sponsored links
TEDxBeaconStreet

Nikolai Begg: A tool to fix one of the most dangerous moments in surgery

ニコライ・ベグ: 極めて危険な一瞬を回避できる手術器具

November 12, 2013

多くの手術は皮膚に穴をあけることから始まり、このときに体内の組織を傷つける危険が伴います。機械工学のエンジニアであるニコライ・ベグは、手術で頻繁に使われるトロッカーと呼ばれる医療器具の物理的なメカニズムに注目し、これを改良しました。日常的に行われる手術の危険性を軽減することができる発明です。

Nikolai Begg - Mechanical engineer
Nikolai Begg is a PhD candidate in mechanical engineering whose passion is rethinking medical devices. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
The first time I stood
in the operating room
手術室に初めて入って
00:12
and watched a real surgery,
実際に手術を見学するまで
00:14
I had no idea what to expect.
どんなものなのか
イメージも浮かびませんでした
00:16
I was a college student in engineering.
当時 大学の工学部の学生で
00:19
I thought it was going to be like on TV.
テレビで見たようなものを
想像していました
00:21
Ominous music playing in the background,
不吉な音楽が流れる中で
00:23
beads of sweat pouring down the surgeon's face.
外科医の額からは汗が噴き出している
00:25
But it wasn't like that at all.
でも 実際は全く違いました
00:28
There was music playing on this day,
そこで流れていた音楽は
00:30
I think it was Madonna's greatest hits. (Laughter)
マドンナのベストヒットだったと思います
(笑)
00:31
And there was plenty of conversation,
手術スタッフ同士で
よく会話もしています
00:34
not just about the patient's heart rate,
患者の心拍数などだけではなく
00:36
but about sports and weekend plans.
スポーツの話とか
週末に何をするかとか
00:38
And since then, the more surgeries I watched,
それ以後 手術というものを見学する度に
00:41
the more I realized this is how it is.
このようなものだと分かってきました
00:43
In some weird way, it's just
another day at the office.
いつも通りの日常的な風景があるだけです
00:45
But every so often
でも たまに
00:48
the music gets turned down,
音楽が止み
00:50
everyone stops talking,
突然皆が静かになって
00:52
and stares at exactly the same thing.
全員が何かに注目することあります
00:53
And that's when you know
that something absolutely critical
これは 何か重大で 注意を要する危険なことが
00:56
and dangerous is happening.
起こっているサインです
00:58
The first time I saw that
最初にそれを目撃したのは
01:01
I was watching a type of surgery
腹腔鏡手術と呼ばれる
01:02
called laparoscopic surgery
手術の最中でした
01:03
And for those of you who are unfamiliar,
ご存知ない方のために
簡単に説明すると
01:05
laparoscopic surgery, instead of the large
腹腔鏡手術では一般の手術のように
01:08
open incision you might
be used to with surgery,
大きく開腹する代わりに
01:10
a laparoscopic surgery
is where the surgeon creates
外科医は このような
01:13
these three or more small
incisions in the patient.
小さな穴を 3箇所以上開け
01:15
And then inserts these long, thin instruments
そこに この様な長くて細い器具と
01:18
and a camera,
カメラも挿入して
01:21
and actually does the procedure inside the patient.
患者の体内の空間で
手術を行うものです
01:22
This is great because there's
much less risk of infection,
この手術の利点は
細菌感染のリスクや
01:26
much less pain, shorter recovery time.
痛みが大幅に減り
回復も早いことです
01:28
But there is a trade-off,
でも欠点もあります
01:31
because these incisions are created
腹壁に小さな穴を開けるのに
01:34
with a long, pointed device
先の尖った細長い
01:36
called a trocar.
「トロッカー」という器具を使いますが
01:38
And the way the surgeon uses this device
これを外科医が どのように使うかというと
01:40
is that he takes it
患者のお腹にあて
01:42
and he presses it into the abdomen
腹壁に穴が開くまで
01:43
until it punctures through.
押すわけです
01:45
And now the reason why
everyone in the operating room
手術室のスタッフ全員が
01:49
was staring at that device on that day
この器具に注目していたのは
01:52
was because he had to be absolutely careful
この過程で細心の注意を払い
01:54
not to plunge it through
器具が腹壁を突き破ったときに
01:58
and puncture it into the organs
and blood vessels below.
その下にある臓器や血管まで傷つけないように
する必要があったからです
01:59
But this problem should seem
pretty familiar to all of you
日常よくある問題と同じですね
02:03
because I'm pretty sure
you've seen it somewhere else.
日常よくある問題と同じですね
02:05
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:08
Remember this?
皆さんも経験ありますね?
02:09
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:11
You knew that at any second
ストローがもう少しで
02:15
that straw was going to plunge through,
突き刺さるというとき
02:17
and you didn't know if it was
going to go out the other side
反対側まで突き破って
パックを持つ手に
02:19
and straight into your hand,
突き刺さってしまうとか
02:21
or if you were going to
get juice everywhere,
ジュースが ドバッと噴出するかとか
02:22
but you were terrified. Right?
不安な気分になりましたよね?
02:24
Every single time you did this,
皆さんもストローを手に 毎回
02:27
you experienced the same
fundamental physics
私が手術室で見たものと
物理的には同じ事を
02:29
that I was watching in the operating room that day.
やっていたわけです
02:31
And it turns out it really is a problem.
実はこれが本当に問題であることが分かりました
02:35
In 2003, the FDA actually came out and said
2003年にFDAが
02:37
that trocar incisions might
be the most dangerous step
トロッカーの刺入が低侵襲手術の
02:40
in minimally invasive surgery.
最も危険な作業であると発表し
02:43
Again in 2009, we see a paper that says
再び2009年にはトロッカーが
02:45
that trocars account for over half
腹腔鏡手術に伴う重大な問題の
02:48
of all major complications in laparoscopic surgery.
過半数以上に関係するという論文も発表されました
02:50
And, oh by the way,
にもかかわらず
02:54
this hasn't changed for 25 years.
この器具は過去25年
同じものが使われているのです
02:55
So when I got to graduate school,
そこで 大学院では
02:58
this is what I wanted to work on.
これをテーマに研究することにしました
03:00
I was trying to explain to a friend of mine
何に取り組んでいるかを
03:02
what exactly I was spending my time doing,
友達に解ってもらおうとして
03:03
and I said,
「アパートの壁に何かを掛けるために
03:06
"It's like when you're drilling through a wall
ドリルで穴を開けていて
03:07
to hang something in your apartment.
ドリルが内壁を突き破った瞬間
03:10
There's that moment when the drill
first punctures through the wall
刃が突然 突き抜けてしまった
経験があるだろう?」と言うと
03:13
and there's this plunge. Right?
刃が突然 突き抜けてしまった
経験があるだろう?」と言うと
03:17
And he looked at me and he said,
彼は私の方を見て こう言いました
03:23
"You mean like when they drill
into people's brains?"
「頭蓋骨にドリルで穴を開けるときと同じだね?」
03:25
And I said, "Excuse me?" (Laughter)
これにはビックリしました(笑)
03:28
And then I looked it up and they
do drill into people's brains.
実際調べてみると
頭の手術にはドリルを使うんです
03:31
A lot of neurosurgical procedures
脳神経科の手術の多くは
03:34
actually start with a drill
incision through the skull.
頭蓋骨にドリルで穴を開けることから
始まります
03:36
And if the surgeon isn't careful,
外科医が気をつけないと
03:39
he can plunge directly into the brain.
ドリルの刃が脳内に突き進んでしまいます
03:41
So this is the moment when I started thinking,
これを知り 考え始めました
03:45
okay, cranial drilling, laparoscopic surgery,
頭蓋骨に穴を開けたり
腹腔鏡手術
03:47
why not other areas of medicine?
他にも何かあるんじゃないか?
03:50
Because think about it, when was
the last time you went to the doctor
だって 医者に行けば 何かで必ず
03:52
and you didn't get stuck with something? Right?
ブチッと刺されますからね?
(笑)
03:54
So the truth is
実際 医療の現場では
03:57
in medicine puncture is everywhere.
刺す行為は日常的にあります
03:58
And here are just a couple
of the procedures that I've found
体の様々な組織を刺す医療行為を
04:01
that involve some tissue puncture step.
いくつか調べてみました
04:03
And if we take just three of them —
ここでは3つだけ 見てみましょう
04:07
laparoscopic surgery,
epidurals, and cranial drilling —
腹腔鏡手術 硬膜外麻酔
開頭手術ですが
04:09
these procedures account
for over 30,000 complications
これらの手術だけで
アメリカでは年間
04:13
every year in this country alone.
3万件もの問題が
報告されています
04:17
I call that a problem worth solving.
これは 何とかした方が良いと
思ったわけです
04:20
So let's take a look at some of the devices
これらの処置に使用される
04:22
that are used in these types of procedures.
器具をいくつかお見せしましょう
04:25
I mentioned epidurals. This is an epidural needle.
硬膜外麻酔に
使われる針がこれです
04:27
It's used to puncture through
the ligaments in the spine
これで背骨の間から靱帯を穿刺して
04:30
and deliver anesthesia during childbirth.
出産時などの麻酔薬を注入します
04:33
Here's a set of bone marrow biopsy tools.
これは 骨髄生検に使われる器具です
04:35
These are actually used
to burrow into the bone
骨の中に突き刺して
04:38
and collect bone marrow
or sample bone lesions.
骨髄や骨病変のサンプルを採取します
04:40
Here's a bayonette from the Civil War.
こちらは 南北戦争時代の銃剣です
04:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:45
If I had told you it was a
medical puncture device
これが 医療器具だと紹介しても
04:48
you probably would have believed me.
きっと誰も疑わないでしょうね
04:51
Because what's the difference?
似たようなものですから
04:53
So, the more I did this research
調べれば調べるほど
04:55
the more I thought there has to be
さらに良い方法があるべきだと
04:57
a better way to do this.
思うようになりました
04:58
And for me the key to this problem
これらの人体に穴を開ける器具に
05:01
is that all these different puncture devices
共通の問題も見えてきました
05:03
share a common set of fundamental physics.
物理的な問題です
05:05
So what are those physics?
物理的に何が起こっているのでしょう?
05:09
Let's go back to drilling through a wall.
再び壁に穴を開けるのを見てみましょう
05:11
So you're applying a force
on a drill towards the wall.
ドリルで壁に対して力をかけていますね?
05:12
And Newton says the wall
is going to apply force back,
ニュートンの法則によれば
この時 壁が押し返す力は
05:16
equal and opposite.
同じ強さで逆向きです
05:19
So, as you drill through the wall,
穴を開ける過程では
05:21
those forces balance.
この2つの力は釣り合っています
05:22
But then there's that moment
でも ドリルの刃が
05:24
when the drill first punctures
through the other side of the wall,
壁を貫通した瞬間
05:26
and right at that moment
the wall can't push back anymore.
壁はもう押し返す力が無くなります
05:28
But your brain hasn't reacted
to that change in force.
でも その変化に人間が反応できないため
05:31
So for that millisecond,
ほんのミリ秒間
05:34
or however long it takes you
to react, you're still pushing,
反応が起こるまで
ドリルを押し続けることになり
05:35
and that unbalanced force
causes an acceleration,
その一方的な力によって
05:38
and that is the plunge.
刃が突っ込んでしまうわけです
05:41
But what if right at the moment of puncture
でも もし貫通の瞬間に
05:44
you could pull that tip back,
ドリルの刃を引っ込められたら
05:48
actually oppose the forward acceleration?
加速的に前進するのを
避けられるでしょうか?
05:49
That's what I set out to do.
これを研究の課題にしました
05:52
So imagine you have a device
組織に穴を開けるための
05:54
and it's got some kind of sharp tip
to cut through tissue.
先の尖った器具があるとします
05:56
What's the simplest way
you could pull that tip back?
その先端を引っ込める
最も簡単な方法は何でしょう?
05:59
I chose a spring.
私はバネだと思いました
06:02
So when you extend that spring,
you extend that tip out
バネが伸びながら
器具の先端が出るようにして
06:04
so it's ready to puncture tissue,
組織を貫通する直前に
06:07
the spring wants to pull the tip back.
バネが先端を引っこめるという仕組みです
06:09
How do you keep the tip in place
穴が開く瞬間まで
06:10
until the moment of puncture?
引っ込まないようにするには
06:12
I used this mechanism.
こんな仕掛けを使いました
06:14
When the tip of the device
is pressed against tissue,
器具の先端が組織に押し当てられていると
06:17
the mechanism expands outwards
and wedges in place against the wall.
この仕掛けは外側に広がって
06:19
And the friction that's generated
壁との間に生まれた摩擦から
06:23
locks it in place and prevents
the spring from retracting the tip.
固定されバネが器具の先端を
引き戻すのを防ぎます
06:25
But right at the moment of puncture,
でも穴が貫通した瞬間
06:28
the tissue can't push back
on the tip anymore.
組織が先端部を押し返せなくなり
06:30
So the mechanism unlocks
and the spring retracts the tip.
このメカニズムが解除され
バネが先端部を引っ込めます
06:32
Let me show you that
happening in slow motion.
これをスロー再生しておみせします
06:35
This is about 2,000 frames a second,
毎秒2000フレームで撮影しました
06:37
and I'd like you to notice the tip
映像の下の方に見える器具の先端が
06:39
that's right there on the bottom,
about to puncture through tissue.
穴を開けるところです
06:40
And you'll see that
right at the moment of puncture,
穴が貫通した途端
06:43
right there, the mechanism unlocks
and retracts that tip back.
このようにロックが解除され
先端が引き戻されます
06:48
I want to show it to you again, a little closer up.
もう一度 クローズアップ映像を
お見せします
06:51
You're going to see the sharp bladed tip,
尖った刃の先端が見えますが
06:54
and right when it punctures
that rubber membrane
ゴムの膜をやぶった瞬間に
06:56
it's going to disappear
into this white blunt sheath.
刃は白い鞘の中に引っ込んでしまいます
06:58
Right there.
見えますね
07:02
That happens within four 100ths
of a second after puncture.
貫通の後これに要する時間は100分の4秒
07:04
And because this device is designed
to address the physics of puncture
しかも このデバイスは一般的な
「突き破り」防止のデザインで
07:08
and not the specifics of cranial drilling
頭蓋骨に穴を開けたり
07:12
or laparoscopic surgery,
or another procedure,
腹腔鏡手術専用ではないので
07:14
it's applicable across these
different medical disciplines
様々な医療の現場で使えます
07:16
and across different length scales.
スケールを変えることもできます
07:19
But it didn't always look like this.
でも これは改良を重ねた結果です
07:22
This was my first prototype.
これは最初の試作品で
07:24
Yes, those are popsicle sticks,
そう アイスキャンディーの棒で作りました
(笑)
07:26
and there's a rubber band at the top.
上にあるのは輪ゴムです
07:29
It took about 30 minutes to do this, but it worked.
30分ほどでこれを作って
上手くいくと分かったので
07:31
And it proved to me that my idea worked
このアイデアを使って
07:34
and it justified the next couple
years of work on this project.
2年間 このプロジェクトに
取り組むことを決めました
07:36
I worked on this because
この研究のきっかけは
07:39
this problem really fascinated me.
この問題が頭を離れず
07:41
It kept me up at night.
夜も眠れなかったからです
07:43
But I think it should fascinate you too,
でも 誰でも気になることだと思います
07:45
because I said puncture is everywhere.
刺される機会はそこら中にありますから
07:48
That means at some point
it's going to be your problem too.
いつ この問題に遭遇するかわかりません
07:50
That first day in the operating room
手術を初めて見学したあの日
07:54
I never expected to find myself
on the other end of a trocar.
自分がトロッカーのお世話になるとは
思いもしませんでした
07:56
But last year, I got appendicitis
when I was visiting Greece.
去年のことですが
ギリシャ旅行中に盲腸になり
07:59
So I was in the hospital in Athens,
アテネの病院に入院しました
08:02
and the surgeon was telling me
そこで 執刀医に
08:04
he was going to perform
a laparoscopic surgery.
「腹腔鏡手術を行う」とを告げられました
08:06
He was going to remove my appendix
through these tiny incisions,
小さな穴から盲腸を取り出すのです
08:08
and he was talking about what
I could expect for the recovery,
回復にどのくらいかかるかや
08:11
and what was going to happen.
予後などの説明を受けた後
08:13
He said, "Do you have any questions?"
And I said, "Just one, doc.
何か質問はあるかと訊かれ
唯一 尋ねたのは
08:15
What kind of trocar do you use?"
「 どんなトロッカーをお使いですか?」
ということでした
08:17
So my favorite quote
about laparoscopic surgery
腹腔鏡手術を
うまく言い表した言葉があります
08:21
comes from a Doctor H. C. Jacobaeus:
H. C. ヤコビウスという医者の言葉で
08:24
"It is puncture itself that causes risk."
「危険なのは穴を開けること自体だ」
08:27
That's my favorite quote
because H.C. Jacobaeus
なぜこの言葉が印象的かというと
08:31
was the first person to ever perform
laparoscopic surgery on humans,
人間に初めて腹腔鏡手術を行った
H. C. ヤコビウスによって
08:34
and he wrote that in 1912.
1912年に書き残された言葉だからです
08:38
This is a problem that's been injuring and
even killing people for over 100 years.
この問題が100年もの間
患者を傷つけたり 殺したりしてきたわけです
08:41
So it's easy to think that for
every major problem out there
この世にある様々な問題には
08:47
there's some team of experts
working around the clock to solve it.
専門家が日夜休まず
努力をしているはずだと思うものですが
08:49
The truth is that's not always the case.
実はそうとは限らないのです
08:53
We have to be better at finding those problems
このような問題を見つけ
08:56
and finding ways to solve them.
解決できるように努めるべきなのです
08:59
So if you come across a problem that grabs you,
ですから 何か気になる問題に遭遇して
09:02
let it keep you up at night.
夜も寝られなかったら
09:05
Allow yourself to be fascinated,
その問題にのめりこんでみて下さい
09:07
because there are so many lives to save.
沢山の人の命を救えるかもしれません
09:09
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:12
Translator:Akiko Hicks
Reviewer:Eriko T.

sponsored links

Nikolai Begg - Mechanical engineer
Nikolai Begg is a PhD candidate in mechanical engineering whose passion is rethinking medical devices.

Why you should listen
Since Nikolai Begg first saw robotic surgery performed as a thirteen-year-old, he has been in love with building things to help others. Now as a PhD Candidate in mechanical engineering at MIT, Begg works on designs to improve any number of things in people's lives -- from salt and pepper shakers that always stay in the same position relative to one another to a non-invasive female urinary catheter. He's especially passionate about how he can apply physics and mechanical principles to medical devices. In 2013 he won the annual Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for Invention, for a product that makes more precise incisions during surgery.
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.