10:47
TED2015

Joseph DeSimone: What if 3D printing was 100x faster?

ジョゼフ・デシモン: 3Dプリンターを100倍高速化する技術

Filmed:

私たちが3Dプリントと思っているものは実際には2Dプリントを繰り返しているに過ぎず、しかも非常に遅いのだとジョゼフ・デシモンは言います。TED2015のステージで彼が披露するのはターミネーター2に触発されたという新技術で、従来の25〜100倍という速さで均質な強いパーツを作ることができます。3Dプリントが約束してきた大きな夢がついに実現されるのでしょうか?

- Chemist, inventor
The CEO of Carbon3D, Joseph DeSimone has made breakthrough contributions to the field of 3D printing. Full bio

I'm thrilled to be here tonight
私たちがこれまで
2年以上取り組んできたことを
00:12
to share with you something
we've been working on
今日この場で
ご紹介できるのを
00:14
for over two years,
とても喜ばしく思っています
00:17
and it's in the area
of additive manufacturing,
新しい付加製造技術で
00:19
also known as 3D printing.
3Dプリントという名でも
知られているものです
00:21
You see this object here.
これをご覧ください
00:24
It looks fairly simple,
but it's quite complex at the same time.
ごくシンプルですが
同時にとても複雑なものです
00:26
It's a set of concentric
geodesic structures
同心測地線の集まりで
00:30
with linkages between each one.
それぞれが中心と
繋がっています
00:33
In its context, it is not manufacturable
by traditional manufacturing techniques.
従来の製造技術では
作り出すことのできないものです
00:36
It has a symmetry such
that you can't injection mold it.
射出成形できないような
対称的な形で
00:43
You can't even manufacture it
through milling.
フライス加工でも
作れません
00:47
This is a job for a 3D printer,
3Dプリンターの仕事です
00:51
but most 3D printers would take between
three and 10 hours to fabricate it,
しかし多くの3Dプリンターでは
これを作るのに3〜10時間かかるでしょう
00:54
and we're going to take the risk tonight
to try to fabricate it onstage
それをこの10分の講演の間に
ステージ上で作るということに
00:58
during this 10-minute talk.
挑戦したいと思います
01:02
Wish us luck.
どうか幸運を祈ってください
01:05
Now, 3D printing is actually a misnomer.
3Dプリントという呼び名は
正確ではありません
01:08
It's actually 2D printing
over and over again,
実際には2Dプリントを
繰り返しているにすぎません
01:11
and it in fact uses the technologies
associated with 2D printing.
使われている技術も
2Dプリント関連の技術です
01:15
Think about inkjet printing where you
lay down ink on a page to make letters,
インクジェット印刷を考えてみてください
文字を出すためにページの上にインクを置きます
01:20
and then do that over and over again
to build up a three-dimensional object.
これを繰り返すことで
3次元的なオブジェクトを作り出すのです
01:25
In microelectronics, they use something
マイクロエレクトロニクスにも
01:30
called lithography to do
the same sort of thing,
リソグラフィーという
同様のことを行う技術があって
01:32
to make the transistors
and integrated circuits
トランジスタや
集積回路といった構造を
01:34
and build up a structure several times.
繰り返し印刷して
作り上げますが
01:36
These are all 2D printing technologies.
これも2次元印刷技術です
01:38
Now, I'm a chemist,
a material scientist too,
私は化学者であり
材料科学者です
01:42
and my co-inventors
are also material scientists,
私の共同考案者もまた
材料科学者で
01:45
one a chemist, one a physicist,
1人は化学者
1人は物理学者ですが
01:48
and we began to be
interested in 3D printing.
私たちは3Dプリントに
興味を持つようになりました
01:51
And very often, as you know,
new ideas are often simple connections
新しいアイデアというのは
得てして
01:53
between people with different experiences
in different communities,
異なる領域の異なる経験を持つ人の
繋がりから生まれますが
01:59
and that's our story.
私たちの場合もそうでした
02:03
Now, we were inspired
私たちが触発されたのは
02:05
by the "Terminator 2" scene for T-1000,
映画『ターミネーター2』の中で
T-1000が出てくるシーンです
02:08
and we thought, why couldn't a 3D printer
operate in this fashion,
3Dプリンターでこんな風に
できないものかと思いました
02:12
where you have an object
arise out of a puddle
すごい形状のものが
水たまりの中から
02:18
in essentially real time
リアルタイムで
02:23
with essentially no waste
材料の無駄もなく
02:25
to make a great object?
できあがっていくんです
02:27
Okay, just like the movies.
ちょうどあの映画みたいに
02:30
And could we be inspired by Hollywood
ハリウッド映画に
触発されたアイデアを
02:31
and come up with ways
to actually try to get this to work?
実現する方法を
考え出すことなんてできるのか?
02:34
And that was our challenge.
これは難題でした
02:38
And our approach would be,
if we could do this,
もしそれができたなら
02:40
then we could fundamentally address
the three issues holding back 3D printing
3Dプリントが本格的な
製造プロセスとなることを妨げている
02:43
from being a manufacturing process.
3つの問題を解決できます
02:47
One, 3D printing takes forever.
第1の問題は 3Dプリントには
延々と時間がかかること
02:50
There are mushrooms that grow faster
than 3D printed parts. (Laughter)
3Dプリンターで作るよりも早く成長する
キノコがあるくらいです (笑)
02:52
The layer by layer process
層を重ねていく
というプロセスは
02:59
leads to defects
in mechanical properties,
力学的性質の弱さを
もたらしますが
03:01
and if we could grow continuously,
we could eliminate those defects.
連続的に成長させていくことができれば
この欠点を取り除けます
03:04
And in fact, if we could grow really fast,
we could also start using materials
とても速く成長させることができれば
03:08
that are self-curing,
and we could have amazing properties.
自己回復素材などを使うこともでき
素晴らしい性質を持たせることができます
03:13
So if we could pull this off,
imitate Hollywood,
もしハリウッドの
フィクションを実現できれば
03:18
we could in fact address 3D manufacturing.
3D製造の問題を
解決できるのです
03:22
Our approach is to use
some standard knowledge
私たちのアプローチでは
高分子化学の領域では
03:26
in polymer chemistry
よく知られたことを
使っています
03:29
to harness light and oxygen
to grow parts continuously.
光と酸素を利用して連続的に
パーツを成長させるのです
03:32
Light and oxygen work in different ways.
光と酸素は逆方向に作用します
03:39
Light can take a resin
and convert it to a solid,
光は樹脂を
03:42
can convert a liquid to a solid.
液体から固体に変えます
03:45
Oxygen inhibits that process.
酸素はこのプロセスを阻害します
03:47
So light and oxygen
are polar opposites from one another
だから光と酸素は化学的に
03:50
from a chemical point of view,
正反対の働きをするわけです
03:54
and if we can control spatially
the light and oxygen,
光と酸素を空間的に
制御してやることで
03:56
we could control this process.
このプロセスを
制御できるようになります
04:00
And we refer to this as CLIP.
[Continuous Liquid Interface Production.]
私たちはこれを
CLIP(連続的液体面生成)と呼んでいます
04:02
It has three functional components.
これには3つの
構成要素があります
04:05
One, it has a reservoir
that holds the puddle,
1つは貯水槽で
あのT-1000が出てくる場面のように
04:08
just like the T-1000.
液体を保持します
04:12
At the bottom of the reservoir
is a special window.
この貯水槽の底には
特別な窓がありますが
04:14
I'll come back to that.
これについては
後ほど説明します
04:16
In addition, it has a stage
that will lower into the puddle
これに加えて台があって
貯水槽に降りてきて
04:18
and pull the object out of the liquid.
液体からオブジェクトを
引き出していきます
04:21
The third component
is a digital light projection system
3番目の要素は
貯水槽の下にある
04:24
underneath the reservoir,
デジタル投影システムで
04:28
illuminating with light
in the ultraviolet region.
紫外線領域の
光を投影します
04:30
Now, the key is that this window
in the bottom of this reservoir,
鍵となるのは
貯水槽の下にある窓ですが
04:34
it's a composite,
it's a very special window.
これは複合的で
特別なものです
04:37
It's not only transparent to light
but it's permeable to oxygen.
光を通すだけでなく
酸素も透過します
04:40
It's got characteristics
like a contact lens.
コンタクトレンズのような性質を
持っているわけです
04:43
So we can see how the process works.
このプロセスがどう働くか
見てみましょう
04:47
You can start to see that
as you lower a stage in there,
台が降りてきて
04:49
in a traditional process,
with an oxygen-impermeable window,
従来のプロセスだと
窓は酸素を透過せず
04:53
you make a two-dimensional pattern
2次元的なパターンが
04:57
and you end up gluing that onto the window
with a traditional window,
窓に張り付いた形でできます
05:00
and so in order to introduce
the next layer, you have to separate it,
次の層を作るためには
分離する必要があり
05:03
introduce new resin, reposition it,
新しい樹脂を入れ
再配置する—
05:06
and do this process over and over again.
というプロセスを
何度も繰り返します
05:10
But with our very special window,
しかし私たちの特別な窓を使うと
05:13
what we're able to do is,
with oxygen coming through the bottom
光を当てている間
05:15
as light hits it,
下から酸素が上がって来て
05:18
that oxygen inhibits the reaction,
反応を阻害することで
05:21
and we form a dead zone.
死角を作ることができます
05:23
This dead zone is on the order
of tens of microns thick,
この死角は
厚さが数十ミクロンで
05:26
so that's two or three diameters
of a red blood cell,
赤血球の2、3個分です
05:30
right at the window interface
that remains a liquid,
窓に接する部分は
液体の状態のままで
05:34
and we pull this object up,
オブジェクトを
引き上げていきます
05:36
and as we talked about in a Science paper,
サイエンス誌の論文に
書きましたが
05:38
as we change the oxygen content,
we can change the dead zone thickness.
酸素含有量を変えることで
この死角の厚みを変えることができます
05:40
And so we have a number of key variables
that we control: oxygen content,
だから制御できる変数がたくさんあります
酸素含有量
05:45
the light, the light intensity,
the dose to cure,
光 光量 硬化線量
05:49
the viscosity, the geometry,
粘度 形状
05:52
and we use very sophisticated software
to control this process.
そしてプロセスの制御のため
非常に洗練されたソフトウェアを使っています
05:54
The result is pretty staggering.
結果はとても
目覚ましいものです
05:58
It's 25 to 100 times faster
than traditional 3D printers,
従来の3Dプリンターより
25〜100倍高速です
06:01
which is game-changing.
業界を一変させられます
06:06
In addition, as our ability
to deliver liquid to that interface,
加えて境界の部分に
液体を送ることもできるので
06:08
we can go 1,000 times faster I believe,
スピードは千倍にもできると
考えています
06:12
and that in fact opens up the opportunity
for generating a lot of heat,
これは多くの熱を
生み出すことになるでしょう
06:16
and as a chemical engineer,
I get very excited at heat transfer
化学技術者として
熱伝導の問題と
06:19
and the idea that we might one day
have water-cooled 3D printers,
あまりに高速で水冷装置を
備えた3Dプリンターという考えには
06:23
because they're going so fast.
とても興奮を感じます
06:28
In addition, because we're growing things,
we eliminate the layers,
加えて 連続的に成長させるため
06:30
and the parts are monolithic.
層構造がなくなって
均質になります
06:34
You don't see the surface structure.
表面構造がなく
06:36
You have molecularly smooth surfaces.
なめらかなのが分かるでしょう
06:38
And the mechanical properties
of most parts made in a 3D printer
3Dプリンターで作られた部品の
力学的性質は
06:41
are notorious for having properties
that depend on the orientation
印刷した方向に依存するというのは
よく知られていますが
06:45
with which how you printed it,
because of the layer-like structure.
これは層構造によるものです
06:49
But when you grow objects like this,
しかしこのように
成長させることで
06:53
the properties are invariant
with the print direction.
物質特性が印刷方向に
依存しなくなります
06:55
These look like injection-molded parts,
射出成型された部品のようで
06:59
which is very different
than traditional 3D manufacturing.
従来の3Dプリンターで作られたものとは
大きく異なります
07:02
In addition, we're able to throw
加えて
07:05
the entire polymer
chemistry textbook at this,
高分子化学の知識を
丸ごと投入して
07:09
and we're able to design chemistries
that can give rise to the properties
3Dプリントされるオブジェクトに
ほしい性質を生み出す
07:12
you really want in a 3D-printed object.
化学反応をデザインすることができます
07:16
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:19
There it is. That's great.
できあがりましたね
ほっとしました
07:21
You always take the risk that something
like this won't work onstage, right?
本番の舞台になるとうまくいかないというのは
よくあることですから
07:26
But we can have materials
with great mechanical properties.
素材に優れた力学的性質を
持たせることもできます
07:30
For the first time, we can have elastomers
高い弾性あるいは
緩衝性を持つ
07:33
that are high elasticity
or high dampening.
高分子弾性体を
使うことができます
07:35
Think about vibration control
or great sneakers, for example.
振動の制御や優れたスニーカーといった
応用が考えられます
07:37
We can make materials
that have incredible strength,
非常に強い素材
07:41
high strength-to-weight ratio,
really strong materials,
高い強度重量比を持つ素材
07:44
really great elastomers,
非常に優れた高分子弾性体を
作り出すことができます
07:48
so throw that in the audience there.
どうぞ手に取ってご覧ください
07:50
So great material properties.
優れた物質特性です
07:53
And so the opportunity now,
if you actually make a part
最終製品に使える特性を
07:55
that has the properties
to be a final part,
パーツに持たせることができて
07:59
and you do it in game-changing speeds,
画期的なスピードで
作れるとなれば
08:02
you can actually transform manufacturing.
製造過程を大きく変えられる
可能性があります
08:06
Right now, in manufacturing,
what happens is,
現在製造業界が
取り組んでいるものに
08:08
the so-called digital thread
in digital manufacturing.
「デジタルスレッド」と
呼ばれるものがあります
08:11
We go from a CAD drawing, a design,
to a prototype to manufacturing.
CADによる設計から プロトタイプを経て
製造まで 一連の流れで行います
08:14
Often, the digital thread is broken
right at prototype,
多くの場合
このデジタルスレッドが
08:19
because you can't go
all the way to manufacturing
プロトタイプのところで切れていて
製造まで行けません
08:22
because most parts don't have
the properties to be a final part.
パーツの多くが最終製品の性質を
持っていないためです
08:24
We now can connect the digital thread
今や設計からプロトタイプ 製造へと
08:28
all the way from design
to prototyping to manufacturing,
全体を通してデジタルスレッドを
つなげられるようになり
08:30
and that opportunity
really opens up all sorts of things,
あらゆる可能性が広がります
08:35
from better fuel-efficient cars
dealing with great lattice properties
高い強度重量比を持つ
優れた格子特性に取り組む
08:38
with high strength-to-weight ratio,
高燃費車から
08:43
new turbine blades,
all sorts of wonderful things.
新しいタービン翼まで
あらゆる素晴らしいものです
08:45
Think about if you need a stent
in an emergency situation,
緊急の状況で
ステントが必要な時
08:49
instead of the doctor pulling off
a stent out of the shelf
医者は標準サイズのものを
08:54
that was just standard sizes,
棚から取り出す代わりに
08:58
having a stent that's designed
for you, for your own anatomy
患者の血管に合わせて
09:00
with your own tributaries,
設計されたステントを使えます
09:04
printed in an emergency situation
in real time out of the properties
緊急の際に
リアルタイムでプリントし
09:06
such that the stent could go away
after 18 months: really-game changing.
18ヶ月すると消える性質を
持ったステントです
09:10
Or digital dentistry, and making
these kinds of structures
あるいはデジタル歯科では
このような構造を
09:13
even while you're in the dentist chair.
患者が椅子に座っている間に
作ることができます
09:17
And look at the structures
that my students are making
ノースカロライナ大学の
私の学生たちの作った
09:20
at the University of North Carolina.
構造を見てください
09:23
These are amazing microscale structures.
目を見張るような
マイクロスケール構造です
09:25
You know, the world is really good
at nano-fabrication.
ナノサイズについては
既に優れた製造技術があります
09:28
Moore's Law has driven things
from 10 microns and below.
10ミクロン以下のサイズについては
ムーアの法則が駆動してきました
09:31
We're really good at that,
その面ではとても
うまくいっています
09:35
but it's actually very hard to make things
from 10 microns to 1,000 microns,
しかし10ミクロンから
1000ミクロンの間という
09:37
the mesoscale.
中規模のものを作るのが
難しいのです
09:41
And subtractive techniques
from the silicon industry
半導体産業の
減法的技術は
09:43
can't do that very well.
この領域では
上手く機能しません
09:46
They can't etch wafers that well.
ウエハーを上手く
エッチングできません
09:47
But this process is so gentle,
しかしこの製造技術は
09:49
we can grow these objects
up from the bottom
とても静かに
底から物を成長させていく
09:51
using additive manufacturing
加法的製造技術で
09:53
and make amazing things
in tens of seconds,
素晴らしい物を
数十秒で作れ
09:55
opening up new sensor technologies,
新しいセンサー技術
09:57
new drug delivery techniques,
新しい薬物送達技術
09:59
new lab-on-a-chip applications,
really game-changing stuff.
新しいラボ・オン・チップ など
大きな可能性が開けます
10:02
So the opportunity of making
a part in real time
ですから最終製品となりうる
性質を持つパーツを
10:07
that has the properties to be a final part
リアルタイムで作れることで
10:11
really opens up 3D manufacturing,
3D製造の夢が本物になります
10:14
and for us, this is very exciting,
because this really is owning
これは私たちにとって
非常にエキサイティングなことで
10:17
the intersection between hardware,
software and molecular science,
これはハードウェアとソフトウェアと
分子科学の交わる部分だからです
10:20
and I can't wait to see what designers
and engineers around the world
この優れたツールによって
世界のデザイナやエンジニアにどんなことができるようになるか
10:27
are going to be able to do
with this great tool.
目にするのが待ち遠しいです
10:31
Thanks for listening.
どうもありがとうございました
10:34
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:36
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Maki Sugimoto

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Joseph DeSimone - Chemist, inventor
The CEO of Carbon3D, Joseph DeSimone has made breakthrough contributions to the field of 3D printing.

Why you should listen

Joseph DeSimone is a scholar, inventor and serial entrepreneur. A longtime professor at UNC-Chapel Hill, he's taken leave to become the CEO at Carbon3D, the Silicon Valley 3D printing company he co-founded in 2013. DeSimone, an innovative polymer chemist, has made breakthrough contributions in fluoropolymer synthesis, colloid science, nano-biomaterials, green chemistry and most recently 3D printing. His company's Continuous Liquid Interface Production (CLIP) suggests a breakthrough way to make 3D parts.

Read the paper in Science. Authors: John R. Tumbleston, David Shirvanyants, , Nikita Ermoshkin, Rima Janusziewicz, Ashley R. Johnson, David Kelly, Kai Chen, Robert Pinschmidt, Jason P. Rolland, Alexander Ermoshkin, Edward T. Samulsk.

DeSimone is one of less than twenty individuals who have been elected to all three branches of the National Academies: Institute of Medicine (2014), National Academy of Sciences (2012) and the National Academy of Engineering (2005), and in 2008 he won the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize for Invention and Innovation. He's the co-founder of several companies, including Micell Technologies, Bioabsorbable Vascular Solutions, Liquidia Technologies and Carbon3D.

More profile about the speaker
Joseph DeSimone | Speaker | TED.com