17:43
TED2002

Moshe Safdie: Building uniqueness

モシェ・サフディ: 独創性を建築することについて

Filmed:

建築家モシェ・サフディは長いキャリアを省みながら、彼がデザインを手掛けたプロジェクトの中の4つを詳しく紹介し、それぞれの建築がその場所と利用者にとって真にユニークなものになるようにした彼の苦労話をお話しします。

- Architect
Moshe Safdie's buildings -- from grand libraries to intimate apartment complexes -- explore the qualities of light and the nature of private and public space. Full bio

So, what I'd like to talk about is something
私がお話ししようとすることは
00:13
that was very dear to Kahn's heart, which is:
(建築家ルイス・)カーンにとって
とても大切だったものです
00:17
how do we discover what is really particular about a project?
あるプロジェクトについて
何が特別なのかをどう見出すのでしょう?
00:19
How do you discover the uniqueness of a project as unique as a person?
人々が持つ様なユニークさをプロジェクトでは
どう見い出せばよいのでしょう?
00:22
Because it seems to me that finding this uniqueness
というのも
この独創性を見出すということは
00:28
has to do with dealing with the whole force of globalization;
グローバリゼーションの潮流に
対応していくことだと思うからです
00:31
that the particular is central to finding the uniqueness of place
特別であることは
場所のユニークさや
00:41
and the uniqueness of a program in a building.
建築プログラムのユニークさを
見出すことの核心を成しています
00:47
And so I'll take you to Wichita, Kansas,
カンサス州ウィチタを例にとってみましょう
00:50
where I was asked some years ago to do a science museum
数年前 科学博物館の
デザインの仕事を受けました
00:54
on a site, right downtown by the river.
そこはダウンタウンの川縁です
00:57
And I thought the secret of the site was to make the building of the river, part of the river.
そしてこの場所での建築については
川の一部として考えようと思いました
01:02
Unfortunately, though, the site was separated from the river by McLean Boulevard
残念なことに 土地はマクリーン通り
によって川から隔てられていたので
01:08
so I suggested, "Let's reroute McLean,"
「マクリーン通りを迂回させよう」
と提案しました
01:13
and that gave birth instantly to Friends of McLean Boulevard.
即座に「マクリーン通りの友人達」
(反対する市民団体)が生まれました
01:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:20
And it took six months to reroute it.
迂回に6ヶ月かかりました
01:25
The first image I showed the building committee was
建築委員会に見せた最初の写真は
01:28
this astronomic observatory of Jantar Mantar in Jaipur
ジャイプールにある このジャンタル・
マンタル天文台でした
01:34
because I talked about what makes a building a building of science.
科学博物館とはどういうものか
について話していたものですから
01:39
And it seemed to me that this structure -- complex, rich and yet
この構造は―
複雑で豊かでありながらも 完全に合理的で
01:45
totally rational: it's an instrument -- had something to do with science,
一種の道具といえるもので―
科学に関係があり
01:51
and somehow a building for science should be different and unique and speak of that.
科学に関する建築は異質でユニークで
科学を語るべきものであると思います
01:54
And so my first sketch after I left was to say,
それで最初のスケッチでは
こう提案しました
01:59
"Let's cut the channel and make an island and make an island building."
「それじゃあ 川を分岐させて
間に島を造り そこに建築しよう」
02:01
And I got all excited and came back, and
そしてウキウキして戻ると皆が
02:07
they sort of looked at me in dismay and said, "An island?
うろたえた目で私を見てこう言います
「島ですって?」
02:10
This used to be an island -- Ackerman Island --
これは島だったんです
ーアッカーマン島というー
02:13
and we filled in the channel during the Depression to create jobs."
この川は恐慌時代に雇用促進の為に
埋め立てられていたんですよ
02:15
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:18
And so the process began and they said,
さて工程が始まると
皆は言うのです
02:21
"You can't put it all on an island;
「全てを島に乗っけるなんて無理ですよ
02:24
some of it has to be on the mainland because
コミュニティにも良い顔をしなければ
いけないんだから
02:26
we don't want to turn our back to the community."
少しは本土に移さなければ」
02:28
And there emerged a design: the galleries sort of forming an island
それで現れたデザインがこうです
展示室が集まって島となり
02:31
and you could walk through them or on the roof.
その間や屋根づたいに行き来する
02:35
And there were all kinds of exciting features:
その他にも楽しい仕掛けがあり
02:38
you could come in through the landside buildings,
本土側のビルから入ると
02:41
walk through the galleries into playgrounds in the landscape.
展示室を通り見晴らしの良い
遊び場へと行くことができます
02:44
If you were cheap you could walk on top of a bridge to the roof,
あるいはケチな人は
橋の上を通り屋根へ渡り
02:47
peek in the exhibits and then get totally seduced,
展示物をタダで覗き込みウットリして
02:50
come back and pay the five dollars admission.
それから5ドルの入場料を
払い改めて展示を見にくればいい
02:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:56
And the client was happy -- well, sort of happy
クライアントはまあ喜んでくれて
02:58
because we were four million dollars over the budget, but essentially happy.
予算を5億円ほど超過しましたが
満足してくれていました
03:00
But I was still troubled, and I was troubled because I felt this was capricious.
でも私はまだ不満足でした
気まぐれ過ぎると感じたからです
03:04
It was complex, but there was something capricious about its complexity.
複雑なデザインでしたが
何かそこには気まぐれさがありました
03:10
It was, what I would say, compositional complexity,
それは何というか
単なる構成的な複雑さだったのです
03:15
and I felt that if I had to fulfill what I talked about --
お話ししたような理想を
実現させようと思えば
03:18
a building for science -- there had to be some kind of a generating idea,
科学の為の建築ーそれには
何かしらアイデアを生み出すような
03:23
some kind of a generating geometry.
幾何学なものでなければと思ったのです
03:26
And this gave birth to the idea of having toroidal generating geometry,
それがトーラス型の幾何学形状となり
03:29
one with its center deep in the earth for the landside building
陸側の建物は中心が地中深く潜り
03:34
and a toroid with its center in the sky for the island building.
一方 島側の建物は中心が中空に位置します
03:38
A toroid, for those who don't know,
トーラスとは何かを
ご存じない方に説明すると
03:44
is the surface of a doughnut or, for some of us, a bagel.
ドーナツやベーグルの表面の形です
03:46
And out of this idea started spinning off many,
この形から様々な
03:50
many kinds of variations of different plans and possibilities,
設計や拡張性に
様々なバリエーションが生まれ
03:54
and then the plan itself evolved in relationship to the exhibits,
設計は
展示物との関係を基に発展しました
03:59
and you see the intersection of the plan with the toroidal geometry.
この図でトーラス表面との交わりが
見て取れますね
04:03
And finally the building -- this is the model.
そして建物ーこれは設計モデルです
04:09
And when there were complaints about budget, I said,
予算上の苦情が出たとき
私は言いました
04:12
"Well, it's worth doing the island because you get twice for your money: reflections."
「島はやる価値がありますよ 費用の2倍の
見返りがあるからね 水面にも映るからですよ」
04:14
And here's the building as it opened,
これが開館した日の姿です
04:20
with a channel overlooking downtown, and as seen from downtown.
ダウンタウンを河川側から見た眺めと
ダウンタウンから見た姿です
04:23
And the bike route's going right through the building,
自転車道が建物の合間を
突っ切っています
04:28
so those traveling the river would see the exhibits and be drawn to the building.
川に沿って走ると展示物が目に入り
建物に引き寄せられるという訳です
04:31
The toroidal geometry made for a very efficient building:
トーラス形状が
建築をとても効率的にしています
04:40
every beam in this building is the same radius, all laminated wood.
この建物の梁は全て同じ太さで
ラミネートされた木でできています
04:43
Every wall, every concrete wall is resisting the stresses and supporting the building.
コンクリートでできた各々の壁は
応力に耐え 建物を支えており
04:48
Every piece of the building works.
建物のあらゆる構成部位が役に立っています
04:54
These are the galleries with the light coming in through the skylights,
これらの展示室には
空からの光が差し込んでいます
04:57
and at night, and on opening day.
これが夜
開館日です
05:02
Going back to 1976.
1976年にさか戻ります
05:08
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:11
In 1976, I was asked to design a children's memorial museum
1976年
エルサレムのヤド・ヴァシェムの
05:16
in a Holocaust museum in Yad Vashem in Jerusalem,
ホロコースト記念館内の この場所に
05:21
which you see here the campus.
子供記念館を
デザインするように頼まれました
05:25
I was asked to do a building,
建物のデザインを頼まれ
05:28
and I was given all the artifacts of clothing and drawings.
子供たちの服や絵の遺品を
渡されましたが
05:30
And I felt very troubled.
とても気分が沈みー
05:36
I worked on it for months and I couldn't deal with it
何ヶ月も取り組みましたが
気分が乗りませんでした
05:38
because I felt people were coming out of the historic museum,
なぜなら 歴史博物館を鑑賞する人々は
05:40
they are totally saturated with information
多くの情報を見て出てきます
05:43
and to see yet another museum with information,
さらにもう1つの博物館で
情報を与えられても
05:46
it would make them just unable to digest.
誰もそれを消化すらできなくなるでしょう
05:49
And so I made a counter-proposal:
それで 逆にこちらから案を提示しました
05:53
I said, "No building." There was a cave on the site; we tunnel into the hill,
「建造物は無しにしましょう」
そこには洞窟があったので 丘陵にトンネルを掘り
05:55
descend through the rock into an underground chamber.
岩の中を下りてくと
地下の部屋へと通じます
06:02
There's an anteroom with photographs of children who perished
そこには亡くなった子供達の写真が
展示された部屋があり
06:08
and then you come into a large space.
それから広々とした空間へと出ます
06:12
There is a single candle flickering in the center;
中央では1本の蝋燭の灯りが揺れていて
06:16
by an arrangement of reflective glasses, it reflects into infinity in all directions.
それを鏡があらゆる方角へ
無限に反射させるのです
06:20
You walk through the space, a voice reads the names,
空間を歩くと 声が子供らの名前、年齢
06:27
ages and place of birth of the children.
出生地を読み上げていきますが
06:32
This voice does not repeat for six months.
6ヶ月の間
繰り返されることはありません
06:34
And then you descend to light and to the north and to life.
光のある方へ 北へと進んでいくと
また現実の世界に戻ってきます
06:37
Well, they said, "People won't understand,
皆「誰も理解しないよ
06:42
they'll think it's a discotheque. You can't do that."
ディスコみたいに思うだろう
こんなの無理だ」と言い
06:44
And they shelved the project. And it sat there for 10 years,
このプロジェクトはお蔵入りとなり
10年間そのままでした
06:46
and then one day Abe Spiegel from Los Angeles,
ある日エイブ・シュピーゲルが
ロスから来ました
06:50
who had lost his three-year-old son at Auschwitz,
彼はアウシュヴィッツで
3歳の息子を亡くしていたのですが
06:54
came, saw the model, wrote the check and it got built 10 years later.
このモデルを見て小切手を切ったので
10年後にこれは実現しました
06:57
So, many years after that in 1998,
それから何年も後の1998年
07:03
I was on one of my monthly trips to Jerusalem
月例となっていたエルサレムへの旅行中
07:07
and I got a call from the foreign ministry saying,
外務省から電話があり
07:11
"We've got the Chief Minister of the Punjab here.
「パンジャーブ州の首相が
ここにいらしているんだ
07:14
He is on a state visit. We took him on a visit to Yad Vashem,
これは公式訪問で
ヤド・ヴァシェムにお連れしたところ
07:20
we took him to the children's memorial; he was extremely moved.
子供記念館を見て
とても心を動かされたんだ
07:26
He's demanding to meet the architect. Could you come down and meet him in Tel Aviv?"
建築家に会いたがっておられる
テル・アビブまで会いにきてくれないか?」
07:29
And I went down and Chief Minister Badal said to me,
私が駆けつけると
バダル首相はこう仰ったのです
07:32
"We Sikhs have suffered a great deal, as you have Jews.
「我々シーク教徒たちもユダヤ人のように
とても苦しんだ
07:37
I was very moved by what I saw today.
今日見たものに大変心を動かされた
07:42
We are going to build our national museum to tell the story of our people;
私たちも シークの人々について語るために
国立記念館を作るつもりで
07:45
we're about to embark on that.
まさに取り掛かろうとしているところだ
07:49
I'd like you to come and design it."
インドに来てデザインして欲しい」
07:51
And so, you know, it's one of those things that you don't take too seriously.
それはあまり本気にできないような
類いの話でしたが
07:53
But two weeks later, I was in this little town, Anandpur Sahib,
2週間後 私はパンジャーブの州都
チャンディーガルの郊外にある
07:59
outside Chandigarh, the capital of the Punjab,
アナンプール・サヒブ
という小さな町にいました
08:04
and the temple and also next to it the fortress
そこには寺院と その隣には
08:08
that the last guru of the Sikhs, Guru Gobind, died in
シーク教の前指導者グル・ゴービンドが
亡くなった要塞がありました
08:13
as he wrote the Khalsa, which is their holy scripture.
そこでは 彼は聖典である
カルサを書いていました
08:18
And I got to work and they took me somewhere down there,
仕事に取り掛かると
街や寺院から9キロも離れたところに
08:23
nine kilometers away from the town and the temple,
連れ出され
08:28
and said, "That's where we have chosen the location."
「ここが建築予定地だ」
と言われました
08:30
And I said, "This just doesn't make any sense.
私は「訳が分からないな
08:33
The pilgrims come here by the hundreds of thousands --
巡礼者たちは数十万人も来るだろう
08:37
they're not going to get in trucks and buses and go down there.
こんなところまでトラックや
バスで皆が来れるわけがない
08:40
Let's get back to the town and walk to the site."
街に戻ってここまで歩いてみよう」
08:43
And I recommended they do it right there, on that hill
そして あの丘から
この丘まで
08:46
and this hill, and bridge all the way into the town.
街へとつながる道を歩きとおすことを
勧めました
08:49
And, as things are a little easier in India, the site was purchased within a week
インドでは物事が簡単に運ぶもので
1週間も経たぬうちに新たに土地が買われ
08:53
and we were working.
作業が始まりました
08:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:01
And my proposal was to split the museum into two --
私の提案は博物館を2つに分けー
09:02
the permanent exhibits at one end, the auditorium, library,
一方には常設展示室
他方には オーディトリウム 図書館と
09:06
and changing exhibitions on the other --
特設向け展示室を配置し
09:11
to flood the valley into a series of water gardens
その谷間には水の庭園を展開し
09:13
and to link it all to the fort and to the downtown.
これら全てを 砦 それから
ダウンタウンへとつなげるのです
09:17
And the structures rise from the sand cliffs --
この建築は砂の岸壁からそびえ立ちー
09:21
they're built in concrete and sandstones; the roofs are stainless steel --
コンクリートと砂岩で造られています
屋根はステンレス・スチールでできており
09:25
they are facing south and reflecting light towards the temple itself,
南を向いていて
寺院へと光を反射します
09:30
pedestrians crisscross from one side to the other.
歩行者は両サイドを自由に往来できます
09:35
And as you come from the north, it is all masonry growing out of the sand cliffs
北から近づくと石造りの建築が
砂の崖から聳え立ち
09:38
as you come from the Himalayas and evoking the tradition of the fortress.
ヒマラヤの方から来ると
昔ながらの要塞を思い起こさせます
09:44
And then I went away for four months
その後 私は4ヶ月その場を離れましたが
09:50
and there was going to be groundbreaking.
起工式が行われるので
戻ってくると
09:52
And I came back and, lo and behold, the little model I'd left behind
ごらんあれ
私が作った小さな設計モデルが
09:54
had been built ten times bigger for public display on site
10倍に拡大されたものが
公開され
09:57
and ... the bridge was built!
しかも…すでに橋がかかっていました!
10:01
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:04
Within the working drawings!
図に描いた通りに!
10:11
And half a million people gathered for the celebrations;
50万人ほどが祝賀式典に集まり
10:14
you can see them on the site itself as the foundations are beginning.
建築予定地で基礎工事が
始まっているのが見えます
10:20
I was renamed Safdie Singh. And there it is under construction;
私はサフディ・シングという新しい
名前をもらいました
10:24
there are 1,800 workers at work and it will be finished in two years.
今 建設中で 1,800人の労働者が従事し
2年以内に出来上がる計画です
10:29
Back to Yad Vashem three years ago. After all this episode began,
3年前のヤド・ヴァシェムに話を戻します
先ほどの話の後
10:34
Yad Vashem decided to rebuild completely the historic museum
ヤド・ヴァシェムは この歴史博物館を
一から作り直そうと決めました
10:39
because now Washington was built -- the Holocaust Museum in Washington --
情報という点ではずっと包括的な
10:43
and that museum is so much more comprehensive in terms of information.
ワシントンの
ホロコースト博物館が出来たし
10:46
And Yad Vashem needs to deal with three million visitors a year at this point.
ヤド・ヴァシェムでは 今や年間3百万人の
入場者が訪れているので
10:51
They said, "Let's rebuild the museum."
彼らは「よし博物館を建て直そう」
と言うのです
10:55
But of course, the Sikhs might give you a job on a platter -- the Jews make it hard:
しかし シーク教徒ならすぐに仕事に始められても
ユダヤ教徒だと簡単にはいきません
10:57
international competition, phase one, phase two, phase three.
「国際コンペ、フェーズ1
フェーズ2、フェーズ3」とね
11:01
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:06
And again, I felt kind of uncomfortable with the notion
またもや私は
11:08
that a building the size of the Washington building --
ワシントンの博物館程の大きさ―
11:12
50,000 square feet -- will sit on that fragile hill
4,600平方メートルほどの建物が
地盤の弱い丘陵に建ち
11:17
and that we will go into galleries -- rooms with doors
ドアで仕切られた展示室に入り
―そこはありふれた展示室で
11:21
and sort of familiar rooms -- to tell the story of the Holocaust.
ホロコーストの展示を見るという
アイデアを具合悪く感じました
11:25
And I proposed that we cut through the mountain. That was my first sketch.
そこで山を横断する案を提案しました
これが最初のスケッチです
11:29
Just cut the whole museum through the mountain --
博物館全体が山の中を縦断し―
11:34
enter from one side of the mountain,
山の片方から入り
11:36
come out on the other side of the mountain --
もう片方から出ます
11:38
and then bring light through the mountain into the chambers.
そして採光は山を通り抜けて
部屋に取り入れるのです
11:40
And here you see the model:
これがその設計モデルです
11:44
a reception building and some underground parking.
入り口のビルと地下駐車場
11:47
You cross a bridge, you enter this triangular room, 60 feet high,
橋を渡ると 高さ18メートルの
三角柱状の室内へと入っていきます
11:50
which cuts right into the hill
これは丘を横切っており
11:56
and extends right through as you go towards the north.
北の方向へと伸びています
11:58
And all of it, then, all the galleries are underground,
展示室は全て地下にあり
12:03
and you see the openings for the light.
採光の為の開口部が見えます
12:06
And at night, just one line of light cuts through the mountain,
夜には山肌を切り裂く
一筋の光だけが見えます
12:09
which is a skylight on top of that triangle.
三角の頂点である天窓からの光です
12:12
And all the galleries,
展示室へ進んでいくと
12:16
as you move through them and so on, are below grade.
それは全て丘の斜面の下にあるのです
12:20
And there are chambers carved in the rock --
岩が抉られた中にできた部屋は
コンクリートの壁
12:23
concrete walls, stone, the natural rock when possible -- with the light shafts.
石 又は 自然の岩で作られ
可能な所には調光シャフトがついています
12:28
This is actually a Spanish quarry, which sort of inspired
これはスペインの石切場なのですが
12:32
the kind of spaces that these galleries could be.
展示室のデザインは
これから触発されたものです
12:38
And then, coming towards the north, it opens up:
それから北へ進むと 開口部にたどり着きます
12:41
it bursts out of the mountain into, again, a view of light and of the city
山が突如開かれ
光と街と
12:44
and of the Jerusalem hills.
エルサレムの丘が目に入ってきます
12:50
I'd like to conclude with a project I've been working on for two months.
さて 私がこの2か月作業している
プロジェクトで締めくくりましょう
12:55
It's the headquarters for the Institute of Peace in Washington,
ワシントンの合衆国平和研究所です
13:00
the U.S. Institute of Peace.
アメリカ合衆国平和研究所
13:06
The site chosen is across from the Lincoln Memorial;
リンカーン記念堂の向かいが
建設場所として選ばれました
13:08
you see it there directly on the Mall. It's the last building on the Mall,
ナショナル・モール地区の
最も端にある建物で
13:13
on access of the Roosevelt Bridge that comes in from Virginia.
バージニア州からの入り口となる
ルーズベルト橋に接しています
13:17
That too was a competition, and it is something I'm just beginning to work on.
これもコンペで決まったもので
私はこの仕事に取り掛かったところです
13:22
But one recognized the kind of uniqueness of the site.
立地の特別さが
注目されました
13:30
If it were to be anywhere in Washington,
ワシントンのどこかに建てるだけなら
13:34
it would be an office building, a conference center,
オフィスビルや会議センターや
13:36
a place for negotiating peace and so on -- all of which the building is --
平和を交渉するような
そんな建物になったことでしょう
13:39
but by virtue of the choice of putting it on the Mall and by the Lincoln Memorial,
でもモール内 しかも リンカーン記念堂の
隣という場所が選ばれたことにより
13:43
this becomes the structure that is the symbol of peace on the Mall.
この建物はモール地区で平和の象徴となる
構造となったのです
13:47
And that was a lot of heat to deal with.
さて 色々な課題がありました
13:52
The first sketch recognizes that the building is many spaces --
最初の図案を見ると
建物には多くの空間があります―
13:57
spaces where research goes on, conference centers,
平和の達成を目的とした
博物館として
14:01
a public building because it will be a museum devoted to peacemaking --
研究室、会議室
公共向けの建物といったものの空間です
14:06
and these are the drawings that we submitted for the competition,
これらはコンペに提出した図案ですが
14:10
the plans showing the spaces which radiate outwards from the entry.
入り口を起点として
外へと放射状に広がる空間を表しています
14:14
You see the structure as, in the sequence of structures on the Mall,
この建物は
モール地区の一連の建物にあって
14:19
very transparent and inviting and looking in.
とても透明感があり
訪れて入ってみる気にさせます
14:23
And then as you enter it again, looking in all directions towards the city.
中に入ると どちらを向いても
町が見えます
14:27
And what I felt about that building is that it really was a building
私は この建物は
14:32
that had to do with a lightness of being -- to quote Kundera --
(ミラン・)クンデラの言葉を借りれば
「存在の軽さ」や
14:36
that it had to do with whiteness,
罪の無さ
ある種のダイナミックな性質や
14:43
it had to do with a certain dynamic quality and it had to do with optimism.
楽観主義といったものと
関係すべきだと感じていました
14:45
And this is where it is; it's sort of evolving.
今はこうなっていて
まるで進化しているようです
14:51
Studies for the structure of the roof,
これは屋根の構造のスケッチで
14:56
which demands maybe new materials:
この屋根には新しい素材が
必要となるかもしれません
14:59
how to make it white, how to make it translucent, how to make it glowing,
白く半透明に 光り輝くようにし
15:03
how to make it not capricious.
気まぐれなものには しないためです
15:07
And here studying, in three dimensions,
これは3D的なスケッチですが
15:12
how to give some kind, again, of order, a structure;
ある種の秩序や構造を
与えようとしています
15:15
not something you feel you could just change
それはデザインの過程で
15:21
because you stop the design of that particular process.
ちょっと変えてしまおうという気が
起こらないようなものです
15:23
And so it goes.
ご覧ください
15:31
I'd like to conclude by saying something ...
締めくくりにー
15:37
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:39
I'd like to conclude by relating all of what I've said to the term "beauty."
今まで話したことを全て「美」という言葉に
結びつけて締めくくりたいのですが
15:47
And I know it is not a fashionable term these days,
最近ではそれほどファッショナブルな
言葉でもありませんね
15:53
and certainly not fashionable in the discourse of architectural schools,
建築学科の授業においても
きっとそうでしょう
15:56
but it seems to me that all this, in one way or the other, is a search for beauty.
しかし こうしたデザインは全て 何れにしろ
美の探求であると私には思えるのです
16:00
Beauty in the most profound sense of fit.
美とは「適合」の最も
深遠なものとして見いだされます
16:06
I have a quote that I like by a morphologist, 1917,
形態論学者であるセオドア・クックが
1917年に語った
16:09
Theodore Cook, who said, "Beauty connotes humanity.
私のお気に入りの言葉を引用します
「美とは人間性を意味している
16:18
We call a natural object beautiful because we see
我々が自然界の物を美しいと言うのは
その形態が―
16:22
that its form expresses fitness, the perfect fulfillment of function."
適合つまり機能の完璧な実現を
そこに見るからだ」と言いました
16:26
Well, I would have said the perfect fulfillment of purpose.
目的の完璧な実現と
表現しても良いかもしれません
16:31
Nevertheless, beauty as the kind of fit; something that tells us
しかしながら 美はある種の適合であり
16:35
that all the forces that have to do with our natural environment
自然環境に関係する
―人工的な環境もそうですが―
16:40
have been fulfilled -- and our human environment -- for that.
あらゆる力が表現されたもので
なければなりません
16:44
Twenty years ago, in a conference Richard and I were at together,
20年前私はリチャードと
会議に来ていて
16:48
I wrote a poem, which seems to me to still hold for me today.
その時 詩を書きました
その内容は今でも正しいと思っています
16:53
"He who seeks truth shall find beauty. He who seeks beauty shall find vanity.
「真実を求める者は 美を発見し
美を求めるものは 虚飾を見つけるだろう
16:58
He who seeks order shall find gratification.
秩序を求めるものは 満足を見出し
17:05
He who seeks gratification shall be disappointed.
満足を求めるものは 落胆を見るだろう
17:09
He who considers himself the servant of his fellow beings
友に仕える者は
自己表現の喜びを見出し
17:13
shall find the joy of self-expression. He who seeks self-expression
自己表現を求めるものは
17:16
shall fall into the pit of arrogance.
傲慢の奈落へと落ちるだろう
17:22
Arrogance is incompatible with nature.
傲慢さは自然とは相容れないものだ
17:24
Through nature, the nature of the universe and the nature of man,
自然、宇宙の本質
それに人間の性質を通して
17:27
we shall seek truth. If we seek truth, we shall find beauty."
我々は真実を追求する
真実を求める者は 美を発見するだろう」
17:30
Thank you very much. (Applause)
ありがとうございました
(拍手)
17:34
Translated by Eriko T.
Reviewed by Tomoyuki Suzuki

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Moshe Safdie - Architect
Moshe Safdie's buildings -- from grand libraries to intimate apartment complexes -- explore the qualities of light and the nature of private and public space.

Why you should listen

Moshe Safdie's master's thesis quickly became a cult building: his modular "Habitat '67" apartments for Montreal Expo '67. Within a dizzying pile of concrete, each apartment was carefully sited to have natural light and a tiny, private outdoor space for gardening. These themes have carried forward throughout Safdie's career -- his buildings tend to soak in the light, and to hold cozy, user-friendly spaces inside larger gestures.

He's a triple citizen of Canada, Israel and the United States, three places where the bulk of his buildings can be found: in Canada, the National Gallery in Ottawa, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Vancouver public library. For Yad Vashem, the Holocaust museum in Jerusalem, he designed the Children's Memorial and the Memorial to the Deportees; he's also built airport terminals in Tel Aviv. In the US, he designed the elegant and understated Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Masachusetts, and the Crystal Bridges Museum in Arkansas.

More profile about the speaker
Moshe Safdie | Speaker | TED.com