17:33
TED2006

Mena Trott: Meet the founder of the blog revolution

メーナ・トロットがブログについて語る

Filmed:

ブログ革命の母、ムーバブルタイプのメーナ・トロットが、ブログができて間もない頃の気づき:一般の人がオンラインで生活を共有できるようになる事が、世界をもっとフレンドリーで結びついた世界にする鍵なのだと話します。

- Blogger; cofounder, Six Apart
Mena Trott and her husband Ben founded Six Apart in a spare bedroom after the blogging software they developed grew beyond a hobby. With products Movable Type, TypePad, LiveJournal and Vox, the company has helped lead the "social media" revolution. Full bio

Over the past couple of days
ここ数日の間
00:25
as I've been preparing for my speech,
私が自分のスピーチの準備をしていながら
00:27
I've become more and more nervous
私が話す事と
00:29
about what I'm going to say and about being on the same stage
他の素晴らしい人達が話をしたこのステージのことで
00:31
as all these fascinating people.
とても緊張していました
00:34
Being on the same stage as Al Gore, who was the first person I ever voted for.
私が初めて投票した、あのアル・ゴアと同じステージに立って
00:36
And --
それから --
00:40
(Laughter)
(笑い)
00:42
So I was getting pretty nervous and, you know,
そして私は緊張していました それに
00:45
I didn't know that Chris sits on the stage,
クリスがステージの脇で座っていたのも知りませんでしたし
00:47
and that's more nerve wracking.
別の緊張の種です
00:49
But then I started thinking about my family.
しかし私はそこで自分の家族のことを
00:51
I started thinking about my father and my grandfather
私の父や祖父のことを、曾祖父のことを
00:53
and my great-grandfather,
考え始めました
00:56
and I realized
そして
00:58
that I had all of these Teds
私の血に流れる
01:00
going through my blood stream --
Ted の存在に気がつきました
01:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:04
-- that I had to
-- それが私 --
01:05
consider this "my element."
それが私の成分だと思って下さい
01:07
So, who am I?
それで私は誰なのでしょうか?
01:09
Chris kind of mentioned I started a company with my husband.
クリスが既に言った様に、私は夫と会社を始めました
01:11
We have about 125 people internationally.
今では全世界で125人になりました
01:15
If you looked in the book,
本を開いてみれば
01:17
you saw this,
私がショックを受けた
01:19
which I really was appalled by.
これを目にするでしょう
01:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:25
And because I wanted to impress you all with slides,
過去のグラフなどを使った素晴らしいプレゼンテーションを見て
01:28
since I saw the great presentations yesterday with graphs,
私も好印象を与える為に
01:31
I made a graph that moves,
私も動くグラフを作ってみました
01:33
and I talk about the makeup of me.
そして私のメイクアップについて話す事にしました
01:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:39
So, besides this freakish thing,
この奇妙なことに加えて
01:42
this is my science slide. This is math,
これが私のサイエンススライドです 数学
01:44
and this is science; this is genetics.
そしてこれは科学 遺伝についてです
01:46
This is my grandmother, and this is where I get this mouth.
こちらは私の祖母で、ここから私の口が生まれました
01:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:51
I'm a
それで
01:53
blogger, which, probably to a lot of you,
私はブロガーで、それはここにいる殆どの人達にとって
01:55
means different things.
様々な意味を持っているはずです
01:57
You may have heard about the Kryptonite lock
クリプトナイトの鍵について聞いた事もあるかと思います
01:59
brouhaha, where a blogger talked about how you hack,
ブロガーがボールペンを使ってクリプトナイト社の鍵を
02:02
or break into, a Kryptonite lock using a ballpoint pen,
壊せると言って大騒ぎになりました
02:05
and it spread all over. Kryptonite had to adjust the lock,
その話は広がり、クリプトナイト社は鍵を調整する必要に迫られました
02:08
and they had to address it to
そして消費者を安心させる為に
02:11
avoid too many customer concerns.
その事を広報しなければなりませんでした
02:13
You may have heard about Rathergate,
ラザーゲイト事件について聞いた方もいるかも知れません
02:15
which was basically the result of
それはブロガーたちが 111 という数字の後ろの
02:17
bloggers realizing that the "th"
'th" が古いタイプライターではなく
02:19
in 111
Word で
02:22
is not typesetted on an old typewriter; it's on Word.
書かれたものだと気がついた結果起こりました
02:24
Bloggers exposed this,
ブロガーはその事を公表したり
02:28
or they worked hard to expose this.
公にする為に多大な力を注ぎました
02:30
You know, blogs are scary. This is what you see.
ブログって怖い これを見てあなたはそう思います
02:33
I see this, and I'm sure scared --
私もそう思いますし、私だって怖いです
02:35
and I swear on stage -- shitless about blogs,
ここで断言します – ブログはひどいものです
02:38
because this is not something that's friendly.
フレンドリーなものではありません
02:41
But there are blogs that are
しかしブログの中には
02:44
changing the way we read news and consume media, and, you know,
ニュースや広告メディアの読み方を変えたりするものもあります
02:46
these are great examples. These people are reaching thousands,
これが良い例です これらの人々は数千から数百万人の読者に
02:49
if not millions, of readers,
影響を及ぼしています
02:52
and that's incredibly important.
そしてそれは凄く重要なことです
02:54
During the hurricane,
ハリケーンが来ているときも
02:56
you had MSNBC posting about the hurricane on their blog,
MSNBCでは彼らのブログにてハリケーンについて頻繁に
02:58
updating it frequently. This was possible
情報を更新していました それは
03:01
because of the easy nature of blogging tools.
ブログツールの使いやすさによるものです
03:03
You have my friend,
私の友人は
03:06
who has a blog on digital --
デジタル機器 -- 記録装置についての
03:08
on PDRs, personal recorders.
ブログを持っていて
03:10
He makes enough money, just by running ads,
広告を設ける事だけで、オレゴンにいる
03:12
to support his family up in Oregon.
家族を養って行くだけの収入を得ています
03:14
That's all he does now, and this is something that
今では彼はそれだけをして、それは
03:16
blogs have made possible.
ブログにより可能になったことです
03:18
And then you have something like this, which is Interplast.
Interplast のようなものもあります
03:20
It's a wonderful organization of
これは一般の人達と医師により
03:22
people and doctors who go to developing nations
構成される組織で、発展途上国に行き形成外科を
03:25
to offer plastic surgery to those who need it.
必要としている人にそれを施すことをしています
03:28
Children with cleft palates will get it,
それで口蓋裂で苦しんでいる子供は必要な手術を受け、
03:31
and they document their story. This is wonderful.
その話を記録します 素晴らしいことです
03:33
I am not that caring.
私にはそこまでの思いやりはありません
03:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:39
I talk about myself. That's what I am. I'm a blogger.
自分の事を話す事にします それが私 -- ブロガー -- です
03:42
I have always decided that I was going to be an expert on one thing,
私は常に1つのことに関してのエキスパートになろうと考えてきました
03:45
and I am an expert on this person,
そして私はこの人物のエキスパートです
03:48
and so I write about it.
そしてその事について書く事にしました
03:50
And --
そして
03:52
the short story about my blog: it started in 2001. I was 23.
私のブログについて簡単に言うと : 2001年に始まりました 私は23歳でした
03:53
I wasn't happy with my job,
私はデザイナーをしていたのですが
03:56
because I was a designer,
そこまで刺激を受ける事ができず
03:58
but I wasn't being really stimulated.
仕事に満足していませんでした
04:00
I was an English major in college. I didn't have any use for it,
大学では英文学を専攻しました それを活用することは全くできませんでしたが
04:02
but I missed writing. So, I started to write a blog
書く事は恋しかったのです それでブログを書き始める事にしました
04:04
and I started to create things like these little stories.
そしてこのような小話を作り始めました
04:08
This was an illustration about my camp experience when I was 11 years old,
これは私が11歳の頃のキャンプでの経験を絵にしたもので
04:11
and how I went to a YMCA camp -- Christian camp --
どうやって YMCA キャンプ -- クリスチャンキャンプ -- に行ったのか
04:15
and basically by the end, I had
簡単に言ってしまえば、私は終わり頃に
04:18
made my friends hate me so much
友人にとても嫌われ
04:20
that I hid in a bunk. They couldn't find me.
土手に隠れていました 彼らに見つかる事無く
04:23
They sent a search party, and I overheard people saying
捜索隊を送ったのですが、そこで私が崖から飛び降りたりして
04:25
they wish I had killed myself,
自殺したら良いのに
04:27
jumped off Bible Peak.
というのを聞いてしまいました
04:29
You can laugh, this is OK.
それで -- 笑っても大丈夫ですよ
04:31
This is me.
これが私なのです
04:35
This is what happened to me.
これが私に起こった事
04:37
And when I started my blog it was really this one goal --
私がブログを書き始めた頃これが私のゴールでした
04:39
I said,
私はそれに気がついて言いました
04:42
I am not going to be famous
私は世界での有名人には
04:44
to the world,
ならない
04:46
but I could be famous to people on the Internet.
しかしインターネットでの有名人にはなれる
04:48
And I set a goal. I said, "I'm going to win an award,"
そしてゴールを定めました 賞を受ける、と言いました
04:50
because I had never won an award in my entire life.
今まで生きてきて賞を貰ったことはありませんでしたから
04:53
And I said, "I'm going to win this award --
そしてこの賞を取ると言いました
04:56
the South by Southwest Weblog award."
South by Southwest Weblog アワードです
04:58
And I won it. I reached all of these people,
そして私は受賞しました 読者を獲得し
05:00
and I had tens of thousands of people reading about my life everyday.
何万人もの人に自分の人生を読まれることになりました
05:03
And then I wrote a post about a banjo.
バンジョーについてのポストを書きました
05:06
I wrote a post
バンジョーを買いたいという
05:09
about wanting to buy a banjo --
ポストを書きました --
05:11
a $300 banjo, which is a lot of money,
300ドルするバンジョーで、高価なものです
05:13
and I don't play instruments;
私は楽器を演奏しませんし
05:16
I don't know anything about music.
音楽についても全く知りません
05:18
I like music, and I like banjos,
音楽が好きで、バンジョーが好きなのです
05:20
and I think I probably heard Steve Martin playing,
多分スティーヴ・マーティンの演奏を聴いて
05:23
and I said, "I could do that."
これなら私もできると言ったのでしょう そして
05:25
And I said to my husband, I said, "Ben, can I buy a banjo?" And he's like, "No."
夫に「ベン、バンジョーを買っても良いかしら?」 彼は「No」
05:27
And my husband --
私の夫ですが
05:30
this is my husband, who is very hot --
これが私のとても魅力的な夫で
05:33
he won an award for being hot --
魅力的ということで賞を取ったこともあります
05:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:37
-- he told me,
彼が言うには
05:39
"You cannot buy a banjo.
「バンジョーは買えないよ、これは
05:41
You're just like your dad," who "collects" instruments.
楽器を買って集めている君の父親みたいじゃないか」
05:43
And I wrote a post
そして私はどれだけ
05:46
about how I was so mad at him;
彼に怒っているかについてポストを書きました
05:48
he was such a tyrant because he would not let me buy this banjo.
彼がどんな暴君なのか、バンジョーを買わせてくれないのですから
05:50
And those people who know me understood my joke.
私を知っている人達はこの冗談を理解しました
05:53
This is Mena, this is how I make a joke at people.
メーナはこういう風に人々をネタにジョークを言うのだと
05:55
Because the joke in this is that this person is not a tyrant:
ここでのジョークは彼が暴君では無く
05:58
this person is so loving and so sweet
私に自分のドレスアップをさせてくれて
06:01
that he lets me dress him up
その写真を私のブログで公開させてくれる程
06:03
and post pictures of him to my blog.
愛情溢れる優しい人なのかということなのですから
06:05
(Laughter)
(笑い)
06:08
And if he knew I was showing this right now --
-- 彼がこの写真を今日この場で使うと知ってたら
06:12
I put this in today -- he would kill me.
殺されていたでしょうね
06:14
But the thing was, I wrote this, and my friends read it,
重要なことは、私はこのポストを書き、私の友人はそれを読んで
06:17
and they're like, "Oh, that Mena, she wrote a post about,
彼らは、メーナがくだらない物を欲しがってくだらない事を
06:19
you know, wanting a stupid thing and being stupid."
しているという、新しいポストを書いたと思ったのです
06:22
But I got emails from people that said,
しかし私は別の人々からメールを貰いました
06:24
"Oh my God, your husband is such an asshole.
「なんてこと、あなたの夫はとんでもないろくでなしよ
06:27
How much money does he spend on beer in a year?
1年で彼はどれだけのお金をビールに使うの
06:30
You could take that money and buy your banjo.
そのお金でバンジョーを買う事ができるよ
06:33
Why don't you open a separate account?"
別の口座を作ったらどうなの?」
06:36
I've been with him since I was 17 years old. We've never had a separate bank account.
私は17歳の頃から彼と一緒にいます -- 別々の口座を持った事はありません
06:37
They said, "Separate your bank account --
彼らは「口座を分けて
06:40
spend your money; spend his money. That's it."
自分のお金も、彼のお金も使いなさい」と言いました
06:42
And then I got people saying, "Leave him."
他の人は「彼と別れなさい」と言いました
06:44
And --
それで
06:46
I was like, "OK, what, who are these people?
彼らは一体誰なのか?
06:48
And why are they reading this?"
そしてなぜこれを読んでいるのか?
06:51
And I realized: I don't want to reach these people.
そして気がつきました:別にこう言う人達に読まれたい訳じゃない
06:53
I don't want to write for this public audience.
一般的な観衆に向かって書きたくは無いのです
06:55
And I started to kill my blog slowly.
そして私は自分のブログを少しずつ閉じていきました
06:58
I'm like, I don't want to write this anymore,
もうこれを書き続けたくは無いと思ったのです
07:00
and I slowly and slowly --
少しずつ
07:02
And I did tell personal stories from time to then.
個人的なこともたまには書きました
07:04
I wrote this one, and I put this up because of Einstein today.
このポストは今日がアインシュタインの日だからです
07:07
And I'm going to get choked up, because this is my first pet,
喉を詰まらせると思います、これは私の最初のペットで
07:10
and she passed away two years ago.
2年前に亡くなったからです
07:12
And I decided to break from, "I don't really write about my public life,"
そして「普通の生活を書かない」というのを中断することにしました
07:14
because I wanted to give her a little memorial.
彼女の追悼をしたかったからです
07:17
But anyways.
とにかく
07:19
It's these sort of personal stories. You know, you read the blogs about politics,
こう言う種類の個人的な話なのです あなたは政治やメディア、
07:21
or about media, and gossip and all these things.
ゴシップなどについてのブログを読むでしょう
07:23
These are out there, but it's more of the personal
そういうことも書かれていますが、私が書きたいのは
07:26
that interests me, and this is --
もっと個人的なことで私が興味を持つもの
07:29
this is who I am.
それが私なのです
07:31
You see Norman Rockwell. And you have art critics say,
ノーマン・ロックウェルについて読んでみると、芸術批評家が
07:33
"Norman Rockwell is not art.
ノーマン・ロックウェルは芸術ではない
07:35
Norman Rockwell hangs in
ノーマン・ロックウェルの絵はリビングルームや
07:37
living rooms and bathrooms, and this is not
トイレの中に掛けられている、そしてそれは
07:39
something to be considered high art."
高尚な芸術と呼ばれる様なものではない
07:41
And I think this is one of the most important things
そして私はこれが我々人間にとって最も
07:44
to us as humans.
重要な事だと思うのです
07:47
These things resonate with us,
こうした事が我々の共感を生むのです
07:49
and, if you think about blogs, you think of high art blogs,
ブログと言うと高尚な芸術の様なブログを考えるかも知れません
07:52
the history paintings about, you know, all biblical stories,
聖書を題材にした歴史画のようなものです
07:54
and then you have this.
そしてこういうものを見ます
07:58
These are the blogs that interest me: the people who just tell stories.
こう言うものが私の興味をひくのです : 単に話をする人達
08:00
One story is
そして1つの話は
08:03
about this baby, and his name is Odin.
オーディンという名前の赤ちゃんに関するものでした
08:05
His father was a blogger.
彼の父親はブロガーで
08:07
And he was writing his blog one day,
ある日ブログを書く様になりました
08:10
and his wife gave birth to her baby
彼の妻が25週目で赤ちゃんを
08:12
at 25 weeks.
生んだ時
08:15
And he never expected this.
彼はそのことを全く予期していませんでした
08:17
One day it was normal; the next day it was hell.
その日は普通の日で -- 次の日は地獄でした
08:19
And this is a one-pound baby.
この赤ちゃんは500グラムに満たず
08:22
So Odin was documented every single day.
オーディンは毎日記録されました
08:24
Pictures were taken every day: day one, day two ...
毎日写真を撮られ、1日目、2日目
08:27
You have day nine -- they're talking about his apnea;
9日目にして無呼吸状態について語り始め
08:29
day 39 -- he gets pneumonia.
39日目には肺炎にかかりました
08:32
His baby is so small,
この赤ちゃんはとても小さく
08:34
and I've never encountered such a
私はこんなに
08:36
just --
こんなにも -- 不安になる写真を見たことが
08:39
a disturbing image, but just -- just so heartfelt.
ありませんでした 心からこみ上げる不安です
08:40
You're reading this as this happens,
あなたは、まさにそこで起こっている事を読んでいるのです
08:43
so on day 55, everybody reads that
55日目には皆が読んでいました
08:46
he's having failures: breathing failures and heart failures,
彼は呼吸不全と心不全を患っていて
08:49
and it's slowing down, and you don't know what to expect.
それは衰えを見せていました、何が起きるのか分かりません
08:52
But then it gets better. Day 96 he goes home.
しかしその後症状は良くなり 96日目には家に帰りました
08:56
And you see this post.
そしてこのポストを見るのです
08:59
That's not something that you're going to see in a paper or a magazine
これは新聞や雑誌で見る様なものではありません
09:01
but this is something that this person feels,
しかしこれはこの人が感じている事なのです
09:04
and people are excited about it.
皆この事に関して興奮していました
09:06
Twenty-eight comments. That's not a huge amount of people reading,
28コメント そこまで多くの人に読まれていた訳ではありません
09:08
but 28 people matter.
しかし28人にとっては重要だったのです
09:10
And today he is a healthy baby,
今日、彼は健康な乳児です
09:13
who, if you read his blog --
このブログを読んだ人なら --
09:15
it's Snowdeal.org, his father's blog --
Snowdeal.org が彼の父親のブログなのですが --
09:18
he is taking pictures of him still, because he is still his son
彼はまだ写真を撮っています 親子の絆があるからです
09:21
and he is, I think, at his age level right now
病院から受けたとても良い治療のおかげで、
09:24
because he had received such great treatment from the hospital.
彼の身体は現在標準的な水準に達していると思います
09:27
So, blogs.
ブログですが
09:31
So what? You've probably heard these things before.
それが何なのでしょうか?このような事は前にも聞いたことがあるはずです
09:33
We talked about the WELL,
WELL コミュニティーについても話しましたし
09:35
and we talked about all these sort of things
こう言う事に関してもオンラインの歴史の中では
09:37
throughout our online history.
話されてきました
09:39
But I think blogs are basically just an evolution,
しかしブログというのは1つの進化であると私は考えます
09:41
and that's where we are today.
それが我々が今日いるところなのです
09:44
It's this record of who you are, your persona.
これはあなたがどういう人間なのかの記録であり、あなたの人格なのです
09:46
You have your Google search where you say, "Hey, what is Mena Trott?"
グーグルの検索窓にてメーナ・トロットとは何か訊くでしょう
09:49
And then you find these things and you're happy or unhappy.
そしてこのようなものを見つけ、幸せになるか不幸になるか
09:52
But then you also find people's blogs,
しかしあなたはブログも見つけるでしょう
09:56
and those are the records of people who are writing daily --
そしてそれは人々が日々記録している事 --
09:58
not necessarily about the same topic, but things that interest them.
同じトピックである必要はありませんが、彼らが興味を持っている事なのです
10:01
And we talk about the world flattens as being this panel,
世界がこのパネルのようにフラットになっていると言われています
10:05
and I am very optimistic.
私はとても楽観的です
10:08
Whenever I think about blogs I'm like, "Oh, we've got to reach all these people."
ブログの事を考えると、いつも皆に思いを伝えたいと思うのです
10:11
Millions and hundreds of millions and billions of people.
何万人、何千万人、何億人という人々に
10:13
You know, we're getting into China, we want to be there,
中国に進出していますし、そこにいたいと考えています
10:16
but you know, there are so many people who won't
しかし大勢の人々はブログを書く為の
10:18
have the access to write a blog.
アクセスすら持っていません
10:20
But to see something like the $100 computer is amazing, because it's a --
しかし100ドルPCなどは素晴らしい事です、なぜなら
10:22
blogging software is simple.
ブログの為のソフトウェアはシンプルなものだからです
10:25
We have a successful company because of timing,
時流に乗り、根気を持つ事で、我々は
10:27
and because of perseverance, but it's simple stuff --
成功した会社を作りました、しかしそれは単純なことなのです
10:29
it's not rocket science.
ロケットサイエンスではありません
10:31
And so, that's an amazing thing to consider.
考えてみると凄い事だと思います
10:33
So,
それで
10:37
the life record of a blog is something
ブログによる人生の記録は
10:39
that I find incredibly important.
非常に重要なことだと思います
10:42
We started with a slide of my Teds,
この講演は私の Ted に関するスライドで始めました
10:44
and I had to add this slide, because I knew that
私はこのスライドを加えなければなりませんでした、なぜなら
10:46
the minute I showed this, my mom -- my mom will see this deck somehow,
これを見せた途端に、私の母親 -- 母はこのデッキを見て
10:49
because she does read my blog --
彼女は私のブログを読んでますから --
10:51
and she'll say, "Why wasn't there a picture of me?"
こう言うでしょう「何故私の写真がないの?」
10:53
This is my mom. So, I have all of the people that I know of.
それが私の母なのです これで知っている人は全て揃った事になります
10:55
But this is basically the extent
しかしこれはおおむね
10:59
of the family that I know in terms of
私の直系の家族を拡大したものに
11:02
my direct line.
すぎません
11:04
I showed a Norman Rockwell painting before,
先ほどノーマン・ロックウェルの絵を見せました
11:06
and this one I grew up with,
これは私が育ちながら見たもので
11:08
looking at constantly.
常に見ていました
11:10
I would spend hours looking at just the connections,
これらの繋がりを見ながら何時間も過ごしました
11:12
saying, "Oh, the little kid up at the top has red hair;
「あら一番上にいる小さい子は赤毛で、
11:14
so does that first generation up there."
そこにいる最初の家族と同じね」と言うのです
11:17
And just these little things.
このような小さなことです、これは
11:19
This is not science, but this was enough for me
科学ではありませんが、私にとっては
11:22
to be really so interested in how we have evolved
我々がどのように進化して、どのように祖先を辿るのか
11:24
and how we can trace our line.
興味を持つのに十分でした
11:28
So, that has always influenced me.
そしてそれは常に私に影響を与え
11:31
I have this record,
私はこの記録、この --
11:33
this 1910 census
Grabowski という -- 私の旧姓なのですが、
11:35
of another Grabowski -- that's my maiden name --
1910年の国勢調査を持っています
11:37
and there's a Theodore, because there's always a Theodore.
シオドアがあり、
11:39
This is all I have. I have a couple of
これが私の持っているもの全てです 誰かの
11:42
facts about somebody.
事実を持っているのです
11:44
I have their date of birth, and their age,
彼らの生年月日や年齢
11:46
and what they did in their household, if they spoke English,
彼らが英語を話せれば、どのような家事をこなしたのか
11:49
and that's it. That's all I know of these people.
それだけです 私が彼らについて知っているのはそれだけなのです
11:51
And it's pretty sad,
悲しい事です
11:53
because I only go back five generations,
5世代遡ると
11:55
and then it's it. I don't even know what happens on my mom's side,
それで終わりなのです 私の母方には何が起こったのかすら分かりません
11:58
because she's from Cuba and I don't have that many things.
彼女はキューバから来ていて、そこまで多くのものはありませんから
12:01
And just doing this I spent time in the archives --
この為に私は公文書館で時間を費やす必要がありました --
12:05
that's another thing why my husband's a saint --
だから私の夫は聖人なのです
12:07
I spent time in the Washington archives, just sitting there,
私がワシントンアーカイブで座りながらこういうものを探しながら
12:09
looking for these things. Now it's online,
ただ座っている時に 今はオンラインなのですが
12:11
but he sat through that.
彼は最後までそこにいたのです
12:13
And so you have this record and,
このような記録があり
12:15
you know, this is my great-great-grandmother.
これは私の曾曾祖母です
12:18
This is the only picture I have. And to think
これは私のたった1つの写真で そして
12:20
of what we have the ability to do with our blogs;
ブログでできることを考えてみると;
12:22
to think about the people
人々が100ドルPCを使って
12:25
who are on those $100 computers
彼らがどのような人間なのか個人的な話を
12:27
talking about who they are, sharing these personal stories --
共有することを考えてみると
12:29
this is an amazing thing.
これは凄い事です
12:32
Another photo that has greatly influenced me,
私が大きな影響を受けたもう1つの写真
12:35
or a series of photos, is this project
一連の写真は、アルゼンチンの男性と
12:38
that's done by an Argentinean man and his wife.
その妻が行ったこのプロジェクトです
12:40
And he's basically taking a picture of his family everyday
彼は自分の家族を毎日撮影し、
12:43
for the past, what is '76 --
76年から
12:46
20, oh my God, I'm '77 --
20、なんてこと私は77 --
12:49
29 years? Twenty-nine years.
29年?29年の間
12:51
There was a joke, originally, about my graph that I left out, which is:
ここで私が掲載しなかったグラフに関する冗談があるのですが
12:55
you see all this math? I'm just happy I was able to add it up to 100,
式がいくつも書かれていて、私はそれで100まで足し算できれば
12:57
because that's my skill set.
それが私のスキルというわけです
13:00
So you have these people aging,
それでここで人々は年を重ねて行きます
13:06
and now this is them today, or last year,
これが最新、もしくは去年のもの
13:09
and that's a powerful thing to have, to be able to track this.
自分を振り返るのに使えるとても強力なものです
13:12
I wish that I would have this of my family.
私の家族にもこのようなものがあったらと思います
13:15
I know that
いつの日か
13:18
one day my children will be wondering --
私の子供、もしくは私の孫が --
13:20
or my grandchildren, or my great-grandchildren,
もしかしたら私の曾孫が
13:22
if I ever have children --
もしも子供を持てばの話ですが --
13:24
what I am going to --
私のすること -- 私がどのような人間だったのか
13:26
who I was, so I do something that's very narcissistic:
考えるでしょう、そこで私はとてもナルシストなことをします
13:29
I am a blogger --
私はブロガーです --
13:32
that is an amazing thing for me,
私にとってこれは凄い事です
13:34
because it captures a moment in time everyday.
なぜなら毎日の時間を記録するからです
13:36
I take a picture of myself -- I've been doing this since last year --
私は毎日自分の写真を撮ります -- 去年からこういうことをしています --
13:39
every single day.
自分を毎日毎日
13:42
And, you know, it's the same picture;
そして、写真は同じものです
13:44
it's basically the same person.
これは同じ人物です
13:46
Only a couple of people read it. I don't write this for this audience;
数人の人しかこれを見ません ここにいる人達の為に書いているのではありません
13:48
I'm showing it now, but I would go
今は見せていますが、もしも本当に
13:51
insane if this was really public.
公開されたら気が狂うと思います
13:53
About four people probably read it,
恐らく4人ぐらいの人間がこれを見ているのでしょう
13:55
and they tell me, you know, "You haven't updated" --
そして彼らは -- 更新してないでしょう -- と言います
13:57
I'm probably going to get people telling me I haven't updated --
恐らく他の人達に更新していないと言われる事になると思います
13:59
but this is something that's amazing, because I can go back to a day --
しかしこれは凄いことです、過去の日に戻る事ができるからです
14:02
I can go back to April 2005,
2005年の4月に戻って
14:04
and say, what was I doing this day? I look at it, I know exactly.
この日何をしていたのか?それを見る事で知る事ができます
14:06
It's this visual cue that is so important to what we do.
この視覚的なきっかけが何をするのにも重要なのです
14:09
I put the bad pictures up too,
そして写りの悪い写真もありますし
14:12
because there are bad pictures.
それも載せています
14:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:17
And I remember instantly: I am in Germany in this --
すぐに思い出します: 私はドイツにいて --
14:18
I had to go for a one-day trip.
日帰り旅行をしなければならなくて
14:21
I was sick, and I was in a hotel room,
私は気分が悪くて、ホテルの部屋にいて
14:23
and I wanted not to be there. And so you see these things.
そして私はそこにいたく無かった こういうことが分かるのです
14:26
It's not just always smiling. Now I've kind of evolved it, so I have this look.
常に笑顔でいるのではありません 今はちょっと進歩していてこんな顔もできます
14:29
If you look at my driver's license
私の運転免許証には
14:32
I have the same look,
これと同じ顔が載ってます
14:33
and it's -- it's -- a pretty disturbing thing
これはかなり動揺させられます
14:35
but it's something that is really important.
しかしこれは本当に重要なことです
14:39
And the last story
私が最後に
14:42
I really want to tell is this story,
本当に話したい話はこれです
14:45
because this is probably the one that
おそらくこれは私がしている中で
14:47
means the most to me in all of what I'm doing.
最も重要なことだからです
14:49
And I'll probably get choked up, because I tend to when I talk about this.
恐らく喉を詰まらせると思います、この話をするときはそうなりがちなのです
14:52
So, this woman,
それで、この女性は
14:54
her name was Emma, and she was a blogger
彼女の名前はエマといい、彼女は我々の TypePad という
14:56
on our service, TypePad. And she was a beta tester,
サービスを使うブロガーでした 彼女はベータテスターでした
14:59
so she was there right when we opened --
我々が始めたころから彼女は関わっていて
15:01
you know, there were 100 people --
100人程いる中で --
15:03
and she wrote about her life dealing with cancer.
彼女は自分のがんについて書きました
15:05
She was writing and writing and writing,
彼女はいつも書き続け
15:08
and we all started reading it, because we had so few blogs on the service,
皆がそれを読むようになりました、まだそこまでブログはありませんでしたから
15:10
we could keep track of everyone.
皆を把握することができたのです
15:13
And she was writing one day, and, you know,
彼女はいつものように書いていたのですが、
15:15
then she disappeared for a little bit.
少しの間姿を消しました
15:17
And her sister came on, and she said that
そして彼女の妹が来て、エマが
15:19
Emma had passed away. And all of our support staff
亡くなった事を告げました 彼女と話をした
15:22
who had talked to her were really emotional,
サポートスタッフは皆 -- とても感情的になっていました
15:25
and it was a very hard day at the company.
それは会社にとってとても大変な1日でした
15:28
And
そしてそれは
15:31
this was one of those instances where I realized
それは私がブログがどれほど我々の関係に
15:33
how much blogging affects our relationship,
影響を与えるか、そして世界がどれほどフラットになっているか
15:35
and flattening this sort of world.
気がついた瞬間でした
15:37
That this woman is in England,
この女性は英国にいて
15:39
and she lives --
彼女は
15:41
she lived a life where she was talking about
そこで彼女は自分自身について、何をしていたのか
15:43
what she was doing.
語っていたのです
15:46
But the big thing that really influenced us was,
しかし本当に我々に影響を与えた大きな事は
15:48
her sister wrote to me, and she said, you know,
彼女の妹が私に連絡を取り、
15:51
and she wrote on this blog, that --
このブログについてこう書いたことです --
15:53
writing her blog during the last couple of months of her life
エマの人生の最後の数ヶ月で、ブログを書いていたことは
15:55
was probably the best thing that had happened to her,
恐らく彼女の人生で最高に良かった事だ、と
15:58
and being able to talk to people, being able to share what was going on,
人と話すことができ、何が起こっているのか共有することができ、
16:00
and being able to write and receive comments.
コメントを書いたり受け取ったりすることができる
16:03
And that was amazing -- to be able to know
凄い事です 我々が
16:06
that we had empowered that, and that blogging
その手助けして、ブログを書く事が
16:08
was something that she felt comfortable doing, and that
彼女にとって心地よいもので、
16:11
the idea that blogging doesn't have to be scary,
ブログが怖いものである必要は無く、
16:14
that we don't always have to be attack of the blogs,
常にブログの発作に苦しまなくて良く
16:16
that we can be people who are open,
我々がオープンで人々に話しかけるのを
16:18
and wanting to help and talk to people.
助けられるというのを知ったのは
16:20
That was an amazing thing.
凄い事です
16:22
And -- and so I printed out her --
そして私は彼女のブログを
16:24
or I sent a PDF of her blog to her family,
プリント -- いえPDFファイルを彼女の家族に送りました
16:26
and they passed it out at her memorial service,
そして彼らはそれを彼女の告別式に配布しました
16:29
and even in her obituary,
彼女の死亡告知以外にも
16:31
they mentioned her blog because it was such a big part of her life.
彼らは彼女のブログについて話ました それは彼女の人生の大きな一部だったからです
16:33
And that's a huge thing.
とても大きなことです
16:35
So, this is her legacy,
これは彼女の遺産で
16:37
and I think that
私が思うに
16:39
my call to action to all of you is:
私がここであなた方に言いたい事は
16:41
you know, think about blogs, think about what they are,
ブログについて考えて下さい、それが何なのか
16:43
think about what you've thought of them, and then
あなたがブログについて知っていたこと、思っていた事を考えてみて、
16:46
actually do it, because it's something
実際にやってみるのです なぜならそれは
16:48
that is really going to change our lives.
本当に我々の人生を変えるものなのですから
16:50
So, thank you.
ありがとう
16:52
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:53
Translated by Akira KAKINOHANA
Reviewed by Masahiro Kyushima

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Mena Trott - Blogger; cofounder, Six Apart
Mena Trott and her husband Ben founded Six Apart in a spare bedroom after the blogging software they developed grew beyond a hobby. With products Movable Type, TypePad, LiveJournal and Vox, the company has helped lead the "social media" revolution.

Why you should listen

Time's 2006 Person of the Year is "You," which is to say, everybody: "The many wresting power from the few and helping one another for nothing." The tools of this revolution have come in no small part from Six Apart, a 2002 startup that helped enable the blogging boom with its products. And co-founder Mena Trott, who rose to Internet fame with her own blog, DollarShort, has become a strong voice explaining the role of personal blogging in today's culture.

Trott and her husband Ben developed Movable Type for their own use in 2001, but it became immensely popular and they dove in full-time. By the time they were preparing their blog-hosting service TypePad, investors were knocking on the door. In 2004, the company grew from seven employees to 50, with Mena Trott serving as chief executive, as well as an interface designer. Today, having acquired LiveJournal and introduced rich-media sharing platform Vox, Six Apart's software gives online voice to millions of people and organizations worldwide.

More profile about the speaker
Mena Trott | Speaker | TED.com