sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2014

Matthieu Ricard: How to let altruism be your guide

マチウ・リカール: 愛他性に導かれる生き方

October 17, 2014

愛他性とは何でしょうか?簡単に言えば、自分以外の人達の幸せを願うことです。そして、幸福学の研究者で仏教の僧侶でもあるマチウ・リカールが言うには、愛他性は短期的なものであれ長期的なものであれ、また仕事に関するものであれ暮らしに関するものであれ、何か決断を下す時に重要な指針として働くものなのです。

Matthieu Ricard - Monk, author, photographer
Sometimes called the "happiest man in the world," Matthieu Ricard is a Buddhist monk, author and photographer. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So we humans have an extraordinary
potential for goodness,
我々人間は 善行への
並外れた可能性を持っています
00:12
but also an immense power to do harm.
しかし 害を為す
計り知れない力も持っています
00:19
Any tool can be used to build
or to destroy.
どんな道具も やり方次第で
建設的にも破壊的にも使えます
00:24
That all depends on our motivation.
全ては我々の動機にかかっています
00:29
Therefore, it is all the more important
したがって 利己的な動機よりも
00:33
to foster an altruistic motivation
rather than a selfish one.
愛他的な動機を育むことが
とても重要です
00:36
So now we indeed are facing
many challenges in our times.
我々は 今まさに
多くの問題に直面しています
00:42
Those could be personal challenges.
個人的な問題もあるでしょう
00:48
Our own mind can be our best friend
or our worst enemy.
己の心は 最高の友にも
最悪の敵にもなり得ます
00:52
There's also societal challenges:
社会的な問題もあります
00:58
poverty in the midst of plenty,
inequalities, conflict, injustice.
豊かさの只中にある貧困や
不平等、葛藤、不正です
01:01
And then there are the new challenges,
which we don't expect.
それから新しい問題もあります
我々が予期していなかったものです
01:06
Ten thousand years ago, there were
about five million human beings on Earth.
1万年前 地球上にいた人類は
およそ500万人でした
01:10
Whatever they could do,
人類がどんなことをしようとも
01:15
the Earth's resilience
would soon heal human activities.
地球の回復力が人間の活動による
傷をすぐに癒していたものです
01:17
After the Industrial
and Technological Revolutions,
産業革命や技術革命の後
01:22
that's not the same anymore.
状況は変わりました
01:25
We are now the major agent
of impact on our Earth.
いまや我々は地球に影響を及ぼす
主要因子になっています
01:27
We enter the Anthropocene,
the era of human beings.
我々は「人新世」
つまり人類の時代にいるのです
01:31
So in a way, if we were to say
we need to continue this endless growth,
ですから もし我々が
この際限のない成長 —
01:36
endless use of material resources,
際限のない物質的資源の消費を
続ける必要があると言うのなら
01:43
it's like if this man was saying --
この男のようなことになります
01:47
and I heard a former head of state,
I won't mention who, saying --
某国の前首脳がこう言うのを聞きました
お名前は出しませんが —
01:50
"Five years ago, we were at
the edge of the precipice.
「5年前 我々は崖っぷちにいた
01:55
Today we made a big step forward."
今日 我々は大きな一歩を踏み出した」と
01:59
So this edge is the same
that has been defined by scientists
この崖っぷちは科学者達が
「地球の限界」として
02:02
as the planetary boundaries.
定義してきたものです
02:08
And within those boundaries,
they can carry a number of factors.
この限界に含めるものとして
様々な要因を考えることができます
02:11
We can still prosper, humanity can still
prosper for 150,000 years
我々は繁栄を続けることもできます
02:15
if we keep the same stability of climate
気候の安定性を
ここ1万年の完新世と同水準に維持すれば
02:21
as in the Holocene
for the last 10,000 years.
人類はさらに15万年
繁栄し続けられます
02:24
But this depends on choosing
a voluntary simplicity,
しかしこれは 簡素な生活を
自発的に選択することや
02:27
growing qualitatively, not quantitatively.
量的成長から質的成長へと
転換できるかに かかっています
02:33
So in 1900, as you can see,
we were well within the limits of safety.
1900年には ご覧のように
安全な範囲のずっと内側にいました
02:35
Now, in 1950 came the great acceleration.
それから1950年代に
大きな加速がありました
02:42
Now hold your breath, not too long,
to imagine what comes next.
さあこの後どうなるか想像して
息を飲んで下さい
02:47
Now we have vastly overrun
some of the planetary boundaries.
今や 我々は地球の限界のいくつかを
大幅に超えてしまっています
02:52
Just to take biodiversity,
at the current rate,
生物多様性だけを見ても
今のペースでは
02:58
by 2050, 30 percent of all species
on Earth will have disappeared.
2050年には 地球上の全ての種のうち
30%が滅ぶでしょう
03:02
Even if we keep their DNA in some fridge,
that's not going to be reversible.
いくらDNAを冷凍保存しても
それらの種が 生き返る訳ではありません
03:09
So here I am sitting
ですから私は
03:14
in front of a 7,000-meter-high,
21,000-foot glacier in Bhutan.
ブータンにある 標高7千メートルの
氷河の前に座っているわけです
03:16
At the Third Pole, 2,000 glaciers
are melting fast, faster than the Arctic.
この「第3の極」では 2千の氷河が
北極よりも早く溶けています
03:22
So what can we do in that situation?
ではこの状況で我々に
何ができるのでしょう?
03:29
Well, however complex
politically, economically, scientifically
環境問題が政治的 経済的
また科学的に
03:33
the question of the environment is,
いかに複雑であっても
03:41
it simply boils down to a question
of altruism versus selfishness.
それは 愛他性 対 利己性 の問題に
単純に還元できます
03:43
I'm a Marxist of the Groucho tendency.
私はマルクスを信奉しています —
グルーチョの方ですけど
03:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:54
Groucho Marx said, "Why should I care
about future generations?
グルーチョ・マルクス曰く
「なんで将来の世代を気にかけなきゃいけない?
03:55
What have they ever done for me?"
そいつらが俺に何してくれたって言うんだ?」
03:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:00
Unfortunately, I heard
the billionaire Steve Forbes,
大富豪スティーヴ・フォーブスも
Fox ニュースで 同じことを言っていましたが
04:02
on Fox News, saying exactly
the same thing, but seriously.
彼の方は真剣でした
04:07
He was told about the rise of the ocean,
海面上昇について聞かれて
言ったんです
04:10
and he said, "I find it absurd
to change my behavior today
「100年後に起きることのために
04:13
for something that will happen
in a hundred years."
今日の自分の行動を変えるなんて
馬鹿げている」 と
04:16
So if you don't care
for future generations,
もし将来の世代のことなんて
気にしないというなら
04:19
just go for it.
ご勝手に
04:22
So one of the main challenges of our times
我々の時代における
主な問題の一つは
04:25
is to reconcile three time scales:
3つの時間尺度の間を
取り持つことです
04:28
the short term of the economy,
経済という短期的なもの
つまり
04:31
the ups and downs of the stock market,
the end-of-the-year accounts;
株式市場の変動や
年末決算といったもの
04:33
the midterm of the quality of life --
それから生活の質という
中期的なもの —
04:37
what is the quality every moment of our
life, over 10 years and 20 years? --
10年 20年にわたる
生活の質はどうかということ
04:40
and the long term of the environment.
そして環境という
長期的なものです
04:45
When the environmentalists
speak with economists,
環境活動家が経済学者と話をすると
04:49
it's like a schizophrenic dialogue,
completely incoherent.
統合失調症風の会話になって
筋が全く通りません
04:51
They don't speak the same language.
彼らは話す言語が
違っているんです
04:54
Now, for the last 10 years,
I went around the world
この10年 私は世界中を回って
至る所の
04:57
meeting economists, scientists,
neuroscientists, environmentalists,
経済学者、科学者
神経科学者、環境活動家
05:01
philosophers, thinkers
in the Himalayas, all over the place.
哲学者、ヒマラヤの思索家に
会ってきましたが
05:05
It seems to me, there's only one concept
先程の 3つの時間尺度の間を
取り持てるのは
05:09
that can reconcile
those three time scales.
たった1つの概念しか
ないように思えます
05:13
It is simply having more
consideration for others.
それは単に 他者を
もっと大事にするということです
05:16
If you have more consideration for others,
you will have a caring economics,
もし他者をもっと大事にすれば
経済は思いやりに基づくものになるでしょう
05:21
where finance is at the service of society
そこでは金融が社会に
奉仕するのであって
05:25
and not society at the service of finance.
社会が金融に
奉仕するのではありません
05:28
You will not play at the casino
人々が信頼して
預けた資産を
05:32
with the resources that people
have entrusted you with.
カジノで賭けたりは
しないでしょう
05:34
If you have more consideration for others,
もしあなたが他人を
もっと大事にするなら
05:36
you will make sure
that you remedy inequality,
あなたはきっと
不平等を是正したり
05:39
that you bring some kind
of well-being within society,
社会や教育や職場に
05:43
in education, at the workplace.
何らかの幸せを
もたらそうとするでしょう
05:46
Otherwise, a nation that is
the most powerful and the richest
そうでなければ
国自体は力や富を持っても
05:48
but everyone is miserable,
what's the point?
一人一人は不幸な国になってしまいます
そんなの意味があるでしょうか?
05:52
And if you have more
consideration for others,
そして他人をもっと
大事にするなら
05:55
you are not going to ransack
that planet that we have
今のようなペースで地球を
荒らしたりはしないでしょう
05:57
and at the current rate, we don't
have three planets to continue that way.
こんなことを続けられる
予備の惑星がある訳ではないのです
06:01
So the question is,
そこで生じる疑問はこれです
06:05
okay, altruism is the answer,
it's not just a novel ideal,
愛他性が答えなのだとして
それは単に目新しい理想ではなく
06:07
but can it be a real, pragmatic solution?
現実的で実用的な
解決策なのか?
06:12
And first of all, does it exist,
そもそも 真の愛他性なんて
存在するのか?
06:15
true altruism, or are we so selfish?
我々は本当のところ
利己的ではないのか?
06:18
So some philosophers thought
we were irredeemably selfish.
我々は救いようのないほど
利己的な存在だと考えた哲学者もいます
06:22
But are we really all just like rascals?
しかし我々は皆 本当に単なる
悪党なのでしょうか?
06:27
That's good news, isn't it?
ありがたい話ですな
06:32
Many philosophers,
like Hobbes, have said so.
ホッブズなど多くの哲学者は
かつてそう言いました
06:35
But not everyone looks like a rascal.
しかし悪党には見えない人もいます
06:37
Or is man a wolf for man?
それとも人間は
人間の敵なのでしょうか?
06:41
But this guy doesn't seem too bad.
でもこの人は
それほど悪人面をしていません
06:44
He's one of my friends in Tibet.
彼はチベットにいる
私の友人の1人です
06:46
He's very kind.
彼はとても親切です
06:49
So now, we love cooperation.
それに 我々は協同することが大好きです
06:52
There's no better joy
than working together, is there?
一緒に活動すること以上に
喜ばしいことはないですよね?
06:55
And then not only humans.
そしてこれは
人間に限ったことではありません
07:00
Then, of course, there's
the struggle for life,
もちろん
生きる上での闘争はあります
07:04
the survival of the fittest,
social Darwinism.
適者生存
社会的ダーウィニズムです
07:06
But in evolution, cooperation --
though competition exists, of course --
しかし進化の中では
もちろん競争もありますが
07:10
cooperation has to be much more creative
to go to increased levels of complexity.
複雑さを増す世界を生きていくために
もっと創造的に協同する必要があります
07:16
We are super-cooperators
and we should even go further.
我々は協同することに長けていますが
さらなる進歩が必要です
07:22
So now, on top of that,
the quality of human relationships.
そこで何よりも
人間関係の質が問題になります
07:27
The OECD did a survey among 10 factors,
including income, everything.
OECDが収入その他 10の要因について
調査を行ったところ
07:33
The first one that people said,
that's the main thing for my happiness,
幸福の重要な要因として
人々が一番に挙げたのは
07:37
is quality of social relationships.
社会的関係の質でした
07:41
Not only in humans.
これは人間に限ったことではありません
07:44
And look at those great-grandmothers.
そしてご覧下さい
この素敵なおばあちゃん達を
07:47
So now, this idea
that if we go deep within,
ですから つまるところ我々が
07:50
we are irredeemably selfish,
救いようないほどに
利己的であるという考えは
07:55
this is armchair science.
机上の考えにすぎません
07:58
There is not a single sociological study,
社会学の研究にも
心理学の研究にも
08:01
psychological study,
that's ever shown that.
そんな結果を示すものは
1つもありません
08:03
Rather, the opposite.
むしろ逆です
08:06
My friend, Daniel Batson,
spent a whole life
友人の ダニエル・バトソンは
全人生を費やして
08:08
putting people in the lab
in very complex situations.
人々を非常に複雑な状況に置く
実験をしてきました
08:12
And of course we are sometimes selfish,
and some people more than others.
もちろん我々は利己的になる時もあるし
他の人より利己的な人もいます
08:14
But he found that systematically,
no matter what,
しかし体系的に研究した結果
どんな場合にも
08:19
there's a significant number of people
愛他的にふるまう人は
08:21
who do behave altruistically,
no matter what.
かなり多くいることを
彼は見出しました
08:24
If you see someone
deeply wounded, great suffering,
もしひどい怪我をして
苦しんでいる人を見かけたら
08:28
you might just help
out of empathic distress --
苦しみに共感して
とにかく助けようとするでしょう
08:31
you can't stand it, so it's better to help
than to keep on looking at that person.
見ているのが耐えられず
助ける方が楽なのです
08:34
So we tested all that, and in the end,
he said, clearly people can be altruistic.
それを検証した結果 彼は言いました
人間は明らかに愛他的だと
08:38
So that's good news.
これは吉報です
08:44
And even further, we should look
at the banality of goodness.
さらに言えば 善行がありふれていることにも
我々は目を向けるべきです
08:46
Now look at here.
この場を見て下さい
08:51
When we come out, we aren't
going to say, "That's so nice.
ここから帰る時 我々は
こうは言わないでしょう
08:53
There was no fistfight while this mob
was thinking about altruism."
「素晴らしかった!誰も殴り合わずに
愛他性について考えていたんだから!」
08:56
No, that's expected, isn't it?
それを当然のことと
思っていますよね?
09:00
If there was a fistfight,
we would speak of that for months.
もし殴り合いがあったら
何か月も 語り草になるでしょう
09:02
So the banality of goodness is something
that doesn't attract your attention,
ありふれた善行には
誰も注意を向けません
09:06
but it exists.
しかしそれは存在するのです
09:09
Now, look at this.
これをご覧下さい
09:11
So some psychologists said,
こんなことを言う心理学者もいました
09:21
when I tell them I run 140 humanitarian
projects in the Himalayas
私はヒマラヤで 140の
人道的プロジェクトを運営していて
09:23
that give me so much joy,
それが多くの喜びを
もたらしてくれると言うと
09:27
they said, "Oh, I see,
you work for the warm glow.
彼らは言いました
「なるほど 満足感のための活動ですね
09:29
That is not altruistic.
You just feel good."
愛他的なのではなく
単に自分が良い気分になりたいだけでしょう」
09:32
You think this guy,
when he jumped in front of the train,
皆さんは この人が
電車の前に飛び込んだ時
09:35
he thought, "I'm going to feel
so good when this is over?"
「よしこれで良い気分になれるぞ」
と考えたと思うわけですね
09:38
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:41
But that's not the end of it.
しかも それだけではありません
09:43
They say, well, but when
you interviewed him, he said,
彼は後でインタビューされて
言ったんです
09:45
"I had no choice.
I had to jump, of course."
「選択の余地などなく ともかく
飛び込む以外にありませんでした」
09:48
He has no choice. Automatic behavior.
It's neither selfish nor altruistic.
選択の余地がないなら自動的な行動で
利己的でも愛他的でもありません
09:51
No choice?
でも本当に
選択の余地がないのか?
09:55
Well of course, this guy's
not going to think for half an hour,
もちろん この人は
「手を貸そうか 貸すまいか」と
09:56
"Should I give my hand? Not give my hand?"
30分かけて考えたりはしないでしょう
09:59
He does it. There is a choice,
but it's obvious, it's immediate.
彼に選択の余地はありましたが
答えは明らかで 即決です
10:01
And then, also, there he had a choice.
そうして ここでも
選択をしています
10:05
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:07
There are people who had choice,
like Pastor André Trocmé and his wife,
選択の余地のあった人々がここにもいます
牧師アンドレ・トロクメとその妻
10:10
and the whole village
of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon in France.
そして ル・シャンボン・シュル・リニョンの
村人達です
10:14
For the whole Second World War,
they saved 3,500 Jews,
第二次世界大戦中 彼らは
3千5百人のユダヤ人を救いました
10:17
gave them shelter,
brought them to Switzerland,
彼らをかくまい
スイスに逃がしたのです
10:20
against all odds, at the risk
of their lives and those of their family.
自分や家族の命を
危険にさらしてです
10:23
So altruism does exist.
そう 愛他性はまさに存在するのです
10:27
So what is altruism?
では愛他性とは何なのでしょう?
10:29
It is the wish: May others be happy
and find the cause of happiness.
それは願いです― 「他の人々が幸せになり
幸せの源を見つけてほしい」という
10:30
Now, empathy is the affective resonance
or cognitive resonance that tells you,
さて 共感とは 感情的あるいは
認知的な共鳴のことで
10:34
this person is joyful,
this person suffers.
この人は喜んでいるとか
苦しんでいるとか 教えてくれます
10:40
But empathy alone is not sufficient.
しかし共感だけでは
十分ではありません
10:42
If you keep on being
confronted with suffering,
苦しみに直面し続ける場合
10:46
you might have empathic distress, burnout,
共感的な苦痛や燃え尽きを
感じるかもしれません
10:48
so you need the greater sphere
of loving-kindness.
ですから必要なのは
より高次の領域である慈しみです
10:51
With Tania Singer at the Max Planck
Institute of Leipzig,
ライプツィヒにある
マックス・プランク研究所の
10:55
we showed that the brain networks for
empathy and loving-kindness are different.
タニア・シンガーと我々は 脳のネットワークが
共感と慈しみの場合で異なることを示しました
10:58
Now, that's all well done,
我々は 素晴らしいものを
持っているんです
11:04
so we got that from evolution,
from maternal care, parental love,
進化の過程 そして母親の心遣いや
親の愛情のおかげです
11:06
but we need to extend that.
しかしこれを拡張せねばなりません
11:11
It can be extended even to other species.
他の種の生物にまで
拡張することもできます
11:13
Now, if we want a more altruistic society,
we need two things:
さてもっと愛他的な社会を望むなら
しなければならないことは2つです
11:16
individual change and societal change.
個人の変化と 社会の変化です
11:21
So is individual change possible?
では個人の変化は可能でしょうか?
11:24
Two thousand years
of contemplative study said yes, it is.
2千年にわたる瞑想研究によると
答えはイエスです
11:26
Now, 15 years of collaboration
with neuroscience and epigenetics
神経科学とエピジェネティクスによる
15年間の共同研究でも
11:30
said yes, our brains change
when you train in altruism.
答えはイエスです
愛他性の訓練は脳を変化させます
11:33
So I spent 120 hours in an MRI machine.
そこで私はMRIの機械に入って
120時間過ごしました
11:38
This is the first time I went
after two and a half hours.
これは最初の2時間半を
終えたところです
11:42
And then the result has been published
in many scientific papers.
そうしてこの結果は
多くの学術誌に掲載されました
11:45
It shows without ambiguity
that there is structural change
利他愛を抱くよう
訓練した人には
11:48
and functional change in the brain
when you train the altruistic love.
脳の構造的・機能的変化が
明らかに見られます
11:52
Just to give you an idea:
参考のために少し紹介すると
11:56
this is the meditator at rest on the left,
左側は瞑想者の安静時の状態と
慈悲の瞑想中の状態です
11:58
meditator in compassion meditation,
you see all the activity,
活動の様子がよく分かるでしょう
12:00
and then the control group at rest,
nothing happened,
右側の対照群では
安静時にも瞑想時にも
12:04
in meditation, nothing happened.
何も起きていません
12:07
They have not been trained.
彼らは訓練を受けていません
12:09
So do you need 50,000 hours
of meditation? No, you don't.
では5万時間ばかりの瞑想が
必要なのでしょうか? -いいえ
12:11
Four weeks, 20 minutes a day,
of caring, mindfulness meditation
4週間 1日20分 思いやりと
マインドフルネスの瞑想をするだけで
12:15
already brings a structural change
in the brain compared to a control group.
対照群と比較して
脳の構造的変化が起きるのです
12:19
That's only 20 minutes a day
for four weeks.
1日20分を4週間 それだけです
就学前の子供でもできます
12:25
Even with preschoolers --
Richard Davidson did that in Madison.
リチャード・デビッドソンは
マディソンで
12:29
An eight-week program: gratitude, loving-
kindness, cooperation, mindful breathing.
8週間のプログラムを行いました
感謝、慈しみ、協同、マインドフル呼吸法についてです
12:33
You would say,
"Oh, they're just preschoolers."
「就学前の子供にはまだ無理だ」
と仰るでしょう
12:39
Look after eight weeks,
8週間で
向社会的行動が
12:41
the pro-social behavior,
that's the blue line.
青い線のように変化します
12:43
And then comes the ultimate
scientific test, the stickers test.
そして完璧に科学的な
「ステッカーテスト」を行います
12:45
Before, you determine for each child
who is their best friend in the class,
事前に それぞれの子供の
好きな子 好きでない子
12:51
their least favorite child,
an unknown child, and the sick child,
それから知名度の低い子 病気の子を
調べておきます
12:55
and they have to give stickers away.
そして子供達はステッカーを
配らねばなりません
12:59
So before the intervention,
they give most of it to their best friend.
訓練前には 大半のステッカーを
好きな子にあげます
13:01
Four, five years old,
20 minutes three times a week.
この4、5歳の子供達に
週3回 20分の訓練をしたところ
13:06
After the intervention,
no more discrimination:
差別をしなくなったんです
13:09
the same amount of stickers to their
best friend and the least favorite child.
仲の良い子にも そうでない子にも
同数のステッカーをあげていました
13:12
That's something we should do
in all the schools in the world.
世界中の学校で
これをすべきだと思います
13:16
Now where do we go from there?
ではそこからどうしましょうか?
13:20
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:22
When the Dalai Lama heard that,
he told Richard Davidson,
これを耳にしたダライ・ラマは
デビッドソンに言いました
13:26
"You go to 10 schools, 100 schools,
the U.N., the whole world."
「10校で 100校で 国連で
全世界でやりなさい」
13:29
So now where do we go from there?
ではそこからどうしましょうか?
13:32
Individual change is possible.
個人の変化は可能です
13:34
Now do we have to wait for an altruistic
gene to be in the human race?
人類が愛他性の遺伝子を獲得するまで
我々は待たねばならないのでしょうか?
13:36
That will take 50,000 years,
too much for the environment.
それには5万年かかるでしょう
環境はそんなに待ってくれません
13:41
Fortunately, there is
the evolution of culture.
さいわい 文化も進化します
13:44
Cultures, as specialists have shown,
change faster than genes.
専門家が示してきたように
文化は遺伝子より速いスピードで変化します
13:49
That's the good news.
これは吉報です
13:55
Look, attitude towards war
has dramatically changed over the years.
ほら 戦争への態度は年月を経て
劇的に変化したでしょう
13:56
So now individual change and cultural
change mutually fashion each other,
そのように 個人の変化と文化の変化は
互いを形づくるのです
14:00
and yes, we can achieve
a more altruistic society.
我々はもっと愛他的な社会を
作り上げることもできます
14:05
So where do we go from there?
ではここから何をしましょう?
14:07
Myself, I will go back to the East.
私自身は 東へ戻るつもりです
14:09
Now we treat 100,000 patients
a year in our projects.
今 我々のプロジェクトでは
1年に10万人の患者を治療し
14:11
We have 25,000 kids in school,
four percent overhead.
我々の学校では2万5千人が学んでいて
4%の管理費で運営しています
14:15
Some people say, "Well,
your stuff works in practice,
こう言う人達がいます
「君達は 実践はしているよ
14:19
but does it work in theory?"
でも理論的検討はしているのかい?」
14:21
There's always positive deviance.
「良い逸脱」は常にあるものです
14:23
So I will also go back to my hermitage
ですから私は僧院に戻り
14:27
to find the inner resources
to better serve others.
もっと人への奉仕に役立てられる
内的資源を探すつもりです
14:29
But on the more global level,
what can we do?
しかし よりグローバルな水準で
我々がすべきことは何でしょうか?
14:32
We need three things.
必要なのは3つの事です
14:36
Enhancing cooperation:
協同を増すことが必要です
14:37
Cooperative learning in the school
instead of competitive learning,
学校では競争的学習ではなく
協同学習を行うことであり
14:40
Unconditional cooperation
within corporations --
職場では見返りを求めず
協働することです-
14:43
there can be some competition
between corporations, but not within.
企業間での競争は有り得ますが
内部では しません
14:47
We need sustainable harmony.
I love this term.
それから「持続可能な調和」も必要です
私はこの言葉がとても好きです
14:51
Not sustainable growth anymore.
もう持続可能な成長はいりません
14:55
Sustainable harmony means now
we will reduce inequality.
持続可能な調和とは
不平等を減らすことです
14:57
In the future, we do more with less,
将来的に より少ないもので
より多くのことができるようになるでしょう
15:01
and we continue to grow qualitatively,
not quantitatively.
そして我々は 質的に成長し続けます
量的にではありません
15:05
We need caring economics.
さらに思いやりに基づく経済が必要です
15:10
The Homo economicus cannot deal
with poverty in the midst of plenty,
「ホモ・エコノミクス」は
豊かさの中の貧困には対処できませんし
15:12
cannot deal with the problem
of the common goods
大気や海洋といった
共有資源の問題を
15:18
of the atmosphere, of the oceans.
取り扱うこともできません
15:20
We need a caring economics.
思いやりに基づく経済が
我々には必要です
15:22
If you say economics
should be compassionate,
経済に思いやりが必要と言ったら
返事はこうでしょう
15:24
they say, "That's not our job."
「それは我々の仕事じゃない」
15:26
But if you say they don't care,
that looks bad.
しかし彼らが気にかけないとしたら
それはまずいことです
15:28
We need local commitment,
global responsibility.
我々には地元への貢献と
世界に対する責任が必要です
15:31
We need to extend altruism
to the other 1.6 million species.
我々は愛他性を他の160万種の生き物にも
拡大しなければなりません
15:34
Sentient beings
are co-citizens in this world.
生きとし生けるものは
世界に共に暮らす仲間です
15:40
and we need to dare altruism.
我々は愛他性を実践せねばなりません
15:43
So, long live the altruistic revolution.
それでは 皆さん
愛他性革命万歳!
15:46
Viva la revolución de altruismo.
Viva la revolución de altruismo.
(愛他性革命万歳)
15:50
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:54
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
16:00
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:02
Translator:Naoko Fujii
Reviewer:Yasushi Aoki

sponsored links

Matthieu Ricard - Monk, author, photographer
Sometimes called the "happiest man in the world," Matthieu Ricard is a Buddhist monk, author and photographer.

Why you should listen

After training in biochemistry at the Institute Pasteur, Matthieu Ricard left science behind to move to the Himalayas and become a Buddhist monk -- and to pursue happiness, both at a basic human level and as a subject of inquiry. Achieving happiness, he has come to believe, requires the same kind of effort and mind training that any other serious pursuit involves.

His deep and scientifically tinged reflections on happiness and Buddhism have turned into several books, including The Quantum and the Lotus: A Journey to the Frontiers Where Science and Buddhism Meet. At the same time, he also makes sensitive and jaw-droppingly gorgeous photographs of his beloved Tibet and the spiritual hermitage where he lives and works on humanitarian projects.

His latest book on happiness is Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill; his latest book of photographs is Tibet: An Inner Journey.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.