sponsored links
TEDxBrighton

Colin Grant: How our stories cross over

コリン・グラント: 気難しい父親の息子として

October 26, 2012

コリン・グラントは、これまでの人生で、父親の世界と自分の世界のはざまで、感情の波間を漂ってきました。ジャマイカ出身の両親のもとでイングランドに生まれたグラントが、彼が育った移民コミュニティの中で共有された物語に目を向け、自分を拒んだ父親を許そうと思えるに至った過程を振り返ります。

Colin Grant - Author, historian
Colin Grant is an author and historian whose works focus on larger-than-life figures of the African diaspora. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
This is a photograph
この写真には
00:12
of a man whom for many years
私が何年も暗殺を企てた男が
00:14
I plotted to kill.
写っています
00:17
This is my father,
私の父―
00:21
Clinton George "Bageye" Grant.
クリントン・ジョージ “バガイ” グラントです
00:24
He's called Bageye because he has
父が “バガイ (袋)” と呼ばれたのは
00:27
permanent bags under his eyes.
常に目元の涙袋がたるんでいたからです
00:30
As a 10-year-old, along with my siblings,
10歳だった私は 兄妹と一緒に
00:34
I dreamt of scraping off the poison
ハエ取り紙から毒をこそげ取って
00:37
from fly-killer paper into his coffee,
父のコーヒーに混ぜたり
00:41
grounded down glass and sprinkling it
ガラスを砕いて
00:45
over his breakfast,
父の朝食にかけたり
00:47
loosening the carpet on the stairs
階段のカーペットを緩めておいて
00:50
so he would trip and break his neck.
父が滑って首を折らないかと
思い巡らしていました
00:51
But come the day, he would always
しかし そうはうまくいかず
父はいつでも
00:55
skip that loose step,
カーペットの緩んだ段をとばして歩き
00:57
he would always bow out of the house
コーヒーも朝食も満足にとらずに
00:59
without so much as a swig of coffee
背中を丸めて
01:01
or a bite to eat.
出かけて行くのでした
01:03
And so for many years,
何年もの間
01:05
I feared that my father would die
私は自分が殺す機会を逸しているうちに
01:07
before I had a chance to kill him.
父が死ぬのではないかと恐れたものです
01:09
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:11
Up until our mother asked him to leave
母が父に家から出ていってほしいと
01:15
and not come back,
告げるまで
01:18
Bageye had been a terrifying ogre.
バガイは恐ろしい怪物でした
01:20
He teetered permanently on the verge of rage,
父は常に怒りを爆発させる寸前の状態でした
01:24
rather like me, as you see.
ご覧のとおり 私のような感じです
01:28
He worked nights at Vauxhall Motors in Luton
父はルートンのヴォクソール・モータースで
夜間勤務をしていたので
01:31
and demanded total silence throughout the house,
家の中が完全に静かであることを求めました
01:35
so that when we came home from school
ですから 私たちは午後3時半に
01:38
at 3:30 in the afternoon, we would huddle
学校から帰ると テレビのそばに
01:40
beside the TV, and rather like safe-crackers,
寄り合って さながら金庫破りのように
01:42
we would twiddle with the volume control knob
テレビのボリュームを回して
01:46
on the TV so it was almost inaudible.
ほとんど聞こえないくらいの
音量に合わせたものです
01:48
And at times, when we were like this,
時には 家の中で
01:51
so much "Shhh," so much "Shhh"
「シーッ」と声を潜めてばかりいたので
01:53
going on in the house
「シーッ」と声を潜めてばかりいたので
01:56
that I imagined us to be like
その様子は まるで
01:58
the German crew of a U-boat
ドイツ軍兵士がUボートで
02:00
creeping along the edge of the ocean
こっそりと海面に近づいていくようだと
02:03
whilst up above, on the surface,
思っていました
一方 その上の水面には
02:06
HMS Bageye patrolled
英国海軍軍艦のバガイ号が
02:07
ready to drop death charges
静寂を乱す者に
02:11
at the first sound of any disturbance.
爆雷を落とすべく
待ち構えているのです
02:13
So that lesson was the lesson that
これが教えてくれた教訓は
02:17
"Do not draw attention to yourself
「家でも外でも
02:20
either in the home or outside of the home."
人目を引くようなことをするな」
というものでした
02:22
Maybe it's a migrant lesson.
これは あるいは移民であるがゆえの
教訓であったかもしれません
02:24
We were to be below the radar,
私たちはレーダーの監視下に置かれており
02:27
so there was no communication, really,
コミュニケーションらしいものは
02:30
between Bageye and us and us and Bageye,
バガイと私たちの間に
まるでありませんでした
02:31
and the sound that we most looked forward to,
私たちが心待ちにしていた音はというと―
02:34
you know when you're a child and you want
あなた方が子供の頃は
02:37
your father to come home
and it's all going to be happy
父親が帰ってくるのが嬉しくて
02:39
and you're waiting for that sound of the door opening.
ドアが開く音を待ちかねていたことでしょう
02:42
Well the sound that we looked forward to
私たちが楽しみにしていた音は
02:44
was the click of the door closing,
ドアがかちっと閉まる音でした
02:45
which meant he'd gone and would not come back.
バガイは出て行って
もう帰ってこないのだとわかる音です
02:47
So for three decades,
30年の間
02:52
I never laid eyes on my father, nor he on me.
私と父が互いを目にすることは
ありませんでした
02:55
We never spoke to each other for three decades,
30年間 互いに話すことも
ありませんでしたが
02:58
and then a couple of years ago, I decided
数年前 私は
03:00
to turn the spotlight on him.
彼に目を向けることを決めました
03:02
"You are being watched.
「お前は見られているんだ
03:06
Actually, you are.
本当に
03:08
You are being watched."
見られているんだぞ」
03:10
That was his mantra to us, his children.
これは父が 私たち子供に
言い聞かせていた呪文でした
03:12
Time and time again he would say this to us.
何度も何度も聞かされました
03:15
And this was the 1970s, it was Luton,
これは時代が1970年代で
場所がルートンという
03:16
where he worked at Vauxhall Motors,
彼がヴォクソール・モータースに
勤めていた街であり
03:19
and he was a Jamaican.
彼がジャマイカ人だったからです
03:21
And what he meant was,
父が言いたかったのは
03:23
you as a child of a Jamaican immigrant
「ジャマイカ系移民の子供として
03:24
are being watched
お前たちは その振る舞いと
03:26
to see which way you turn, to see whether
ステレオタイプに当てはまるかどうかが
03:28
you conform to the host nation's stereotype of you,
見られているんだ」ということでした
03:30
of being feckless, work-shy,
無責任で 仕事嫌いで
03:34
destined for a life of crime.
そのうち犯罪を犯すに違いない
というものです
03:36
You are being watched,
「お前たちは見られているんだから
03:39
so confound their expectations of you.
彼らの期待を裏切ってやれ」というのです
03:41
To that end, Bageye and his friends,
その意味においては
バガイとその友人は―
03:45
mostly Jamaican,
ほとんどがジャマイカ人でしたが―
03:49
exhibited a kind of Jamaican bella figura:
ジャマイカ人として立派な印象を残しました
03:51
Turn your best side to the world,
世間には自分の最も良い側面と
03:55
show your best face to the world.
良い顔を見せろ というものです
03:57
If you have seen some of the images
40年代や50年代にやってきた
04:00
of the Caribbean people arriving
カリブ系の人々の
04:01
in the '40s and '50s,
写真を見たことがあれば
04:03
you might have noticed that a lot of the men
多くの男性がトリルビー帽を
かぶっていることに
04:05
wear trilbies.
気付いたでしょう
04:07
Now, there was no tradition
of wearing trilbies in Jamaica.
ジャマイカにはトリルビー帽をかぶる
習慣はありません
04:08
They invented that tradition for their arrival here.
この国にやってくる際に
伝統を作り出したのです
04:12
They wanted to project themselves in a way
彼らは自分たちが
このように見られたいという姿を
04:15
that they wanted to be perceived,
投影したかったのです
04:17
so that the way they looked
そのために 彼らの見た目と
04:19
and the names that they gave themselves
自ら名乗る名前が
04:21
defined them.
彼らを定義づけました
04:23
So Bageye is bald and has baggy eyes.
バガイは髪がなく 目には涙袋がありました
04:25
Tidy Boots is very fussy about his footwear.
“Tidy boots (きれいなブーツ)” は
靴に気をつかいました
04:31
Anxious is always anxious.
“Anxious (心配性)” は心配性でした
04:35
Clock has one arm longer than the other.
“Clock (時計)” は片方の腕が
もう片方より長かったのです
04:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:40
And my all-time favorite was the
guy they called Summerwear.
私の1番のお気に入りは
“Summerwear (夏服)” と呼ばれた男です
04:44
When Summerwear came to this country
“夏服” は60年代初頭に
04:47
from Jamaica in the early '60s, he insisted
ジャマイカからイングランドにやってくると
04:49
on wearing light summer suits,
どんな天気であっても
夏用の薄手のスーツを
04:51
no matter the weather,
着るといってきかなかったのです
04:53
and in the course of researching their lives,
彼らの人生を調査する間に
04:55
I asked my mom, "Whatever
became of Summerwear?"
私は母に「“夏服” はどうなったの?」
と尋ねました
04:56
And she said, "He caught a cold and died." (Laughter)
母は「風邪をひいて死んでしまったわ」
と言いました (笑)
04:59
But men like Summerwear
しかし “夏服” のような男たちは
05:04
taught us the importance of style.
スタイルの重要性を教えてくれます
05:06
Maybe they exaggerated their style
彼らはスタイルを強調したかもしれません
05:08
because they thought that they were not considered
自分たちがあまり洗練されていないと
思われていると
05:10
to be quite civilized,
考えたためです
05:13
and they transferred that generational attitude
そして彼らはその世代の態度や不安を
05:15
or anxiety onto us, the next generation,
私たち 次の世代に引き継ぎました
05:18
so much so that when I was growing up,
ですから 私が育った時代には
05:20
if ever on the television news or radio
テレビのニュースやラジオで
05:23
a report came up about a black person
黒人が犯罪を犯したという
05:25
committing some crime —
ニュースがあれば―
05:26
a mugging, a murder, a burglary —
ひったくり 殺人 強盗など―
05:28
we winced along with our parents,
私たちは両親と共にたじろいだのです
05:32
because they were letting the side down.
なぜなら 彼らが
世間体を傷つけているからです
05:35
You did not just represent yourself.
皆 自分を代表しているだけでなく
05:38
You represented the group,
グループを代表しているのです
05:39
and it was a terrifying thing to come to terms with,
自分も もしかしたら同じような目で
05:41
in a way, that maybe you were going
見られるかもしれないということは
05:46
to be perceived in the same light.
ある意味で 受け入れるのが恐ろしいことでした
05:48
So that was what needed to be challenged.
ですから そのことに
立ち向かわねばならなかったのです
05:52
Our father and many of his colleagues
私たちの父やその同僚の多くは
05:56
exhibited a kind of transmission but not receiving.
発信はしていても 受信することは
ありませんでした
06:00
They were built to transmit but not receive.
彼らは発信する能力はあっても
受信はできなかったのです
06:04
We were to keep quiet.
私たちは沈黙するほかありませんでした
06:06
When our father did speak to us,
父が私たちに話して来るときは
06:09
it was from the pulpit of his mind.
説教であることが常でした
06:10
They clung to certainty in the belief
確かな信念にしがみついていたため
06:13
that doubt would undermine them.
疑いが生まれれば
台無しになってしまいます
06:15
But when I am working in my house
私が家で仕事をして
06:19
and writing, after a day's writing, I rush downstairs
1日中 書き物をしたあとに
下の階に降りて行き
06:22
and I'm very excited to talk about
Marcus Garvey or Bob Marley
興奮して マーカス・ガーヴィーや
ボブ・マーリーの話をすると
06:26
and words are tripping out of my mouth like butterflies
言葉が蝶のように次々と出てきます
06:29
and I'm so excited that my children stop me,
私があまりにも興奮しているので
子供たちは私を止めて
06:32
and they say, "Dad, nobody cares."
「お父さん 誰も興味ないよ」と言います
06:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:38
But they do care, actually.
でも 子供たちは
本当は興味があるのです
06:42
They cross over.
行き会う時がくるのです
06:44
Somehow they find their way to you.
どうにかして 父親のもとに
やってくる時がくるのです
06:46
They shape their lives according
to the narrative of your life,
子供たちはあなたが語る人生を通して
自分たちの人生を形作ります
06:48
as I did with my father and my mother, perhaps,
私が父や母の人生から学んだように
06:52
and maybe Bageye did with his father.
そしてバガイが その父親から学んだように
06:56
And that was clearer to me
このことは 私が
06:59
in the course of looking at his life
父の人生を振り返るうちに
はっきりとしてきました
07:00
and understanding, as they say,
そして ネイティブアメリカンが
07:03
the Native Americans say,
よく言うように
07:06
"Do not criticize the man until you can walk
「相手のモカシンを履いて歩かずに
07:08
in his moccasins."
相手を批判してはならない」のだと
わかったのです
07:09
But in conjuring his life, it was okay
父の人生を掘り起こす中で
07:12
and very straightforward to portray
1970年代のイングランドにおける
07:14
a Caribbean life in England in the 1970s
カリブ系移民の生活を描くのは
実に簡単でした
07:18
with bowls of plastic fruit,
ボウルに入ったプラスチックの果物
07:21
polystyrene ceiling tiles,
ポリスチレンの天井
07:26
settees permanently sheathed
配達されたときについてきた
07:29
in their transparent covers
that they were delivered in.
透明な覆いがかかったままのソファ
07:31
But what's more difficult to navigate
ですが もっと理解しがたいのは
07:34
is the emotional landscape
異なる世代間の
07:36
between the generations,
感情のひだであり
07:38
and the old adage that with age comes wisdom
老齢と共に知恵がつくという古いことわざは
07:40
is not true.
真実ではないのです
07:45
With age comes the veneer of respectability
老齢と共に訪れるのは
世間体といううわべと
07:47
and a veneer of uncomfortable truths.
不快な真実といううわべです
07:50
But what was true was that my parents,
真実であったのは 私の両親―
07:53
my mother, and my father went along with it,
私の母と父はそのうわべと共にあり
07:56
did not trust the state to educate me.
国が私に授ける教育を
信頼しなかったということです
07:59
So listen to how I sound.
私の発音をよく聞いてください
08:01
They determined that they would
send me to a private school,
両親は私を私立の学校に入れると
決めていましたが
08:04
but my father worked at Vauxhall Motors.
父が働いていたのは
ヴォクソール・モータースです
08:08
It's quite difficult to fund a private school education
私立校の学費を払い
08:10
and feed his army of children.
何人もの子供たちを食べさせるのは
困難でした
08:14
I remember going on to the school
私は学校の入学試験を受けに行き
08:16
for the entrance exam, and my father said
父が神父さんに―
08:18
to the priest — it was a Catholic school —
カトリック系の学校でした―
こう言ったのを覚えています
08:20
he wanted a better "heducation" for the boy,
息子には良い「ちょういく(教育)」を
受けさせたいと
08:24
but also, he, my father,
ですが 父は
08:28
never even managed to pass worms,
蟯虫検査もパスしたことがなかったので
08:31
never mind entrance exams.
入学試験のことは気にも留めませんでした
08:34
But in order to fund my education,
私の学費を捻出するため
08:36
he was going to have to do some dodgy stuff,
父は危ない仕事にも
手を出さねばならず
08:38
so my father would fund my education
父は私の学費のために
08:41
by trading in illicit goods from the back of his car,
車のトランクから
非合法な商品を売ったのです
08:44
and that was made even more tricky because
これはさらに厄介な状況になりました
08:48
my father, that's not his car by the way.
ちなみに これは父の車ではありません
08:49
My father aspired to have a car like that,
父はそのような車を
手に入れたいと望んでいましたが
08:51
but my father had a beaten-up Mini,
父の車はボロボロのミニで
08:53
and he never, being a
Jamaican coming to this country,
移民としてこの国にやってきた
ジャマイカ人である父は
08:55
he never had a driving license,
運転免許証がなく
09:00
he never had any insurance or road tax or MOT.
車両保険や道路税や
車検などもありませんでした
09:02
He thought, "I know how to drive;
父は「運転の仕方を知っているのに
09:06
why do I need the state's validation?"
どうして国の認可が要ると言うのか?」
と考えていたのです
09:08
But it became a little tricky when
we were stopped by the police,
しかし 警察に車を止められた時などは
厄介なことになりました
09:11
and we were stopped a lot by the police,
そして実際私たちは
よく警察に止められました
09:13
and I was impressed by the way
ところで 私も父の警官への対応には
09:15
that my father dealt with the police.
感心していました
09:16
He would promote the policeman immediately,
父はその警官をすぐさま昇進させたのです
09:18
so that P.C. Bloggs became Detective Inspector Bloggs
つまり会話の中でブロッグス巡査を
09:21
in the course of the conversation
警部補と呼び
09:25
and wave us on merrily.
そうすると 陽気に見逃してくれるのです
09:26
So my father was exhibiting what we in Jamaica
父はジャマイカで言うところの
09:28
called "playing fool to catch wise."
「賢くやるためにバカなふりをする」というのを
実践していたのです
09:30
But it lent also an idea
しかし これは同時に
09:34
that actually he was being diminished
警官から父が軽く見られたり
09:38
or belittled by the policeman —
見くびられるということでもあり
09:40
as a 10-year-old boy, I saw that —
10歳の私にも それはわかりました
09:42
but also there was an ambivalence towards authority.
しかし 権威に対する
相反する感情もあったのです
09:44
So on the one hand, there was
一方では
09:46
a mocking of authority,
権威をばかにしていながら
09:48
but on the other hand, there was a deference
もう一方では 権威に
09:50
towards authority,
従ってもいました
09:52
and these Caribbean people
そして こうしたカリブ系の人々は
09:54
had an overbearing obedience towards authority,
大仰なまでに権威に服従しており
09:56
which is very striking, very strange in a way,
これはある意味で とても目立ち
とても奇妙でした
10:00
because migrants are very courageous people.
なぜなら移民というのはとても
勇気のある人々だからです
10:02
They leave their homes. My father and my mother
彼らは祖国を離れるのですから
私の両親は
10:05
left Jamaica and they traveled 4,000 miles,
ジャマイカを離れて 4千マイルも旅をして
10:08
and yet they were infantilized by travel.
その移動によって 子供じみてしまいました
10:12
They were timid,
引っ込み思案になり
10:16
and somewhere along the line,
そのせいか どういうわけか
10:17
the natural order was reversed.
自然の順序が反対になってしまいました
10:19
The children became the parents to the parent.
子供たちが両親の親のようになったのです
10:21
The Caribbean people came to
this country with a five-year plan:
カリブ系の人々は5年計画で
この国にやってきました
10:26
they would work, some money, and then go back,
仕事をして お金を貯めたら
戻るつもりでいたのです
10:29
but the five years became 10, the 10 became 15,
しかし 5年のつもりが10年になり
10年が15年になりました
10:31
and before you know it,
you're changing the wallpaper,
そして気づかぬうちに
壁紙を変えるようになり
10:33
and at that point, you know you're here to stay.
ある時点で もうここに留まるのだと
思うようになるのです
10:36
Although there's still the kind of temporariness
それでも 私の両親はどこかしら
10:39
that our parents felt about being here,
一時的に滞在しているだけだ
といったところがありましたが
10:42
but we children knew that the game was up.
私たち子供はそんな遊びは
もう終わったと知っていました
10:44
I think there was a feeling that
私が思うに 両親が
10:49
they would not be able to continue with the ideals
思い描いていた人生の理想を
10:51
of the life that they expected.
抱き続けるわけにはいかないだろうと
感じていたのです
10:57
The reality was very much different.
現実は ずっと異なっていました
10:59
And also, that was true of the reality
そして それは私の教育という試みにおける
11:01
of trying to educate me.
現実についてもそうでした
11:03
Having started the process,
my father did not continue.
自ら始めておきながら
父は途中で投げ出してしまいました
11:04
It was left to my mother to educate me,
私の教育は母の手にゆだねられ
11:08
and as George Lamming would say,
ジョージ・ラミングならこう言うでしょう
11:11
it was my mother who fathered me.
「私の父親役を務めたのは母であった」と
11:14
Even in his absence, that old mantra remained:
父が不在であっても
例の呪文は健在でした
11:17
You are being watched.
「お前は見られているんだぞ」と
11:20
But such ardent watchfulness can lead to anxiety,
しかし そこまでの用心深さは
不安感へつながりかねません
11:21
so much so that years later, when I was investigating
実際に 何年も後になって
11:25
why so many young black men
多くの若い黒人男性たちが
11:27
were diagnosed with schizophrenia,
統合失調症の診断を受けている理由を
調査していたときに―
11:28
six times more than they ought to be,
実に平均の6倍もの多さなのですが―
11:30
I was not surprised to hear the psychiatrist say,
精神科医の言葉を聞いても驚きませんでした
11:33
"Black people are schooled in paranoia."
「黒人はパラノイアを刷り込まれている」
と言うのです
11:36
And I wonder what Bageye would make of that.
父 バガイならこれを聞いて
何と言うだろうかと思います
11:41
Now I also had a 10-year-old son,
私にも10歳の息子がいたので
11:44
and turned my attention to Bageye
バガイに関心がわき
11:47
and I went in search of him.
父を探すことにしました
11:50
He was back in Luton, he was now 82,
父はルートンに戻っており
82歳になっていました
11:51
and I hadn't seen him for 30-odd years,
私は30数年間 会っていませんでした
11:55
and when he opened the door,
父がドアを開けると
11:58
I saw this tiny little man with lambent, smiling eyes,
そこにいたのは この背の小さな
目に柔らかい笑みを浮かべた男性でした
12:00
and he was smiling, and I'd never seen him smile.
父が微笑むのを見たことが
それまでありませんでした
12:04
I was very disconcerted by that.
私は父の笑みにうろたえました
12:06
But we sat down, and he had
a Caribbean friend with him,
しかし 一緒に腰をかけて
父はカリブ系の友人と一緒に
12:09
talking some old time talk,
昔話をしていたところでした
12:12
and my father would look at me,
父は私に目を向けました
12:15
and he looked at me as if I would
父が私を見る目は まるで私が
12:17
miraculously disappear as I had arisen.
現れたとき同様に 今にも
消えてしまうんじゃないかといったようでした
12:19
And he turned to his friend, and he said,
それから友人の方を向き
父はこう言いました
12:23
"This boy and me have a deep, deep connection,
「この子と私は深い深い絆で結ばれているんだ―
12:25
deep, deep connection."
それは深い絆でね」
12:28
But I never felt that connection.
でも私はそんな絆を
感じたことはありませんでした
12:31
If there was a pulse, it was very weak
鼓動のようなものがあったにしても
とても弱いか―
12:32
or hardly at all.
ほとんどなかったも同然でした
12:35
And I almost felt in the course of that reunion
この再会の間中 私は
12:38
that I was auditioning to be my father's son.
父の息子になるためのオーディションを
受けているような気分でした
12:40
When the book came out,
本が出版されると
12:44
it had fair reviews in the national papers,
全国各紙でいい書評をもらいましたが
12:46
but the paper of choice in Luton is not The Guardian,
ルートンで新聞と言えば
ガーディアン紙ではありません
12:48
it's the Luton News,
ルートン・ニューズ紙です
12:51
and the Luton News ran the headline about the book,
そして この本について
ルートン・ニューズ紙が選んだ見出しは
12:54
"The Book That May Heal a 32-Year-Old Rift."
「32年に及ぶ不和を癒やす一冊」でした
12:57
And I understood that could also represent
これは世代間の不和をも意味するのだと
13:03
the rift between one generation and the next,
私は理解しました
13:06
between people like me and my father's generation,
私のような人々と
父の世代の人々との不和です
13:08
but there's no tradition in Caribbean life
しかしカリブ系の生活には
13:12
of memoirs or biographies.
回顧録や伝記といった伝統はありません
13:14
It was a tradition that you didn't
chat about your business in public.
自らの私生活については
公に語らないのが伝統なのです
13:16
But I welcomed that title, and I thought actually, yes,
しかし 私はこの見出しを
喜んで受け入れましたし
13:20
there is a possibility that this
実際に この本が
かつては語られなかったようなことを
13:25
will open up conversations
that we'd never had before.
語るきっかけを生み出す
可能性があると思いました
13:27
This will close the generation gap, perhaps.
この本が世代間の差を
埋めてくれるかもしれない―
13:31
This could be an instrument of repair.
この本が修理道具となってくるかもしれないと
思ったのです
13:35
And I even began to feel that this book
そして この本は私の父にとっては
13:38
may be perceived by my father
子としての深い愛情を示す行為だと
13:40
as an act of filial devotion.
受け取られるかもしれないと
感じ始めました
13:43
Poor, deluded fool.
なんと哀れな浅はかな考えでしょうか
13:47
Bageye was stung by what he perceived to be
バガイは自らの短所が公にさらされたことに
13:51
the public airing of his shortcomings.
ひどく傷つきました
13:55
He was stung by my betrayal,
父は私の裏切りに傷つき
13:58
and he went to the newspapers the next day
翌日 新聞社を訪れて
14:01
and demanded a right of reply,
応酬する権利を要求しました
14:03
and he got it with the headline
そして 見出しにこう出たのです
14:04
"Bageye Bites Back."
「バガイ反撃に出る」と
14:06
And it was a coruscating account of my betrayal.
そして その記事は私の裏切りを
鮮やかに切り捨てました
14:09
I was no son of his.
私は彼の息子などではなく
14:12
He recognized in his mind that his colors
父は自らの肌の色によって
14:15
had been dragged through the
mud, and he couldn't allow that.
地を這うような生活を強いられたと考えており
それを許すことができなかったのだといいます
14:17
He had to restore his dignity, and he did so,
彼は尊厳を取り戻さなければならず
実際に取り戻しました
14:20
and initially, although I was disappointed,
私は始めこそ がっかりしましたが
14:22
I grew to admire that stance.
その立場を敬うようになりました
14:25
There was still fire bubbling through his veins,
もう82歳でありながら 父の身体にはまだ
14:26
even though he was 82 years old.
炎に沸き立つような血が流れていたのです
14:30
And if it meant that we would now return
そして これが再び30年の沈黙へと
14:33
to 30 years of silence,
戻ることを意味しているのであれば
14:36
my father would say, "If it's so, then it's so."
父ならこう言うでしょう
「そういうものなら そうなんだろう」と
14:39
Jamaicans will tell you that
there's no such thing as facts,
ジャマイカ人は 事実などというものはなく
14:45
there are only versions.
様々な見解があるだけだと言うでしょう
14:48
We all tell ourselves the versions of the story
私たちは自分が
14:50
that we can best live with.
一番信じたい見解に基づいた話を
するだけのことなのです
14:53
Each generation builds up an edifice
各世代の生み出す体系は
14:56
which they are reluctant or sometimes unable
自ら解体したがらなかったり
14:58
to disassemble,
時に解体不可能であるものですが
15:00
but in the writing, my version of the story
本の中で 私の見解から語った物語は
15:03
began to change,
変化し始め
15:06
and it was detached from me.
私の手から離れていきました
15:08
I lost my hatred of my father.
私の父に対する憎しみは消えました
15:12
I did no longer want him to die or to murder him,
父が死ねばいいとか
殺したいと思わなくなり
15:15
and I felt free,
自由になったように感じました
15:20
much freer than I'd ever felt before.
以前よりずっと自由になったのです
15:24
And I wonder whether that freedness
私は この自由な感覚が父にも
15:29
could be transferred to him.
伝わらないだろうかと考えました
15:31
In that initial reunion,
初めての再会で
15:36
I was struck by an idea that I had
私は自分が幼い頃の写真を
15:40
very few photographs of myself
ほとんど持っていないことに
15:42
as a young child.
衝撃を受けました
15:46
This is a photograph of me,
これは私が
15:48
nine months old.
9ヶ月の頃の写真です
15:50
In the original photograph,
元の写真では
15:53
I'm being held up by my father, Bageye,
私は父 バガイに抱き上げられていますが
15:55
but when my parents separated, my mother
両親が離婚したときに
15:58
excised him from all aspects of our lives.
母はあらゆる生活の側面から父を除外しました
16:00
She took a pair of scissors and cut
him out of every photograph,
母はハサミですべての写真から
父を切り取り
16:03
and for years, I told myself
the truth of this photograph
何年もの間 この写真は
私がひとりぼっちで
16:07
was that you are alone,
誰にも支えられていないのだと
16:10
you are unsupported.
語っているのだと
自分に言い聞かせていました
16:13
But there's another way of looking at this photograph.
ですが この写真には別の見方もあったのです
16:16
This is a photograph that has the potential
これは再会する可能性を
16:18
for a reunion,
持っている写真―
16:21
a potential to be reunited with my father,
父と再び出会う可能性を持った写真なのです
16:23
and in my yearning to be held up by my father,
そして父に抱き上げられたいという思いから
16:26
I held him up to the light.
私は父を白日のもとにさらしたのでした
16:30
In that first reunion,
最初の再会では
16:33
it was very awkward and tense moments,
とてもぎこちなく緊張する瞬間ばかりで
16:36
and to lessen the tension,
緊張を和らげるために
16:38
we decided to go for a walk.
散歩に行くことにしました
16:39
And as we walked, I was struck
一緒に歩くうちに 私は
16:43
that I had reverted to being the child
今や父よりずっと背が高いにもかかわらず
16:45
even though I was now towering above my father.
自分が子どもに戻ったように感じました
16:47
I was almost a foot taller than my father.
私は父より30センチくらい背が高いのです
16:50
He was still the big man,
父はいまだに大きい人なので
16:53
and I tried to match his step.
父の足取りに遅れまいとしました
16:55
And I realized that he was walking
そして私は父がいまだに
17:00
as if he was still under observation,
誰かに見られているような歩き方を
することに気づきましたが
17:02
but I admired his walk.
父の足取りに感心しました
17:04
He walked like a man
父の足取りはまるで
17:07
on the losing side of the F.A. Cup Final
F.A. カップファイナルで
2位に甘んじたチームが
17:10
mounting the steps to collect his condolence medal.
壇上へ2位のメダルを
取りに上がるかのようでした
17:13
There was dignity in defeat.
敗北の中にも威厳があったのです
17:16
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
17:20
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:22
Translator:Moe Shoji
Reviewer:Misaki Sato

sponsored links

Colin Grant - Author, historian
Colin Grant is an author and historian whose works focus on larger-than-life figures of the African diaspora.

Why you should listen
Colin Grant is an English historian and son of black Jamaican immigrants who explores the legacy of slavery and its effect on modern generations of the African diaspora. In Negro with a Hat: The Rise and Fall of Marcus Garvey Grant chronicles the life of the controversial Jamaican politician and his obsession with a "redeemed" Africa; in I & I: The Natural Mystics, Marley, Tosh and Wailer he explores the struggles faced by now legendary Rastafarian reggae artists the Wailers; and in his most recent book, Bageye at the Wheel, Grant confronts his own father in a memoir about his lifelong inner conflict with the immigrant experience.
Grant is also an Associate Fellow in the Centre for Caribbean Studies at the University of Warwick and a producer for BBC Radio.
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.