sponsored links
TEDxMonroeCorrectionalComplex

Dan Pacholke: How prisons can help inmates live meaningful lives

ダン・パチョルキ: 受刑者の有意義な人生のために、刑務所ができること

March 15, 2014

アメリカでは、刑務所を統括する部門のことを「矯正省」としばしば呼びます。それなのに彼らの焦点は受刑者を収容し統制することにあります。ワシントン州矯正省の副長官であるダン・パチョルキは、それとは違った見方をお話しします。それは、人間らしい生活環境と、有意義な仕事や学習の機会を提供する刑務所です。

Dan Pacholke - Prison administrator and reformer
Dan Pacholke aims to keep the Washington State Department of Corrections on the front edge of innovation by rethinking the design of prisons, the training of officers and the education opportunities made available to inmates. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
We're seen as the organization that is
the bucket for failed social policy.
我々は失敗した社会政策のためにある
バケツのような組織として見られています
00:12
I can't define who comes to us or how long they stay.
私には誰が我々の所に来て どれくらい居るのか
決めることはできません
00:16
We get the people for whom
nothing else has worked,
我々が受け入れるのは
誰からも見放され
00:19
people who have fallen through all
他の全ての
社会的セーフティーネットから
00:21
of the other social safety nets.
落っこちてしまった人たちです
00:23
They can't contain them, so we must.
社会が受け皿になれないなら
我々がせねばなりません
00:25
That's our job:
それが我々の仕事です
00:27
contain them, control them.
彼らを収容し統制することです
00:28
Over the years, as a prison system,
何年にもわたって 刑務所のシステムや
00:31
as a nation, and as a society,
国や社会は
00:34
we've become very good at that,
それが非常に上手になりました
00:36
but that shouldn't make you happy.
しかしそれは喜ばしいことではありません
00:37
Today we incarcerate more people per capita
今日 人口あたりの投獄者数は
00:39
than any other country in the world.
世界の他の国より多いのです
00:41
We have more black men in prison today
今日 刑務所にいる黒人の数は
00:43
than were under slavery in 1850.
奴隷法のあった1850年を超えています
00:45
We house the parents of almost three million
我々は コミュニティの
00:48
of our community's children,
300万人の子どもの親を収容しており
00:49
and we've become the new asylum,
また我々は新たな精神病院と化しています
00:51
the largest mental health provider in this nation.
つまりこの国の精神医療の
最大の提供場所になっています
00:53
When we lock someone up,
人を閉じ込めるのは
00:56
that is no small thing.
些細なことではありません
00:58
And yet, we are called the
Department of Corrections.
こんな有様なのに
我々は「矯正省」と呼ばれています
00:59
Today I want to talk about
今日私は我々が考えている
01:02
changing the way we think about corrections.
矯正の在り方の転換について
お話しします
01:04
I believe, and my experience tells me,
私の信念と経験から言うと
01:06
that when we change the way we think,
我々が考え方を変えれば
01:08
we create new possibilities, or futures,
新しい可能性や未来を
生み出すことができます
01:10
and prisons need a different future.
そして刑務所は違う未来を
必要としています
01:13
I've spent my entire career
in corrections, over 30 years.
私は30年のキャリア全てを
矯正の分野で過ごしてきました
01:15
I followed my dad into this field.
父を追い この世界に入ったのです
01:19
He was a Vietnam veteran. Corrections suited him.
彼はベトナム帰還兵でした
矯正は彼にぴったりの仕事でした
01:20
He was strong, steady, disciplined.
彼は強く 真面目で 規律正しい人でした
01:23
I was not so much any of those things,
私はそういうタイプではなく
01:26
and I'm sure that worried him about me.
きっと彼はそんな私を
案じていたことでしょう
01:28
Eventually I decided, if I was
going to end up in prison,
最終的に私は決めました
自分が刑務所で人生を終えるならば
01:30
I'd better end up on the right side of the bars,
私は牢の外側にいたいなと
01:33
so I thought I'd check it out,
それで私は父の働いていた
01:34
take a tour of the place my dad worked,
マクニール島刑務所について調べて
01:36
the McNeil Island Penitentiary.
見学したいと考えたのです
01:38
Now this was the early '80s,
これは80年代初めのことで
01:40
and prisons weren't quite what you see
刑務所は 現在テレビや映画館で
01:42
on TV or in the movies.
目にするのとかなり違っていました
01:44
In many ways, it was worse.
多くの点で 悪い方向にです
01:46
I walked into a cell house that was five tiers high.
私は5階建ての監房棟の中を歩きました
01:48
There were eight men to a cell.
1つの監房に8人の男性がいました
01:51
there were 550 men in that living unit.
その住居ユニットには
550人の男性がいました
01:52
And just in case you wondered,
疑問に思われた方のために言っておくと
01:55
they shared one toilet in those small confines.
彼らはこの小さな空間で
1つのトイレを共用していました
01:57
An officer put a key in a lockbox,
職員が監房の鍵を開けると
02:00
and hundreds of men streamed out of their cells.
何百人もの男性が房の外に
ぞろぞろ出ていきました
02:01
Hundreds of men streamed out of their cells.
何百人もの男性が房の外に
ぞろぞろ出ていきました
02:04
I walked away as fast as I could.
私はできるだけ早くそこを立ち去りました
02:06
Eventually I went back and
I started as an officer there.
最終的に私はそこに戻り
職員として働き始めました
02:08
My job was to run one of those cell blocks
私の仕事は1区画の監房を運営し
02:11
and to control those hundreds of men.
そこの何百人もの男性を
統制することでした
02:12
When I went to work at our receptions center,
受付センターで仕事をしている時でも
02:16
I could actually hear the inmates
roiling from the parking lot,
受刑者たちが駐車場から
騒々しくやって来る物音や
02:17
shaking cell doors, yelling,
監房のドアを揺さぶったり 
叫んだり
02:20
tearing up their cells.
監房を壊そうとする音が
聞こえました
02:23
Take hundreds of volatile people and lock them up,
何百もの激しやすい人々を
鍵をかけて閉じ込めると
02:24
and what you get is chaos.
混沌に陥ります
02:27
Contain and control — that was our job.
収容と統制-それが我々の仕事でした
02:29
One way we learned to do this more effectively
これをより効果的にするために
我々が学んだのは
02:31
was a new type of housing unit
新しい住居ユニットでした
02:34
called the Intensive Management Unit, IMU,
それは集中管理ユニット
IMUと呼ばれました
02:35
a modern version of a "hole."
現代版の「穴蔵」です
02:38
We put inmates in cells behind solid steel doors
我々は差入れ口の付いた
硬い鋼鉄製ドアの監房に
02:39
with cuff ports so we could restrain them
受刑者を入れ 外から手錠をかけたり
食事を与えたりできるようにしました
02:42
and feed them.
受刑者を入れ 外から手錠をかけたり
食事を与えたりできるようにしました
02:44
Guess what?
どうなったと思いますか?
02:45
It got quieter.
静かになりました
02:48
Disturbances died down in the general population.
全体的に騒動はなくなりました
02:49
Places became safer
そこはより安全になりました
02:52
because those inmates who
were most violent or disruptive
なぜなら最も暴力的
あるいは破壊的な受刑者は
02:53
could now be isolated.
隔離できるようになったからです
02:56
But isolation isn't good.
しかし隔離はいいことではありません
02:57
Deprive people of social
contact and they deteriorate.
人から社会的接触をはく奪し
その人の状態を悪くします
02:59
It was hard getting them out of IMU,
彼らをIMUから出すのは困難でした
03:02
for them and for us.
それは彼らにとっても我々にとってもです
03:04
Even in prison, it's no small thing
刑務所の中であっても
人を閉じ込めるということは
03:06
to lock someone up.
些細なことではありません
03:09
My next assignment was to one
of the state's deep-end prisons
私の次の配置先は
難しい州立刑務所でした
03:11
where some of our more violent
or disruptive inmates are housed.
そこにはもっと暴力的で破壊的な受刑者が
収容されていました
03:13
By then, the industry had advanced a lot,
その頃には この業界は進歩していて
03:16
and we had different tools and techniques
我々は破壊的行動を管理する為に
03:18
to manage disruptive behavior.
さまざまな道具やテクニックを使いました
03:20
We had beanbag guns and pepper spray
我々はビーンバッグ・ガン(非致死性の散弾銃)や
催涙スプレー
03:22
and plexiglass shields,
それからプレキシガラスの盾
03:24
flash bangs, emergency response teams.
閃光弾 緊急対応チームも備えていました
03:26
We met violence with force
我々は暴力には力で対峙し
03:29
and chaos with chaos.
混沌には混沌で対峙しました
03:31
We were pretty good at putting out fires.
我々は争いを鎮静化するのが
かなり得意でした
03:32
While I was there, I met two
experienced correctional workers
私がそこにいた頃 2人の経験豊かな
矯正スタッフに出会いました
03:35
who were also researchers,
彼らは研究者でもありました
03:38
an anthropologist and a sociologist.
文化人類学者と社会学者です
03:39
One day, one of them commented to me and said,
ある日彼らの1人が言いました
03:43
"You know, you're pretty good at putting out fires.
「君は争いを鎮静させるのが
上手だよね
03:44
Have you ever thought about how to prevent them?"
どうやれば争いを防げるかを
考えてみたことはあるかい?」と
03:46
I was patient with them,
力ずくのアプローチは刑務所を
03:50
explaining our brute force approach
安全にするのだと説明しながら
03:52
to making prisons safer.
私は彼らに寛容になろうとしていました
03:53
They were patient with me.
彼らも私に対してそうしていました
03:55
Out of those conversations grew some new ideas
この会話が
新しいアイデアにつながり
03:57
and we started some small experiments.
我々は小さな実験をいくつか始めました
03:59
First, we started training our officers in teams
第1に 我々は職員の訓練を
04:01
rather than sending them one or two
at a time to the state training academy.
州の研修所に1、2人ずつ送ってではなく
チームの中で行うことにしました
04:03
Instead of four weeks of training, we gave them 10.
4週間ではなく
10週間訓練を受けさせました
04:06
Then we experimented with an apprenticeship model
そして我々は徒弟制モデルを試みました
04:09
where we paired new staff with veteran staff.
そこでは 新人がベテランスタッフと
ペアで仕事をしました
04:11
They both got better at the work.
彼らは両方とも仕事の腕をあげました
04:15
Second, we added verbal de-escalation skills
第2に 我々は
言語による静穏化スキルを
04:17
into the training continuum
訓練に取り入れました
04:20
and made it part of the use of force continuum.
そして力の行使が続くなかに
それを加えました
04:22
It was the non-force use of force.
それは力の行使に対する
非暴力の行使でした
04:24
And then we did something even more radical.
より思い切ったこともしました
04:27
We trained the inmates on those same skills.
受刑者たちに同じスキルを
訓練したのです
04:28
We changed the skill set,
我々はスキルの組み合わせを変えて
04:31
reducing violence, not just responding to it.
暴力にただ応酬するのでなく
暴力自体を減らそうとしたのです
04:33
Third, when we expanded our facility,
we tried a new type of design.
第3に 施設拡張の際
我々は新しい内装を試みました
04:36
Now the biggest and most controversial component
このデザインの面で
最大かつ最も論議を生んだのは
04:39
of this design, of course, was the toilet.
もちろんトイレでした
04:42
There were no toilets.
トイレがないのです
04:46
Now that might not sound
significant to you here today,
これは今の皆さんには
意義が分からないかもしれません
04:47
but at the time, it was huge.
しかし当時は重大事でした
04:50
No one had ever heard of a cell without a toilet.
トイレのない監房など誰も
聞いたことがなく
04:51
We all thought it was dangerous and crazy.
皆 危険で正気の沙汰ではないと
考えていました
04:54
Even eight men to a cell had a toilet.
1つの監房に8人いるような環境でも
トイレがありました
04:56
That small detail changed the way we worked.
この小さなことが我々の仕事を変えました
04:59
Inmates and staff started interacting
受刑者と職員のオープンな交流が増え
05:02
more often and openly and developing a rapport.
ラポール(信頼関係)が発展しました
05:04
It was easier to detect conflict and intervene
葛藤を エスカレートする前に 発見し
05:07
before it escalated.
介入するのが簡単になりました
05:09
The unit was cleaner, quieter,
safer and more humane.
ユニットはより清潔に 静かに
そして安全で人間的になりました
05:10
This was more effective at keeping the peace
これは当時の私が見たことのある
05:14
than any intimidation technique I'd seen to that point.
どの威嚇的なテクニックよりも
平和を保つのに有用でした
05:16
Interacting changes the way you behave,
相互交流は人の行動を変えます
05:19
both for the officer and the inmate.
職員も受刑者もそうです
05:21
We changed the environment
and we changed the behavior.
我々は環境を変えることで
行動を変えたのです
05:23
Now, just in case I hadn't learned this lesson,
この教訓を万一学び損ねていては
いけないと思われたのか
05:26
they assigned me to headquarters next,
私は次に本庁に配置されました
05:28
and that's where I ran straight
up against system change.
そこで私はシステムの変化に
まさに直面したのです
05:30
Now, many things work against system change:
現状では多くの事柄が
システムの変化に抵抗します
05:33
politics and politicians, bills and laws,
政治と政治家 法案と法律
05:35
courts and lawsuits, internal politics.
裁判所と訴訟 内部での駆け引き
05:37
System change is difficult and slow,
システムの変化は困難かつゆっくりで
05:40
and oftentimes it doesn't take you
しばしば思うようにはいきません
05:42
where you want to go.
しばしば思うようにはいきません
05:44
It's no small thing to change a prison system.
刑務所のシステムを変えるのは
些細なことではありません
05:46
So what I did do is I reflected
on my earlier experiences
それで私は自分の経験を振り返り
05:50
and I remembered that when we interacted
with offenders, the heat went down.
我々が受刑者と交流を持つと
彼らが落ち着いたことを思い出しました
05:52
When we changed the environment,
the behavior changed.
我々が環境を変えたら
行動も変わりました
05:55
And these were not huge system changes.
これらは大きなシステム変化ではなく
05:57
These were small changes, and these changes
小さな変化でしたが これらの変化が
05:59
created new possibilities.
新しい可能性を開いたのです
06:01
So next, I got reassigned as
superintendent of a small prison.
次に私は小さな刑務所に
所長として配属されました
06:03
And at the same time, I was working on my degree
そして同時に 私は
エバーグリーン州立大学で
06:06
at the Evergreen State College.
学位に向けて勉強をしていました
06:08
I interacted with a lot of
people who were not like me,
自分と違うタイプの人と
たくさん交流しました
06:10
people who had different ideas
さまざまな考えや
06:12
and came from different backgrounds.
バックグラウンドを持つ人たちです
06:14
One of them was a rainforest ecologist.
その1人は熱帯雨林の
生態学者でした
06:15
She looked at my small prison and what she saw
彼女は私の小さな刑務所を見て
06:18
was a laboratory.
そこを実験室にすることを思いつきました
06:20
We talked and discovered how prisons and inmates
刑務所や受刑者たちだけでは
やり遂げられない企画を
06:21
could actually help advance science
我々が手助けすることによって
06:24
by helping them complete projects
科学の進歩に貢献できるかについて
06:26
they couldn't complete on their own,
我々は話し合い
その方法を発見しました
06:28
like repopulating endangered species:
例えば絶滅寸前の種を増やすことです
06:30
frogs, butterflies, endangered prairie plants.
カエル チョウ 絶滅しかけている
プレーリーの植物などです
06:32
At the same time, we found ways to make
同時に我々は 太陽光や
06:35
our operation more efficient
雨水の資源化 有機栽培や
06:37
through the addition of solar power,
リサイクルを通じた
06:38
rainwater catchment, organic gardening, recycling.
より効果的な運営方法を見出しました
06:40
This initiative has led to many projects
この改善策は多くの企画につながり
06:44
that have had huge system-wide impact,
システム全体へ影響を与えました
06:47
not just in our system, but in
other state systems as well,
我々のシステムだけでなく
他の州のシステムにもです
06:48
small experiments making a big difference
小さな実験が科学やコミュニティを
06:52
to science, to the community.
大きく変えました
06:54
The way we think about our work changes our work.
自分たちの仕事について考えたことが
我々の仕事を変えました
06:57
The project just made my job
more interesting and exciting.
この企画は私の仕事をより面白く
わくわくするものにしてくれました
07:00
I was excited. Staff were excited.
私もスタッフも わくわくしていました
07:03
Officers were excited. Inmates were excited.
職員も 受刑者もです
07:05
They were inspired.
彼らは感化されていました
07:07
Everybody wanted to be part of this.
皆がこの一員になりたがりました
07:09
They were making a contribution, a difference,
彼らは意味や重要性を感じられる
07:10
one they thought was meaningful and important.
貢献をし変化を生み出しました
07:13
Let me be clear on what's going on here, though.
ここで 状況を明確にさせてください
07:15
Inmates are highly adaptive.
受刑者たちは非常に適応的です
07:17
They have to be.
彼らはそうである必要があるのです
07:19
Oftentimes, they know more about our own systems
しばしば彼らは運営側よりも
我々のシステムについて
07:20
than the people who run them.
よく知っています
07:23
And they're here for a reason.
そして彼らは理由があってここにいます
07:25
I don't see my job as to punish them or forgive them,
私は自分の仕事は彼らを罰したり
許したりすることではなく
07:27
but I do think they can have
彼らは刑務所の中にいても
07:30
decent and meaningful lives even in prison.
きちんとした有意義な生活を
送れると考えています
07:31
So that was the question:
ですから問題はここです
07:34
Could inmates live decent and meaningful lives,
受刑者はきちんとした
有意義な生活を送れるのか
07:36
and if so, what difference would that make?
もしそうなら
これはどんな変化を生むのか?
07:39
So I took that question back to the deep end,
それで私はこの質問を
より難しい場所へ持って帰りました
07:42
where some of our most
violent offenders are housed.
そこでは最も暴力的な受刑者が
収容されていました
07:45
Remember, IMUs are for punishment.
IMUは懲罰の場でしたね
07:48
You don't get perks there, like programming.
そこで得られるものはないと
我々は考えていました
07:49
That was how we thought.
例えば処遇プログラムの実施などです
07:51
But then we started to realize that if any inmates
しかし分かってきたのは
受刑者のなかでも特に
07:53
needed programming, it
was these particular inmates.
彼らにこそ処遇プログラムが
必要だということです
07:55
In fact, they needed intensive programming.
実際 彼らは集中的なプログラムを
必要としていました
07:58
So we changed our thinking 180 degrees,
ですから我々は考え方を180度変えて
08:00
and we started looking for new possibilities.
新しい可能性を探し始めました
08:02
What we found was a new kind of chair.
私が見つけたのは新しいタイプの椅子です
08:04
Instead of using the chair for punishment,
罰のために椅子を使うのではなく
08:07
we put it in classrooms.
我々は教室にそれを置いたのです
08:09
Okay, we didn't forget our responsibility to control,
大丈夫 我々は統制する責任を
忘れてはいません
08:11
but now inmates could interact safely, face-to-face
ですが今や受刑者は
他の受刑者やスタッフと
08:14
with other inmates and staff,
対面で安全に交流できるのです
08:16
and because control was no longer an issue,
そしてもはや統制は問題でないので
08:18
everybody could focus on other things,
全員が他のこと
例えば学習に集中できます
08:19
like learning. Behavior changed.
行動は変わりました
08:21
We changed our thinking, and we changed
what was possible, and this gives me hope.
考え方を変えるとできることも変わります
このことは希望をくれました
08:24
Now, I can't tell you that any of this stuff will work.
現時点ではこれが
全てうまくいくとは言えませんが
08:29
What I can tell you, though, it is working.
うまくいきつつあるとは言えます
08:31
Our prisons are getting safer
for both staff and inmates,
我々の刑務所はスタッフと受刑者
双方にとってより安全になってきています
08:34
and when our prisons are safe,
そして刑務所が安全であれば
08:37
we can put our energies into
a lot more than just controlling.
我々はエネルギーを統制以上のものに
費やすことができます
08:39
Reducing recidivism may be our ultimate goal,
再犯を減らすことは
我々の最終目標ですが
08:42
but it's not our only goal.
それが唯一の目標ではありません
08:45
To be honest with you, preventing crime
正直に言うと 犯罪を防ぐには
08:46
takes so much more from so many more people
もっと多くの人々や
08:48
and institutions.
機関が必要です
08:50
If we rely on just prisons to reduce crime,
もし犯罪の減少を
刑務所だけに頼ると
08:52
I'm afraid we'll never get there.
それは決して 叶わないと思いますが
08:55
But prisons can do some things
刑務所では
できるとは思えなかったことを
08:57
we never thought they could do.
することだってできるのです
08:59
Prisons can be the source of innovation
刑務所は絶滅危惧種を復活させ
09:00
and sustainability,
環境を回復する
09:02
repopulating endangered species
and environmental restoration.
革新と持続可能性の
源にもなれます
09:04
Inmates can be scientists and beekeepers,
受刑者たちは科学者にも
養蜂家にも
09:07
dog rescuers.
犬を保護するスタッフにもなれます
09:10
Prisons can be the source of meaningful work
受刑者は有意義な仕事と機会を
09:11
and opportunity for staff
そこで暮らすスタッフと
09:14
and the inmates who live there.
受刑者にくれる源にもなれます
09:16
We can contain and control
我々は収容と統制とともに
09:18
and provide humane environments.
人間的な環境を提供することもできます
09:20
These are not opposing qualities.
これらは矛盾するものではありません
09:23
We can't wait 10 to 20 years to find out
我々はこの価値を確認するのに
09:25
if this is worth doing.
10年 20年も待ってはいられません
09:27
Our strategy is not massive system change.
我々のやり方は大規模な
システム変化ではありません
09:29
Our strategy is hundreds of small changes
我々のやり方は年単位ではなく
09:32
that take place in days or months, not years.
数日や数か月単位での小さな変化を
何百も起こすことです
09:34
We need more small pilots where we learn as we go,
我々はもっと小さな試行をしながら
学ぶことが必要です
09:37
pilots that change the range of possibility.
試行は可能性の幅を広げます
09:41
We need new and better ways to measure impacts
我々は働くことや交流
環境の安全性に及ぼす
09:44
on engagement, on interaction,
影響を測定するための
09:46
on safe environments.
新しい そしてよりよい方法が必要です
09:47
We need more opportunities to participate in
我々や皆さんのコミュニティに
09:49
and contribute to our communities,
参加したり 貢献したりする機会を
09:52
your communities.
もっと必要としています
09:54
Prisons need to be secure, yes, safe, yes.
刑務所は安全である必要があります 
そのとおりです
09:56
We can do that.
それは実現できます
09:59
Prisons need to provide humane environments
刑務所は人間的環境であることが
必要です
10:00
where people can participate, contribute,
そこでは人々は有意義な生活に参加し
10:02
and learn meaningful lives.
貢献し 学ぶことができるのです
10:05
We're learning how to do that.
我々はその方法を学んでいる最中です
10:06
That's why I'm hopeful.
だから私は希望を持っています
10:08
We don't have to stay stuck
in old ideas about prison.
刑務所に関する古い観念に
とらわれる必要はありません
10:10
We can define that. We can create that.
我々がそれを決め 作り出せるのです
10:12
And when we do that thoughtfully and with humanity,
それを徹底的に
人間的なやり方で行った時
10:14
prisons can be more than the bucket
刑務所は失敗した社会政策のための
10:17
for failed social policy.
バケツ以上のものになるのです
10:19
Maybe finally, we will earn our title:
おそらくついに 我々は「矯正省」という
10:20
a department of corrections.
名前に見合うものになるのです
10:24
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
10:26
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:28
Translator:Naoko Fujii
Reviewer:Claire Ghyselen

sponsored links

Dan Pacholke - Prison administrator and reformer
Dan Pacholke aims to keep the Washington State Department of Corrections on the front edge of innovation by rethinking the design of prisons, the training of officers and the education opportunities made available to inmates.

Why you should listen

Dan Pacholke has spent more than three decades working in prisons, first as a corrections office and later as an administrator. Now the Deputy Secretary of Operations for the Washington State Department of Corrections, he says, “I don’t see my job as to punish or forgive [inmates], but I do think they can have decent and meaningful lives in prison.”

Pacholke has dedicated his career to changing the way we think about corrections. Over the years, he has helped usher in programs designed to prevent fires before they start rather than fight them after they’ve flared up. Pacholke has been part of initiatives to redesign prison facilities to maximize interaction between the staff and inmates, to give corrections officers training in verbal de-escalation as well as physical response, and to give inmates opportunities to learn new things while they are in the system. As the co-director of the Sustainability in Prisons Project, Pacholke brought recycling, composting, horticulture and even bee-keeping programs into prisons—to give inmates meaningful work, but also to cut costs and make prisons more sustainable. 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.