19:09
TED2007

Ben Dunlap: The life-long learner

ベン・ダンラップ: 生涯学び続けるということ

Filmed:

ウォフォード・カレッジの学長ベン・ダンラップが、ホロコーストを生き延びたハンガリー人であるシャンドー・テスラから学んだ、情熱を持って生きることと生涯学び続けることの意義について語ります。

- College president
Ben Dunlap is a true polymath, whose talents span poetry, opera, ballet, literature and administration. He is the president of South Carolina’s Wofford College. Full bio

"Yo napot, pacak!" Which, as somebody here must surely know,
「Jó napot, pacák!」会場のどこかに
わかる方がいるはずですが
00:18
means "What's up, guys?" in Magyar,
マジャール語で「よっ みんな!」
という意味です
00:24
that peculiar non-Indo-European language spoken by Hungarians
マジャール語は
ハンガリー人が話す特異な非印欧語で
00:27
for which, given the fact that cognitive diversity is
認知多様性が少なくとも
地球上の種の多様性と同じくらい
00:30
at least as threatened as biodiversity on this planet,
危機に直面していることから考えると
00:33
few would have imagined much of a future even a century or two ago.
1〜2世紀前から既にあまり未来はない
と思われてきた言語ですが
00:36
But there it is: "Yo napot, pacak!"
未だに使われてます ほら
「Jó napot, pacák!」
00:40
I said somebody here must surely know, because
この言葉 絶対に誰かがわかるはずと
言ったのには理由があります
00:42
despite the fact that there aren't that many Hungarians to begin with,
そもそもこの世にハンガリー人自体
そんなに沢山存在しないし
00:46
and the further fact that, so far as I know, there's not a drop
さらに 私の体にハンガリー人の血は
00:49
of Hungarian blood in my veins, at every critical juncture of my life
一滴も流れていないのにもかかわらず
私の人生の要所要所すべての場面で
00:52
there has been a Hungarian friend or mentor there beside me.
ハンガリー人の友人や師が
そばにいたからなんです
00:56
I even have dreams that take place in landscapes
ハンガリー映画で見た記憶のある風景が
01:00
I recognize as the landscapes of Hungarian films,
夢に出てきたことさえあります
01:02
especially the early movies of Miklos Jancso.
とりわけミクローシュ・ヤンチョー監督の
初期の映画からね
01:06
So, how do I explain this mysterious affinity?
このハンガリーに対する不思議な親近感は
どこから来るのでしょうかね?
01:09
Maybe it's because my native state of South Carolina,
私の地元が
サウスカロライナなせいでしょうか
01:13
which is not much smaller than present-day Hungary,
現在のハンガリー国と
さほど変わらない面積ですが
01:18
once imagined a future for itself as an independent country.
ひとつの国として独立しようと
したことがある州です
01:21
And as a consequence of that presumption,
この思い上がった考えの結末として
01:24
my hometown was burned to the ground by an invading army,
私の故郷の街は軍に襲われ
焼け野原になってしまいました
01:26
an experience that has befallen many a Hungarian town and village
これはハンガリーの長い苦難の歴史を通して
戦火に晒されてきた町や村にも
01:30
throughout its long and troubled history.
降りかかった事態ですから
01:34
Or maybe it's because when I was a teenager back in the '50s,
それとも
私がまだ10代だった50年代に
01:37
my uncle Henry -- having denounced the Ku Klux Klan
叔父のヘンリーが
クー・クラックス・クランを糾弾した結果
01:40
and been bombed for his trouble and had crosses burned in his yard,
そのせいでクランから執拗な攻撃を受け
庭で十字架を焼かれたり
01:43
living under death threat -- took his wife and children to Massachusetts for safety
殺すぞと脅迫される日々の中
妻子をマサチューセッツに逃がした後
01:47
and went back to South Carolina to face down the Klan alone.
対決のためサウスカロライナに
単独で戻ってきたことでしょうか
01:51
That was a very Hungarian thing to do,
だってこれは非常に
ハンガリー的な行為だからです
01:54
as anyone will attest who remembers 1956.
1956年を知る人は
誰もがそう証言するでしょう
01:57
And of course, from time to time Hungarians
もちろん
ハンガリー人も時には独自の
02:01
have invented their own equivalent of the Klan.
クラン的組織を作ったりしてましたがね
02:04
Well, it seems to me that this Hungarian presence in my life
まあ 私の人生における
ハンガリー人の存在について
02:06
is difficult to account for, but ultimately I ascribe it to an admiration
理由を説明するのは難しいのですが
つまるところ 罪悪感と敗北の歴史に
02:13
for people with a complex moral awareness,
反逆および虚勢とが合わさった
複雑な倫理意識を持つ民族への
02:19
with a heritage of guilt and defeat matched by defiance and bravado.
敬愛の念によるものであると
結論づけることにしています
02:22
It's not a typical mindset for most Americans,
これは典型的な
アメリカ人の考え方ではありません
02:27
but it is perforce typical of virtually all Hungarians.
しかし事実 ハンガリー人全体に
共通する必然的典型です
02:30
So, "Yo napot, pacak!"
だから「Jó napot, pacák!」ってね
02:34
I went back to South Carolina after some 15 years amid the alien corn
さて 私は15年間もサウスカロライナを離れ
知らぬ土地で暮らしつないでおりましたが
02:36
at the tail end of the 1960s,
60年代の終わりに帰ってきました
02:41
with the reckless condescension of that era
当時の風潮に対し
俺が地元を救ってやるんだって
02:44
thinking I would save my people.
向こう見ずにも上から目線でした
02:47
Never mind the fact that they were slow to acknowledge they needed saving.
救いが必要だとわかってもらうのに
時間がかかったのはいいとして
02:49
I labored in that vineyard for a quarter century before
25年間ブドウ園で汗を流して働いた後
02:53
making my way to a little kingdom of the just in upstate South Carolina,
サウスカロライナ州のちょっと北にある
小さな王国に移動しました
02:56
a Methodist-affiliated institution of higher learning called Wofford College.
メソジスト系の高等教育機関
ウォフォード・カレッジです
03:00
I knew nothing about Wofford
ウォフォードのことは何も知らず
03:04
and even less about Methodism,
メソジスト主義なんてもっとわからない
03:06
but I was reassured on the first day that I taught at Wofford College
けど そこで初めて講義をした日
ほっとしました
03:08
to find, among the auditors in my classroom,
私の授業の聴講者に
90歳のハンガリー人がいたんです
03:12
a 90-year-old Hungarian, surrounded by a bevy of middle-aged European women
『ニーベルングの指輪』の
黄金を守るニンフがごとく周りを固める
03:14
who seemed to function as an entourage of Rhinemaidens.
中年のヨーロッパ人女性の一団に
囲まれていました
03:21
His name was Sandor Teszler.
彼の名前はシャンドー・テスラ
03:23
He was a puckish widower whose wife and children were dead
妻も子供も亡くし
孫とも遠く離れて暮らしているという
03:26
and whose grandchildren lived far away.
いたずらっ気のある男やもめでした
03:30
In appearance, he resembled Mahatma Gandhi,
マハトマ・ガンジーから
ふんどしを引いて
03:33
minus the loincloth, plus orthopedic boots.
歩行補助ブーツを足したような
風貌でした
03:36
He had been born in 1903 in the provinces
テスラ氏は 1903年
のちにユーゴスラビアになった
03:39
of the old Austro-Hungarian Empire,
旧オーストリア=ハンガリー帝国の領地で
03:43
in what later would become Yugoslavia.
生まれました
03:45
He was ostracized as a child, not because he was a Jew --
子供の頃は孤立していました
ユダヤ人だからではありません
03:48
his parents weren't very religious anyhow --
そもそも熱心なユダヤ教の
家庭ではなかったし
03:51
but because he had been born with two club feet,
両足が先天性内反足だったからです
03:52
a condition which, in those days, required institutionalization
当時は こういった病気の子供は
入院させられ
03:55
and a succession of painful operations between the ages of one and 11.
1歳から11歳の間にものすごく痛い
手術を何度も受けねばなりませんでした
04:00
He went to the commercial business high school as a young man
成長した彼はブダベストの
商業高校に通いました
04:04
in Budapest, and there he was as smart as he was modest
頭もよく おとなしい生徒で
04:07
and he enjoyed a considerable success. And after graduation
かなりの優秀な成績で卒業した後
04:12
when he went into textile engineering, the success continued.
繊維技術業に進み
そこでも続けて成功を収めました
04:15
He built one plant after another.
工場を次々に建て
04:18
He married and had two sons. He had friends in high places who
結婚して 二人の息子をもうけ
有力者に友人がいたお陰で
04:20
assured him that he was of great value to the economy.
国の経済界の中でも安泰でした
04:23
Once, as he had left instructions to have done,
ある時 部下に指示を出して帰った後
04:26
he was summoned in the middle of the night by the night watchman at one of his plants.
真夜中に 夜間警備員に
呼び出されたそうです
04:31
The night watchman had caught an employee who was stealing socks --
靴下を盗もうとしている
従業員を捕まえたためです
04:34
it was a hosiery mill, and he simply backed a truck up to the loading dock
そこは靴下工場でした
積み込み場にトラックを後ろから入れ
04:39
and was shoveling in mountains of socks.
大量の靴下を積み込んでいて
捕まったのです
04:42
Mr. Teszler went down to the plant and confronted the thief and said,
テスラ氏は工場に出向き
盗人に向かってこう言ったそうです
04:43
"But why do you steal from me? If you need money you have only to ask."
「どうして盗むんだね?金が要るなら
頼みに来ればいいだけだろう」
04:47
The night watchman, seeing how things were going and waxing indignant,
ことの次第を見ていた警備員は
憤然として言いました
04:52
said, "Well, we're going to call the police, aren't we?"
「では 警察を呼びますよね?」
04:56
But Mr. Teszler answered, "No, that will not be necessary.
しかしテスラ氏は
「いや それは必要ない
04:58
He will not steal from us again."
彼はもうここで盗みをはたらくことはない」
05:01
Well, maybe he was too trusting, because he stayed where he was
お人よし過ぎたのかもしれません
ナチスのオーストリア併合後も
05:03
long after the Nazi Anschluss in Austria
さらに ブダペストで人々が逮捕され
05:08
and even after the arrests and deportations began in Budapest.
追放され始めた頃になっても
逃げずに留まっていたし
05:10
He took the simple precaution of having cyanide capsules placed in lockets
いざというときに対しても
青酸カプセルをロケットに入れて
05:15
that could be worn about the necks of himself and his family.
家族全員が首にかけるという
簡単な対策のみでした
05:19
And then one day, it happened: he and his family were arrested
そしてある日 とうとう事が起きました
彼も家族も捕えられ
05:22
and they were taken to a death house on the Danube.
ドナウ川の死のキャンプに
連れて行かれたのです
05:26
In those early days of the Final Solution, it was handcrafted brutality;
「ユダヤ人問題の最終的解決策」
初期の頃で 直接手を下す残虐行為
05:29
people were beaten to death and their bodies tossed into the river.
死ぬまで打たれた後
死体は川に投げ捨てられました
05:33
But none who entered that death house had ever come out alive.
この死のキャンプに入ったが最後
生きて出た人はいませんでした
05:37
And in a twist you would not believe in a Steven Spielberg film --
ここで スティーブン・スピルバーグ映画
でもありえないような展開が起こります
05:41
the Gauleiter who was overseeing this brutal beating was the very same thief
この残忍な処刑行為を監督していた
ナチスの長官が なんと
05:45
who had stolen socks from Mr. Teszler's hosiery mill.
テスラ氏の工場から靴下を盗んだ
男だったのです
05:50
It was a brutal beating. And midway through that brutality,
残虐なむち打ちの刑でした
その真っ只中に
05:54
one of Mr. Teszler's sons, Andrew, looked up and said,
テスラ氏の息子の一人 アンドリューが
父を見上げて言いました
05:59
"Is it time to take the capsule now, Papa?"
「パパ そろそろカプセルを飲むときかな?」
06:02
And the Gauleiter, who afterwards vanishes from this story,
すると長官が来て
ちなみにその後二度と話に登場しませんが
06:05
leaned down and whispered into Mr. Teszler's ear,
身をかがめ テスラ氏の耳元で
06:09
"No, do not take the capsule. Help is on the way."
「いや カプセルは飲むな
助けがもうすぐ来る」と囁き
06:12
And then resumed the beating.
むち打ちを再開したのです
06:15
But help was on the way, and shortly afterwards
そして本当に助けが来ました
それから間もなく
06:17
a car arrived from the Swiss Embassy.
スイス大使館から車が来て
06:19
They were spirited to safety. They were reclassified as Yugoslav citizens
家族ごと安全な場所に移されたのです
ユーゴスラビア市民として再区分され
06:22
and they managed to stay one step ahead of their pursuers
戦時中は ぎりぎり
追っ手から逃がれつづけ
06:26
for the duration of the War, surviving burnings and bombings
戦火や爆撃の中を生き延びましたが
06:29
and, at the end of the War, arrest by the Soviets.
大戦の最後に ソビエト軍に
捕えられます
06:33
Probably, Mr. Teszler had gotten some money into Swiss bank accounts
おそらく テスラ氏はスイス銀行に
いくらか蓄えがあったのでしょうね
06:35
because he managed to take his family first to Great Britain,
家族を連れて英国に逃げた後
06:39
then to Long Island and then to the center of the textile industry in the American South.
ロングアイランドへ 続いて
アメリカ南部の繊維産業中心地に
06:43
Which, as chance would have it, was Spartanburg, South Carolina,
そこが 偶然 サウスカロライナの
スパータンバーグでした
06:47
the location of Wofford College.
ウォフォード・カレッジの所在地です
06:51
And there, Mr. Teszler began all over again and once again achieved immense success,
そこでテスラ氏はまた一からやり直し
再びめざましい成功を収めました
06:53
especially after he invented the process
特に ダブル・ニットと言う
06:59
for manufacturing a new fabric called double-knit.
新しい生地の製造方法を編み出した後は
大成功でした
07:01
And then in the late 1950s, in the aftermath of Brown v. Board of Education,
時は流れ 1950年代後半
ブラウン対教育委員会裁判の余波の中
07:04
when the Klan was resurgent all over the South,
クー・クラックス・クランが
南部いたる所で再興していました
07:11
Mr. Teszler said, "I have heard this talk before."
この状況に テスラ氏は
「どこかで聞いたことのある話だ」と
07:14
And he called his top assistant to him and asked,
つぶやいたそうです
一番の部下を呼びこう訊ねました
07:18
"Where would you say, in this region, racism is most virulent?"
「この地域で人種差別が一番
ひどいのはどこだね?」
07:23
"Well, I don't rightly know, Mr. Teszler. I reckon that would be Kings Mountain."
「テスラさん 正確には分かりませんが
キングスマウンテンだと思います」
07:26
"Good. Buy us some land in Kings Mountain
「よろしい では
キングスマウンテンに土地を買って
07:31
and announce we are going to build a major plant there."
そこに大規模な工場を建てると
発表しなさい」
07:35
The man did as he was told, and shortly afterwards,
部下はその通りにし
その後まもなく
07:37
Mr. Teszler received a visit from the white mayor of Kings Mountain.
キングスマウンテンの白人の市長が
テスラ氏を訪問しました
07:40
Now, you should know that at that time,
さて
ここでご注意いただきたいのですが
07:44
the textile industry in the South was notoriously segregated.
当時南部の繊維産業は
ひどい人種隔離で知られていました
07:47
The white mayor visited Mr. Teszler and said,
白人市長がテスラ氏に
07:50
"Mr. Teszler, I trust you’re going to be hiring a lot of white workers."
「テスラさん お宅の工場では白人を沢山
雇っていただけますよね」
07:54
Mr. Teszler told him, "You bring me the best workers that you can find,
テスラ氏は答えます「この地区で
最高の労働者を見つけてきてくれたまえ
07:57
and if they are good enough, I will hire them."
仕事ができるなら雇うとも」
08:01
He also received a visit from the leader of the black community,
また 黒人コミュニティのリーダーである
牧師もテスラ氏を訪問しました
08:03
a minister, who said, "Mr. Teszler, I sure hope you're going to
「テスラさん お宅の新しい工場では
08:08
hire some black workers for this new plant of yours."
黒人も雇っていただけますよね」
08:10
He got the same answer: "You bring the best workers that you can find,
答えは同じでした
「最高の労働者を見つけてきてくれたまえ
08:12
and if they are good enough, I will hire them."
仕事ができるなら雇うとも」
08:16
As it happens, the black minister did his job better than the white mayor,
ここで 黒人牧師は白人市長よりも
いい結果を出したわけですが
08:19
but that's neither here or there.
どっちか片方のみではなく
08:22
Mr. Teszler hired 16 men: eight white, eight black.
白人8人 黒人8人の
16人が採用されました
08:23
They were to be his seed group, his future foremen.
テスラ氏の生え抜きチームとして
いずれ監督を任せる人材です
08:27
He had installed the heavy equipment for his new process
キングスマウンテン近郊の
ある使われなくなった店舗に
08:30
in an abandoned store in the vicinity of Kings Mountain,
新しい製造過程に使う
重機を入れ
08:33
and for two months these 16 men would live and work together,
そこで16人の作業員が2か月間
住み込みで働き
08:36
mastering the new process.
新工程を習得するのです
08:39
He gathered them together after an initial tour of that facility
初日の施設内ツアーを終えた後
全員を集めて
08:40
and he asked if there were any questions.
質問はないかと尋ねました
08:44
There was hemming and hawing and shuffling of feet,
咳払い 口ごもる者や
そわそわし出す者
08:46
and then one of the white workers stepped forward and said,
その中で白人の従業員が
前に出て言いました
08:48
"Well, yeah. We’ve looked at this place and there's only one place to sleep,
「えっと 施設内を見ましたが
寝る場所は一箇所しかない
08:53
there's only one place to eat, there's only one bathroom,
食べる場所も一つ
便所も一つ
08:56
there's only one water fountain. Is this plant going to be integrated or what?"
水飲み器も一つだけ
この工場は人種混合ってわけですかい?」
08:59
Mr. Teszler said, "You are being paid twice the wages of any other textile workers in this region
テスラ氏の答えは「君らは この辺の繊維業の
誰と比べても倍の賃金をもらっている
09:05
and this is how we do business. Do you have any other questions?"
これが我々のやり方だ
他に質問は?」
09:10
"No, I reckon I don't."
「いえ ありませんです」
09:14
And two months later when the main plant opened
2か月後 主要工場が開設され
09:15
and hundreds of new workers, white and black,
何百もの新米工員が
白人も 黒人も
09:19
poured in to see the facility for the first time,
初の施設見学に
なだれ込んできました
09:21
they were met by the 16 foremen, white and black, standing shoulder to shoulder.
白人と黒人16人の監督が
肩を並べて迎え入れます
09:23
They toured the facility and were asked if there were any questions, and
中を案内し
質問はないかどうか尋ねました
09:29
inevitably the same question arose:
当然 同じ質問が来ます
09:33
"Is this plant integrated or what?"
「この工場は人種混合ってわけですかい?」
09:34
And one of the white foremen stepped forward and said,
すると白人監督の一人が
前に出て言いました
09:36
"You are being paid twice the wages of any other workers
「君らは この辺の繊維業の誰と比べても
09:39
in this industry in this region and this is how we do business.
倍の賃金をもらっている
そしてこれが我々のやり方だ
09:43
Do you have any other questions?"
他に質問は?」
09:47
And there were none. In one fell swoop,
誰も何も言いませんでした
こうしてテスラ氏が
09:49
Mr. Teszler had integrated the textile industry in that part of the South.
その地域の繊維業の人種統合を
一挙にやってのけたという話です
09:53
It was an achievement worthy of Mahatma Gandhi,
マハトマ・ガンジー並みの功績でした
09:57
conducted with the shrewdness of a lawyer and the idealism of a saint.
聖人並みの理想と 弁護士並みの手腕で
やってのけたわけです
10:00
In his eighties, Mr. Teszler, having retired from the textile industry,
テスラ氏は80歳を超えると
繊維業から引退して
10:04
adopted Wofford College,
ウォフォード・カレッジに
来るようになり
10:10
auditing courses every semester,
毎学期欠かさず
聴講を続けました
10:12
and because he had a tendency to kiss anything that moved,
動くものには何でもキスするという
習性があったので
10:14
becoming affectionately known as "Opi" -- which is Magyar for grandfather --
誰も彼もが親しみを込めて「Opi」
と呼ぶようになりました
10:18
by all and sundry. Before I got there, the library of the college
おじいさんという意味のマジャール語です
私が来る前 既にカレッジの図書館は
10:22
had been named for Mr. Teszler, and after I arrived in 1993,
テスラ氏にちなんだ名がついており
私が来た1993年には
10:26
the faculty decided to honor itself by naming Mr. Teszler Professor of the College --
大学が彼の栄誉にあずかろうと
テスラ氏に教授という呼び名を付けました
10:31
partly because at that point he had already taken
理由の一つとして
その時 既に彼がカタログ上の
10:36
all of the courses in the catalog, but mainly because
コースを全て受講してしまっていた
というのもありますが
10:39
he was so conspicuously wiser than any one of us.
主な理由は 彼が誰よりも際立った
叡智の持ち主だったからです
10:42
To me, it was immensely reassuring that the presiding spirit
私にとって非常に心強く思えたのは
このサウスカロライナ北部の
10:47
of this little Methodist college in upstate South Carolina
小さなメソジスト大学の
長老的な存在である人物が
10:51
was a Holocaust survivor from Central Europe.
中央ヨーロッパから来た
ホロコースト生存者だということでした
10:55
Wise he was, indeed, but he also had a wonderful sense of humor.
賢人であることはもちろん
素晴らしいユーモアのセンスの持ち主でした
10:59
And once for an interdisciplinary class,
ある総合クラスでのことです
11:03
I was screening the opening segment of Ingmar Bergman's "The Seventh Seal."
イングマール・ベルイマン『第七の封印』
のオープニング部を視聴していました
11:06
As the medieval knight Antonius Block returns from the wild goose chase
中世の騎士アントニウス・ブロックが
無益に終わった遠征から帰国
11:10
of the Crusades and arrives on the rocky shore of Sweden,
スウェーデンの海岸に到着します
11:14
only to find the specter of death waiting for him,
そこに待ち受けていたのは死神だった
という部分です
11:17
Mr. Teszler sat in the dark with his fellow students. And
暗い部屋でテスラ氏は
他の生徒と一緒に座っていました
11:20
as death opened his cloak to embrace the knight
死神がマントを開きアントニウスに
恐ろしい死の抱擁を与えたとき
11:24
in a ghastly embrace, I heard Mr. Teszler's tremulous voice:
テスラ氏が震える声でつぶやくのが
聞こえました 「おっとっと」
11:28
"Uh oh," he said, "This doesn't look so good." (Laughter)
「これはまずいことになったなぁ」
(笑)
11:32
But it was music that was his greatest passion, especially opera.
彼が最も熱心だったのは音楽です
特にオペラ
11:36
And on the first occasion that I visited his house, he gave me
初めて彼の家を訪ねたとき
光栄にも
11:43
honor of deciding what piece of music we would listen to.
かける音楽を選んでいいと言われ
11:46
And I delighted him by rejecting "Cavalleria Rusticana"
『カヴァレリア・ルスティカーナ』を
蹴って ベーラ・バルトークの
11:50
in favor of Bela Bartok's "Bluebeard's Castle."
『青ひげ公の城』を選んだので
非常に喜ばれました
11:54
I love Bartok's music, as did Mr. Teszler,
私はバルトークの音楽が大好きです
テスラ氏もそうで
11:57
and he had virtually every recording of Bartok's music ever issued.
発売されたレコードは一枚一枚
全て揃えておいででした
12:00
And it was at his house that I heard for the first time
バルトークのピアノ協奏曲第3番を
12:04
Bartok's Third Piano Concerto and learned from
初めて聞いたのもテスラ氏の家です
12:06
Mr. Teszler that it had been composed in nearby Asheville, North Carolina
この曲が バルトークの死ぬ直前の年に
ノースカロライナのアシュビルで
12:09
in the last year of the composer's life.
書かれたものだと教えてもらいました
12:14
He was dying of leukemia and he knew it,
白血病でもうすぐ死ぬと
わかっていたバルトークが
12:16
and he dedicated this concerto to his wife,
妻でコンサートピアニストだった
12:19
Dita, who was herself a concert pianist.
ディッタに捧げた曲です
12:22
And into the slow, second movement, marked "adagio religioso,"
アダージョ・レリジオーソの
ゆったりとした第二楽章では
12:25
he incorporated the sounds of birdsong that he heard
彼にとって最後の春だと
わかっていたある日
12:29
outside his window in what he knew would be his last spring;
窓の外でさえずっていた鳥の歌声を
表現したそうです
12:33
he was imagining a future for her in which he would play no part.
彼自身はもう存在していない
妻の未来を想像して書いたこの楽曲
12:36
And clearly this composition is his final statement to her --
これは明らかに 妻へ宛てた
最後の言葉でもありました
12:42
it was first performed after his death --
バルトークの死後
初めて演奏され
12:48
and through her to the world.
妻の手で世に出されたのです
12:50
And just as clearly, it is saying, "It's okay. It was all so beautiful.
遺言であることと同様に はっきりと
こんなメッセージも含まれています
12:52
Whenever you hear this, I will be there."
「もうこれでいい 君との日々は最高だった
この曲が流れるときはいつも傍にいるから」
12:59
It was only after Mr. Teszler's death that I learned
テスラ氏の死後になって
初めて知ったのですが
13:03
that the marker on the grave of Bela Bartok in Hartsdale, New York
ニューヨークのハーツデールにある
ベーラ・バルトークの墓碑は
13:08
was paid for by Sandor Teszler. "Yo napot, Bela!"
テスラ氏が寄贈したものだそうです
「Jó napot, ベーラ!」
13:12
Not long before Mr. Teszler’s own death at the age of 97,
自身が97歳で亡くなる少し前
13:17
he heard me hold forth on human iniquity.
講義を聴きに来てくれました
テーマは人間の邪悪さ
13:22
I delivered a lecture in which I described history
歴史というものは概して
13:26
as, on the whole, a tidal wave of human suffering and brutality,
人類の苦難と残虐性の
津波のようなものであると熱弁しました
13:28
and Mr. Teszler came up to me afterwards with gentle reproach and said,
終わった後 テスラ氏が来て
優しい叱責を込めてこう言いました
13:32
"You know, Doctor, human beings are fundamentally good."
「いいかい 博士 人間というものは
本質的に善いものなんだよ」
13:37
And I made a vow to myself, then and there,
その時 その場所で
私は自分に誓いを立てました
13:43
that if this man who had such cause to think otherwise
ここまで 人間は悪だと考えても
おかしくない体験をしてきたこの人が
13:47
had reached that conclusion,
そういう結論に至るのなら
13:51
I would not presume to differ until he released me from my vow.
彼がこの誓いから解放してくれるまで
この論には反対するまい と
13:53
And now he's dead, so I'm stuck with my vow.
テスラ氏が亡き今
この誓いに縛られてしまっています
13:57
"Yo napot, Sandor!"
「Jó napot シャンドー!」
14:01
I thought my skein of Hungarian mentors had come to an end,
彼の死で ハンガリー人との師弟関係の
糸が切れたと思ったその時
14:03
but almost immediately I met Francis Robicsek, a Hungarian doctor --
間をあけずにフランシス・ロボチェック
というハンガリー人医師と出会いました
14:07
actually a heart surgeon in Charlotte, North Carolina, then in his late seventies --
ノースカロライナのシャーロットで
心臓外科医をしている70歳台後半の先生で
14:14
who had been a pioneer in open-heart surgery,
開心術の先駆者となった人です
14:18
and, tinkering away in his garage behind his house,
家の裏のガレージで機械をいじり
14:20
had invented many of the devices that are standard parts of those procedures.
直視下心臓手術では標準器具となる
装置をいくつも発明しました
14:24
He's also a prodigious art collector, beginning as an intern in Budapest
驚異的な芸術品コレクターでもありました
ブダペストでのインターン時代からずっと
14:29
by collecting 16th- and 17th-century Dutch art and Hungarian painting,
16・17世紀のオランダの芸術品や
ハンガリー絵画を蒐集し続け
14:34
and when he came to this country moving on to Spanish colonial art,
アメリカに来てからは
スパニッシュ・コロニアルアート
14:38
Russian icons and finally Mayan ceramics.
ロシアのイコン そしてついには
マヤの陶器に手を広げていました
14:43
He's the author of seven books, six of them on Mayan ceramics.
彼の著書7冊のうち
6冊がマヤ陶器についてです
14:46
It was he who broke the Mayan codex, enabling scholars to relate
マヤ陶器に描かれた絵文字と
古文書の象形文字との関連性を
14:49
the pictographs on Mayan ceramics to the hieroglyphs of the Mayan script.
学者達に示し
マヤの絵文書を解読したのもこの人です
14:53
On the occasion of my first visit, we toured his house
初めて博士のお宅にお邪魔したとき
家中を案内してもらい
14:57
and we saw hundreds of works of museum quality,
美術館レベルの芸術作品が
何百と並んでいました
15:00
and then we paused in front of a closed door and Dr. Robicsek said,
そして あるドアの前で立ち止まりました
博士がそれは誇らしげに
15:03
with obvious pride, "Now for the piece de resistance."
「さあこの先はレジスタンス作品だ」
15:08
And he opened the door and we walked into a
と言ってドアを開け
入ったのは
15:11
windowless 20-by-20-foot room with shelves from floor to ceiling, and
6メートル四方の窓のない部屋で
床から天井まで壁一面ぎっしり
15:14
crammed on every shelf his collection of Mayan ceramics.
マヤ陶器のコレクションで
埋まっていました
15:20
Now, I know absolutely nothing about Mayan ceramics,
私はマヤの陶器について
本当に何もわかりませんが
15:22
but I wanted to be as ingratiating as possible so I said,
出来るだけご機嫌を取りたくて
15:24
"But Dr. Robicsek, this is absolutely dazzling."
「しかし博士 これは全くもって
お見事ですな」
15:27
"Yes," he said. "That is what the Louvre said.
「うむ」と博士
「ルーブル美術館も同じことを言った
15:31
They would not leave me alone until I let them have a piece,
品の一つをやるまで
しつこくつきまとわれたよ
15:34
but it was not a good one." (Laughter)
大した品ではなかったがね」
(笑)
15:38
Well, it occurred to me that I should invite Dr. Robicsek
そこで博士を ウォフォードに招待して
講義をしてもらおうと思いたちました
15:40
to lecture at Wofford College on -- what else?
テーマはレオナルド・ダ・ヴィンチ
これしかない
15:44
-- Leonardo da Vinci. And further, I should invite him to meet
更に 私の長年の付き合いの
管財人にも紹介することにしました
15:47
my oldest trustee, who had majored in French history at Yale
この方はもう70数年前
イェール大学でフランス史を専攻
15:51
some 70-odd years before and, at 89, still ruled the world's
そして89歳にして なお
民間では世界最大の
15:55
largest privately owned textile empire with an iron hand.
繊維業帝国を自らの手で
率いている
16:00
His name is Roger Milliken. And Mr. Milliken agreed,
ロジャー・ミルケンという方です
ミルケン氏は会ってもよいと
16:05
and Dr. Robicsek agreed. And Dr. Robicsek visited
ロボチェック博士も会ってもよいと
そういうわけで
16:09
and delivered the lecture and it was a dazzling success.
博士が来て講義をされました
これまた 見事な大成功でした
16:12
And afterwards we convened at the President's House with Dr. Robicsek
講義の後 学長宅にお招きしました
片側にロボチェック博士
16:15
on one hand, Mr. Milliken on the other.
もう片側にミルケン氏
16:19
And it was only at that moment, as we were sitting down to dinner,
夕食の席につこうとしていたその時
初めて
16:20
that I recognized the enormity of the risk I had created,
自分が招いた事態の重さに
気づいたのです
16:24
because to bring these two titans, these two masters of the universe
この二人の巨人 それぞれ
世界の覇者であるこの二人を
16:26
together -- it was like introducing Mothra to Godzilla over the skyline of Tokyo.
引き合わせるということは 東京上空で
ゴジラとモスラを引き合わせるようなもの
16:30
If they didn't like each other, we could all get trampled to death.
もし うまくいかなければ
皆巻き添えで大変なことになる
16:35
But they did, they did like each other.
しかし 大丈夫でした
二人は意気投合
16:38
They got along famously until the very end of the meal,
もう大いに意気投合されたのですが
会食の最後の最後に
16:40
and then they got into a furious argument.
激しい議論になりました
16:43
And what they were arguing about was this:
議論の焦点は何かというと
16:45
whether the second Harry Potter movie was as good as the first. (Laughter)
ハリー・ポッター映画の二作目が
前作並みに良いかどうか です(笑)
16:47
Mr. Milliken said it was not. Dr. Robicsek disagreed.
ミルケン氏は二作目は駄目だと言い
博士が異議を唱えました
16:52
I was still trying to take in the notion that these titans,
この光景を前に この巨人
世界の覇者である二人が 余暇には
16:57
these masters of the universe, in their spare time watch Harry Potter movies,
ハリー・ポッターを観ていることが
信じきれずにいたその時
17:01
when Mr. Milliken thought he would win the argument by saying,
ミルケン氏が議論に勝ったつもりで
こう言いました
17:04
"You just think it's so good because you didn't read the book."
「原作を読んでないから
映画がいいと思えるだけだ」
17:08
And Dr. Robicsek reeled back in his chair, but quickly gathered his wits,
ロボチェック博士は一瞬 椅子の上で
ひるみましたが すぐ気を取り直し
17:11
leaned forward and said, "Well, that is true, but I'll bet you went
身を乗り出して言いました
「それはそうだが 君は映画に
17:15
to the movie with a grandchild." "Well, yes, I did," conceded Mr. Milliken.
孫と一緒に行っただろう」
「その通りだが」とミルケン氏
17:18
"Aha!" said Dr. Robicsek. "I went to the movie all by myself." (Laughter) (Applause)
「ほらな!」とロボチェック博士
「私は独りで観に行ったぞ」(笑)(拍手)
17:23
And I realized, in this moment of revelation,
この瞬間 私は気づいたのです
17:28
that what these two men were revealing was the secret
二人がお互いに明かしているのは
実は彼らの成功の秘密だと
17:33
of their extraordinary success, each in his own right.
それぞれ自分の力で成し遂げた
たぐいまれな成功です
17:37
And it lay precisely in that insatiable curiosity,
それはまさに
この飽くなき好奇心
17:40
that irrepressible desire to know, no matter what the subject,
溢れる知識欲のたまものでした
テーマが何であれ 知りたいという欲求
17:44
no matter what the cost,
どれだけ金がかかろうと
17:48
even at a time when the keepers of the Doomsday Clock
たとえ世界終末時計の管理者が
17:50
are willing to bet even money that the human race won't be around
人類は五分五分の確率で
17:53
to imagine anything in the year 2100, a scant 93 years from now.
2100年 わずか93年後には
滅亡しているだろうと言ったとしてもです
17:56
"Live each day as if it is your last," said Mahatma Gandhi.
ガンジーの名言
「毎日を 明日死ぬと思って生きなさい」
18:01
"Learn as if you'll live forever."
「永遠に生きると思って学びなさい」
18:05
This is what I'm passionate about. It is precisely this.
私の情熱はまさにこの言葉に尽きます
18:07
It is this inextinguishable, undaunted appetite for learning and experience,
この 知と経験に対する
決して消えることのない 不屈の欲求
18:12
no matter how risible, no matter how esoteric,
どんなに馬鹿げていても
どんなにマニアックでも
18:21
no matter how seditious it might seem.
どんなに扇動的に思われても
18:23
This defines the imagined futures of our fellow Hungarians --
この学ぼうとする意欲が
我らがハンガリー人
18:26
Robicsek, Teszler and Bartok -- as it does my own.
ロボチェック氏 テスラ氏
バルトーク氏など そして私自身の
18:32
As it does, I suspect, that of everybody here.
そしてここにいる皆さんの
思い描く未来を形作るものです
18:37
To which I need only add, "Ez a mi munkank; es nem is keves."
ただ一言付け足すとすれば
「Ez a mi munkank; es nem is keves.」
18:41
This is our task; we know it will be hard.
「これが我々の課題である
困難であることはわかっている」
18:47
"Ez a mi munkank; es nem is keves. Yo napot, pacak!" (Applause)
「Ez a mi munkank; es nem is keves.
Jó napot, pacák!」 (拍手)
18:52
Translated by Riaki Ponist
Reviewed by Misaki Sato

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Ben Dunlap - College president
Ben Dunlap is a true polymath, whose talents span poetry, opera, ballet, literature and administration. He is the president of South Carolina’s Wofford College.

Why you should listen

Ben Dunlap was a dancer for four years with the Columbia City Ballet, kicking off a life of artistic and cultural exploration. A Rhodes Scholar, he did his PhD in English literature at Harvard, and is now the president of Wofford College, a small liberal arts school in South Carolina. He has taught classes on a wide variety of subjects, from Asian history to creative writing.

He's also a writer-producer for television, and his 19-part series The Renaissance has been adopted for use by more than 100 colleges. He has been a Senior Fulbright Lecturer in Thailand and a moderator at the Aspen Institute.

More profile about the speaker
Ben Dunlap | Speaker | TED.com