15:13
TEDSalon Berlin 2014

Jeremy Heimans: What new power looks like

ジェレミー・ハイマンズ: 新しいパワーとはどんなものか?

Filmed:

私たちは大衆の力を活用する クラウドソーシング型ビジネスモデルを日々目にしています―UBER、Kickstarter、AirBnB(エアビーアンドビー)など。 インターネットを介して社会問題に挑戦する活動家、ジェレミー・ハイマンズがこの新しいパワーの形がいつ政治の分野に影響し始めるのか?を問います。あなたが思っているより早いかもしれません。政治や権力の将来についての大胆なこの議論―あなたは、どう思いますか?

- Activist
At Purpose, Jeremy Heimans strategizes how to harness new social, economic and technological models to build movements with impact. Full bio

So this is Anna Hazare,
これはアナ・ハザレ氏です
00:12
and Anna Hazare may well be
the most cutting-edge
今日 世界でもっとも斬新な
00:15
digital activist in the world today.
デジタル活動家です
00:19
And you wouldn't know it by looking at him.
見かけだけでは 判断できませんが
00:22
Hazare is a 77-year-old Indian
anticorruption and social justice activist.
彼は77歳インド人の
反汚職 社会正義活動家です
00:24
And in 2011, he was running a big campaign
2011年 彼は大規模な
社会運動を行っていました
00:30
to address everyday corruption in India,
インド人エリート達が好んで無視する問題
00:33
a topic that Indian elites love to ignore.
インドにおける汚職問題に切り込む為です
00:36
So as part of this campaign,
彼は このキャンペーンに
00:39
he was using all of the traditional tactics
昔からあるような
00:41
that a good Gandhian organizer would use.
良きガンジー派が使うであろう
数々の戦術を使い
00:43
So he was on a hunger strike,
ハンガーストライキを用いました
00:45
and Hazare realized through his hunger
そしてハザレ氏は 空腹のうちに気づきました―
00:47
that actually maybe this time,
今回は
00:49
in the 21st century,
この21世紀では
00:51
a hunger strike wouldn't be enough.
ハンガーストライキだけでは
だめだと
00:53
So he started playing around
with mobile activism.
そこで 携帯電話を使った
モバイル戦術を始めました
00:54
So the first thing he did
is he said to people,
まず最初に 人々に
00:59
"Okay, why don't you send me
「では 私の反汚職キャンペーンを
01:01
a text message if you support
支持する方は 私に
01:03
my campaign against corruption?"
テキストメッセージを送ってください」
01:04
So he does this, he
gives people a short code,
と言うと
01:06
and about 80,000 people do it.
およそ8万人もの人々が それに答えました
01:08
Okay, that's pretty respectable.
良い結果ですね
01:11
But then he decides,
それから 彼は
01:13
"Let me tweak my tactics a little bit."
戦術を少し変えてみました
01:14
He says, "Why don't you leave
me a missed call?"
「私に電話をかけて 着信履歴だけ
残して切って下さい」と言いました
01:16
Now, for those of you who have
lived in the global South,
このすぐ電話を切るということ
01:20
you'll know that missed calls
おわかりですね
01:24
are a really critical part
of global mobile culture.
このモバイル社会では 重要な意味があります
01:25
I see people nodding.
皆さん うなずいておられる
01:29
People leave missed calls all the time:
これは良く使われる手法です
01:30
If you're running late for a meeting
待ち合わせに遅れそうになり
01:32
and you just want to let them
know that you're on the way,
もうすぐ来ると 伝えたいとき
01:34
you leave them a missed call.
電話を掛けて着信履歴だけを残します
01:36
If you're dating someone and
you just want to say "I miss you"
恋人に「会いたい」と伝えたい時
01:38
you leave them a missed call.
着信履歴を残します
01:40
So a note for a dating tip here,
いくつかの文化圏での
01:41
in some cultures,
デートのワザですが
01:44
if you want to please your lover,
恋人を喜ばせる為に
01:45
you call them and hang up.
(Laughter)
電話を掛けてワン切りをする(笑)
01:46
So why do people leave missed calls?
何の為に着信履歴だけを
残すなんてことをするのでしょうか?
01:51
Well, the reason of course is that
理由のひとつは
01:54
they're trying to avoid charges
電話をかけたりメッセージを送る際の
01:56
associated with making calls
and sending texts.
通信料を避けたい
という事があります
01:58
So when Hazare asked people
to leave him a missed call,
ハザレ氏が着信履歴を残すように
人々に呼びかけた時
02:02
let's have a little guess how
many people actually did this?
何人がそれに答えたと思いますか?
02:06
Thirty-five million.
3千5百万人です
02:11
So this is one of the largest coordinated
actions in human history.
史上最大の組織活動でした
02:15
It's remarkable.
驚くべきことです
02:19
And this reflects the extraordinary strength
of the emerging Indian middle class
これは インド中流社会の
目を見張るような勢いでの発展と
02:21
and the power that their
mobile phones bring.
彼らの携帯電話がもたらす力を
反映しています
02:25
But he used that,
ハザレ氏は
02:28
Hazare ended up with this massive
CSV file of mobile phone numbers,
ここで大量に得た
02:30
and he used that to deploy
携帯電話番号データを使い
02:34
real people power on the ground
人々の力を結集させ
02:36
to get hundreds of thousands of
people out on the streets in Delhi
何千もの人々をデリーの大通りに集め
02:38
to make a national point of
everyday corruption in India.
日常起こるインドの汚職に反旗を翻したのです
02:41
It's a really striking story.
すごいことです
02:46
So this is me when I was 12 years old.
これは 私が12歳の頃です
02:48
I hope you see the resemblance.
面影があるでしょう?
02:50
And I was also an activist,
その頃から 社会活動家でした
02:52
and I have been an activist all my life.
そしてそれからずっとそうです
02:54
I had this really funny childhood
変な子供時代
02:56
where I traipsed around the world
あちこち駆け回っては
02:57
meeting world leaders and
Noble prize winners,
世界の大物や ノーベル賞受賞者に
会いに行って
02:59
talking about Third World debt,
第3世界の債務を議論し
03:02
as it was then called,
その頃 そう呼ばれてましたね
03:04
and demilitarization.
軍国主義からの開放も議論しました
03:06
I was a very, very serious child.
(Laughter)
とっても まじめな子供だったんです(笑)
03:07
And back then,
その頃
03:12
in the early '90s,
90年代の初め
03:13
I had a very cutting-edge
tech tool of my own:
私は最新のテクノロジーを持っていました
03:15
the fax.
ファックスです
03:19
And the fax was the
tool of my activism.
ファックスが 私の社会活動の道具でした
03:21
And at that time, it was the best way
当時 これは画期的な機械で
03:23
to get a message to a lot of people
多くの人々にメッセージを
送ることができました
03:25
all at once.
それも一度に です
03:27
I'll give you one example of a fax
campaign that I ran.
私の ファックス作戦の一つを
ご紹介しましょう
03:29
It was the eve of the Gulf War
湾岸戦争が始まる前日
03:31
and I organized a global campaign
to flood the hotel,
ジェイムズ・ベイカー氏と
タリク・アジズ氏が会談していた
03:34
the Intercontinental in Geneva,
ジュネーブのホテルに
03:37
where James Baker and Tariq Aziz
世界中から大量の
03:39
were meeting on the eve of the war,
ファックスを送って
03:40
and I thought if I could
flood them with faxes,
ホテルをファックスで溢れかえらせて
戦争を止めよう―
03:42
we'll stop the war.
という作戦でした
03:44
Well, unsurprisingly,
当然の事ながら
03:46
that campaign was wholly unsuccessful.
その作戦は失敗に終わりました
03:48
There are lots of reasons for that,
その理由は沢山あります
03:51
but there's no doubt that
one sputtering fax machine
ジュネーブのファックス一台が何を吐き出しても
03:53
in Geneva was a little bit
of a bandwidth constraint
多くの人にメッセージを伝える力は
03:55
in terms of the ability to
get a message to lots of people.
あまりに非力でした
03:59
And so, I went on to
discover some better tools.
なので 他の道具を探してみました
04:02
I cofounded Avaaz, which uses the
Internet to mobilize people
インターネットで人々に行動を呼びかける
04:06
and now has almost
40 million members,
アバーズという組織を立ち上げました
今では4千万の会員がいます
04:08
and I now run Purpose, which
is a home for these kinds of
そして今はパーパス(目的)という名の
04:11
technology-powered movements.
テクノロジーを駆使した
社会運動組織を運営しています
04:13
So what's the moral of this story?
この話の教訓とは何でしょう?
04:16
Is the moral of this story,
さあ ここでの教訓は
04:18
you know what, the fax is kind of
eclipsed by the mobile phone?
携帯電話技術がファックスを凌いでしまった
そういうことでしょうか?
04:19
This is another story of
tech-determinism?
これも技術決定論の一例だ
といったことでしょうか?
04:24
Well, I would argue that there's
actually more to it than that.
いえ 教訓はそれ以上だと思います
04:26
I'd argue that in the last 20 years,
ここ20年で
04:30
something more fundamental has changed
新技術だけでなく
04:32
than just new tech.
もっと根本的なことが変化しました
04:35
I would argue that there has
been a fundamental shift
世界で もっと根本的な
04:36
in the balance of power
パワーの移動が起こったのだと
04:39
in the world.
考えています
04:41
You ask any activist how
to understand the world,
社会活動家に世界をどう読むか と尋ねると
04:43
and they'll say,
"Look at where the power is,
こう言うでしょう「パワーがどこにあり誰が持っているか
04:45
who has it, how it's shifting."
それがどう移り変わっていくかを見ろ」と
04:47
And I think we all sense that
something big is happening.
皆が今 何か大きな事が
起こっていると感じています
04:50
So Henry Timms and I —
同じ社会活動家の
04:53
Henry's a fellow movement builder —
ヘンリー・ティムズと私は
04:55
got talking one day and
we started to think,
ある日 今の新しい世界をどう解釈するかを
04:57
how can we make sense of this new world?
話し合い始めました
04:59
How can we describe it and give
新しい時代を言い表し
05:01
it a framework that makes it more useful?
それを活用する為の枠組みを
どう築いていくかを です
05:02
Because we realized that many
なぜなら
05:04
of the lessons that we were
discovering in movements
我々が 今までムーブメントから
発見してきた事の多くは
05:06
actually applied all over the world
世界中のあらゆるセクターで
実際に起こっている
05:08
in many sectors of our society.
ということに気づいたからです
05:11
So I want to introduce you to
this framework:
ここで 私の構想を紹介します
05:13
Old power, meet new power.
古いパワーが新しいパワーと出会うのです
05:15
And I want to talk to you about
what new power is today.
今日の新しいパワーとは
05:17
New power is the deployment
多くの人たちの参加を促すパワー
05:21
of mass participation
and peer coordination —
仲間と協力するパワー
05:23
these are the two key elements —
これらは 変化をもたらしたり
05:26
to create change and shift outcomes.
結果を左右する 重大な要素です
05:28
And we see new power all around us.
そして私たちは
至る所に新しいパワーを見かけます
05:30
This is Beppe Grillo
これは ベッペ・グリッロ氏
05:33
he was a populist Italian blogger
イタリア人で人気のブロガーです
05:34
who, with a minimal political apparatus
and only some online tools,
最小限の政治組織とインターネットだけで
05:37
won more than 25 percent of the vote
最近のイタリアの選挙で
05:40
in recent Italian elections.
25%以上の票を得ました
05:43
This is Airbnb,
これは Airbnb (エアビーアンドビー)
05:45
which in just a few years
ここ 2〜3年で
05:46
has radically disrupted the hotel industry
ホテル業界に変革をもたらしました
05:48
without owning a single
square foot of real estate.
物件を一つも所有しない
宿泊ビジネスです
05:50
This is Kickstarter,
こちらは Kickstarter (キックスターター)
05:53
which we know has raised over a billion dollars
5百万人以上から
05:55
from more than five million people.
10億ドル以上を集めました
05:57
Now, we're familiar with all of these models.
私たちにはもう見慣れた
ビジネスモデルですね
06:00
But what's striking is the commonalities,
これらの新しいモデルの
構造は似かよっていますが
06:02
the structural features of
these new models
古いパワーとでは
06:05
and how they differ from old power.
大きな違いがあります
06:07
Let's look a little bit at this.
これを見てください
06:09
Old power is held like a currency.
古いパワーは 通貨のように所有されましたが
06:11
New power works like a current.
新しいパワーは潮流に似ています
06:14
Old power is held by a few.
古いパワーは 少数に握られていますが
06:16
New power isn't held by a few,
it's made by many.
新しいパワーは 大勢の参加によって作られます
06:19
Old power is all about download,
古いパワーは ダウンロード方式
06:22
and new power uploads.
対して新しいパワーは
つまりアップロードです
06:24
And you see a whole set of
characteristics that you can trace,
そうした新しいパワーの数々の特徴の片鱗を
06:26
whether it's in media or
politics or education.
メディア、政界、教育、何の分野であれ
至るところに見ることが出来ます
06:29
So we've talked a little bit
about what new power is.
これまで 新しいパワーについて
話してきました
06:32
Let's, for a second, talk about
what new power isn't.
では 新しいパワーでは無い物とは?
06:34
New power is not your Facebook page.
それはあなたの
フェイスブックページではありません
06:37
I assure you that having a
social media strategy
ソーシャルメディアは
06:41
can enable you to do just as much download
情報をダウンロードするだけ という点で
06:44
as you used to do when you had the radio.
ラジオと変わりありません
06:46
Just ask Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad,
シリアの独裁者アサドに聞いてみてください
06:49
I assure you that his Facebook page
彼のフェイスブックには
06:53
has not embraced the power
of participation.
参加者によって作られたパワーはありません
06:54
New power is not inherently positive.
新しいパワーは必ずしも肯定的なものだ
というわけではありません
06:59
In fact, this isn't an normative
argument that we're making,
新しいパワーを決めつけるための
議論しているわけではありませんが
07:02
there are many good things
about new power,
新しいパワーには 多くの良い点がありますが
07:04
but it can produce bad outcomes.
同時に 悪い結果を招くこともあるわけです
07:06
More participation, more peer coordination,
参加者が増えると その分
意見の摺り合わせの必要も増えます
07:08
sometimes distorts outcomes
それで結果を歪めたりもします
07:10
and there are some things,
時には 医療のように
07:12
like things, for example,
in the medical profession
新しいパワー(による決定の仕方)には全く
07:13
that we want new power
to get nowhere near.
関わってもらいたくない分野もあります
07:15
And thirdly, new power is not
the inevitable victor.
第3に 新しいパワーが 必ず勝つとも限りません
07:18
In fact, unsurprisingly,
実際 当然の事ながら
07:21
as many of these new power
models get to scale,
多くのこのような新しいパワーモデルが
ある程度の規模に育つと
07:22
what you see is this massive pushback
古いパワーによって 押し返されたり
するのを
07:25
from the forces of old power.
目にするでしょう
07:28
Just look at this really
interesting epic struggle
見てください
07:30
going on right now between
Edward Snowden and the NSA.
エドワード・スノーデン氏と
米国家安全保障局長官
07:32
You'll note that only one of
the two people on this slide
この二人のうち 一人は
07:36
is currently in exile.
国外亡命中です
07:39
And so, it's not at all clear
新しいパワーが
07:41
that new power will be
the inevitable victor.
必ず勝つとは限りません
07:42
That said, keep one thing in mind:
とは言え私たちは今
07:44
We're at the beginning of a
very steep curve.
とは言え私たちは今
急カーブに
07:47
So you think about some of
these new power models, right?
差し掛かっていることを
覚えておいてください
07:50
These were just like someone's
数年前誰かが始めた
07:52
garage idea a few years ago,
オリジナルのアイデアだったものが
07:54
and now they're disrupting
entire industries.
今 あらゆる業界で革新をもたらしています
07:56
And so, what's interesting
about new power,
この新しいパワーが面白いのは
08:00
is the way it feeds
on itself.
力の泉を自らが沸き起こしていることです
08:02
Once you have an experience of new power,
一度新しいパワーを経験をしたら
08:04
you tend to expect and
want more of it.
もっとそれを体験したくなることでしょう
08:06
So let's say you've used a
peer-to-peer lending platform
ピア・ツー・ピアの
Lending TreeやProsperで
08:08
like Lending Tree or Prosper,
資金調達を取り付けたとします
08:11
then you've figured out that
you don't need the bank,
すると もう銀行など
08:14
and who wants the bank, right?
必要ないと思うでしょう
08:16
And so, that experience tends
to embolden you
こんな経験をしたら更に
08:18
it tends to make you want
more participation
生活のいろんな面でも
08:20
across more aspects of your life.
ソーシャル参加の力を
欲するようになるでしょう
08:23
And what this gives rise to is
価値観も
08:26
a set of values.
変わってきます
08:27
We talked about the models
ここまで 新しいパワーが生んだ
08:29
that new power has engendered —
ビジネスモデルについてお話しました
08:30
the Airbnbs, the Kickstarters.
Airbnb と Kickstarter です
08:32
What about the values?
では その価値観は?
08:34
And this is an early sketch
まだ初期の段階での感触ですが
08:35
at what new power values look like.
新しいパワーの価値観は
08:37
New power values prize
transparency above all else.
何よりも その透明性を重要視します
08:39
It's almost a religious
belief in transparency,
透明性というものには
ライトを当てて透かしてみると
08:43
a belief that if you shine
a light on something,
もっと良くなる
08:45
it will be better.
そんな信仰的な通念があります
08:47
And remember that in the 20th
century, this was not at all true.
20世紀は そうではなかったことを
思い出して下さい
08:48
People thought that gentlemen
should sit behind closed doors
ドアに閉ざされた向こう側で
08:51
and make comfortable agreements.
紳士協定を結ぶのが良いのだと
信じられていました
08:54
New power values of informal,
networked governance.
新しいパワーは 非公式なネットワークによる
統治に価値を認めます
08:56
New power folks would never
have invented the U.N. today,
良きにつけ 悪しきにつけ
09:00
for better or worse.
これでは 今日の国連は発足できなかったでしょう
09:02
New power values participation,
新しいパワーでは 参加する事
09:04
and new power is all about do-it-yourself.
自分でする ということに意義があります
09:06
In fact, what's interesting
about new power
面白いことに新しいパワーは
09:09
is that it eschews some of
the professionalization
20世紀にもてはやされた
ある種のプロフェッショナリズムや
09:10
and specialization that was
専門性といったものを回避しています
09:14
all the rage in the 20th century.
専門性といったものを回避しています
09:15
So what's interesting about these
新しいパワーの価値 モデルの
09:18
new power values and these
new power models
興味深い点は
09:20
is what they mean for organizations.
それが組織にとって 意味する事です
09:22
So we've spent a bit of time thinking,
組織の種類を4マスの表に
09:24
how can we plot organizations
プロットしてみて
09:26
on a two-by-two where, essentially,
プロットしてみて
09:29
we look at new power values
新しいパワーの価値観と
09:31
and new power models
新しいパワーモデルとの座標軸の
09:33
and see where different people sit?
どこに誰が位置するかを見てみました
09:34
We started with a U.S. analysis,
はじめに アメリカの組織から
09:36
and let me show you
some interesting findings.
気づいた面白い点です
09:38
So the first is Apple.
アップル社は
09:40
In this framework, we actually
described Apple
ここでは 古いパワーに
09:42
as an old power company.
属します
09:45
That's because the ideology,
なぜなら
09:47
the governing ideology of Apple
アップル社の概念
09:49
is the ideology of the perfectionist
自社の商品への徹底した
09:51
product designer in Cupertino.
完璧主義の概念
09:54
It's absolutely about that beautiful,
perfect thing descending upon us
あのとても美しい商品に対する
09:56
in perfection.
完璧主義は
10:00
And it does not value, as a
company, transparency.
自社の透明性に価値を置かず
10:01
In fact, it's very secretive.
むしろ 秘密主義です
10:04
Now, Apple is one of the most
succesful companies in the world.
アップル社は世界有数の企業なので
10:06
So this shows that you can
これは 古いパワーが今なお
10:08
still pursue a successful
old power strategy.
成功する例だと言えます
10:10
But one can argue that there's
real vulnerabilites in that model.
このモデルには 脆弱な点もあると
言えるかもしれません
10:12
I think another interesting comparison
もうひとつの興味深い例では
10:15
is that of the Obama campaign
オバマ大統領のキャンペーンと
10:17
versus the Obama presidency.
彼の政治政策
10:20
(Applause)
(笑)
10:23
Now, I like President Obama,
オバマ大統領は
10:30
but he ran with new
power at his back, right?
新しいパワーに乗りましたね
10:32
And he said to people,
彼は 我々の時代が
10:36
we are the ones we've
been waiting for.
やって来たと言って
10:38
And he used crowdfunding
大衆から寄付金を集め
10:40
to power a campaign.
キャンペーンを行いました
10:41
But when he got into office,
しかし 一旦当選すると
10:42
he governed like more or less
all the other presidents did.
他の大統領と似た 政治を執っています
10:44
And this is a really interesting trend,
そして これはとても興味深い傾向ですが
10:47
is when new power gets powerful,
新しいパワーが勢いを持つと
10:49
what happens?
何が起こるか?
10:51
So this is a framework you
should look at
このフレームワークを使って
10:53
and think about where your
own organization
あなた自身の組織がどこに位置するか
10:55
sits on it.
考えてみてください
10:56
And think about where it
should be
そして5年後10年後にはどこに
10:57
in five or 10 years.
移動しているべきでしょう
10:59
So what do you do if you're old power?
あなたが古いパワーだとしたら
どうします?
11:00
Well, if you're there
thinking, in old power,
もしあなたが 古いパワーには
何も起こらないはずだと
11:03
this won't happen to us.
考えているとしたら
11:06
Then just look at the Wikipedia
entry for Encyclopædia Britannica.
ウィキペディアのブリタニカ百科事典の
項目を見てみてください
11:08
Let me tell you, it's a very sad read.
侘しい事態ですね
11:13
But if you are old power,
あなたが古いパワーだとすると
11:15
the most important thing you
can do is to occupy yourself
あなたが出来る 最も大切な事は
11:17
before others occupy you,
他者があなたを支配する前に
11:20
before you are occupied.
自分自身を支配するということです
11:23
Imagine that a group
of your biggest skeptics
あなたの組織の信用できないグループが
11:24
are camped in the heart
of your organization
組織の中心にはびこって
11:27
asking the toughest questions
難問を突きつけてきたらどうします?
11:29
and they can see everything
inside of your organization.
組織の隅々まで見られて
11:31
And ask them, would they
like what they see
彼らが気に入らないことがあれば
11:34
and should our model change?
あなたはビジネスモデルを変えますか?
11:37
What about if you're new power?
もしあなたが新しいパワーなら どうします?
11:39
Is new power kind of just
riding the wave to glory?
新しいパワーは 勢いに乗ってればいい
だけでしょうか?
11:41
I would argue no.
そうとは思いません
11:44
I would argue that there
are some very real challenges
新しいパワーはこの黎明期に
11:45
to new power in this nascent phase.
大きな課題を乗り越えなければ
ならないものだと見ています
11:47
Let's stick with the Occupy Wall Street
example for a moment.
「ウォ-ル街を占拠せよ」という運動を見てみましょう
11:49
Occupy was this incredible example
of new power,
まさしく 新しいパワーの良い例です
11:52
the purest example of new power.
最も純粋な新しいパワーの形です
11:55
And yet, it failed to consolidate.
しかし 失敗に終わりました
11:57
So the energy that it created
結集されたエネルギーは
12:00
was great for the meme phase,
瞬間 勢いを増し流行しましたが
12:02
but they were so committed to participation,
参加する事にだけ専念され
12:03
that they never got anything done.
何もなされませんでした
12:06
And in fact that model
このモデルから見える課題は
12:08
means that the challenge for new power is:
組織したパワーを体制に取り込まれずに
12:09
how do you use institutional power
どう使っていくか ということです
12:12
without being institutionalized?
どう使っていくか ということです
12:15
One the other end of the spectra is Uber.
次は真逆の例 配車サービス
UBER社を見てみましょう
12:17
Uber is an amazing,
新しいパワーが
12:19
highly scalable new power model.
大規模に展開され得る
モデルの例です
12:21
That network is getting denser and denser
UBER社のネットワークは
12:23
by the day.
日に日に発達しています
12:25
But what's really interesting
about Uber is
しかし UBERの興味深い点は
12:26
it hasn't really adopted new power values.
新しいパワーの価値観をまだ
取り入れていない点です
12:28
This is a real quote from
the Uber CEO recently:
これはUBER社最高経営責任者が
最近実際に言った言葉です
12:32
He says, "Once we get rid of the dude
in the car" — he means drivers —
「運転席の兄ちゃんがいなくなれば」
―運転手のことです―
12:36
"Uber will be cheaper."
「UBERの料金はもっと安くなる」
12:41
Now, new power models
live and die
新しいパワーの興亡は
12:44
by the strength of their networks.
そのネットワークの強さに依り決まります
12:47
By whether the drivers and the consumers
サービスを利用する運転手と顧客が
12:50
who use the service actually believe in it.
そのサービスを支持するかどうかが
左右するのです
12:51
Because they're not an exercise
of top-down perfectionism,
なぜならこれはトップダウン形式の完璧主義が
運命を決定するのでなく
12:54
they are about the network.
ネットワーク自体のあり方が重要だからです
12:57
And so, the challenge,
そしてここでの難題は
12:59
and this is why it's in
no way surprising,
考えると辻褄が合いますが―
13:01
is that Uber's drivers
are now unionizing.
UBERの運転手たちが今や
労働組合を結成し始めていることです
13:03
It's extraordinary.
特筆すべきです
13:07
Uber's drivers are turning on Uber.
こうして運転手たちが会社と対立し始めているのです
13:09
And the challenge for Uber —
UBER社の問題は
13:11
this isn't an easy situation for them —
難しいことに
13:13
is that they are locked into
a broader superstrcuture
この会社が自らを以下の状況を通して古いパワーに
13:15
that is really old power.
閉じ込めてしまった事です
13:18
They've raised more than a billion
dollars in the capital markets.
つまり UBER社は資本市場から
10億ドルの資金を調達しました
13:20
Those markets expect a financial return,
市場は投資に対するリターンを期待します
13:23
and they way you get a financial return
その利益の回収は 運転手と顧客を
13:25
is by squeezing and squeezing
絞り上げる事から
13:27
your users and your drivers
得られます
13:29
for more and more value
UBER社の投資家たちは
13:32
and giving that value to your investors.
こうして利益を得るのです
13:33
So the big question about the future
of new power, in my view, is:
新しいパワーの将来とはなにか?
13:35
Will that old power just emerge?
古いパワーが再び現れるのか?
13:39
So will new power elites just become
新しいパワーのエリートたちが
13:42
old power and squeeze?
古いパワーと化し 利益を絞り上げていくのか?
13:43
Or will that new power
base bite back?
それともそれから新しいパワーが巻き返すのか?
13:45
Will the next big Uber
新たに現れる 次なるUBER社は
13:48
be co-owned by Uber drivers?
運転手たちと共同で所有されるのか?
13:50
And I think this going
to be a very interesting
その将来の運営構造がどうなるのか
13:52
structural question.
非常に興味深いです
13:55
Finally, think about new power
最後に 新しいパワーを
13:57
being more than just an
私たちの消費者体験を少しだけ良くするように
14:00
entity that scales things
基盤を大きくするようなもの だけでなく
14:02
that make us have slightly
better consumer experiences.
それ以上なのだと理解して下さい
14:04
My call to action for new power
私が新しいパワーへ呼びかけることは
14:08
is to not be an island.
孤立化しないことです
14:10
We have major structural
problems in the world today
今日の世界のあらゆる構造的な問題が
14:12
that could benefit enormously
新しいパワーの仕掛け人たちが
得意とする
14:15
from the kinds of mass participation
多くの人を動かす方法や
14:18
and peer coordination
その参加者の間の
14:20
that these new power players
協力を生み出す力から
14:21
know so well how to generate.
途方も無い恩恵を
得ることが出来るでしょう
14:23
And we badly need them to
turn their energies and their power
そのパワーを我々が今 どうしても必要としているのです
14:25
to big, what economists might call
経済学者が公共財の問題(フリーライダー問題)
と呼ぶ大きな問題―
14:29
public goods problems,
投資家を簡単に募ることのできる資本市場の
14:32
that are often beyond markets
仕組みの限界を越えた問題―
14:34
where investors can easily be found.
これを解決する為です
14:36
And I think if we can do that,
もしそうする事ができたら
14:38
we might be able to fundamentally change
我々は 根本から
14:40
not only human beings' sense of
their own agency and power —
個人が持つ影響力の感覚を
変えることができるだけでなく―
14:43
because I think that's the most
wonderful thing about new power,
何故なら 新しいパワーが人々にもたらす
最高のものは
14:46
is that people feel more powerful —
自分をより力強く感じる事だから―
14:49
but we might also be able to change
また
14:52
the way we relate to each other
我々の お互いとの関わり合い方や
14:54
and the way we relate to
authority and institutions.
制度や公共機関との関わり合い方をも
変えていけるでしょう
14:55
And to me, that's absolutely
私にとっては それは無条件に
14:59
worth trying for.
努力に値するものです
15:01
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
15:02
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:03
Translated by Naomi Mandel
Reviewed by Eriko T.

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jeremy Heimans - Activist
At Purpose, Jeremy Heimans strategizes how to harness new social, economic and technological models to build movements with impact.

Why you should listen

Jeremy Heimans has been building movements since childhood, when he ran precocious fax campaigns on issues such as environmental conservation and third world debt in his native Australia. A former McKinsey strategy consultant, he has co-founded several online campaign groups and citizen activism initiatives, including GetUp (an Australian political movement with more members than Australia's political parties combined), Avaaz (an online political movement with more than 40 million members) and AllOut (a global movement for LGBT people and their straight friends and family). 

Now based in New York, Heimans is co-founder and CEO of Purpose, a social business that builds movements and ventures that he says, “uses the power of participation to bring change in the world.” He and colleague Henry Timms, executive director of 92nd Street Y, a cultural and community center in New York, and founder of #GivingTuesday, are set to publish an essay in November 2014 examining new forms of power and their meaning. As Heimans puts it, “Old power downloads and commands; new power uploads and shares.”

The World Economic Forum at Davos named Heimans a Young Global Leader and in 2011 he was awarded the Ford Foundation's 75th Anniversary Visionary Award. In 2012, Fast Company named him one of the Most Creative People in Business, and in 2014, CNN picked his concept of "new power" as one of 10 ideas to change the world

More profile about the speaker
Jeremy Heimans | Speaker | TED.com