22:31
TED2015

Monica Lewinsky: The price of shame

モニカ・ルインスキー: 晒された屈辱の値段

Filmed:

「残酷なスポーツを観て楽しむように、公然と侮辱するのは止めるべき」だとモニカ・ルインスキーは訴えます。1998年当時、個人的な信用を世界的な規模でほぼ一瞬のうちに失ったのは、彼女が初めてだったのです。彼女が経験したように、ネットで屈辱的な情報を晒されることは今では日常的な出来事になりました。彼女は勇気を出してネットにおける「屈辱の文化」を考察し、それとは別の道が必要だと訴えます。

- Social activist
Monica Lewinsky advocates for a safer and more compassionate social media environment, drawing from her unique experiences at the epicenter of a media maelstrom in 1998. Full bio

You're looking at a woman
who was publicly silent for a decade.
みなさんの目の前にいるのは
10年間 公の場に出なかった人間です
00:12
Obviously, that's changed,
ご覧のとおり 今は違いますが
00:18
but only recently.
それもほんの最近のことです
00:20
It was several months ago
数か月前に
00:23
that I gave my very first
major public talk
私はフォーブス誌の
「30才以下の30人」サミットで
00:24
at the Forbes 30 Under 30 summit:
初めてたくさんの聴衆に向けて話しました
00:27
1,500 brilliant people,
all under the age of 30.
全員30才以下の聡明な1,500人です
00:30
That meant that in 1998,
つまり1998年には
00:35
the oldest among the group were only 14,
その中の一番年上の人でも
ほんの14才 ―
00:37
and the youngest, just four.
年下の人は4才だったことになります
00:41
I joked with them that some
might only have heard of me
私のことを ラップの歌詞でしか
聞いたことがない人がいるかもなんて
00:45
from rap songs.
冗談を言いました
00:48
Yes, I'm in rap songs.
そう ラップに私が出てくるんです
00:50
Almost 40 rap songs. (Laughter)
それも 40曲近く (笑)
00:53
But the night of my speech,
a surprising thing happened.
でも講演をした夜に
びっくりするようなことがありました
00:58
At the age of 41, I was hit on
by a 27-year-old guy.
41才の私が 27才の男性に
口説かれたんです
01:02
I know, right?
びっくりでしょう?
01:09
He was charming and I was flattered,
彼は魅力的で 私もうれしかったけれど
01:12
and I declined.
断りました
01:14
You know what his
unsuccessful pickup line was?
彼の口説き文句は
何だったと思います?
01:17
He could make me feel 22 again.
「もう一度22才の時の
気持ちにしてあげるよ」だったんです
01:21
(Laughter) (Applause)
(笑)(拍手)
01:24
I realized later that night,
I'm probably the only person over 40
その後 気づいたんですが
たぶん私は22才に戻りたいと思わない ―
01:30
who does not want to be 22 again.
ただ一人の40代でしょうね
01:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:38
(Applause)
(拍手)
01:41
At the age of 22,
I fell in love with my boss,
22才の時に上司と恋に落ちて
01:47
and at the age of 24,
24才の時に
01:52
I learned the devastating consequences.
その破滅的な結果を経験しました
01:55
Can I see a show of hands of anyone here
みなさんの中で
22才の時に過ちを犯さず
01:59
who didn't make a mistake
or do something they regretted at 22?
後悔するようなことも
一切ない方は手をあげてください
02:02
Yep. That's what I thought.
やっぱり そうですよね
02:09
So like me, at 22, a few of you
may have also taken wrong turns
何人もの方が私と同じように
22才で間違いを犯して
02:12
and fallen in love with the wrong person,
好きになってはいけない人と恋に落ち
02:18
maybe even your boss.
その相手が上司だった人さえ
いるかもしれません
02:21
Unlike me, though, your boss
ただ私とは違って
02:24
probably wasn't the president
of the United States of America.
みなさんの上司は
アメリカ大統領ではなかったでしょう
02:26
Of course, life is full of surprises.
もちろん人生には
驚くようなことも たくさん起きますが
02:31
Not a day goes by that I'm not
reminded of my mistake,
私は自分の過ちを
思い出さない日はないし
02:36
and I regret that mistake deeply.
深く後悔しています
02:41
In 1998, after having been swept up
into an improbable romance,
1998年に信じられないような
恋愛に流され その後 ―
02:45
I was then swept up into the eye
of a political, legal and media maelstrom
それまで誰も見たことが無かったような
政治 法律 そしてメディアの
02:52
like we had never seen before.
激流の中心に飲み込まれたのです
02:57
Remember, just a few years earlier,
ほんの数年前まで
03:01
news was consumed from just three places:
ニュースの出どころは
たった3つでした
03:03
reading a newspaper or magazine,
新聞や雑誌を読むこと
03:06
listening to the radio,
ラジオを聞くこと
03:09
or watching television.
テレビを見ること ―
03:11
That was it.
それだけでした
03:13
But that wasn't my fate.
ところが私の場合は違いました
03:14
Instead, this scandal was brought to you
このスキャンダルが 世に知れ渡ったのは
03:18
by the digital revolution.
デジタル革命を通してでした
03:21
That meant we could access
all the information we wanted,
それによって 私たちは
望み通りのあらゆる情報に
03:24
when we wanted it, anytime, anywhere,
いつでも どこでも 好きな時に
アクセスできるようになったのです
03:27
and when the story broke in January 1998,
1998年1月 このニュースが報じられたのは
03:32
it broke online.
ネット上でした
03:36
It was the first time the traditional news
従来の報道が大きなニュースを
03:39
was usurped by the Internet
for a major news story,
ネットに さらわれたのは
初めてのことで
03:42
a click that reverberated
around the world.
クリックが世界中に響き渡りました
03:47
What that meant for me personally
私個人にとっては
03:52
was that overnight I went
from being a completely private figure
一夜にして 全くの私人から
03:54
to a publicly humiliated one worldwide.
世界中で公然と辱められる
人間になってしまったのです
04:00
I was patient zero
of losing a personal reputation
個人の信用を 世界的な規模で
04:05
on a global scale almost instantaneously.
ほぼ一瞬のうちに失ったのは
私が初めてでした
04:09
This rush to judgment,
enabled by technology,
テクノロジーによって可能になった ―
04:15
led to mobs of virtual stone-throwers.
性急な判断をもとに 大衆が
仮想空間で石を投げつけてきたのです
04:17
Granted, it was before social media,
確かにソーシャルメディアは
まだありませんでしたが
04:22
but people could still comment online,
ネット上でコメントしたり
04:25
email stories, and, of course,
email cruel jokes.
話をメールしたり
非情な冗談を送ることはできました
04:28
News sources plastered
photos of me all over
メディアは私の写真を
至る所に貼り付けて
04:34
to sell newspapers, banner ads online,
新聞やオンラインのバナー広告を売り
視聴者がチャンネルを
04:37
and to keep people tuned to the TV.
変えないようにしていました
04:41
Do you recall a particular image of me,
私の写真を覚えていますか?
04:45
say, wearing a beret?
例えばベレー帽をかぶった写真です
04:49
Now, I admit I made mistakes,
今にして思えば 確かに間違いでした
04:53
especially wearing that beret.
特に あのベレー帽です
04:56
But the attention and judgment
that I received, not the story,
私に向けられた注目と批判
ニュースにではなく ―
05:00
but that I personally received,
was unprecedented.
私個人に向けられた注目と批判は
かつてないものでした
05:04
I was branded as a tramp,
いろいろな烙印を押されました
売春婦とか
05:08
tart, slut, whore, bimbo,
あばずれ ふしだら 売女 淫売 ―
05:12
and, of course, that woman.
そして「あの女」と呼ばれたのです
05:18
I was seen by many
無数の人々が 私を見ていましたが
05:22
but actually known by few.
実際に私を知る人は
ほとんどいませんでした
05:25
And I get it: it was easy to forget
今ならわかります
誰もが忘れがちなのは
05:28
that that woman was dimensional,
「あの女」が実在の生身の人間で
05:32
had a soul, and was once unbroken.
心があり かつて傷ついていない頃が
あったということです
05:34
When this happened to me 17 years ago,
there was no name for it.
こんなことが起きた17年前には
その状況に名前などありませんでした
05:41
Now we call it cyberbullying
and online harassment.
今ならネットいじめとか
オンラインハラスメントと呼ばれます
05:46
Today, I want to share
some of my experience with you,
今日はみなさんに
私が経験したことをお話しします
05:52
talk about how that experience has helped
shape my cultural observations,
経験を通して どのように
文化への視点を養ったのか ―
05:55
and how I hope my past experience
can lead to a change that results
私の過去が変化につながり
苦しむ人々が減ることを
06:00
in less suffering for others.
どれほど望んでいるか お話しします
06:05
In 1998, I lost my reputation
and my dignity.
1998年 私は信用も尊厳も失いました
06:10
I lost almost everything,
ほぼすべてを失い
06:15
and I almost lost my life.
命さえ失う寸前でした
06:18
Let me paint a picture for you.
当時の様子を説明しましょう
06:24
It is September of 1998.
時は1998年9月です
06:29
I'm sitting in a windowless office room
私は窓のない ―
06:32
inside the Office
of the Independent Counsel
独立検察官事務所の
06:35
underneath humming fluorescent lights.
低くうなる蛍光灯の下に座っています
06:38
I'm listening to the sound of my voice,
私は自分の声を聞いています
06:43
my voice on surreptitiously
taped phone calls
その声は 密かに電話を録音したもので
06:46
that a supposed friend
had made the year before.
前年に友人だと信じていた人物が
かけてきたものです
06:50
I'm here because
I've been legally required
私は その部屋で
20時間分の会話の録音すべてを
06:53
to personally authenticate
all 20 hours of taped conversation.
自ら確認するよう
法的に求められています
06:57
For the past eight months,
the mysterious content of these tapes
8か月間
謎めいたテープの内容が
07:05
has hung like the Sword
of Damocles over my head.
ダモクレスの剣のように
私の頭の上にぶら下がっています
07:09
I mean, who can remember
what they said a year ago?
1年前に言ったことを
覚えている人なんていますか?
07:13
Scared and mortified, I listen,
恐怖と屈辱を感じながら
私は聞いています
07:17
listen as I prattle on
about the flotsam and jetsam of the day;
どうでもいいおしゃべりをする自分
07:23
listen as I confess my love
for the president,
大統領への愛情と
07:27
and, of course, my heartbreak;
当然の失恋を告白する自分
07:31
listen to my sometimes catty,
sometimes churlish, sometimes silly self
それから 時にいじわるで
時に無愛想で 時にふざけている自分
07:34
being cruel, unforgiving, uncouth;
時に残酷な事を言い 非情で 下品な
自分の声を聞いています
07:39
listen, deeply, deeply ashamed,
自分かどうかも わからないほど
07:45
to the worst version of myself,
最悪の部分を
07:48
a self I don't even recognize.
深く恥じながら聞いています
07:50
A few days later, the Starr Report
is released to Congress,
数日後 スター報告書が
議会に提出されます
07:56
and all of those tapes and transcripts,
those stolen words, form a part of it.
そこには盗まれた言葉である
テープの内容がすべて含まれます
08:00
That people can read the transcripts
is horrific enough,
内容を読まれるだけでも
ゾッとしましたが
08:06
but a few weeks later,
数週間経つと
08:10
the audio tapes are aired on TV,
音声がテレビで放送され
08:13
and significant portions
made available online.
大部分がネットで
聞けるようになります
08:17
The public humiliation was excruciating.
公然と辱められるのは苦痛でした
08:22
Life was almost unbearable.
生きるのが つらくなりました
08:27
This was not something that happened
with regularity back then in 1998,
1998年当時 こういう状況は
頻繁に起こることではありませんでした
08:32
and by this, I mean the stealing
of people's private words, actions,
「こういう状況」とは
個人的な発言や行動や
08:38
conversations or photos,
会話や写真が「盗まれ」
08:43
and then making them public --
公に晒されることです
08:46
public without consent,
同意もなく
08:49
public without context,
発言の背景も無視し
08:51
and public without compassion.
思いやりもなく 公開されることです
08:53
Fast forward 12 years to 2010,
12年後の2010年には
08:58
and now social media has been born.
すでにソーシャルメディアが
登場していて
09:01
The landscape has sadly become much
more populated with instances like mine,
悲しいことに 私のような事例が
はるかに多くなりました
09:05
whether or not someone
actually make a mistake,
その人が実際に
過ちを犯したかどうかなど関係なく
09:10
and now it's for both public
and private people.
有名人も無名な人も関係なくです
09:13
The consequences for some
have become dire, very dire.
中には極めて深刻な
事態に陥った人もいます
09:18
I was on the phone with my mom
2010年9月に
09:25
in September of 2010,
私は母と電話で話していました
09:28
and we were talking about the news
タイラー・クレメンティという
09:31
of a young college freshman
from Rutgers University
ラトガース大学の1年生の
09:32
named Tyler Clementi.
ニュースのことです
09:35
Sweet, sensitive, creative Tyler
タイラーは優しく繊細で
創造性豊かでした
09:38
was secretly webcammed by his roommate
でも彼が男性と関係をもっているところを
09:41
while being intimate with another man.
ルームメイトがウェブカメラで
隠し撮りしたのです
09:44
When the online world
learned of this incident,
これがネットに広まると
09:48
the ridicule and cyberbullying ignited.
嘲笑とネットいじめに
火がつきました
09:51
A few days later,
数日後 ―
09:56
Tyler jumped from
the George Washington Bridge
タイラーはジョージ・ワシントン橋から
09:57
to his death.
身を投げて 亡くなりました
10:01
He was 18.
18才でした
10:03
My mom was beside herself about
what happened to Tyler and his family,
タイラーと彼の家族のことを思って
私の母は怒り狂いました
10:07
and she was gutted with pain
私には理由がよくわからないほど
10:12
in a way that I just couldn't
quite understand,
母は苦痛に打ちのめされていました
10:14
and then eventually I realized
やがて わかったのですが
10:18
she was reliving 1998,
母は1998年の苦痛を
もう一度体験していたのです
10:20
reliving a time when she sat
by my bed every night,
毎晩 私のベッドに
寄り添っていた あの時 ―
10:23
reliving a time when she made me shower
with the bathroom door open,
私がシャワーを浴びる時も
ドアは開けっ放しのままにさせた あの時 ―
10:30
and reliving a time
when both of my parents feared
父も母も 自尊心を
ズタズタにされた私が
10:36
that I would be humiliated to death,
自ら命を絶つのではないかと恐れた
あの時のことを
10:40
literally.
思い出していたのです
10:43
Today, too many parents
今 愛する子どもたちを
自分たちの手で
10:48
haven't had the chance to step in
and rescue their loved ones.
救うことができなかった親が
あまりにも多くいます
10:51
Too many have learned
of their child's suffering and humiliation
子どもが辱められ 苦しんでいることを
手遅れになって初めて知る ―
10:54
after it was too late.
親が あまりに多いのです
10:58
Tyler's tragic, senseless death
was a turning point for me.
タイラーの痛ましい 無意味な死が
私にとって転機になりました
11:01
It served to recontextualize
my experiences,
彼の死を通して
私は自分の経験を別の情況にあてはめ
11:06
and I then began to look at the world
of humiliation and bullying around me
身の回りにある いじめや
人を辱める行為に目を向けて
11:10
and see something different.
そこに何か他のものを
見出そうとし始めたのです
11:14
In 1998, we had no way of knowing
where this brave new technology
1998年には インターネットという
すばらしい新技術が何をもたらすのか
11:18
called the Internet would take us.
知るすべは ありませんでした
11:23
Since then, it has connected people
in unimaginable ways,
それ以降 想像を超える
人々のつながりが生まれ
11:26
joining lost siblings,
離れ離れになったきょうだいが再会し
11:30
saving lives, launching revolutions,
命が救われ 革命が起こりました
11:32
but the darkness, cyberbullying,
and slut-shaming that I experienced
その一方で ネットいじめや
私も経験したように尻軽と罵られることなど
11:36
had mushroomed.
闇の部分も急増したのです
11:41
Every day online, people,
especially young people
それに対処できるほど
大人になりきっていない若者が
11:45
who are not developmentally
equipped to handle this,
毎日 ネット上で
11:49
are so abused and humiliated
虐待され 辱められて
11:52
that they can't imagine living
to the next day,
次の日まで生きる力さえ失い
11:55
and some, tragically, don't,
痛ましいことに
実際に死を選ぶ人もいます
11:57
and there's nothing virtual about that.
これはバーチャルなことではありません
12:01
ChildLine, a U.K. nonprofit that's focused
on helping young people on various issues,
様々な問題を抱えた若者を支援する
イギリスのNPO チャイルドラインは
12:05
released a staggering statistic
late last year:
昨年末に驚くべき統計を公表しました
12:11
From 2012 to 2013,
2012年から13年の間に
12:15
there was an 87 percent increase
ネットいじめに関する
電話やメールでの相談が
12:18
in calls and emails related
to cyberbullying.
87%も増加したというのです
12:22
A meta-analysis done
out of the Netherlands
オランダで行われたメタ分析では
12:27
showed that for the first time,
普通のいじめよりも
12:29
cyberbullying was leading
to suicidal ideations
ネットいじめの方が
はるかに 死を望む感情に
12:31
more significantly than offline bullying.
つながりやすいことが
明らかになりました
12:36
And you know what shocked me,
although it shouldn't have,
そして 今さらながら
ショックを受けたのは
12:40
was other research last year
that determined humiliation
去年行われた別の調査で
屈辱という感情が
12:43
was a more intensely felt emotion
幸福や さらには怒りよりも
12:47
than either happiness or even anger.
強く感じられると
わかったことでした
12:50
Cruelty to others is nothing new,
他人を虐げるのは
目新しいことではありません
12:56
but online, technologically
enhanced shaming is amplified,
でもネット上では
テクノロジーによって恥が増幅され
12:59
uncontained, and permanently accessible.
際限なく広がり
永久にアクセス可能になるのです
13:05
The echo of embarrassment used to extend
only as far as your family, village,
かつて恥の影響は
せいぜい家族や村 ―
13:11
school or community,
学校や地域の中に留まっていました
13:16
but now it's the online community too.
ところが今はネット上の
コミュニティーにまで広がります
13:19
Millions of people, often anonymously,
数百万人が しばしば名前も明かさず
13:23
can stab you with their words,
and that's a lot of pain,
誰かを言葉で傷つけることができ
そのダメージは深刻です
13:25
and there are no perimeters
around how many people
公然とあなたを監視し
13:29
can publicly observe you
晒し者にできる人間の数には
13:33
and put you in a public stockade.
上限がありません
13:35
There is a very personal price
公然と辱められることで
13:39
to public humiliation,
個人が代償を払うことになり
13:42
and the growth of the Internet
has jacked up that price.
インターネットが拡大するにつれ
その相場は上昇しています
13:45
For nearly two decades now,
ここ20年近くの間に
13:51
we have slowly been sowing the seeds
of shame and public humiliation
ネット上と現実世界
両方の文化的な土壌に
13:54
in our cultural soil,
both on- and offline.
恥と屈辱の種子が
ゆっくり蒔かれつつあります
13:58
Gossip websites, paparazzi,
reality programming, politics,
ゴシップサイトやパパラッチ
リアリティーショーや政治 ―
14:04
news outlets and sometimes hackers
all traffic in shame.
ニュースメディアや時にはハッカーが
恥を不正に売買しています
14:09
It's led to desensitization
and a permissive environment online
そのためネット上は
感覚の麻痺と放任的な空気に支配され
14:14
which lends itself to trolling,
invasion of privacy, and cyberbullying.
荒らしやプライバシー侵害や
ネットいじめに拍車をかけています
14:19
This shift has created
what Professor Nicolaus Mills calls
そんな状況の変化から生まれたのが
14:25
a culture of humiliation.
ニコラス・ミルズ教授が
「屈辱の文化」と呼ぶものです
14:29
Consider a few prominent examples
just from the past six months alone.
目立った例を
この半年に限って取り上げましょう
14:33
Snapchat, the service which is used
mainly by younger generations
Snapchat は
利用者の大半が若者で
14:38
and claims that its messages
only have the lifespan
送られたメッセージが
14:43
of a few seconds.
数秒で消えるとされます
14:46
You can imagine the range
of content that that gets.
やり取りされる内容は
想像できるでしょう
14:47
A third-party app which Snapchatters
use to preserve the lifespan
ところがSnapchatの利用者が
メッセージの表示時間を伸ばすために使う
14:51
of the messages was hacked,
サードパーティ製のアプリがハックされ
14:55
and 100,000 personal conversations,
photos, and videos were leaked online
10万件の私的な会話や写真や
ビデオがネットに流出し
14:57
to now have a lifespan of forever.
永久に消えなくなりました
15:04
Jennifer Lawrence and several other actors
had their iCloud accounts hacked,
ジェニファー・ローレンスと
数名の俳優のiCloudアカウントがハックされ
15:09
and private, intimate, nude photos
were plastered across the Internet
個人的な秘密の写真やヌードが
インターネット中に
15:13
without their permission.
彼らの許可無く貼り付けられました
15:17
One gossip website
had over five million hits
あるゴシップサイトでは
この記事だけで
15:19
for this one story.
500万ヒットを超えました
15:23
And what about the Sony Pictures
cyberhacking?
ソニー・ピクチャーズの
ハッキングはどうでしょう?
15:27
The documents which received
the most attention
一番注目を集めた情報は
15:30
were private emails that had
maximum public embarrassment value.
公になれば極めて恥ずかしい内容の
私的なメールでした
15:33
But in this culture of humiliation,
ただ この屈辱の文化では
15:39
there is another kind of price tag
attached to public shaming.
公になった恥に
もうひとつ別の値段がついています
15:42
The price does not measure
the cost to the victim,
恥の値段には
被害者の苦痛は含まれていないのです
15:47
which Tyler and too many others,
タイラーや他の多くの人々 ―
15:50
notably women, minorities,
特に女性やマイノリティーや
15:53
and members of the LGBTQ
community have paid,
同性 両性愛者やトランスジェンダーの
コミュニティーへの被害は含まれず
15:55
but the price measures the profit
of those who prey on them.
彼らをえじきにする人間の利益だけが
値段に含まれるのです
15:59
This invasion of others is a raw material,
他人を侵害することが原料となり
16:04
efficiently and ruthlessly mined,
packaged and sold at a profit.
それが効率的かつ冷酷に採集され
包装され販売されて 利益があがります
16:08
A marketplace has emerged
where public humiliation is a commodity
公然と辱められることが
商品になり 恥が産業になる ―
16:14
and shame is an industry.
そんな市場が生まれているのです
16:20
How is the money made?
どうやって儲けるのか?
16:24
Clicks.
答は「クリック」です
16:27
The more shame, the more clicks.
恥を公開すれば クリックが増え
16:29
The more clicks,
the more advertising dollars.
クリック数が増えれば
より多くの広告料が手に入ります
16:32
We're in a dangerous cycle.
私たちは危険なサイクルに陥っています
16:37
The more we click on this kind of gossip,
このようなゴシップを
クリックすればするほど
16:39
the more numb we get
to the human lives behind it,
ゴシップの背後にある
人々の暮らしには鈍感になり
16:42
and the more numb we get,
the more we click.
鈍感になるにつれて
さらにクリックしていくのです
16:46
All the while, someone is making money
その間ずっと 誰かの苦痛の裏で
16:51
off of the back
of someone else's suffering.
金を儲けている人間がいます
16:54
With every click, we make a choice.
クリックする度に
私たちは選択しています
16:58
The more we saturate our culture
with public shaming,
公然と侮辱することが
私たちの文化に溢れるにつれて
17:01
the more accepted it is,
それは次第に認められていき
17:05
the more we will see behavior
like cyberbullying,
サイバーいじめや荒らしや
17:06
trolling, some forms of hacking,
様々なハッキングや
17:10
and online harassment.
ネットハラスメントが
増えていくでしょう
17:12
Why? Because they all have
humiliation at their cores.
なぜなら それらすべての核心に
屈辱があるからです
17:15
This behavior is a symptom
of the culture we've created.
このような行動は私たちが作り上げた
文化の副産物です
17:23
Just think about it.
考えてみてください
17:27
Changing behavior begins
with evolving beliefs.
行動を変えるには
まず考えを改めなければなりません
17:31
We've seen that to be true
with racism, homophobia,
人種差別や同性愛嫌悪や
現在と過去に存在した多くの偏見に
17:34
and plenty of other biases,
today and in the past.
それが当てはまるのを
私たちは すでに経験しています
17:38
As we've changed beliefs
about same-sex marriage,
同性婚に対する考えを改めるにつれて
17:42
more people have been
offered equal freedoms.
より多くの人が
平等な自由を手に入れています
17:46
When we began valuing sustainability,
持続可能性が重視されるようになって
17:50
more people began to recycle.
さらに多くの人が
リサイクルを始めました
17:52
So as far as our culture
of humiliation goes,
屈辱の文化について言えば
17:55
what we need is a cultural revolution.
私たちに必要なのは文化の革新です
17:58
Public shaming
as a blood sport has to stop,
残酷なスポーツを観て楽しむように
公然と侮辱するのは止めるべきです
18:02
and it's time for an intervention
on the Internet and in our culture.
インターネットや私たちの文化に
介入すべきです
18:06
The shift begins with something simple,
but it's not easy.
変化の始まりは単純ですが
簡単ではありません
18:11
We need to return to a long-held value
of compassion -- compassion and empathy.
私たちは 長く重んじられてきた
思いやりと共感に立ち返る必要があるのです
18:16
Online, we've got a compassion deficit,
ネットでの私たちは思いやりに欠けており
18:22
an empathy crisis.
共感は危機的状況です
18:25
Researcher Brené Brown said, and I quote,
研究者のブレネー・ブラウンは
こう言っています
18:29
"Shame can't survive empathy."
「恥は 共感ほど長続きしない」
18:32
Shame cannot survive empathy.
恥は 共感ほど長続きしないのです
18:36
I've seen some very dark days in my life,
私の人生にはとても暗い時期がありましたが
18:42
and it was the compassion and empathy
from my family, friends, professionals,
家族や友人や専門家や
18:46
and sometimes even strangers
that saved me.
時には見知らぬ人からの
共感と思いやりが 私を救ってくれました
18:52
Even empathy from one person
can make a difference.
たった1人が共感するだけでも
変化が起こります
18:57
The theory of minority influence,
社会心理学者
セルジュ・モスコヴィッシが提唱した
19:02
proposed by social psychologist
Serge Moscovici,
少数派の影響力の理論によれば
19:04
says that even in small numbers,
たとえ人数が少なくても
19:08
when there's consistency over time,
一貫性があれば
19:10
change can happen.
変化は起こりうるのです
19:13
In the online world,
we can foster minority influence
ネットの世界では 行動する人になることで
19:15
by becoming upstanders.
少数派の影響力を育むことができます
19:19
To become an upstander means
instead of bystander apathy,
行動する人になるとは
無関心な傍観者でいるのを止め
19:21
we can post a positive comment for someone
or report a bullying situation.
他者への肯定的な意見を投稿し
嫌がらせの現場を報告することです
19:25
Trust me, compassionate comments
help abate the negativity.
思いやりのあるコメントは
悪意の力を弱めるはずです
19:30
We can also counteract the culture
by supporting organizations
また この問題に取り組む
組織を支援することで
19:35
that deal with these kinds of issues,
屈辱の文化に対抗できます
19:39
like the Tyler Clementi
Foundation in the U.S.,
例えばアメリカの
タイラー・クレメンティ財団や
19:41
In the U.K., there's Anti-Bullying Pro,
イギリスの反いじめプログラム
19:44
and in Australia, there's Project Rockit.
オーストラリアの
プロジェクトROCKITです
19:47
We talk a lot about our right
to freedom of expression,
私たちはいつも
表現の自由については語りますが
19:52
but we need to talk more about
表現の自由に伴う責任について
19:58
our responsibility
to freedom of expression.
もっと語るべきなのです
20:00
We all want to be heard,
誰だって話を聞いて欲しいでしょうが
20:03
but let's acknowledge the difference
between speaking up with intention
意図をもって話すことと
注目を集めたいがために話すこととの
20:06
and speaking up for attention.
違いは理解すべきです
20:11
The Internet is
the superhighway for the id,
インターネットは本能的衝動の
スーパーハイウェイですが
20:15
but online, showing empathy to others
ネット上では他者への共感を表すことで
20:19
benefits us all and helps create
a safer and better world.
私たち全員が恩恵を受け
安全でより良い世界を作ことができます
20:22
We need to communicate
online with compassion,
私たちは 思いやりを持って
ネット上でやり取りし
20:27
consume news with compassion,
思いやりを持ってニュースを読み
20:31
and click with compassion.
思いやりを持ってクリックすべきです
20:33
Just imagine walking a mile
in someone else's headline.
自分が見出しになっているところを
しばらく想像してください
20:36
I'd like to end on a personal note.
最後に個人的な話をさせてください
20:43
In the past nine months,
この9か月間 ―
20:47
the question I've been
asked the most is why.
一番よく聞かれたのは
「なぜか」ということです
20:49
Why now? Why was I
sticking my head above the parapet?
なぜ今になって
塹壕から頭を出してきたのか?
20:53
You can read between the lines
in those questions,
こんな質問には
別の意図がありそうですが
20:57
and the answer has nothing
to do with politics.
政治とは関係ないというのが
私の答です
20:59
The top note answer was and is
because it's time:
一番の答は 以前も今も変わりません
「時が来たから」です
21:03
time to stop tip-toeing around my past;
自分の過去から
こそこそ隠れるのを止め
21:09
time to stop living a life of opprobrium;
不名誉な人生を生きるのを止め
21:11
and time to take back my narrative.
自分の物語を
取り戻す時が来たからです
21:15
It's also not just about saving myself.
自分自身を救うことだけが
目的ではありません
21:18
Anyone who is suffering from shame
and public humiliation
恥や 公然の侮辱に苦しむ
あらゆる人々に
21:23
needs to know one thing:
知って欲しいことがあるからです
21:26
You can survive it.
あなたは生き抜くことができます
21:29
I know it's hard.
つらいのはわかります
21:32
It may not be painless, quick or easy,
痛みもあるでしょう
すぐ簡単に消えるものでもないでしょう
21:34
but you can insist
on a different ending to your story.
でも 自分の物語に
別の結末を求めてもいいのです
21:38
Have compassion for yourself.
自分への思いやりを持ってください
21:43
We all deserve compassion,
誰もが 思いやりを受ける資格があり
21:46
and to live both online and off
in a more compassionate world.
ネット上でも現実でも 思いやりのある
世界で生きる資格があるのだから
21:49
Thank you for listening.
ありがとうございました
21:55
(Applause)
(拍手)
21:58
Translated by Kazunori Akashi
Reviewed by Eriko T.

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Monica Lewinsky - Social activist
Monica Lewinsky advocates for a safer and more compassionate social media environment, drawing from her unique experiences at the epicenter of a media maelstrom in 1998.

Why you should listen

After becoming the focus of the history-changing federal investigation into her private life, Monica Lewinsky found herself, at 24 years old, one of the first targets of a “culture of humiliation”: a now-familiar cycle of media, political and personal harassment – particularly online.

Lewinsky survived to reclaim her personal narrative. During a decade of silence she received her Masters in Social Psychology from the London School of Economics and Political Science. In 2014, Lewinsky returned to the public eye with an acclaimed essay for Vanity Fair, which has been nominated for a National Magazine Award for best Essay Writing, and with a widely viewed speech at Forbes’ 30 Under 30 Summit.

More profile about the speaker
Monica Lewinsky | Speaker | TED.com