17:45
TED2014

Andrew Connolly: What's the next window into our universe?

アンドリュー・コノリー: 宇宙へ向けた次の窓は何か?

Filmed:

巨大データはどこにでもあります。空でさえもです。そんな情報を盛りだくさんに、天文学者のアンドリュー・コノリーが空の絶え間なく変わる様相を記録した宇宙に関する巨大データをどのように収集したのかを説明します。宇宙の大量の画像を科学者はどのように捉えるのでしょうか? 巨大望遠鏡がその糸口となります。

- Astronomer
Andrew Connolly is helping to build the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope -- as well as tools to handle the massive datasets it will send our way. Full bio

So in 1781, an English composer,
1781年 英国の作曲家であり
科学技術者であり
00:13
technologist and astronomer called William Herschel
天文学者であるウィリアム・ハーシェルは
00:16
noticed an object on the sky that
空に他の星とは
動きが異なる天体が
00:19
didn't quite move the way the rest of the stars did.
あることに気づきました
00:21
And Herschel's recognition
that something was different,
何かが異なり
00:24
that something wasn't quite right,
何かがおかしいという
ハーシェルの認識は
00:27
was the discovery of a planet,
惑星の発見になったのです
00:29
the planet Uranus,
その惑星は 天王星です
00:31
a name that has entertained
天王星という名前は
00:33
countless generations of children,
何世代にもわたって
子どもたちを楽しませました
00:34
but a planet that overnight
その夜に発見された惑星によって
00:37
doubled the size of our known solar system.
それまでに知られていた
太陽系の大きさが2倍になりました
00:40
Just last month, NASA announced the discovery
ほんの先月のこと NASAは
00:42
of 517 new planets
近隣恒星の周りを回る軌道にある
00:44
in orbit around nearby stars,
517個の新惑星を発見したと
発表しました
00:46
almost doubling overnight the number of planets
我が銀河系で知られている惑星の数が
00:48
we know about within our galaxy.
一夜でほぼ2倍になりました
00:51
So astronomy is constantly being transformed by this
天文学は データの収集能力が
00:53
capacity to collect data,
毎年ほぼ2倍になることにより
00:56
and with data almost doubling every year,
絶えず変革を遂げてきています
00:58
within the next two decades, me may even
今後20年以内には
01:01
reach the point for the first time in history
宇宙にある主だった銀河系を
01:02
where we've discovered the majority of the galaxies
史上初めて
01:05
within the universe.
発見することになるかもしれません
01:08
But as we enter this era of big data,
しかし このビッグデータの時代に突入し
01:09
what we're beginning to find is there's a difference
データ量が多ければよいということと
01:12
between more data being just better
異なる内容を含むデータを集めることの
01:14
and more data being different,
違いを理解し始め
01:17
capable of changing the questions we want to ask,
疑問の投げかけ方を
変えられるようになりました
01:19
and this difference is not about
how much data we collect,
この違いはデータ収集量ではなく
01:22
it's whether those data open new windows
それらのデータが宇宙への新しい窓を
01:25
into our universe,
開くかどうかであり
01:27
whether they change the way we view the sky.
天空の見方を
変えるかどうかなのです
01:28
So what is the next window into our universe?
宇宙への次なる窓とは何でしょうか?
01:31
What is the next chapter for astronomy?
天文学の次章とは何でしょうか?
01:34
Well, I'm going to show you some
of the tools and the technologies
今後20年間に開発する
01:37
that we're going to develop over the next decade,
ツールや技術を紹介し
01:40
and how these technologies,
このような技術が
01:42
together with the smart use of data,
データを上手に扱うことによって
01:44
may once again transform astronomy
宇宙への窓 つまり
01:46
by opening up a window into our universe,
時間への窓を開くことで
今一度天文学を
01:49
the window of time.
変革させるかを説明します
01:51
Why time? Well, time is about origins,
なぜ時間なのでしょうか?
時間とは起源に関することで
01:53
and it's about evolution.
また 進化に関することなのです
01:55
The origins of our solar system,
太陽系の起源-
01:57
how our solar system came into being,
太陽系の形成過程は
01:58
is it unusual or special in any way?
特異であり 特別なのでしょうか?
02:01
About the evolution of our universe.
宇宙の進化において
02:04
Why our universe is continuing to expand,
なぜ宇宙は膨張し続けているのでしょうか?
02:06
and what is this mysterious dark energy
宇宙を膨張させた
02:09
that drives that expansion?
神秘的なダークエネルギーとは
何なのでしょうか?
02:11
But first, I want to show you how technology
まず最初に技術が
いかに空への見方を
02:14
is going to change the way we view the sky.
変えるのかについてお話します
02:16
So imagine if you were sitting
想像してみてください
02:19
in the mountains of northern Chile
あなたはチリ北部にある山脈で
座っていて
02:21
looking out to the west
日が昇るの数時間前に
02:23
towards the Pacific Ocean
太平洋のある西側を
02:24
a few hours before sunrise.
見ています
02:26
This is the view of the night sky that you would see,
これは 夜空の光景で
02:29
and it's a beautiful view,
天の川が地平線にちょっと顔を
02:32
with the Milky Way just peeking out over the horizon.
覗かせている美しい光景
を眺めています
02:34
but it's also a static view,
それは 静止した光景でもあります
02:37
and in many ways, this is the
way we think of our universe:
多くの意味で これが私たちの
宇宙に対する考え方-
02:39
eternal and unchanging.
永遠と不変であるということです
02:42
But the universe is anything but static.
しかし 宇宙は静止しておらず
02:44
It constantly changes on timescales of seconds
数秒から数十億年の時間的尺度で
02:46
to billions of years.
たえず変化しているのです
02:48
Galaxies merge, they collide
銀河同士は
02:50
at hundreds of thousands of miles per hour.
融合したり
毎時数十万マイルの速さで 衝突します
02:52
Stars are born, they die,
星は生まれては 死にますが
02:55
they explode in these extravagant displays.
華々しく爆発して散るのです
02:57
In fact, if we could go back
実際 チリの静かな空に戻り
03:00
to our tranquil skies above Chile,
時間を進めて
03:01
and we allow time to move forward
その空が来年にかけて
03:04
to see how the sky might change over the next year,
どう変化するのかをみてみましょう
03:06
the pulsations that you see
目にしたパルスは
03:11
are supernovae, the final remnants of a dying star
超新星-
死にゆく星の残像で
03:13
exploding, brightening and then fading from view,
爆発して輝きを増し
そして視界から消えていくのです
03:17
each one of these supernovae
それぞれの超新星は 太陽よりも
03:21
five billion times the brightness of our sun,
50億倍も明るいのです
03:23
so we can see them to great distances
ですから遥か彼方にあっても
03:26
but only for a short amount of time.
ほんの短時間だけですが
見ることができます
03:28
Ten supernova per second explode somewhere
1秒間に10個の超新星が
宇宙のどこかで
03:31
in our universe.
爆発しています
03:33
If we could hear it,
音を聞くことができたなら
03:35
it would be popping like a bag of popcorn.
ポップコーンがはじける音のようかも
しれません
03:36
Now, if we fade out the supernovae,
さて 超新星の話はここまでにしますが
03:40
it's not just brightness that changes.
変化するものは明るさだけではありません
03:43
Our sky is in constant motion.
天空は絶えず動いています
03:46
This swarm of objects you
see streaming across the sky
空を横切るように動いている一群は
03:49
are asteroids as they orbit our sun,
太陽の周りを回る小惑星で
03:52
and it's these changes and the motion
変化や動きが見られます
03:54
and it's the dynamics of the system
系の動力学により
03:56
that allow us to build our models for our universe,
宇宙のモデルを作り
03:59
to predict its future and to explain its past.
未来を予測したり
過去を説明することができます
04:01
But the telescopes we've used over the last decade
私たちが過去10年間
使っていた望遠鏡は
04:05
are not designed to capture the data at this scale.
この規模のデータを捉えるように
設計されていません
04:08
The Hubble Space Telescope:
ハッブル宇宙望遠鏡ですが
04:12
for the last 25 years it's been producing
過去25年間に
04:14
some of the most detailed views
宇宙遠方の
最も詳細な画像の多くを
04:16
of our distant universe,
記録してきました
04:18
but if you tried to use the Hubble to create an image
でも もし空全体の画像を
ただ一度作成するのに
04:20
of the sky, it would take 13 million individual images,
ハッブル天体望遠鏡を使うとすると 1,300万枚の画像を
04:22
about 120 years to do this just once.
約120年かけて撮らなければなりません
04:27
So this is driving us to new technologies
そのことが 我々が
新しい技術や新しい望遠鏡を
04:30
and new telescopes,
開発する動機となりました
04:33
telescopes that can go faint
信号が弱くなる
04:35
to look at the distant universe
遠方の宇宙を捉える望遠鏡
04:36
but also telescopes that can go wide
しかも できるだけ素早く画像を撮って
04:38
to capture the sky as rapidly as possible,
広い範囲を撮影できる望遠鏡です
04:41
telescopes like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope,
大型シノプティック・サーベイ望遠鏡
04:43
or the LSST,
LSSTともいいますが―
04:47
possibly the most boring name ever
天文学史上
04:49
for one of the most fascinating experiments
最も素晴らしい実験装置につけられた
04:51
in the history of astronomy,
最も平凡な名前なのかもしれません
04:53
in fact proof, if you should need it,
実際 科学者やエンジニアに
04:55
that you should never allow
a scientist or an engineer
我が子の名前であれ 何であれ
04:57
to name anything, not even your children.
(Laughter)
名前を付けさせるべきではないという
証明なのです (笑)
05:00
We're building the LSST.
私たちはLSSTを作っています
05:06
We expect it to start taking data
by the end of this decade.
10年以内にデータの取得を
開始する予定です
05:07
I'm going to show you how we think
我々の考えを紹介します
05:11
it's going to transform
our views of the universe,
宇宙に対する考えは
変わっていくでしょう
05:12
because one image from the LSST
それというのもLSSTによる1枚の画像は
05:16
is equivalent to 3,000 images
ハッブル宇宙望遠鏡の
05:18
from the Hubble Space Telescope,
3,000枚分の画像に相当し
05:21
each image three and a half degrees on the sky,
3.5度分の空の画像で
05:23
seven times the width of the full moon.
満月の幅の7倍あります
05:26
Well, how do you capture an image at this scale?
この規模の画像は
どのように見るのでしょう?
05:29
Well, you build the largest digital camera in history,
携帯のカメラや
表通りで買ったデジカメのものと
05:31
using the same technology you find
in the cameras in your cell phone
同じ技術を使って
05:35
or in the digital cameras you
can buy in the High Street,
史上最大の望遠鏡を作るとします
05:38
but now at a scale that is five and a half feet across,
直径約1.7m
05:42
about the size of a Volkswagen Beetle,
フォルクスワーゲン・ビートル
くらいのサイズで
05:45
where one image is three billion pixels.
1枚の画像は30億ピクセルからなります
05:48
So if you wanted to look at an image
1枚のLSST画像を
05:51
in its full resolution, just a single LSST image,
最大解像度で見ようとすると
05:52
it would take about 1,500
high-definition TV screens.
1,500台もの高解像度TVスクリーンが
必要です
05:55
And this camera will image the sky,
しかもこのカメラは
06:00
taking a new picture every 20 seconds,
20秒ごとに新しい写真をとって
空をたえず走査していき
06:03
constantly scanning the sky
空の全体像を作りあげていきます
06:06
so every three nights, we'll get a completely new view
3晩ごとにチリ上空の
真新しい景色が
06:08
of the skies above Chile.
見られます
06:11
Over the mission lifetime of this telescope,
この望遠鏡が役目を終えるまでに
06:13
it will detect 40 billion stars and galaxies,
400億個の星や銀河が見えることでしょう
06:16
and that will be for the first time
地上の人々の数よりも多くの
06:19
we'll have detected more objects in our universe
宇宙に存在する天体が
06:21
than people on the Earth.
史上初めて見えることになるでしょう
06:24
Now, we can talk about this
このことを テラバイト
06:26
in terms of terabytes and petabytes
ペタバイト 数十億個の物体という
06:28
and billions of objects,
言葉を使って語ったりしますが
06:30
but a way to get a sense of the amount of data
このカメラから送られてくる
06:31
that will come off this camera
データ量を感覚的に
ご理解いただくには
06:33
is that it's like playing every TED Talk ever recorded
録画されたTEDTalksを
06:35
simultaneously, 24 hours a day,
全て同時に
毎日24時間 週7日間
06:40
seven days a week, for 10 years.
10年間再生し続けるようなものと
お考えください
06:43
And to process this data means
そして このデータ処理量は
06:46
searching through all of those talks
すべてのTEDTalksの
06:48
for every new idea and every new concept,
ビデオの各パートを見て
06:50
looking at each part of the video
コマから次のコマへの変化を調べて
06:52
to see how one frame may have changed
全ての「新しいアイデア」や
「新しい概念」を
06:54
from the next.
検索するようなものです
06:56
And this is changing the way that we do science,
そして このことが科学の有り様や
06:58
changing the way that we do astronomy,
天文学の有り様を変えています
07:00
to a place where software and algorithms
つまりソフトウェアやアルゴリズムにより
07:02
have to mine through this data,
データから情報を見出すことであり
07:05
where the software is as critical to the science
我々が作り上げた望遠鏡やカメラと同じくらい
07:07
as the telescopes and the
cameras that we've built.
ソフトウェアが科学にとっての
生命線になっているのです
07:10
Now, thousands of discoveries
さて このプロジェクトで
07:14
will come from this project,
数千もの発見がなされるでしょうが
07:16
but I'm just going to tell you about two
この規模のデータ・アクセスにより
07:18
of the ideas about origins and evolution
変革が起こるかもしれない
07:20
that may be transformed by our access
起源と進化に関する2つのアイデアを
07:22
to data at this scale.
お話ししたいと思います
07:24
In the last five years, NASA has discovered
過去5年間 NASAは
1,000個を超える
07:27
over 1,000 planetary systems
恒星の周囲を回る
07:29
around nearby stars,
惑星系を発見してきましたが
07:32
but the systems we're finding
私たちが見つけた系は
07:34
aren't much like our own solar system,
太陽系とはあまり似ていませんでした
07:36
and one of the questions we face is
私たちの努力不足では?
07:38
is it just that we haven't been looking hard enough
それとも 太陽系の形成が特別であり
07:40
or is there something special or unusual
特異なものではないか?
07:42
about how our solar system formed?
などといった疑問に直面しました
07:44
And if we want to answer that question,
その疑問に答るのなら
07:46
we have to know and understand
太陽系の歴史を
07:48
the history of our solar system in detail,
詳細に理解する必要があります
07:50
and it's the details that are crucial.
詳細にというのがポイントです
07:53
So now, if we look back at the sky,
空を見上げると
07:55
at our asteroids that were streaming across the sky,
空を横切る小惑星があり
07:59
these asteroids are like the
debris of our solar system.
まるで太陽系の破片のようです
08:02
The positions of the asteroids
小惑星の位置は
08:06
are like a fingerprint of an earlier time
海王星や天王星の軌道が
08:08
when the orbits of Neptune and Jupiter
ずっと太陽に近かった初期の頃に
08:10
were much closer to the sun,
刻まれた記録のようなもので
08:12
and as these giant planets migrated
through our solar system,
このような大型惑星が太陽系を
移動する時
08:14
they were scattering the asteroids in their wake.
その軌跡にあった小惑星を
まき散らしたのでした
08:18
So studying the asteroids
小惑星の研究は
08:21
is like performing forensics,
あたかも科学捜査を-
08:22
performing forensics on our solar system,
太陽系の科学捜査を
行っているかのようです
08:25
but to do this, we need distance,
しかしこれを行うためには
距離を知らねばならず
08:27
and we get the distance from the motion,
距離を知るには
動きを測る必要がありますが
08:30
and we get the motion because of our access to time.
動きは時間を利用することによって
得られます
08:32
So what does this tell us?
これはどういうことでしょう?
08:36
Well, if you look at the little yellow asteroids
画面を動き回る
08:38
flitting across the screen,
小さな黄色い小惑星を見ると
08:40
these are the asteroids that are moving fastest,
私たちに 地球に最も接近しているので
08:43
because they're closest to us, closest to Earth.
最も速く動いているように見えます
08:45
These are the asteroids we may one day
いつの日か宇宙船を小惑星に送り
08:48
send spacecraft to, to mine them for minerals,
鉱物を採掘するかもしれませんし
08:50
but they're also the asteroids that may one day
しかし 6,000万年前に
08:53
impact the Earth,
恐竜が絶滅したように
あるいは
08:55
like happened 60 million years ago
前世紀初頭には
08:57
with the extinction of the dinosaurs,
小惑星が1,000平方メートルの
シベリアの森林を
08:58
or just at the beginning of the last century,
消滅させたように
あるいは
09:01
when an asteroid wiped out
去年 ロシア上空で
09:03
almost 1,000 square miles of Siberian forest,
小型核爆弾級のエネルギーを放出したように
09:04
or even just last year, as one burnt up over Russia,
いつの日にか また小惑星が
09:08
releasing the energy of a small nuclear bomb.
地球に衝突するかもしれません
09:11
So studying the forensics of our solar system
つまり 太陽系の科学捜査という
研究によって
09:14
doesn't just tell us about the past,
過去だけではなく
09:18
it can also predict the future,
including our future.
私たちの未来をも予測できるのです
09:20
Now when we get distance,
さて 遠く離れてみると
09:26
we get to see the asteroids
in their natural habitat,
太陽の周りを回る小惑星の普段の姿は
09:28
in orbit around the sun.
この様に見えるでしょう
09:32
So every point in this visualization that you can see
このように視覚化された
すべての点が
09:33
is a real asteroid.
本物の小惑星なのです
09:36
Its orbit has been calculated
from its motion across the sky.
軌道は空を横切る動きから
計算されました
09:39
The colors reflect the composition of these asteroids,
色は小惑星の成分を反映しています
09:43
dry and stony in the center,
中央部のものは水分を含まず
かつ石質ですが
09:46
water-rich and primitive towards the edge,
縁辺部にあるものは
水分を多く含み原始的です
09:48
water-rich asteroids which may have seeded
太古に小惑星が地球に衝突した時
09:51
the oceans and the seas that we find on our planet
水を豊富に含む小惑星が
地球の海の形成に
09:53
when they bombarded the
Earth at an earlier time.
一役買ったのかもしれません
09:57
Because the LSST will be able to go faint
LSSTは広い範囲を撮れるだけでなく
10:02
and not just wide,
弱い信号も検知できるので
10:04
we will be able to see these asteroids
私たちは太陽系の内側から
10:06
far beyond the inner part of our solar system,
遥か離れたところにある-
10:08
to asteroids beyond the
orbits of Neptune and Mars,
海王星や火星の軌道の彼方にある小惑星や
10:11
to comets and asteroids that may exist
太陽から約1光年離れている
彗星や小惑星を
10:15
almost a light year from our sun.
見ることができるのです
10:17
And as we increase the detail of this picture,
この図の細部を見てみると―
10:20
increasing the detail by factors of 10 to 100,
10倍から100倍に拡大してみると
10:23
we will be able to answer questions such as,
次のような疑問に答えることが
できるでしょう
10:26
is there evidence for planets
outside the orbit of Neptune,
たとえば 海王星の軌道の
外側にある惑星が存在する証拠や
10:29
to find Earth-impacting asteroids
地球の衝突し得る小惑星を
10:32
long before they're a danger,
危険となるかなり前に見つけたり
10:35
and to find out whether, maybe,
おそらくは 太陽が独自に形成されたのか
10:37
our sun formed on its own or in a cluster of stars,
もしくは星の集団の中で
形成されたのか といったことや
10:39
and maybe it's this sun's stellar siblings
太陽には兄弟星があって それが―
10:42
that influenced the formation of our solar system,
太陽系の形成に影響を
与えたのではないかということや
10:45
and maybe that's one of the reasons why
solar systems like ours seem to be so rare.
それが 我が太陽系の類が それほど稀である
理由かもしれない といったことです
10:49
Now, distance and changes in our universe —
さて 距離と宇宙の変化についてですが
10:54
distance equates to time,
(地球からの)距離は
宇宙の時間と同等であり
10:59
as well as changes on the sky.
宇宙の変化でもあります
11:03
Every foot of distance you look away,
1フィートずつ離れて見るごとに
または
11:05
or every foot of distance an object is away,
物体が1フィートずつ離れるごとに
11:08
you're looking back about a
billionth of a second in time,
10億分の1秒ほどの
過去の宇宙の姿が見られます
11:10
and this idea or this notion of looking back in time
この過去を見るという
発想や概念は
11:14
has revolutionized our ideas about the universe,
宇宙についての考え方に
1度ならずも
11:16
not once but multiple times.
革命をもたらしました
11:19
The first time was in 1929,
最初は1929年で
11:21
when an astronomer called Edwin Hubble
エドウィン・ハッブルという天文学者が
11:24
showed that the universe was expanding,
宇宙が膨張していることを証明し
11:26
leading to the ideas of the Big Bang.
ビックバン理論へと発展しました
11:28
And the observations were simple:
観測結果は
11:31
just 24 galaxies
24個の銀河系と
11:34
and a hand-drawn picture.
手書きの図表という単純なものでした
11:36
But just the idea that the more distant a galaxy,
しかし 銀河系が遠ければ遠いほど
11:41
the faster it was receding,
より速いスピードで遠ざかる
という考え方は
11:45
was enough to give rise to modern cosmology.
それだけで
現代宇宙論を生みだすのに十分でした
11:47
A second revolution happened 70 years later,
その70年後に
2回目の革命がありました
11:51
when two groups of astronomers showed
天文学者の2つのグループが
11:53
that the universe wasn't just expanding,
宇宙は単に膨張しているのではなく
膨張速度が―
11:55
it was accelerating,
加速していることを示しました
11:58
a surprise like throwing up a ball into the sky
空に向かってボールを投げたとき
11:59
and finding out the higher that it gets,
高く遠ざかるにつれて
速度を増していくことを見出すような
12:02
the faster it moves away.
そんな驚きでした
12:05
And they showed this
超新星の明るさと
12:07
by measuring the brightness of supernovae,
超新星の明るさが
遠くなるにつれ
12:08
and how the brightness of the supernovae
どの程度弱くなるのかを
測定することで
12:11
got fainter with distance.
このことを証明したのでした
12:13
And these observations were more complex.
これらの観察結果はより複雑です
12:15
They required new technologies and new telescopes,
超新星は
12:17
because the supernovae were in galaxies
ハッブルが観察した銀河より
12:20
that were 2,000 times more distant
2,000倍以上も
遠い銀河系にあるので
12:24
than the ones used by Hubble.
新技術や新しい望遠鏡が
必要となるのです
12:26
And it took three years to find just 42 supernovae,
超新星の爆発は 1つの銀河系で
12:29
because a supernova only explodes
100年に1度しか起こらないので
12:34
once every hundred years within a galaxy.
3年間かけても 42個の超新星しか
発見していません
12:36
Three years to find 42 supernovae
数万個の銀河系を探して
12:39
by searching through tens of thousands of galaxies.
3年間で42個の超新星なのです
12:41
And once they'd collected their data,
データを収集し
12:45
this is what they found.
発見したものがこの図面です
12:47
Now, this may not look impressive,
これは印象的には見えないかもしれません
12:51
but this is what a revolution in physics looks like:
しかし 110億光年離れている超新星の
12:54
a line predicting the brightness of a supernova
明るさを予測した線があって
12:58
11 billion light years away,
その線上に当て嵌まらない
一握りの点が
13:00
and a handful of points that don't quite fit that line.
物理学における革命なのです
13:02
Small changes give rise to big consequences.
小さな変化が大きな結果を
もたらします
13:06
Small changes allow us to make discoveries,
小さな変化は
ハーシェルが惑星を見つけたように
13:10
like the planet found by Herschel.
発見の機会を与えてくれます
13:13
Small changes turn our understanding
小さな変化は 宇宙に対する理解を
13:16
of the universe on its head.
覆します
13:18
So 42 supernovae, slightly too faint,
42個の超新星において光が
僅かながらも弱いなら
13:21
meaning slightly further away,
僅かながら距離が遠く
13:24
requiring that a universe must not just be expanding,
宇宙が単に膨張しているのではなく
13:26
but this expansion must be accelerating,
この膨張が加速していることを意味し
13:29
revealing a component of our universe
今やダークエネルギーと呼ばれている
13:33
which we now call dark energy,
宇宙の要素を存在を明らかにします
13:35
a component that drives this expansion
これは今日の宇宙のエネルギーの
13:37
and makes up 68 percent of the energy budget
68%を占めており
13:40
of our universe today.
膨張を加速させている要素です
13:43
So what is the next revolution likely to be?
次の起こりうる革命とは何なのでしょうか?
13:46
Well, what is dark energy and why does it exist?
ダークエネルギーとは何であり
なぜ存在するのでしょう?
13:50
Each of these lines shows a different model
これらの個々の線は それぞれ
13:53
for what dark energy might be,
ダークエネルギーに関する
異なるモデルを示し
13:55
showing the properties of dark energy.
ダークエネルギーの特性を表しています
13:58
They all are consistent with the 42 points,
それらはいずれも42個の点と整合的です
14:00
but the ideas behind these lines
しかし これらの線の背後にある
14:04
are dramatically different.
考え方が抜本的に違うのです
14:06
Some people think about a dark energy
ダークエネルギーは
時間と共に変化すると
14:08
that changes with time,
考える人たちもいれば
14:11
or whether the properties of the dark energy
暗黒エネルギーの特性は
どこで空を見るかで
14:12
are different depending on where you look on the sky.
異なると考える人たちもいます
14:15
Others make differences and changes
亜原子レベルで 物理学に
14:17
to the physics at the sub-atomic level.
変化や違いをもたらすと
考える人たちもいます
14:19
Or, they look at large scales
あるいは 大きな規模で
14:22
and change how gravity and general relativity work,
重力や一般相対性理論の修正を考えたり
14:25
or they say our universe is just one of many,
私たちの宇宙が数ある宇宙の一つ
つまり
14:29
part of this mysterious multiverse,
この神秘的な多元宇宙の一部だ
と言う人たちもいます
14:31
but all of these ideas, all of these theories,
これらの考え方や理論のすべてが
14:34
amazing and admittedly some of them a little crazy,
素晴らしく
―幾分クレージーなものもありますが―
14:37
but all of them consistent with our 42 points.
いずれも42個の点と
整合しています
14:41
So how can we hope to make sense of this
次の10年でこのことを
理解するために
14:45
over the next decade?
どうすればいいのでしょうか?
14:47
Well, imagine if I gave you a pair of dice,
私があなたに2つのサイコロ
をあげたとします
14:49
and I said you wanted to see whether those dice
あなたはそのサイコロに
細工がしてあるのか
14:52
were loaded or fair.
公正なのかを調べたいとします
14:54
One roll of the dice would tell you very little,
サイコロを一回振っただけでは
ほとんど分かりませんが
14:56
but the more times you rolled them,
何度もサイコロを振ると
14:59
the more data you collected,
より多くのデータが収集されるので
15:01
the more confident you would become,
あなたはより確信をもって
15:03
not just whether they're loaded or fair,
サイコロに細工がしてあるか
どうかだけでなく
15:05
but by how much, and in what way.
細工の程度や
どういう細工なのかも分かるのです
15:08
It took three years to find just 42 supernovae
3年間で42個の超新星しか
見つけられなかったのは
15:12
because the telescopes that we built
私たちが作った望遠鏡が
15:16
could only survey a small part of the sky.
空の一部しか調査できないためです
15:19
With the LSST, we get a completely new view
LSSTを使って3晩ごとに
15:22
of the skies above Chile every three nights.
チリ上空の真新しい姿を
撮影します
15:25
In its first night of operation,
観測を始める最初の夜には
15:29
it will find 10 times the number of supernovae
ダークエネルギーの発見に使われた数の
15:31
used in the discovery of dark energy.
10倍の超新星を見つけるでしょう
15:34
This will increase by 1,000
最初の4か月で
15:37
within the first four months:
1,000個に増え
15:39
1.5 million supernovae by the end of its survey,
調査の終わる頃には
150万個の超新星になります
15:42
each supernova a roll of the dice,
各超新星がサイコロの一振りにあたり
15:46
each supernova testing which theories of dark energy
各超新星は
どのダークエネルギーの理論と整合し
15:50
are consistent, and which ones are not.
どの理論と合わないかという
検証に使われます
15:53
And so, by combining these supernova data
それ故 これらの超新星のデータを
15:57
with other measures of cosmology,
宇宙論の別の測定と
組み合わせることによって
16:01
we'll progressively rule out the different ideas
願わくばこの調査の終わる
2030年頃までには
16:03
and theories of dark energy
ダークエネルギーの
16:06
until hopefully at the end of this survey around 2030,
さまざま考え方や理論から
徐々に絞り込んで
16:08
we would expect to hopefully see
願わくば 宇宙理論-
16:15
a theory for our universe,
宇宙を司る物理学の基本定理が
16:18
a fundamental theory for the physics of our universe,
徐々に解明されることを
16:20
to gradually emerge.
期待しています
16:23
Now, in many ways, the questions that I posed
色々な意味で 私が提起した疑問は
16:26
are in reality the simplest of questions.
実は最も単純なものなのです
16:29
We may not know the answers,
答えは分からないかも
しれませんが
16:33
but we at least know how to ask the questions.
少なくとも質問の仕方を
知っているのです
16:35
But if looking through tens of thousands of galaxies
数万個の銀河系を調べることにより
16:39
revealed 42 supernovae that turned
発見した42個の超新星が
16:42
our understanding of the universe on its head,
我々の頭上にある宇宙の理解を
覆したのならば
16:45
when we're working with billions of galaxies,
数十億の銀河系を調べることにより
16:48
how many more times are we going to find
42個の何倍ほどの超新星を得て
16:51
42 points that don't quite match what we expect?
予測と全く一致しないようなものを
見出すことになるのでしょうか
16:53
Like the planet found by Herschel
ハーシェルが発見した惑星や
16:59
or dark energy
ダークエネルギーや
17:01
or quantum mechanics or general relativity,
量子力学や一般相対性理論のように
17:04
all ideas that came because the data
データが予測と違っていたために
17:08
didn't quite match what we expected.
様々な考え方ができました
17:10
What's so exciting about the next decade of data
今後10年で得られる
17:13
in astronomy is,
天文学のデータによって
17:17
we don't even know how many answers
我が宇宙の起源や進化といった
17:18
are out there waiting,
疑問に対する答えが
17:21
answers about our origins and our evolution.
どれだけ得られるのだろうかと思うと
ワクワクします
17:22
How many answers are out there
質問することすら
17:26
that we don't even know the questions
思い浮かばないことに対する答えが
17:27
that we want to ask?
そこに いくつあるのでしょうか?
17:31
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
17:33
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:35
Translated by Masako Kigami
Reviewed by Tomoyuki Suzuki

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Andrew Connolly - Astronomer
Andrew Connolly is helping to build the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope -- as well as tools to handle the massive datasets it will send our way.

Why you should listen
Andrew Connolly's research focuses on understanding the evolution of our universe, by studying how structure forms and evolves on small and large scales -- from the search for asteroids to the clustering of distant galaxies. He's a ten-year veteran of the Large Synoptic Sky Survey, and is now prepping for the unprecedented data streams we could expect from the under-construction Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.
 
Set on an 8,800-foot peak in northern Chile, the LSST will have an 8.4-meter primary mirror, a 10-square-degree field of view and a 3.2 gigapixel camera. It will survey half the sky every three nights, creating about 100 terabytes of data every week. Astronomers, Connolly suggests, will need wholly new tools to wrangle this amount of data -- so he has been helping bring together computer scientists, statisticians and astronomers to develop scalable algorithms for processing massive data streams.
 
On sabbatical from the University of Washington, Connolly led the development of Google Sky, and he's now working with Microsoft to develop affordable digital planetariums.
More profile about the speaker
Andrew Connolly | Speaker | TED.com