conference at this point,
ここで子供たちはプレス・カンファレンスをやっていますね
15:57
and sort of writing in the dirt.
土に文字を書いています
15:59
And the answer is, what is missing?
答えは—何が足りないのだろう?
16:02
And I'm going to skip over my prediction, actually,
未来の予測は省きましょう
16:06
because I'm running out of time,
時間が無くなって来ました
16:08
and here's the question, is what's going to happen?
一体どういうことが起こるのでしょうか?
16:10
I think the challenge
この課題は
16:14
is to connect the last billion people,
「最後の10億人」を繋げることです
16:15
and connecting the last billion
「最後の10億人」を繋げるということは
16:18
is very different than connecting the next billion,
「次の10億人」を繋げるということとは全く違う事です
16:20
and the reason it's different
その理由は—
16:24
is that the next billion
「次の10億人」を繋げるというのは
16:25
are sort of low-hanging fruit,
簡単な事なのです
16:27
but the last billion are rural.
でも「最後の10億人」は未開の地の人々のことで
16:29
Being rural and being poor
未開の地に住んでいるという事と貧しいということは
16:32
are very different.
全く違います
16:36
Poverty tends to be created by our society,
貧しさは私達の社会が生み出すものですが
16:37
and the people in that community are not poor
未開の地に住む人々は
そう言う意味で貧しいということは
16:41
in the same way at all.
全くありません
16:46
They may be primitive,
彼らは原始的かもしれませんが
16:48
but the way to approach it and to connect them,
その彼らをネットと繋げるということと
16:50
the history of One Laptop per Child,
OLPCの歴史 そして
16:54
and the experiment in Ethiopia,
エチオピアでの実験により
16:56
lead me to believe that we can in fact
私にはこれがごく短い期間で
17:00
do this in a very short period of time.
実現出来るという確信を持ちました
17:03
And so my plan,
この計画というのは—
17:06
and unfortunately I haven't been able
残念ながら計画のパートナー達から
17:08
to get my partners at this point
発表ができるように合意を
17:10
to let me announce them,
とりつけていないのですが
17:13
but is to do this with a stationary satellite.
静止衛星を使って実現します
17:14
There are many reasons
静止衛星が最良ではない理由は多くありますが
17:19
that stationary satellites aren't the best things,
静止衛星が最良ではない理由は多くありますが
17:22
but there are a lot of reasons why they are,
優れている理由も多くあります
17:26
and for two billion dollars,
2千億円で
17:29
you can connect a lot more than 100 million people,
10億人以上をネットに繋げてしまうのですから
17:32
but the reason I picked two,
この数字を選んだ理由は—
17:36
and I will leave this as my last slide,
これが最後のスライドですが
17:38
is two billion dollars
2千億円が
17:42
is what we were spending
アメリカがアフガニスタンに
17:44
in Afghanistan
毎週使っている金額だったからでもあります
17:47
every week.
毎週使っている金額だったからでもあります
17:49
So surely if we can connect
もし私達が
17:51
Africa and the last billion people
アフリカと「最後の10億人」とを
17:54
for numbers like that,
それ位の額で繋ぐ事ができるのなら
17:57
we should be doing it.
そうするべきだと思っています
17:58
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
17:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:02
Chris Anderson: Stay up there. Stay up there.
クリス・アンダーソン(以下ア):そのままでどうぞ
18:05
NN: You're going to give me extra time?
ネ:もっと続けた方が良いですか?
18:10
CA: No. That was wickedly clever, wickedly clever.
ア:いえ
18:12
You gamed it beautifully.
見事にお話しになられました
18:14
Nicholas, what is your prediction?
ニコラス 次の予測では何が起こるんですか?
18:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:18
NN: Thank you for asking.
ネ:聞いて頂いて恐縮です
18:21
I'll tell you what my prediction is,
私の予測はですね—
18:23
and my prediction, and this is a prediction,
これが私の予測です
18:26
because it'll be 30 years. I won't be here.
30年後 私はもういませんが
18:28
But one of the things about learning how to read,
読み方を学ぶということを考えています
18:31
we have been doing a lot of consuming
今まで私達は
18:36
of information going through our eyes,
目を通して多くの情報を吸収して来ましたが
18:39
and so that may be a very inefficient channel.
実はそれはとても非効率的な
経路だったのかもしれません
18:41
So my prediction is that we are
going to ingest information
ですから私の予測では 私達は将来
情報を消化するかたちで吸収しているでしょう
18:44
You're going to swallow a pill and know English.
錠剤を飲み込むともう 英語を学んでしまえるというように
18:49
You're going to swallow a
pill and know Shakespeare.
錠剤を飲むと シェイクスピア文学の知識が吸収されます
18:52
And the way to do it is through the bloodstream.
その情報は血流を通して吸収されます
18:55
So once it's in your bloodstream,
薬は血流に入ると
18:58
it basically goes through it and gets into the brain,
脳まで流れて行き
18:59
and when it knows that it's in the brain
脳に達すると
19:02
in the different pieces,
様々な場所で
19:04
it deposits it in the right places.
情報を正しい部位に届けます
19:05
So it's ingesting.
面白いですよ
19:08
CA: Have you been hanging out
with Ray Kurzweil by any chance?
ア:レイ・カーツワイルとお会いになりましたか?
19:09
NN: No, but I've been hanging
around with Ed Boyden
ネ:いいえ でもエド・ボイデンと話しましたよ
19:12
and hanging around with one of the speakers
スピーカーの一人で
19:15
who is here, Hugh Herr,
ここにいるヒュー・ハー博士や
19:17
and there are a number of people.
色々な人たちともお話していました
19:19
This isn't quite as far-fetched,
これはそう突拍子もない事では
19:20
so 30 years from now.
ないんですよ 30年後にはね
19:22
CA: We will check it out.
ア:楽しみにしていますよ
19:25
We're going to be back and we're going
to play this clip 30 years from now,
またTEDで30年後に今日のクリップを見る事にしましょう
19:27
and then all eat the red pill.
それから皆で赤いカプセルを飲みましょう
19:29
Well thank you for that.
それもあなたのお陰ですね
19:32
Nicholas Negroponte.
ニコラス・ネグロポンテでした
19:34
NN: Thank you.
ネ:ありがとうございました
19:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:37
Translator:Eriko T.
Reviewer:Kayo Kallas

sponsored links

Nicholas Negroponte - Tech visionary
The founder of the MIT Media Lab, Nicholas Negroponte pushed the edge of the information revolution as an inventor, thinker and angel investor. He's the driving force behind One Laptop per Child, building computers for children in the developing world.

Why you should listen

A pioneer in the field of computer-aided design, Negroponte founded (and was the first director of) MIT's Media Lab, which helped drive the multimedia revolution and now houses more than 500 researchers and staff across a broad range of disciplines. An original investor in Wired (and the magazine's "patron saint"), for five years he penned a column exploring the frontiers of technology -- ideas that he expanded into his 1995 best-selling book Being Digital. An angel investor extraordinaire, he's funded more than 40 startups, and served on the boards of companies such as Motorola and Ambient Devices.

But his latest effort, the One Laptop per Child project, may prove his most ambitious. The organization is designing, manufacturing and distributing low-cost, wireless Internet-enabled computers costing roughly $100 and aimed at children. Negroponte hopes to put millions of these devices in the hands of children in the developing world.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.