17:13
TEDMED 2014

Gail Reed: Where to train the world's doctors? Cuba.

ゲイル・リード: 世界の医師たちを訓練するにはどこがいい?それはキューバ

Filmed:

大きな問題には、大きな解決策が必要です。大きなアイデアや想像力、そして大胆さも。 医師を最も必要とする地域社会で働けるように、世界の医師達を育成するハバナの「費用のかからない大きな解決策」ラテンアメリカ医科大学をジャーナリストであるゲイル・リードが紹介するトークです。

- Cuban health care expert
American journalist and Havana resident Gail Reed spotlights a Cuban medical school that trains doctors from low-income countries who pledge to serve communities like their own. Full bio

I want to tell you
聞いて下さい
00:12
how 20,000 remarkable young people
100カ国以上から来た
2万人の優れた若者達が
00:14
from over 100 countries
100カ国以上から来た
2万人の優れた若者達が
00:18
ended up in Cuba
キューバに辿り着き
00:20
and are transforming health in their communities.
彼らのコミュニティーで
医療を改革しています
00:22
Ninety percent of them would never
90%以上の者は国を出たこともなく
00:26
have left home at all
90%以上の者は国を出たこともなく
00:28
if it weren't for a scholarship
to study medicine in Cuba
キューバで医療を学ぶ奨学金を得て
00:29
and a commitment to go back
元々来た所へいずれ戻ると心に決め―
00:33
to places like the ones they'd come from —
そこは田舎の農村や山、そしてゲットー
00:35
remote farmlands, mountains, ghettos —
そこは田舎の農村や山、そしてゲットー
00:38
to become doctors for people like themselves,
彼ら自身と同じような
人々のための医師となるために
00:42
to walk the walk.
「歩むべくを歩み」―
やるべきことをやるために
00:45
Havana's Latin American Medical School:
ハバナにあるラテンアメリカ医科大学は
00:47
It's the largest medical school in the world,
世界で一番大きな医科大学です
00:50
graduating 23,000 young doctors
2005年に開校して以来
00:53
since its first class of 2005,
2万3千人の若い医師達を輩出してきました
00:56
with nearly 10,000 more in the pipeline.
そして尚、更に1万人の卒業を控えています
00:59
Its mission, to train physicians for the people
ここのミッションは 
最も必要としている人々のために
01:02
who need them the most:
医師を育てることです
01:06
the over one billion
それは1度も医者に
かかったことがない
01:08
who have never seen a doctor,
10億人もの人々
01:10
the people who live and die
あらゆる貧困ラインの下で
生きて死んでいく人々です
01:12
under every poverty line ever invented.
あらゆる貧困ラインの下で
生きて死んでいく人々です
01:16
Its students defy all norms.
個々の学生たちはあらゆる
「常識」に挑みます
01:20
They're the school's biggest risk
彼らは学校の最も危険な
リスクであり希望です
01:22
and also its best bet.
彼らは学校の最も危険な
リスクであり希望です
01:24
They're recruited from the poorest,
彼らは地球上で最も貧しく
荒んだ場所から
01:26
most broken places on our planet
集められてきました
01:29
by a school that believes they can become
優秀なだけでなく
彼らはコミュニティーが
01:32
not just the good
切実に必要とする医師となるだろうと
01:34
but the excellent physicians
切実に必要とする医師となるだろうと
01:35
their communities desperately need,
信じる学校の期待を託され
01:37
that they will practice where most doctors don't,
多くの医師が行かないような
貧しい地域や危険な地域で
01:40
in places not only poor
多くの医師が行かないような
貧しい地域や危険な地域で
01:44
but oftentimes dangerous,
多くの医師が行かないような
貧しい地域や危険な地域で
01:46
carrying venom antidotes in their backpacks
リュックに解毒剤を運び
01:49
or navigating neighborhoods
故郷で麻薬やギャングや
01:52
riddled by drugs, gangs and bullets,
弾丸のはびこる界隈を
01:54
their home ground.
くぐり抜ける医師たちです
01:58
The hope is that they will help
彼らにかかっている期待は
02:00
transform access to care,
医療のアクセスを改革し
02:02
the health picture in impoverished areas,
貧困に喘ぐ地域での
健康状況を塗り替え
02:04
and even the way medicine itself
医療自体が学ばれ
実践される方法を
02:07
is learned and practiced,
変えてしまう事です
02:09
and that they will become pioneers in our global reach
そして私たちの皆保険制度が
世界中に広がるための
02:11
for universal health coverage,
開拓者となる事です
02:16
surely a tall order.
もちろん高望みでしょう
02:18
Two big storms and this notion of "walk the walk"
1998年の2つの大きな嵐と
この「歩むべくを歩む」
02:21
prompted creation of ELAM back in 1998.
と言う事がELAMの設立につながりました
02:25
The Hurricanes Georges and Mitch
ハリケーンのジョージとミッチは
02:29
had ripped through the Caribbean
カリブと中央アメリカを直撃して
02:32
and Central America,
カリブと中央アメリカを直撃して
02:34
leaving 30,000 dead
3万人の死者を出し
02:36
and two and a half million homeless.
250百万人のホームレスを生み出しました
02:38
Hundreds of Cuban doctors
volunteered for disaster response,
何百人ものキューバ人医師たちが
災害救援ボランティアに志願しましたが
02:41
but when they got there,
現場に着いたとき
02:45
they found a bigger disaster:
より大きな災害を目にしました
02:47
whole communities with no healthcare,
全コミュニティーが
医療へのアクセスも無く
02:49
doors bolted shut on rural hospitals
地域の病院のドアは物資の不足のために
02:52
for lack of staff,
堅く閉ざされ
02:54
and just too many babies dying
あまりにも多くの赤ちゃんが
02:56
before their first birthday.
最初の誕生日を迎える前に
死んでいきました
02:59
What would happen when these Cuban doctors left?
このキューバ人医師達が去った時
どうなるというのでしょう?
03:02
New doctors were needed to make care sustainable,
治療を持続可能にするために
新たに医師達が必要でした
03:06
but where would they come from?
でも一体どこから
来てくれるというのでしょう?
03:08
Where would they train?
どこで研修をすれば?
03:10
In Havana, the campus of a former naval academy
そこでハバナでは前海軍学校が
03:12
was turned over to the Cuban Health Ministry
キューバ厚生省に委譲され
03:17
to become the Latin American Medical School,
ラテンアメリカ医科大学
03:20
ELAM.
ELAMとなりました
03:23
Tuition, room and board, and a small stipend
嵐により最も激しく被災した国々からの
03:25
were offered to hundreds of students
数百人の学生たちに
03:28
from the countries hardest hit by the storms.
学費、寮、それに諸費が与えられました
03:30
As a journalist in Havana,
ハバナのジャーナリストとして私は
03:33
I watched the first 97 Nicaraguans arrive
1999年3月に最初の
97人のニカラグア人達が
03:35
in March 1999,
到着するのを見届けました
03:38
settling into dorms barely refurbished
彼らはほとんど改装されていない
寮に引越し
03:40
and helping their professors not
only sweep out the classrooms
教授達が教室の床を掃き
03:43
but move in the desks and the
chairs and the microscopes.
机や椅子や顕微鏡を
運び入れるのを手伝いました
03:46
Over the next few years,
それから数年
03:51
governments throughout the Americas
アメリカ大陸の政府は
03:53
requested scholarships for their own students,
それぞれ自国の学生のための奨学金を要求し
03:55
and the Congressional Black Caucus
黒人議員連盟は
03:58
asked for and received hundreds of scholarships
アメリカの若者のために
04:00
for young people from the USA.
何百もの奨学金を獲得しました
04:03
Today, among the 23,000
今日2万3千人の
04:07
are graduates from 83 countries
卒業生の中にはアメリカ大陸や
04:10
in the Americas, Africa and Asia,
アフリカそしてアジアの
83カ国からの出身者がいて
04:13
and enrollment has grown to 123 nations.
そしてそれは123カ国へと拡大しました
04:16
More than half the students are young women.
半数以上の学生は若い女性です
04:22
They come from 100 ethnic groups,
彼らは100の民族から成り立ち
04:24
speak 50 different languages.
50カ国の言葉を話します
04:26
WHO Director Margaret Chan said,
WHO事務局長のマーガレット・チャンは
こう言いました
04:28
"For once, if you are poor, female,
「もしあなたが貧しく女性で
04:31
or from an indigenous population,
先住民族の出身だったら
04:35
you have a distinct advantage,
それは明らかな利点なのです
04:37
an ethic that makes this medical school unique."
あなたはこの学校を
ユニークにする民族の一員ですから」
04:39
Luther Castillo comes from San Pedro de Tocamacho
ルーサー・カスティーヨは
ホンジュラスの太平洋岸にある
04:43
on the Atlantic coast of Honduras.
サン・ペドロ・デ・トカマチョ出身です
04:48
There's no running water,
そこには流れる飲み水もなく
04:50
no electricity there,
電気もなく村へたどりつくには
04:52
and to reach the village, you have to walk for hours
何時間も歩くか
04:54
or take your chances in a pickup truck like I did
私のように思い切ってトラックに運を任せて
04:58
skirting the waves of the Atlantic.
大西洋の波打ち際を走り続けるのです
05:01
Luther was one of 40 Tocamacho children
ルーサーはホンジュラスの人口の
05:04
who started grammar school,
20%を占めるガリフナと呼ばれる
05:09
the sons and daughters of a black indigenous people
20%を占めるガリフナと呼ばれる
05:11
known as the Garífuna,
黒人の土着民族の子供たち—
05:13
20 percent of the Honduran population.
その中でも学校へ行った
40人の1人でした
05:15
The nearest healthcare was fatal miles away.
一番近い病院は生死を分ける
何マイルも先にありました
05:19
Luther had to walk three hours every day
ルーサーは中学校へ通うために
05:24
to middle school.
毎日3時間歩きました
05:27
Only 17 made that trip.
17人だけが通学し
05:29
Only five went on to high school,
5人が高校に進み
05:31
and only one to university:
1人だけ大学に進みました
05:33
Luther, to ELAM,
ELAMへ行ったルーサーは
05:36
among the first crop of Garífuna graduates.
最初のガリフナの卒業生の1人です
05:38
Just two Garífuna doctors had preceded them
それ以前のガリフナの卒業生は
05:42
in all of Honduran history.
ホンジュラス史上たった2人だけでした
05:45
Now there are 69, thanks to ELAM.
ELAMのお蔭で今日では69人になりました
05:48
Big problems need big solutions,
大きな問題には大きな解決策が必要です
05:53
sparked by big ideas, imagination and audacity,
大きなアイデアや想像力 そして大胆さも
05:57
but also solutions that work.
しかしまた有用な解決策も必要です
06:00
ELAM's faculty had no handy evidence base
ELAMの教授陣は
あらかじめ用意された資料もなく
06:03
to guide them, so they learned the hard way,
苦労して学びながら学生を指導し
06:07
by doing and correcting course as they went.
軌道修正をしながら試行錯誤を続けました
06:10
Even the brightest students
貧困層コミュニティーから来た
06:14
from these poor communities
最も優秀な学生でさえも
06:16
weren't academically prepared
6年間の医療トレーニングのための
06:18
for six years of medical training,
知識は十分でなく
06:20
so a bridging course was set up in sciences.
そんな彼らのために
科学の授業が用意されました
06:23
Then came language:
次に必要なのは
06:26
these were Mapuche, Quechuas, Guaraní, Garífuna,
マプチェ、ケチュア、グアラニ、ガリフナ
06:28
indigenous peoples
といったスペイン語を
06:31
who learned Spanish as a second language,
第二言語として学んだ原住民たちや
06:33
or Haitians who spoke Creole.
クレオール語を話す
ハイチ人たちのための語学教育で
06:35
So Spanish became part
スペイン語が
学部に入る前のカリキュラムに
06:38
of the pre-pre-med curriculum.
組み込まれました
06:40
Even so, in Cuba,
キューバでは
06:44
the music, the food, the smells,
音楽、食、におい
06:47
just about everything was different,
あらゆる全てが違っていましたが
06:50
so faculty became family, ELAM home.
教師たちは家族のようになり
ELAMは我が家になりました
06:53
Religions ranged from indigenous beliefs
宗教は土着信仰から
06:58
to Yoruba, Muslim and Christian evangelical.
ヨルバ、ムスリム教、キリスト教、福音主義
と多岐に渡りました
07:00
Embracing diversity became a way of life.
異質なものを受け入れることは
そこでの生き方となりました
07:05
Why have so many countries
なぜそんなにも多くの国々が
07:09
asked for these scholarships?
この奨学金を求めたのでしょうか?
07:11
First, they just don't have enough doctors,
まず十分な医師がいないということ
07:13
and where they do, their distribution
いたとしても
07:17
is skewed against the poor,
貧困層には行き渡っていません
07:18
because our global health crisis
地球規模の医療危機―人的資源の欠乏の為に
07:21
is fed by a crisis in human resources.
ますます悪化しているからです
07:23
We are short four to seven million health workers
基本的ニーズを満たす為だけにも
4〜7百万人の
07:26
just to meet basic needs,
医療従事者たちが不足しています
07:30
and the problem is everywhere.
この問題は至る所で見られます
07:33
Doctors are concentrated in the cities,
医者たちは世界の半分の人口が住む
07:35
where only half the world's people live,
医者たちは世界の半分の人口が住む
07:37
and within cities,
都市に集中しており
07:40
not in the shantytowns or South L.A.
貧民街や南LAには十分いません
07:41
Here in the United States,
アメリカでは
07:46
where we have healthcare reform,
医療制度改革がありますが
07:47
we don't have the professionals we need.
医療従事者たちは不足しています
07:50
By 2020, we will be short
2020年までに
07:52
45,000 primary care physicians.
4万5千人のプライマリーケア医師が
不足するでしょう
07:55
And we're also part of the problem.
我々は問題の一部でもあります
07:59
The United States is the number one importer
アメリカは発展途上国からの
08:01
of doctors from developing countries.
医師の第一の輸入国でもあります
08:04
The second reasons students flock to Cuba
キューバに学生たちが集まる第二の理由は
08:08
is the island's own health report card,
この島独自の健康レポートカードで
08:11
relying on strong primary care.
それはしっかりとした
プライマリーケアに依存しています
08:13
A commission from The Lancet
ランセット誌の委員会は
08:16
rates Cuba among the best performing
キューバを健康において
最も良い成果を上げている
08:18
middle-income countries in health.
中所得国のひとつと評価しています
08:20
Save the Children ranks Cuba
NGOセーブ・ザ・チルドレンは
08:23
the best country in Latin
America to become a mother.
キューバをラテンアメリカで最も
母親にやさしい国だと評価しています
08:25
Cuba has similar life expectancy
キューバはアメリカと同程度の寿命と
08:30
and lower infant mortality than the United States,
より低い新生児死亡率を誇ります
08:33
with fewer disparities,
地域でのばらつきも比較的低く
08:36
while spending per person
地域でのばらつきも比較的低く
08:38
one 20th of what we do on health
しかも一人当たりの医療コストは
08:40
here in the USA.
アメリカの20分の1です
08:43
Academically, ELAM is tough,
ELAMの教育は厳しいですが
08:45
but 80 percent of its students graduate.
80%の学生は卒業します
08:48
The subjects are familiar —
科目はごく一般的なもので—
08:52
basic and clinical sciences —
基礎そして臨床科学などです
08:53
but there are major differences.
大きな違いは次の点にあります
08:56
First, training has moved out of the ivory tower
トレーニングは象牙の塔の外で行われ
08:58
and into clinic classrooms and neighborhoods,
授業では診療を近隣住区で実地するのです
09:02
the kinds of places most of these grads will practice.
ほとんどの卒業生が将来
実際に働くような場所です
09:05
Sure, they have lectures and hospital rotations too,
もちろん彼らは講義や
病院でのシフトもありますが
09:08
but community-based learning starts on day one.
コミュニティーベースの学習は
第1日目から始まります
09:12
Second, students treat the whole patient,
次に学生たちは患者のすべてと向き合います
09:17
mind and body,
心そして身体です
09:21
in the context of their
families, their communities
家族やコミュニティー
そして文化の関連の中で
09:23
and their culture.
患者を診察します
09:25
Third, they learn public health:
3つ目に彼らは公衆衛生を学びます
09:27
to assess their patients' drinking water, housing,
彼らの両親が飲む水や家の状況
09:30
social and economic conditions.
そして社会的経済的状況を
評価する為です
09:33
Fourth, they are taught
4つ目に彼らはしっかりとした問診と
09:37
that a good patient interview
4つ目に彼らはしっかりとした問診と
09:39
and a thorough clinical exam
徹底的な臨床検査によって
09:42
provide most of the clues for diagnosis,
診断に必要なヒントの殆どを得られるので
09:44
saving costly technology for confirmation.
高額な技術で確認する必要がありません
09:47
And finally, they're taught over and over again
最後に彼らは何度も何度も
09:51
the importance of prevention,
予防の大切さを教えこまれます
09:54
especially as chronic diseases
特に慢性疾患が
09:57
cripple health systems worldwide.
世界中で医療制度を硬直させているからです
09:59
Such an in-service learning
このような実地教育は
10:03
also comes with a team approach,
チームアプローチと共に行われ
10:06
as much how to work in teams
チームとしての働き方
10:09
as how to lead them,
チームの指揮の取り方
10:12
with a dose of humility.
少しの謙虚さの必要性も学びます
10:14
Upon graduation, these doctors share
卒業してからこれらの医師たちは
10:16
their knowledge with nurse's aids, midwives,
その知識を看護師や助産婦
10:19
community health workers,
地域医療従事者と共有します
10:21
to help them become better at what they do,
それは彼らがより良い仕事を
するように育てるためで
10:23
not to replace them,
新たな代わりと
交代させるのではありません
10:26
to work with shamans and traditional healers.
彼らは伝統的な呪術師や
治癒師と協力もします
10:28
ELAM's graduates:
ELAMの卒業生たち—
10:33
Are they proving this audacious experiment right?
この大胆な試みが正しいと実証しているでしょうか
10:35
Dozens of projects give us an inkling
数十のプロジェクトから
10:40
of what they're capable of doing.
それを実証できそうだと分かります
10:42
Take the Garífuna grads.
ガリフナの卒業生たち
10:45
They not only went to work back home,
彼らは故郷で働く為に帰っただけでなく
10:47
but they organized their communities to build
自分たちでコミュニティーを動かし
10:49
Honduras' first indigenous hospital.
ホンジュラス初の先住民の病院を建てました
10:51
With an architect's help,
建築家の助けを借り
10:55
residents literally raised it from the ground up.
現地の人々は文字通り1から立ち上げ
10:57
The first patients walked through the doors
2007年12月に最初の患者がそのドアから
11:01
in December 2007,
足を踏み入れました
11:03
and since then, the hospital has received
その時以来 病院は
11:06
nearly one million patient visits.
100万人近くの来院数を記録しました
11:08
And government is paying attention,
政府も注目し
11:11
upholding the hospital as a model
この病院をホンジュラス農村地の
11:14
of rural public health for Honduras.
公衆衛生モデルとして掲げました
11:16
ELAM's graduates are smart,
ELAMの卒業生たちは頭脳明晰で
11:21
strong and also dedicated.
強く そして熱心です
11:25
Haiti, January 2010.
ハイチ 2010年1月
11:28
The pain.
痛みが国を襲いました
11:33
People buried under 30 million tons of rubble.
人々は3千万トンの瓦礫の下に埋もれました
11:35
Overwhelming.
圧倒される光景でした
11:39
Three hundred forty Cuban doctors
340人のキューバ人医師達が
11:41
were already on the ground long term.
既に長期に渡り現地で働いていました
11:43
More were on their way. Many more were needed.
増員が予定されていましたが
より多くの医師が必要でした
11:45
At ELAM, students worked round the clock
ELAMでは、学生達が24時間体制で
11:47
to contact 2,000 graduates.
2千人の卒業生達に連絡をとっていました
11:51
As a result, hundreds arrived in Haiti,
結果として数百名がハイチに着き
11:54
27 countries' worth, from Mali in the Sahara
その内訳は27カ国
11:57
to St. Lucia, Bolivia, Chile and the USA.
サハラにあるマリ共和国からセントルシア、
ボリビア、チリ、アメリカまで様々でした
12:01
They spoke easily to each other in Spanish
みんなスペイン語で互いに会話し
12:06
and listened to their patients in Creole
キューバのELAMからきた
ハイチの医学生のおかげで
12:09
thanks to Haitian medical students
患者がクレオール語で
話すのを聞き取りました
12:12
flown in from ELAM in Cuba.
患者がクレオール語で
話すのを聞き取りました
12:14
Many stayed for months,
彼らの多くはコレラの流行にも関わらず
12:16
even through the cholera epidemic.
数ヶ月残りました
12:18
Hundreds of Haitian graduates
何百人ものハイチ人卒業生たちが
12:21
had to pick up the pieces,
瓦礫のかけらを拾い
12:23
overcome their own heartbreak,
心痛を乗り越え
12:26
and then pick up the burden
ハイチの新しい公共医療制度を作るという
12:28
of building a new public health system for Haiti.
重荷を背負うと決めました
12:30
Today, with aid of organizations and governments
今日ノルウェーからキューバ、ブラジルまでの
12:33
from Norway to Cuba to Brazil,
政府や団体の助けを借り
12:36
dozens of new health centers have been built,
数十の新たな医療センターが建てられました
12:38
staffed, and in 35 cases, headed
そのうち35はELAM卒業生が指揮を取ります
12:41
by ELAM graduates.
そのうち35はELAM卒業生が指揮を取ります
12:44
Yet the Haitian story
しかしこのハイチの物語は
12:48
also illustrates some of the bigger problems
多くの国々が直面する
12:50
faced in many countries.
より大きな問題を描き出しています
12:52
Take a look:
みて下さい
12:54
748 Haitian graduates by
2012, when cholera struck,
2012年コレラが襲った時
748名のハイチ人卒業生たちがいましたが
12:56
nearly half working in the public health sector
半分は公共の医療セクターで働き
13:02
but one quarter unemployed,
4分の1は職がなく
13:05
and 110 had left Haiti altogether.
110名はハイチを離れていました
13:07
So in the best case scenarios,
最良のシナリオでは
13:14
these graduates are staffing
これらの卒業生は続々と職に就き
13:16
and thus strengthening public health systems,
公共医療システムを強化します
13:18
where often they're the only doctors around.
往々にして彼らしか
医師になる者はいない状況です
13:21
In the worst cases, there are simply not enough jobs
最悪のケースでは
最貧民層が治療を受ける
13:25
in the public health sector,
公共医療セクターに
13:27
where most poor people are treated,
十分な働き口が無く
13:29
not enough political will, not enough resources,
政治の活力も資源も
13:32
not enough anything —
何もかもが足りず―
13:34
just too many patients with no care.
ただ溢れる患者が
ケアを受けられずにいます
13:37
The grads face pressure from their families too,
卒業生たちは家族からの
プレッシャーにも直面します
13:40
desperate to make ends meet,
生活するのに必死で
13:43
so when there are no public sector jobs,
公共セクターの働き口がない場合は
13:45
these new MDs decamp into private practice,
これらの新人医師たちは
個人開業医に落ち着いてしまったり
13:48
or go abroad to send money home.
仕送りをするために
海外へ出稼ぎに出たりしてしまうのです
13:51
Worst of all, in some countries,
最悪の例では ある国々では
13:55
medical societies influence accreditation bodies
医学会が免許認定機関に影響を及ぼし
13:58
not to honor the ELAM degree,
ELAM の学位を認めさせません
14:01
fearful these grads will take their jobs
彼らが自分たちの働き口や
14:04
or reduce their patient loads and income.
患者を奪い 生活を脅かすのではないかという
焦りに駆られるのです
14:06
It's not a question of competencies.
これは能力の問題ではありません
14:10
Here in the USA, the California Medical Board
ここアメリカでは
カリフォルニア州医事審議会が
14:13
accredited the school after rigorous inspection,
厳しい審査の後にELAMを認定し
14:15
and the new physicians are making good
新たに医師になった卒業生たちは
14:19
on Cuba's big bet,
次々と審査を通過し
14:21
passing their boards and accepted
ニューヨーク、シカゴ、ニューメキシコ等
14:23
into highly respected residencies
誉高い場所での臨床研修へ受け入れられ―
14:25
from New York to Chicago to New Mexico.
キューバの大いなる賭けに
良い結果をもたらしています
14:27
Two hundred strong, they're coming
200人ものそうした卒業生たちが
14:31
back to the United States energized,
アメリカに戻り やる気に溢れて
14:34
and also dissatisfied.
同時に不満を抱えています
14:36
As one grad put it,
卒業生の1人が言ったように
14:39
in Cuba, "We are trained to provide quality care
キューバでは「私たち医師は最小限の資源で
質の良いケアを提供するように
14:40
with minimal resources,
訓練されています
14:44
so when I see all the resources we have here,
だからこれだけの資源を目にして
14:46
and you tell me that's not possible,
それができないと言うのが信じられません
14:48
I know it's not true.
それは間違いです
14:51
Not only have I seen it work, I've done the work."
そうするのを見てきただけでなく
自分でもやってきたのですから」
14:53
ELAM's graduates,
ELAM卒業生たちは
14:58
some from right here in D.C. and Baltimore,
ワシントンDCやボルチモアの
非常に貧しい家庭から
15:00
have come from the poorest of the poor
ワシントンDCやボルチモアの
非常に貧しい家庭から
15:04
to offer health, education
彼らのコミュニティーに医療、教育
15:07
and a voice to their communities.
声を届けにやって来ました
15:09
They've done the heavy lifting.
彼らは力を尽くしてきました
15:12
Now we need to do our part
さあ私たちも2万3千人を超え
15:15
to support the 23,000 and counting,
増え続ける彼らに力を貸すべきです
15:17
All of us —
私たち皆-
15:21
foundations, residency directors, press,
基金、臨床研修プログラムディレクター、メディア
15:22
entrepreneurs, policymakers, people —
起業家、政治家、一般の人々-
15:26
need to step up.
皆が立ち上がる時です
15:29
We need to do much more globally
私たちはもっと世界規模で
15:31
to give these new doctors the opportunity
これらの新しい医師たちに
15:33
to prove their mettle.
彼らの気概を活かすチャンスを与えるべきです
15:36
They need to be able
彼らは
15:38
to take their countries' licensing exams.
それぞれの国の資格試験を
受けることができなければなりません
15:39
They need jobs in the public health sector
彼らは公共医療セクターや
15:42
or in nonprofit health centers
非営利医療センターのような場所で
15:45
to put their training and commitment to work.
学んだ事や献身を
活かせる仕事に就くべきなのです
15:47
They need the chance to be
彼らは患者に求められている医師となるための
15:51
the doctors their patients need.
チャンスが必要なのです
15:53
To move forward,
前進するためには
15:58
we may have to find our way back
始めに戻ることも必要かもしれません
16:00
to that pediatrician who would
私が子供の頃 シカゴの南の
貧しい地区にある
16:03
knock on my family's door
我が家のドアをノックした
16:05
on the South Side of Chicago when I was a kid,
あの小児科医
患者の家々を見て回ってくれた
16:07
who made house calls,
私達のための公僕だったあの医師を
16:10
who was a public servant.
思い出します
16:12
These aren't such new ideas
これらは医療のあるべき姿として
16:15
of what medicine should be.
それほど新しいアイデアではありません
16:17
What's new is the scaling up
新しいのはプログラムが
育ち進化していること
16:19
and the faces of the doctors themselves:
そして医師たちの顔ぶれです
16:22
an ELAM graduate is more likely to be a she
ELAM卒業生は女性である確率のほうが
16:25
than a he;
高くなりますし―
16:29
In the Amazon, Peru or Guatemala,
アマゾン、ベルー、グァテマラの
16:31
an indigenous doctor;
土着民族の医師 あるいは
16:33
in the USA, a doctor of color
アメリカではスペイン語を流暢に話す
16:36
who speaks fluent Spanish.
有色人種の医師が増えるのですから
16:39
She is well trained, can be counted on,
そうした女医達は よく訓練され 頼りになる
16:41
and shares the face and culture of her patients,
彼女の診る患者と同じ
顔つきや文化を共有している
16:45
and she deserves our support surely,
実に私達がサポートするべき相手です
16:49
because whether by subway, mule, or canoe,
彼女たちは 地下鉄やロバやカヌーに乗って―
16:52
she is teaching us to walk the walk.
私達に「歩むべき歩み」を
教えてくれているのですから
16:56
Thank you. (Applause)
(拍手)
16:59
Translated by Eriko T.
Reviewed by Reiko O Bovee

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Gail Reed - Cuban health care expert
American journalist and Havana resident Gail Reed spotlights a Cuban medical school that trains doctors from low-income countries who pledge to serve communities like their own.

Why you should listen
Many of the doctors treating ebola patients in Africa were trained in Cuba. Why? In this informative talk, journalist Gail Reed spotlights a Cuban medical school that trains doctors from low-income countries -- if they pledge to serve the communities who need them most.
More profile about the speaker
Gail Reed | Speaker | TED.com